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Montana news. (Lewistown, Mont.) 1904-191?, March 04, 1909, Image 2

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THE MONTANA NEWS.
IWBUED WEEKLY.
OFFICE 19 PARK AV. P. O. BOX $08
Entered at the Post Omce for trans
mision through the mail at second
clams rates.
Address all communications and
make all Money payable to the Mon
tana News.
IDA CROUCH-HAZLEIT
Editor and Manager.
SUB8CRIPTIONS:
One Year ..................... 50c
Six M onths ................... 256
One cent per copy in bundles up to 500
State Executive Committee.
J. AI. Kruse . .(Chairman).. Bozeman
T. D. Caultihld ......... . . Mlssoula
L. J. Duncan .............. Butte
National Heladquarters J. JMahlon
Barnes. Secretary. 180 Washington
Street, Chicago, 11l.
State Secretary.
JAS. D. GRAHAM.
SPIES IN THE SCKIALIST PARTY.
The labor novemt nt of the western
country is honey-combed with spies;
and the slimy reptile, the lowest of
the tool by which the capitalist class
keeps the badge of servitude and de
gradation upon the worker, is flying
his trade of filth in both the labor
unions and the socialist organiza
lions. If American working men
were not such dupes of tevery one
who comes to them with an offer of
friendliness it would be easy to de
tect the work of these loathsome be
trayers of the aspirations of the
working class. Every tree is known
by its fruits, and a ,nan can easily he
detected by h!s deeds, whenever ex
.perlenced union men discover a per
son in their ranks who lives along
without caring whether he works or
not. makes a business of :nsluuat
.ng him.,wlf into thl affairs of the
organization, never neglect an oppeir
tunity to stir up strife and dissen
sicn, encourages suspicion ctnd tack
of confidence in those who are ac
tive and earnest In the work of the
class struggle, they mark him at once
or a spotter, and a paid man to null
fy an' destroy the work they hav.
accomplished, and his chances of
staying very long in that community
are usually short-lived.
There is another species of spotter,
more contemptible of anything,
than the man that is paid by the
employers' associations to go from
place to place and desrupt and re
port, and that is the person who re
sidtes at a point and is friendly with
the bosses, and agrees to hold the
men level, and r.stsat the effort for
a raise in wages, pretends to a quasi
respectability, but all the time uses
his influt.nce in an underhand way
against any radical agresslve or ef
ftctive action in the Interest of labor
or its r. slstance to the unjust and
precariotus :ondlitlons under which It
lives.
Thcse creatures that are !ass than
human have cursed Montana and the
industrial states of the inter-mouintain
region for many yewrs, and are still
cursing It. They are in evidence at
all industrial centers.
The socialist party has also be
come the victim of their disintegrat
ing influence. With the pretender,
and class nothing but disrupt. Watch
the man who apposes every construc
tive effort to make socialisn. an ac
tive force In the community. Watch
the man who is shouting for social.
ism as a heaven over yonder but ap
poses, thwarts and fights any rational,
practical, concrete action of the party
in local affairs. Watch these people
and go after them. They will soon
wilt or vanish when they find they
aret discovered. They have not the
staying ,pialiti.s of those who are in
spired with a true desire to make the
world better through the upl!ft of
the labor that makes the world.
If the socialist movement Is good it
murt be good f r something. A
socialist that takes no interest in the
affairs of his own town is simply a
sentimental dreamer. It is practical
men that mann the world.
80IAIJBS IN UTAH.
A correspondent from Utah, a
comrade that used to lbe active in
Ihe Montana socialist movement,
sends In some interesting notes in re
gard to the socialist movemetnt in the.
Mormon state.
Utah is an agricultural state. The
omnlpqtcnce ard omnipresence of the
Mormon religion :s due largely to the
acumen of the founders in discerning
that they mutt solve the economic
problem first if they were to live at
all. The devotees of the sect had
landed in this desert, driven by the
persecutions h(aped upon them from
.ackson county, Mtasourl, and
Hanvoo, Illinois. Their exodus was
during the early gold excitement in
this country, and when they con
cluded to settle in Salt Lake valley
they were eager to delve into the
%ast surrounding mountains for the
glittering treasure.
