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Great Falls daily tribune. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1895-1921, November 27, 1920, Image 15

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Great Falls Daily Tribune
Flr«t issue of Daily Tribune, May 16,1887.
Published «very day In the year ai
Great Fall«, Montana, by The Trlbua»
(Incorporated).
Entered at the Great Fall» postoffle»
as second-class matter.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
BV CAK&1VB IN OUÏ.
Dally and Hunday, 1 year
Dally and hupUay, 6 month*
Da^ly and Sunday, t month» .-W-f
"ally and Sunday, less than three
months, per month
B¥ 3&AJI,—POS1AOE PAID IN V. *
1. Î and 8 Zone and part of i Zone
wlthU Montana.
Dally and Sunday, 1 year ...... ■"•0*
Daily and Kunday, fl months
Dally and Sunday, 8 month*
UaUjr ud Sunday, le** than three
month*, per month W«
kunday only, I year CJ.O«
Bï MAIIv—POSXAGB PAID IN U. »•
Part of « Zone out*lde of Montana
_ and 5, 8, 7 and 8 Zoneat
D«!«y and Sunday, 1 year ....89.0*
g* Jy and VuiiJay, 8 month* W'S
•*"»y and Sunday, 8 month*
«»Uy and Sunday, les* than three
month, per month
.. *y «nly. one year, outsMe of
Montana and in Canada * 3M
United States government now re
«uires that all daily and Sunday paper*
«• paid in advance. Subscriptions thtre
fore cannot be started until a payment
period has been made.
>CUB£B OP THE ASSOCIATED
. PKE8S.
« „ The Associated Press is exclusively »*•
Otlad to the use for re -publicatloa of all
«f«! vs dispatches credited to It or not
otherwise credited la this paper, and
«"«o local news published herein.
. AJ1 persons sending manuscript copy
10 The Tribune shoulJ enclose stamp «
liî return ls desired in case It is con
sidered unavailable.
foreign Advertising Representative«:-»
Benjamin & Kenti.or Co., 225 Fifth ave
nue. New York City; Mailers building.
Pacifia coast representatives:—
w. R. Baranger Co.. B20 Examiner Bldg„
Ran Francisco, Cal.; 803 Title Insurance
ffiag. Zee Angeles. Cal.: 228 Post -Intel
• igeneer BMg. F„ fi »tle. Wash.
as seen
Bnais &. Bears
Reported b.» H. B. Lnke & Co.
New York, Nov. 26.—The stock market
dragged heavily during today's session
and weakness was rather pronounced in
some of the so-called specialties. The
short covering which took place early in
the week and caused a sharp up rush in
prices having spent its force left the
market wanting for a sustaining pur
chasing power which does not seem as
having been attracted by the sharply re
duced level of quotations. No change in
the rediscount rate of the federal reserve
bank in the New York district was an
nounced last Wednesday. Copper metal
sold, at a new low level today and this
caused some fresh selling In the red
metal sharc-s. Refined sugar was quoted
lower and this caused some selling In
the sugar stocks.
NEW YORK STOCKS.
Alaska Gold iy t
American Beet Sugar 52
American Can 25%
American Car Foundry 123%
American International Corp 42'/»
Ajnerican Locomotive 54
American Tel. & Tel
American Woolen omn 70%
American Wool pfd SO}.»
American Smelting & Refining 45
American Zinc 7'4
Anaconda 39%
Baldwin Locomotive 94Vi
Baltimore & Ohio 39
Bethlehem Steel "B" 54Vi
Brooklyn Rapid Transit 12%
Butte & Superiof 11%
Canadian Pacific 116%
Central Leather 38%
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 34"- s
DO pfd 53
Chill Copper 12
Chlno Copper 20
Colorado Fuel & Iron 29%
Corn Products Refining 72%
Crucible Steel S3
Cuba Cane Sugar cmn 23%
DO pfd 67%
Erie Railroad 15V4
General Electric 126
General Motors 15%
Goodrich Co 41%
Oranby 19
Great Northern 80%
Great Northern Ore ctfs 29%
Greene Cananea 22%
Interstate Callahan 7
Illinois Central 89
International Harvester 93
DO pfd 102
Inspiration 34
International Motors 30
Kansas City Southern Railway 21%
Kennecott Copper 19%
Lackawanna Steel 52
Marine pfd 52%
Maxwell Motors 2%
Mexican Petroleum 157
Miami Copper 19%
Midvale Steel 33
Missouri Pacific 22%
Montana Power 59
Nevada Consolidated Copper 9%
New Haven Railway 22
New York Central Railway 75%
Northern Pacific 86%
Pure Oil Co 34%
Pan American Oil 75%
Pennsylvania 40%
Punta Sugar 49%
Republic Steel & Iron 67
Replogle Steel 74%
Railway Steel Spring 85
Reading 87%
Retail Stores 59%
Rock Island "C. T." 31%
Sinclaire Oil 24%
Southern Pacific 112
Southern Railway 24%
Studebaker 43%
Stromberg Carburetor 41%
Tennessee Copper 8%
Texas Oil 47%
Texas Pacific Railway 20
Union Pacific 121%
U. S. Industrial Alcohol 70%
Unitted States Rubber 65%
U. S. Steel 81%
DO pfd 106
U. S. Smelting 43
Utah Copper 51%
Vanadium Steel 43%
Wabash "A" 24%
Western Union 85%
Westinghouse Electric 42%
Willys-Overlund 8
Wilson Packing Co 45
Total sales: Stocks 704,600; bonds $16,
642,000.
BOSTON STOCKS.
Alaska Juneau 1%
Arizona Commercial 7%
Big Ledge 5-16
>3utte Copper & Zinc 5%
Caledonia [email protected]
Calumet & Arizona 46
Calumet & Hecla 246
Cascade Mines 20
Centennial 7
Consolidated Arizona Smelting %
Copper Range 28%
Davis Daly 5%
East Butte 7
Goldwyn Pictures [email protected]
Green Monster %
Hancock 2%
Hecla 4%
Hupp Motor Co 11%
Lake Copper 2%
Mason Valley %
Midvale 1
Mohawk 46
New Cornelia 15
Nlplsslng Silver 8%
North Butte 10%
Old Dominion 19%
Osceola 23
Pond Creek Coal 13%
Quincy 36%
Ray Hercules %
Santa Fe 16%
Shannon 1
Shattuck 6%
Superior 3%
South Lake 2
Superior & Boston 1%
Swift & Co 104
Tuolumne [email protected]
Utah Consolidated 3%
Wolverine 10%
Wright Martin 4f§/6
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Curtis Aeroplane [email protected]
United States Steamship 1%
Boston Wyoming Oil %
Boone Oil 1%@1%
Midwest Refining Oil 144
Midwest Oil 1%
Cosden Oil 6%
Elk Basin Oil 8
Federal Oil 1%
Glenrock Oil 2%
Island Oil 5%
United Texas Petroleum Oil . [email protected]
Ventura Oil 16
BOSTON CURB CLOSE.
Barnes King %
Boston & Ely 30
Boston & Montana 42
Batte & London 12
Consolidated Copper Mines 2
Jerome Verde 15
Success 2
United Verde Extension 24
AT CHICAGO.
Chicago, Nov. 26.—Cattle—Receipts 13,
000; best corn-fed steers and canner cows
steady; other classes slow to unevenly
lower; one load prime yearling steers fed
with show stock $18; bulk native steers
$9.50(gl5.25; butcher cow3 mostly [email protected];
canners largely [email protected]; calves slow to
50c lower; few vealers above $13; stock
ers and feeders weak.
Hogs—Receipts 33,000; fully 25c higher
than Wednesday's average; big packers
buying sparingly but few hogs left in
first viands; top $10,25; bulk [email protected];
pigs 15 to 25c higher; bulk desirable 100
to 130 pound pigs [email protected]
Sheep—Receipts 9,000; fat lambs strong
to 25c higher; choice native lambs to city
butchers $11.50; bulk natives [email protected]; fat
sheep firm; bulk fat native ewes [email protected];
feeders steady.
i
I
I
AT SOUTH ST. PAUL.
South St. Paul, Nov. 26.—Cattle, re
ceipts 4,500; mostly steady to strong, ex
cept that butcher cows and heifers,
strong to 25 cents higher; bulk of beef
steers $6 @ $8; butcher cows and heifers
mostly $4.25 @ $6.25; canners and cutters
$2.25 @ $4; light and medium weight veal
calves, steady, top $11.50; heavy calves,
weak to 50 cents lower; best stockers and
feeders steady, others slow and weak.
Hogs, receipts 10,000; market strong to
shade higher; range $8.75 @ $9.35; bulk
$9.20 @ $9.30; good to choice pigs $9 <3
$9.25; choice light lights $9.40 ® $9.50.
Sheep, receipts, 2,500; fat lambs strong
to 25 cents higher; bulk, fair to choice
lambs $10; fat sheep steady; top ewes $4.
AT KANSAS CITY.
Kansas City, Nov. 26— (U. S. Bureau of
Markets.)—Cattle, 3,800; beef steers, 25 to
50 cents lower quality common early
sales, 6.25( ç *9; bulls and canners, steady;
bulk canners, [email protected]; fat she stock,
£5 cents lower; calves, fulij steady; no
trading in stockers and feftders; under
tone weak.
Sheep, 1,000; sheep and lambs, steady;
feeding lambs, $10.75.
AT OMAHA.