MATERIAL SECURITY.
Brigham Yc ung told them they
would starve to death it they went to
hunt for gold. but it they went to
work and scratched the earth and
ratted a little wheat they could live.
;o the Utah desert has blosomed as
the rose, and the state is noted for
its fruit and Its fine irrigation pro
jeIcts.
The cooperative feature has been
one of the solid bulworks of th,'
strength of Mormonism The people
have built in villages with thi ir farms
lying in the surrounding country.
They live the meager, hardwerkmng
lives of the farmer class, knowing
few luxuries. But real wart is ab
sent from the Mormon communities
The church takes care of its poor
and needy, and this is done larg.'ly
through the Wcrmen's Aid associt
association. The ten per per cent
tLthing which the Mormons pay to
the church goes into the hands of
the church hkirarchy, and by them
is investtd in the great commercial
ent*.rprises with which the church h
identified. President Josephn Smith
.of the Mormon church, successor of
rirnghant Young is the president and
director of nunerous large capitalist
<nterprists within the state, as the
Leet sugar Inlustrits, woolen mills,
rallroads. light, a great system of
stores. and others of an enotmous
profit charact*.r.
TRANSIENT CHARACT ER.
But this apparent economic ., -
(urity iq dec. plive, as lthe stud, nt of
industrial and commereial conditions
uInd(erstated full well. No coopelrative
Itrmner, .ven if it 1esre ge nuine., Urd
Sxt. nued to the * ntire populatl.n of
Snl state or four states, tould ri sist
the pressure, of the trust on e\ery -I i..
Th. farnm'rs. lv reducing th ir s'.,nil
ar(d of living lower and lower. i .ight
retain th. Ir farms for a consid.lrabi, .
Irluiod. tut prices force ,1 to th.e nmini
'null. and the power o,f the bank, r
throubh the mortgage men with the
t apitalist pow, r kpld In the hands
.f th -ir own church ptople, will soon
ford th,* fragal pt ople to confront
lhb. problems of life as evolving capi
talism forces them upon them.
WILL NEVER LEAD t01'T.
But with this character of I oIu
;ation and industry it cannot lhe .x
ipected that Utah will ever lead out
in sociallst institutioens. Sclaltlt agi
tution here must take the f,rnl of
education as to the #nalysis )f the
i.i gitalist system, and whate.ver sklt '
ton of oan organization can he. r,
'lained umlder these diffc'ralties. The
minining industry of the state is larga.
and the' mining and smelting camp:.
are locals of the Western Federation
of Miners. This aggressive orgealtl.
ion Is sending out its Focialikt t.ail,
ings from e*very center, and this, of
tourse, has its influence in counter
acting the hypnatisnm of callrtalist
ildeas. Moreov.er, the socialist party
ue'l some six tlousand percentage.
lut ther,' is little or no corstruetiv9.
a crks. and practica:ly no condu: tin~
eof th.* party a2tivities to I)osith- * Ini-.
Iowe.ver. Utah shows this stage with
that of most of the western stales.
fO IAI.IT P1lRTY EGl ti, '1.M.
'The socialist activities ".egan alt,.ut
eight years ago. Mrs. Haslette was on -
or tile early workers, anu was ihe,
first organier that 'vent into the
southern agricultural country, being
also at one tim.e national comnittee.
man from Utah.
The party has been unfortunate in
is internal affairs. A Balt Iake law
yer who afterwards w,,nt went into
the republican party, at one time'
practically had the whole party In
teresttd in his own hands. His satis
laction arose, and there came a fac.
tional split that threw the organizsa
tlon into the hands of the national
party, and for a number of years the
state was declared In a disorganized
condition. Strife of this sort retards
the advancement of any movement.
Then the party met disaster in the
attempt to form a local press. Th±
I.aper established was called "Th4
c'risls." A man by the name of Dal
ton ca:me from Chicago to edit it. Dal
ton belonged to the bathing impos
nihilist crowd that was making itself
a conspicuous minority at the national
convention four years ago. He
struggled along as a pioneer labor
press has still to struggle in this
country, until finally he sold out to
the "American Party," a party ex
tensibly organised to fight the Mor
mon church, and turned his paper
over to its use during the election
campaign. He afterwards accepted
an office from the city administra
tion, and instead of starving with
the socialist party he is now eating
once more from the wages of capital
Iam.