Omaha, Nov. 26.—Hogs—Receipts 9.000;
mostly steady, in spots a shade lower;
bulk medium and light butchers $6.60®
9.75; top $9.80; bulk strong weight and
packing grades [email protected]
Cattle—Receipts 3,000; beef and butch
er cattle slow, steady to weak; fed steers
$10.75; cows $8; stockers and feeders
steady. , _
Sheep—Receipts 3,500; fat lambs and
sheep strong; fed lambs $10.85; ewes
$4.50; vearling wethers $8; feeding lambs
dull.
AT PORTLAND.
Portland, Nov. 26.— Cattle—Steady; re
ceipts 2361 canners [email protected]$3.50, other
quotations unchanged.
Hogs—Steady; no receipts; quotations
unchanged.
Sheep—Weak; no receipts; quotations
unchanged.
AT SPOKANE.
Spokane, Nov. 26.—Hogs—Receipts 15;
market steady; prime mixed [email protected]>;
medium mixed [email protected]; rough heav
ies [email protected]; pigs [email protected]; stock
ers and feeders $8<gl0.
Cattle—Receipts 18; market steady;
prime steers [email protected]; good to choice $6.50
f®7; medium to good [email protected]; fair to
medium [email protected]; common to fair $4^î
4.50; choice cows and heifers [email protected];
?4 75®5.25; fair to medium [email protected];
good to choice $5.25®6; medium to good
canners [email protected]; bulls [email protected]; calves
[email protected]; stockers and feeders $4.50®'7.50.
Sheep— Receipts 237; market steady;
prime lambs $8®9; fair to medium $708;
prime yearlings [email protected] 25; prime wethers
[email protected]; best mutton ewes $2&5
BOSTON WOOL.
Boston, Nov. 26.—The Commercial Bul
letin tomorrow will say:
"The demand for wool has continued
within narrow limits during the week.
Some fine and fine medium original bag
territory wools have been sold at 70 to
90 cents, according to staple, to various
mills. There is stronger belief that
prices are nearing the bottom rapidly.
The foreign markets are generally slow.
"The goods market is still unsettled
but some sales of surplus cloth are be
ing made fo better advantage.'
Th»* Commercial Bulletin tomorrow
will publish wool quotations as follows:
Michigan fleeces—Fine unwashed, 35
®36; delaine unwashed, 48®..; % blood,
39®..; % blood unwashed, 34®...
Wisconsin—Half blood, 374Ï38; %
blood, [email protected]; % blood, [email protected]
Oregon— Eastern No. 1 staple, 956 97;
eastern clothing, [email protected]; valley No. 1,
S Pulled—Delaine, 90®..; AA 80®..: A
supers, 60®65.
Mohairs—Best combing, 40® 42; best
carding, 33®;35.
SAN FRANCISCO PRODUCE.
San Francisco, Nov. 26.—Butter—Ex
tras 54%c.
Eggs—Fresh extras 81%c; extra pullets
Cheese—Flats fancy 32%c; firsts 26%c;
young Americas 35c.
Vegetables—Eggplant, southern, 5®7c;
summer squash $1.25®2; potatoes, Bur
banks $2.65®2.85; sweets [email protected]%c; onions,
yellow, [email protected]; green onions $1.25; beans
10®15c; cucumbers $1.50® 2.25; peas,
southern, [email protected],
Turkeys nominal.
BARLEY AND FLAX.
Minneapolis, Nov. 26.—Barley [email protected]
Flax—No. 1 [email protected]
DÜLUTH LINSEED.
Duluth, Nov. 26.—Linseed on track and
arrive $1.93.
Recause Mohammed never shaved,
Arabs invariably wear beards.
New York Market
FINANCIAL
New York, Nov. 26.-—Trading on the
stock exchange Friday presented no ma
terial alteration in Its salient aspects
from previous sessions of the week,
price movements being extremely irreg
ular when not actually heavy.
Apart from the relaxed tone of the
money market, which extended to bank
ers acceptances and commercial paper,
developments and advices over the holi
day recess were again of a character to
Inspire extreme caution.
Grain quotations suffered another sen
sational decline. Other commodity
markets were nervous and one of the
most influential of the independent steel
manufacturers adopted lower prices "due
to the law of supply and demand." Ex
change on London was firmer, the Im
provement coinciding with the better
showing of the Bank of England In its
liabilities reserves and rates to most
other foreign centers, Greece again ex
cepted, were variably higher.
Oil«, Stepls Vulnerable.
Shippings, oils, steels, and coppers
were the most vulnerable issues, their
reactions of 1 to 5 points keeping pace
with reduced business, lower prices and
reduction of output, especially in the
metal Industry. Rumor also associated
some of today's selling with the closing
out of former bull pools.
Crucible steel, Atlantic gulf, and Mex
ican petroleum reflected constant pres
sure with international paper, Virginia
Carolina chemical and several of the
cheaper rails. Neutralizing features
were restricted to several of the in
i vestment rails, notably coalers, also
I American Woolen and sundry special
I ties. Sales amounted to 735,000 shares.
Call Money d Per Cent.
Call loans for the day and into the
coming week held at the one rate of
six per cent and an enlarged volume
of business in acceptances and mercan
tile loans was reported at the lower
quotations.
Although the new Issue of Canadian
; Northern bonds was quickly taken, the
! general bond market was dull and heavy,
! especially for liberty issues, the second
; 4%'s losing one point and the fourth
j 4%'s, a large fraction. Total sales, (par
value) $15,275,000.
I Old United States bonds were un
changed on call.
LIBERTY BONDS.
New York, Nov. 26.—Liberty bonds
closed: 3%s 592.20; first 4s $86.60; second
4s $86.20; first 4%s $86.90; second 4%. s
$86.16; third 4>/is $88.80; fourth 4*is
$86.56; Victory 3%s $96; Victory 4% s
$96.02.
MONEY.
New York, Nov. 26.—Prime mercantile
paper unchanged. Exchange irregular.
Sterling—Demand 3.48%; cables 3.49%.
Francs—Demand 6.10; cables 6.12.
Belgian francs—Demand 6.47; cables
6.49.
Guilders—Demand 30.50; cables 30,60.
Lire—Demand 3.65; cables 3.67.
Marks—Demand 1.45; cables 1.46.
Greek marks—Demand 8.80.
New York exchange on Montreal
12 3-16 per cent discount.
Time loans—Easy; 60 days, 90 days and
six months 7®7% per cent.
Call money—Steady; high 6; low 6;
ruling rate 6; closing bid 6; offered at 7;
last loan 6.
M ETAI .S.
New York, Nov. 26.—Copper—Weak;
electrolytic spot and nearby and first
quarter 14 ft 14%.
Iron—Nominally unchanged.
Tin—Easy; spot 35'«35.50; futures 36.50
@37.
Lead—Dull; unchanged.
Zinc—Easy; East St. Louis spot 5.75®
5.85.
Antimony—5.87.
NORTHWEST BANKS.
Portland, Nov. 26.—Clearings $6,732,806;
balances $2,524,571.
Tacoma, Nov. 26.—Clearings $675,686;
balances $95,773.
Seattle, Nov. 26.—Clearings $6,724,025;
balances $2,285,532.
Spokane, Nov. 26.—Clearings $2,722,575;
balances $1,261,716.
NEW YORK COTTON.
New York, Nov. 26.—Spot cotton—
Quiet; middling $15.85.
SILVER.
New York, Nov. 25.—Bar silver—Dom
estic unchanged; foreign 75%c; Mexican
dollars 57%c.
London, Nov. 26.—Bar silver 48%d per
ounce. Money and discount unchanged.
NEW YORK SUGAR.
New York, Nov 26.—Raw sugar 5.76 for
centrifugal. Refined sugar [email protected] for
fine granulated.
BUTTER AND EGGS.
Chicago, Nov. 26.— Butter — Lower;
creamery [email protected]
Eggs—Higher; receipts 1 ,530 cases;
firsts 70St71c; ordinary firsts 59®63c; at
mark, cases included, [email protected]; standards
[email protected]; refrigerator firsts [email protected]
Portland, Nov. 26.— Butter—Firm; ex
tra cubes [email protected]; parchment wrapped
prints, box lots, 59c; cartons 60c; half
box lots %c more; less than half box
lots lc more.
Butterfat—Firm ; receipts light; No. 1
churning cream [email protected] f. o. b. Portland;
undergrades 56c f. o. b. Portland.
New York, Nov. 26.—Butter, weak;
creamery higher than extras, 60%®61;
extra, 60 firsts, [email protected]
Eggs, steady, unchanged.
Seattle, Wn„ Nov. 26.—Eggs, select
local ranch white shells, 75 cents psr
dozen; pullets, [email protected]; storage, 62.
Butter—City creamery, in cubes, 58
cents per pound; bricks or prints, 59;
seconds, In cubes, 52; bricks, 53; country
creamery extras, cost to jobbers in cubes,
64; storage, [email protected] cents.
REALTY TRANSFERS.
Emma Duncan to Ernest Fetterly, lota
in Wilcox addition to Great Falls, $1.
John L. Glllin, Sr., to George Hunter,
160 acres in Sees. 21 and 28-19-4 E!.. $1.
John L. Gillin, Sr.. to Robert Simon
Hunter, SW of 21-19-4 E„ $1.
Cellna Eaton to Oscar W. Hamilton,
lot 11, block 305; lot 4, block 319, land in
Twp. 19, R. 2 E., $1. TI ... „
Emilie Bickett to Oscar W. Hamilton,
Sa Da e vi P d r0 Bruneau'to Oscar W. Hamilton,
same property, $1
A new ferry line the longest in the
world, is to be operated between Eng
land and Sweden.
[CMcago Market
GRAIN ANI» PROVISIONS.