CAV.S MAKE TRAITOBS.
It may be said as an explanation of
the reasons for Dalton's fall that he
found so little cooperation and sup
port in the Salt Lake party, that there
was so little of a settled policy of ac
tion, that his powers of endurance at
least gave way, and he became a
tool In the hands of the enemy. How
ever, that may be, it was a most dis
astrous thing for the socialist paper to
come out and declare war on that re
ligion. It would simply mean that
only gentiles and atheists could be
approved on socialist party principles.
And as for fighting the Mormon
church the anti-Mormon capitalist
press is doing that far more power
fully than the socialists could possibly
do even if they were inclined to do
so. A discrimination in regard to re
ligions is certainly not a part of the
burdens that socialists are obliged to
carry.
LOCAL ORGANIZATION8.
The party at Salt Lake City has
been at a low ebb of efficiency, last
summer takingits charter altogether.
There are many life and intelli
gent socialists in the city, but as is so
painfully characteristic of the west
ern socialist movement a large part
of them are not active in the party.
But it has taken a fresh start and
there is a movement on foot for bet
ter and more efficient work.
AT BINGiIIAM CANYON.
Bingham Canyon is a large copper
mining camp of the Western Federa
tion. The socialists are the most ac
tive here of any point in the state.
having obtained possession of the city
government a few years ago. But our
socialist movement is greatly kindered
by a lack of sound knowledge of a
socialist program on the part of the
terrible obstacles that are thrown in
the way of socialists in office are
such as might well baffle stronger
and for more i.xpt rlenced hearts than
working men taking up for the first
time the reins of administration. And
in their way our vote often drops
back when we have once gained pos
session of places of authority. So the
Bingham Canyon socialists were bat
tered anti betrayed out af office aga'n
I'(N)R ORG;ANIZATION.
Sh;.n.rally speaking there is neither
the *.nthusiasmr nor the organizatior,
that there was In the, party eight
ye'ars ago. The State Secretary has
difficulty in getting active work and
of the locals, dues paid up, or even
answe.rs from their secretaries.
rTh.ere is another burden that the
seeciallst party carries her,, that is
unlknown in any other state. It very
oft. n happens than those who have
adopt( d socialism are also those that
have abandoned the Mormon faith.
anmd besides being heretics against the
established social standards these re
formers ar,' classed with the hated
and despised "apostates." This works
a double burden for these liberal
socialists to carry, and it r.lso makes
it doubly hard for us to convince the
faithful Mormons that socialism is a
political movement for economic free
dom. And the brave souls who hold
their own under these trying circ.um
stances deserve the honor of all com
Ing ge nerations.
It is a marvel that all of these
working class voters do not take more
interest in controlling their own poll
tics. The member of the legislature
from this district, simply laughs at
the request of the working men, and
flatly refused to pre..ent a bil! making
it unlawfgul to hold out a dollar for
hospital fees without the consent of
the worker.
What is needed in Utah is patient
organizers, those thoroughly familiar
with practical labor problems, who
ran spend unlimited time organising
the, men and women, hunting them up
individually and instructing them, and
also those who are able to assist and
strengthen the labor organizations.
It is not talk and oratory that is
needed, it is patient, constructive work
by those who know how to do it,
building a solid socialist groundwork
for a big political movement.
'I'rIE TINTIC DISTRI(T.
Th,* Tintic mining district covers
considerable t,"rritory, and :omprises
the mining and smelting camps of
Eurika, Mammouth, Rlobinson, and
Sllver City. A large number of men
are employed in the district but the
organization among them is poor. Fhe
West-"rn Federation does not seem as
able to make its organization In the
west complete and effective, as the
United Mine Workers have done. The
Eureka union has put up a large ce
ment building costing about $16,000,
and has paid out all but $4,000 on it.