Chicago, Nov. 26.—Strained financial
conditions in North Dakota had much to
do today with a violent new break in th«
price of wheat. For the first time in sev
eral years, the cereal comn anded les3
than $1.50 a bushel. There was a nervous
close at six to 7% cents net decline, with
December $1.52% to $1.53%, and March
$1.48 to $1.48%. Corn finiished at % cents
loss to % cents gain; oats up % to %
cents, and provisions verylng from 20
cents off to an advance of 2% cents.
Attention to the remarkable series of
rural bank failures in North Dakota
was so eager and general among wheat
traders that a selling stampede could bo
easily foreseen. As soon as the market
opened, rushes to the bear side of the
market began, and buyers were restrain
ed through knowledge not only of the
North Daicota banking stluatlon but also
on account of a fresh break in the cotton
market and owing to weakness of for
eign exchange. Rallies took place later.
Influenced by estimates that 1,000,000
bushels had been bought to go to Europe
from ports on the gulf of Mexico. An
nouncement, however, that the Belgian
government had withdrawn from the
market led to a fresh setback as the day
came to an end.
Corn and oats at first sympathized with
wheat depression, and December corn
touched the lowest point since before the
war. In the last part of the session,
though, the scantiness of country offer
ings tended to make the market harden.
Provisions were steadied by an ad
vance in hog values.
Prices of futures follow:
Wheat.
December-—Open. $1.53%; high, $1.57% ;
low, $1.62; close, $1.52%.
March—-Open, $1.47; high, $1.51%; low,
$1.47; close, $1.48.
Com.
December—Open, $63%; high, 65%; low,
36% ; close, 64%.
May—Open, 70%; high, 72%; low, 70V*;
close, 71%.
Oats.
December—Open, 44%; high, 44%; low,
44%; close, 44%.
May—Open, 47; high, 48%; low, 47%;
close, 48%.
CHICAGO CASH GRAIN.
Chicago, Nov. 26.—Wheat—No. 2 hard
$1.6201.63%; No, 2 northern $1.58.
Corn—No. 2 mixed 60%c; No. 2 yellow
[email protected]%c.
Oats—No. 2 white 48®49%c; Iso, 3
white 46% ©47c.
Rye—No. 2 $1.42.
Barley—60(d 90c.
Timothy seed—[email protected]
Clover seed—$15®20.
Pork—Nominal; lard $19.35; ribs $12.50
@15.
MINNEAPOLIS CASH GRAIN.
Minneapolis, Nov. 26.—Wheat, receipt,
580 cars, compared with 581 cars a year
ago.
Cash: —
No. 1 Northern, $1.46%«$1.49%; Decem
ber $1.41%; March $1.45%.
Corn—No. 3 yellow, 68 ij, 69.
Oats—No. 8 white, 41% @ 42%.
Barley—53 @ 77.
Rve—No. 2, $1.83% ® $134%.
Flax—No. 1. $1.91 @ $193.
Flour.—unchanged to 20 cents lower; in
carload lots, family patent, quoted at
$8.60 @ $9 a barrel in 98 pound cotton
sacks. Shipments. 68,589 barrels.
Bran—$32 @ $33.
Prices Paid at Points In Montana Takln«
48-Cent Freight Rate to Minne
apolis and Duluth.
Quotations ending noon. Nov. 27.
Dark northern spring wheat. Per bu.
No. 1, 59 lb. test SI "
No. 2, 57 lb. test U08
No. 3, 55 lb. test 104
No. 4, 53 lb. test 94
No. 5, 50 lb. test 79
Northern spring wheat. Ter bu.
No. 1, 59 lb. test S 104
No. 2, 57 lb. test 10 i
No. 3, 55 lb. test 9"
No. 4, 53 lb. test 87
No. 5, 50 lb. test
Dark hard winter wheat. Per bu.
No. 1. 60 ib. test $1- 0 S
No. 2. 58 lb. test 103
No. 3, 56 lb. test » - 9 3
No. 4, 54 lb. test » 3
No. 5. 51 lb. test • • -6»
Hard winter wheat. 1 er bu.
No. 1, 60 lb. test $ 1 -°3
No. 2, 58 lb. test 9»
No. 3, 56 lb. test
No. 4, 54 lb. test
No. 5, 51 lb. test
40-49 lb. otherwise No. 5, 3c a pound
less than No. 5; other light weight wheat
depends on quality.
Amber durum. ^
No. 1, 60 lb. test
No. 2, 58 lb. test
No. 3, 55 lb. test
No. 4, 54 lb. test •»»
No. 5, 51 lb. test - •
Durum wheat. »,
No. 1, 60 lb. test
No. 2, 58 lb. test
No. 3, 56 lb. test
No. 4, 544 lb. test «
No. 5, 51 lb. test • • • -' 3
Five cents discount per pound under
51 pounds. , ,
Club wheat 10 cents under durum.
Mixed wheat—4 cents less predominat
tlng grain £tnd grade.
Flax: Tor „, h "
NO. i 132
N< Oats Per bu. Cwt.
New No. 2 white oats $ .20 $ .63
New No. 3 white oats 19 -59
New Nos. 3, 4 white oats .. .16 .M
Barley. Per |> u -
No. 2 barley $ -33 $ -69
No. 2 barley
No. 4 barley •*" i
Rve . Per bu. Cwt.
New milling rye $ *95 $1.70
New feed rye b4
Greek Parliament
to Meet December 15
Athens', Nov. 2ft.—(By The Associated
Tress).—Parliament will meet three
days after the plebiscite on the return
of former King C'onstantine on Decem
ber 15, when Queen Mother Olga will
read the speech from the throne, it was
announced today. It is anticipated the
Venizclists will raise the question of the
legality of her regency, declaring th.it
according to the. constitution only par
liament can select a regent
OCTOBER EXPORTS
JUMP 11
I. S. IMPORTS FULL
Trade Balance in Favor
America for Ten Months
Is Two Billion.
of
Washington, Nov. 26.—Exports dur
ing October increased by nearly $150,
000,000 while imports decreased approx
| imately $1,000,000, foreign trade figures
! made public today by the department of
I commerce show. Exports were valued
I at $752,000,000 against $605,000,000 in
September, while imports were valued at
$362,000,000.
The excess of exports over imports in
1 October, amounting to $390.000,000 is
! .the largest in any one month of the pres
! ent year.
For the ten months ending with Octo
ber, exports were $6.832,000,000 com
pared with $6,499,000,000 in the same
period last year and imports were $4.
| 720,000,000 or $1,211,000,000 more than
I during the same period last year.
Trade Balance Falls
j Thus the trade balance in favor of the
i United States for the first ten months
j of this year is $2,112,000,000, compared
I with a balance for the same period the
I year before of $3,400,000,0W.
j Imports of gold during October were
[ the largest in three years, amounting to
'$117,000,000 as compared with $39,000,
000 in September and $5.000,000 in Oc
tober last, year. For the ten months
period gpld imports amounted to $312,
ItfXl.OOO against $61.000,000 in the same
: period of 1919. Gold exports in. October
; were $26,000,000 against $44,000,000 in
October last year and for the ten-months
; ended with October exports amounted
to $285,000,000 against $270,000,000 for
the same period last year.
Silver Trade Small
j Trade in silver remains relatively
small, the statement said. Imports for
; the t<"-n months ending October 1st were
j $78,000,000 against $73.000,000 last year
and exports wore $104,000,000 as eom
; pared with $1*9.000,000 for the corres
ponding period last. year. The figures
for October were not given.
Steel Prices Slashed
by Independent Firms;
Wages Cut May Follow
Youngstown, Ohio, Nov. 26.—Ind»
: pendent steel companies of the Youngs
town district, employing about 30.000
workers announced today that they •nil!
met the reduction of prices announced
by the Jones it Laughlin Co.,, of Titts- '
' burgh, the cut to be effective at once.
Heads of the three largest independ-j
j ent corporations here declared a read
justment in the cost of coal and labor
will have to lollow. They said that!
! wherever labor costs with the independ- j
! ent s are higher than the United States'
Steel corporation the wages will have
to be reduced.
Shinge Mill Men
to Meet in Seattle,
Discuss Industry
Seattle, Nov. 26.—All angles of the
shingle and allied industries will be
! discussed at the fourth annual Red
Cedar Shingle congress which meet&
j here December 7 and S under the aus
i pices of the shingle branch of the AVest
i Const Lumbermen's association accord
! ing to .1. S. Williams, secretary,
i Shingle and lumbermen from all sec
| tions of Washington and many parts of
the west will be in attendance, Mr.
: Williams said. Neil Jameson, of
i Everett, will preside at the congress,
i and W. .T. Ooyle, lieutenant governor
elect, will leliver the opening address.
The convention of the shingle branch
of the West Coast Lumbermen's asso
ciation will be held here December 9.
Pork Prices Slump
in Kansas City Houses
Kansas City, Mo.. Nov. 26.—Whole
sale prices on fresh pork recorded a
sharp drop here today. Owe packing
company quoted pork loins at -•> cents
a pound, a decline of 5 cents from the
price earlier in the week.
Spare ribs sold at 19 cents a pound,
( a three cent drop. Shoulders were
i quoted two cents lower at 19 1-2 to 20
I cents.
i First grade bacon declined 3 cts., sell
j ir.g at 43 to 46 cents and lard was 22
j cents a pound, half a cent down.
The top price paid for hogs at the
j stockyards, today was $10, the lowest
since early in 1917.