But there' are many men working who
do not belong to the union. An un
fair list of these rinegodes to their
elass interest is published, and there
are excellent union men working
faithfully and devoting much time to
&trengthening the organization. The
o.lialist sentiments I,* .trong hut not
realilsd. Reveral city officers in
cluding the mayor were ele'cted on
the socialist ticket, but the party
meetings have been dropped, the see
retary is inactive, a fine woman's
nocialist crganisation has been broken
up, and there Is every evidence that
the trail of the serpent spotter Is at
work.
Go to the
NEWS
For Up-to-Date
Job Printing
Dr. GEO. H. TAYLOR,
DENTIST
Cor. Grand & Jackson St.
Opp. Telephone Etchause
Helena, Montana
To Start the Day Right
Include in the essentials for
breakfast as many of the
Model Bakery's
FINE, FRESH CRISP ROLLS
as you may have appetite for.
The more you eat 'em the better
you like 'em. Carry that name
around with you for a day or two
until you get It fixed.
WARNKEN & SANDBOM
Propri-tor
153 N. Main St. Helena, Mont.
JONES' NEW STONE
OPERA HOUSE
CBNTRALLY LOCATEBD
IL. W. JONES. Mgr.
Kendall, * * tontan
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LOCAL GRBAT FALLS, of the
Socialst Party.
Meats everyr eSday at Umloa Mall at I p. w
We. PALSGROVI., ee',.
15 7th Avemne
LOCAL IVINOSTON, of the
Socialist Party
Meets every second and fourth Wed
nesday evening in Trades & Labor
Hall, opposite Opera House.
Transient comrades invited to attend.
ALVA MAYNE
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GENTS FURNISHINGS
Large Stock of Spring Goods
just arrived
LIVINGSTON, MONTANA
GO TO
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Up-to-Date Work
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HELENA, MONT.
BE YOUNG!
Traces of Age, Wrinkles, Grayness
Baldness, can be removed by secret
formulas. Ingredients cheap and
simple. Bend 25 cents for any one
formula, or 5O cents for all three
Address M4 B. M., 1431 Lewis Bt., Hel
ena, Mont.
FAMILY THEATER
I5-17 Seth Main st
Heolea's Homo of Polite
Vaudevlle.
Three Shows daily Open year around
Beeler's Cafe
Is the Cheapeat and Best Plce
In Town
WAFFLES
They sell like "HOTCARES"
S0 So. Main *- Helena, Mont.
Queen City Hotel and
Restaurant
CON P. REISS, Pamprtetor.
MEALS AT ALL HOURS
Rooms USc and bSc
135 So. Main St. Helena, Mont.
Tel. No. IT-Red Mrs. Geo. Coblso
Private Hospital
FOR CONFPINEMENT ONLY
1ees alosed so. Helena Mos.
Notice
to
Locals
Lena Morrow
Lewis
will lecture in
Montana
during the month
MARCH
Locals desiring to aerar her
for Lectures should ile appl
pikatton with the State Seere
tary at onlce, so as to avoid
dllappoltament. Loale in the
c4tka in wtwhkh ekvctlons are to
he held should arrange a series
of nmcCting for her.
Would You ULike to Look Youag?
WOULD YOU LIKE TO FEEL
YOUNG ?
Bend One Dollar for a simple secret
that will accomplish wonderful results
In making a complexion of Milk and
Roses, perfecting the form and re
moving any and all disease from the
system.
Or. send $1.25 and secure above
secret of Youth and Beauty and a
dainty booklet of Invaluable Instruc
tions for any woman over twenty. A
lovely Holiday gift. Address. M. B. M..
1431 Lewis St., Helena. Mont.
IfYu Work
for a Uvingit should
interest you to know
that you get in wag
es only part of what
jou produce; that a
amuwX pert goes to
the capitalIsts who
own the tools with
which you have to
work. This book by
the greatest of So
clalist writers -x
plains chuay and forcibly how wages
re determned and how they can be
raisled. Stody Marx for yourself ha
will help you to do your own thinking.
Cloth, 50u; paper 10c.
Amp book blished by s. will be umall4 pOemptl
en ecmt eude.. Catalog free. he sate m
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seUe keu sete. cCAGO.
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vet? Send 150 and self addressed
stamped envelope to M. B. U., 1431
Lewis St.. Helena. Mont.
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