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SENATOR SMOOT WANTS
TO BAR FOREIGN WOOL
Salt Lake City, Nov. 26.—With n
view to safeguarding the interests of
American wool growers ani relieving
what he termed to be a critical situa
tion in the wool growing industry. Sen
ator Heed Smoot has announced that he
will introduce a bill cs soon as the sen
ate assembles to place an embargo upon
foreign wool, effective for one year.
TACOMA SCHOOL YOUTHS
GARDENS PRODUCE $147,000
Tacoma, Nov. 26. —Gardens of Taco
ma school children produced $147,000
the past year, according to the report
of C. II. Shartow, supervisor of home
garden work.
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WEB PRICE LEVEL
III STEEL DI«
IS IDE EFFECTIVE
Reduction Nearly 50 Per Cent
in Some Instances; May
Stabilize Market.
Pittsburgh, Pa , Nov. 26.—Most of the
independent steel companies already have
followed the lead of the .Tones & Laugh
lin Steel company, of Pittsburgh, which
reduced prices on bars, plates and struc
tural shapes today to the level of the
United States industrial board's prices
of March, 1919, or are about to do so,
according to high steel authorities here.
Several of the larger independent inter
ests have advised their sales offices in
other cities, it was said, to accept new
business at the indiistrial board's prices.
The new prices adopted by the largest
independent interests and made effective
today ore:
Steel bars, $2.35; structural shapes,
$2.45; plates. $2.65; base Pittsburgh.
Adjustments in prices of fire and cold
rolled steel are to follow.
See Wage Reduction
No reduction in wages is contemplated
immediately, according to the best in
formation obtainable. It was freely
predicted by steel officials, however, that
a wage reduction is inevitable within the
next few weeks.
The new prices are not comparable
with previous prices on any fixed basis,
as some of the independents have been
asking as high as $4 for bars, plates
and shapes, it was reported, and others
have been receiving more conservative
prices, ranging between $3 and 83.25.
The general feeling throughout the
trade here is one of satisfaction at the
decision to reduce prices. It is believed
here now that the immediate result will
be to stabilize the steel market.
Think Bottom Reached.
The sentiment here .seemed to be that
the bottom level of prices has been reach
ed.
A feature of the situation is the con
tinued steady demand for steel pipe and
all tubular goods, steel officials said, for :
which there is heavy buying in the oil i
industry and also in the building trades, j
A firm demand for these, it was said, j
and for certain wire products, notably
nails, has resulted in the prices on these j
commodities not being reduced to the j
industrial board's prices.
Decline in Butter
and Milk Prices
Coming, Prediction
Omaha, Neb.. Nov. 26.—Prediction of
what he referred to as a "serious drop"
in milk and butter prices was made in an
address at the chamber of commerce i
Friday by George Wilbert, of Maryville. !
Ohio, head of the executive committee of
the Ohio Wool Growers' association.
"There is facing us a serious drop in
milk and butter prices, because Danish
butter will soon be coming in at the rate
of 5< >0,000 pounds a month.'' Mr Wilbert
said. "At the same time, more than
$50.000.000 worth of American evapor
ated milk is piled up in Now York. It
cannot be sold for lack of export demand, j
and condensing factories are closing
all over the country."
American farmers, stock men and
dairy men face ruin due fo recent price <
decline of their products unless protect- :
ed from direct competition with cheap
Land and labor in foreign countries, the j
speaker declared.
Rely Upon Justice
and Not on Might,
Nations Are Urged
Washington. Nov. 2TÎ. —The nations of
North and South America were urged
not to rely on their innate right and
! abilitv but" on the principles restricting
I international justice and a rccognitiou
I of the divine sovereignty by Monsignor
1 Thomas, rector of St. Patrick's Catho
' lie church, in a sermon delivered today
I at the twelfth annual Pan-American
i mass.
The services at St. Patrick s held
annually on Thanksgiving day were
attended by a number of members of the
cabinet headed by Secretary Colby of
the state department. Chief Justice
White, and the justices of th« supreme
court, and practically the^putire Latin
American diplomatic corps:
WANT STEAMER BACK.
London, Nov- 26.—The owners of the
Italian steamer Conge which was seized
last September by D'Anntinzio's legioti
naries, have decided to lend Fiume 15,
CHMl.lVK) lire to secure the steamer's re
turn, says a Home dispatch to the Ex
change Telegraph, quoting a message
from Genoa.
Twenty Persons Hurt
in Ohio Train Wreck
Bellefontaine, Ohio, Nov. 26.—Twenty
persons were injured at West Liberty,
near here, late Thursday when Big 4
passenger train No. 10. Cincannati to
Detroit, ran into an open switch and
crashed into a freight train standing
on a sidiug. Two of the injured are
probably fatally hurt. The express car
and common baggage car and smoker of
the passenger train were turned over.
Asia has 236,000,000 latent and used
horsepower from water; North America
%60,000,000. y
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MENU—SATURDAY, NOV. 21
Special Combination Lunch
11:30 to 1:30
Soup—Spaghetti
Choice of the following dishes
Halibut or Salmon
Corn Beef and Cabbag*
Veal Loaf with Tomato Sauce
Swiss Pot Roast
Bread, Veg etables, Pie and Coffee
45 Cents.
DIN NEK SPECIALS
11:30 to 1:30
Potted Beef Ends with Noodles 25
Fricassee of Turkey Wings, Steamed
Dumplings, 25
Roats Sirloin of Beef, Pan Gravy 30
Hamburger Steak, Spanish Sauce 25
SIX O'CLOCK SPECIALS
Small T-Bone Steak, Shoestring
Potatoes 65
Breaded Veal Chops, Country Gravy 26
Small Steak 30
PASTRY SPECIALS
French Cream Pie 15
Lemon Meringue 15
Raisin, 10; Apple 10; Blackberry 10
Mince 10
THE HOME OF GOOD THINGS
TO EAT
116 Central Ave.
LEGAL ADVEKTIT ..N8
NOTICE OF SALE OF CASCADE,
COCSIV, MONTANA, PUBLIC HIGH
WAY BONDS,
Notice is hereby given that In pursu
ance of a Resolution adopted by the
Board of County Commissioners of Cas
cade County, Montana, on October 16th,
1920, authorizing the issuance of coupon
bonds hereinafter described, the said
Board of County Commissioners will on
Tuesday, the 30th day of November, 1920,
at 2:30 o'clock, p. m.. at the County Com
missioners' Room In the Court House, In
the City of Great Falls, Montana, re
ceive sealed bids and sell to the highest
and best bidder, ONE HUNDRED
THOUSAND DOLLARS ($100,000) Cas
cade County, Montana, Public Highway
Bonds of the denomination of $1,000 each,
bearing interest at the rate of six per
cent, per annum, payable semi -annually,
dated the first day of December, 1920,
and becoming due as follows:
$10,000.00 on January 1, 1925;
10,000.00 on January 1, 1928;
10,000.00 on January 1, 1927;
10,000 00 on January 1, 1928;
10,000.00 on January 1, 1934;
10,000.00 on January 1, 1935;
10,000.00 on January 1, 1936;
10.000,00 on January 1, 1938;
10,000.00 on January 1, 1939;
10,000.00 on January 1, 1940;
said bonds being redeemable as follows:
On the first day of January or the
first day of July next preceding their re
spective maturities, both principal and
interest payable at the American Ex
change National Bank, In the City of
New York, State of New York, said bonds
are to be Issued by the County of Cas
cade for the purpose of constructing a
system of necessary Public Highways
within said County; the said bonds will
be printed by the said County and ready
for delivery at the time of sale and the
said County will deliver to tne purchaser
the approving opinion of Wood and Oak
ley, Chicago, Illinois. All bids must be
without condition or qualification and
all bids other than by or on behalf of tha
Sta^.e Board of Land Commissioners of
the State of Montana must be accom
panied by an unconditional certified
check on some reliable bank In the
amount of Five Thousand Dollars, pay
able to the order of the County Treas
urer of Cascade County, Montana, as a
guarantee of good faith, which check
shall be forfeited to the County of Cas
cade, Montana, as liquidated damages by
any bidder to whom the said bonds may
be" awarded at such sale In the event
such successful bidder shall refuse to
accept such bonds and promptly make
payment for such bonds upon delivery
by the County at a bank designated by
such purchaser, the said Oonds will aot
be -»old for less than their oar value and
the Board of County Commissioners re
serves the right to reject any and all bids.
All bids must be addressed to the un
dersigned County Clerk of Cascade Coun
ty. at Great Falls, Montana.
Dated at Great Falls. Cascade County,
Montana, this 16th day of October, 1920.
W. F. RESTER, Chairman,
Board of County Commissioners.
Attest: JOHN E. MORAN,
County Clerk.
First publication Oct. 28. 1920.
K. W. Birowim Àgsiracy
BEN R COMINGS, Mgr.
805 First National Bank Phone 6333
Iusurane Loan» Real Estate
f N
Prevailing Low Rate of
FOEESGM EXCHANGE
Offers Good Investment
OPPORTUNITY
The eyes of investors are now
centered on the prevailing low rate
of exchange for English Sterling,
French Francs. Italian Lire and
German Marks, all of which are
selling much below their normal
value.
We can offer exchange drafts
on these countries at attractive
prices. The following table will
give you an idea of the possibil
ities from an investment stand
point:
Appro*.
Mar. Price Nor. Prie»
English Sterling $3.45 $4.86
French Francs .06.38 .19.8
Italian Lire 03.78 .19.3
German Marks .. .01.30 .23.3
Irviir&g WMftekome Co*
of Montana
Kainbow Hotel Building
Great Falls, Montana

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