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Bisbee daily review. [volume] (Bisbee, Ariz.) 1901-1971, July 31, 1904, Image 1

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M Washington. July 30. Forecast
X for Arizona: Pair la south, show-' X
K era and thunder storms In north- ft
X era portion Sunday and Monday. g
BISBEE DAILY REVIEW
REGULAR MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
THE METAL MARKET. -'
& New York, July 31. Stiver. 58 $
4, 3-8c; Mexican dollars. 45 3-4c. Cop-
per, quiet and unchanged.
'S4'-SJt"$y5$i
VOL. VIII
BISBEE, ARIZONA, SUNDAY MORNING, JULY 31, 1904.
NO. 72
I
TO GET THE NEWS ALL OF THE NEWS YOU'LL HAVE TO READ THE REVIEW IT'S ALL' THERE.
I.
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HENRY G DAVIS.
Ex-Senator Henry G. Davis, the Wee presidential candidate on -
4 the Democratic ticket, is a millionaire, who Is tremendously popular
in West Virginia, where his interests employ thousands of men.
: 4 :
Both Sides Claim Victory
Strikers Will Not Yield
PRESIDENT DONNELLY WILL NOT ASK ROOSEVELT TO TRY TO
BRING ABOUT SETTLEMENT. ALLIED TRADES ASKED FOR RE
1NSTATEMENT, SAY THE PACKERS. LEADERS STATE THAT
THEY HAVE NO KNOWLEDGE tF THIS ACTION. STRIKERS ARE
WELL SUPPLIED WITH PROVISIONS TO CARRY ON THE STRIKE
INDEFINITELY.
DON'T WANT INTERFERENCE FROM ROOSEVELT
Chicago, July 30. The conflict be
tween capital and unionism, which has
been going on In the packing trade in
dustry throughout the country for
nearly three weeks, shows no sign of
-abatement. Tonight both of the op
posing interests seem as determined
as ever to fight to a finish.
The packers declare they have prac
tically won their fight and the strikers
.are becoming demoralized.
In direct opposition to the statement
-of the employers, the strike leaders as
sert that the victory is with the work
men, and it will be a matter of but a
-short time until the packers will be
compelled to ask for peace.
The leaders of four of the allied
trades unions which went on strike in
sympathy with the packing house
butchers are said by the packers to
have made overtures for reinstate
ment today. The strike leaders dis
claimed any knowledge whatever of
the action taken by the four unions
and repeated their assertions that the
outlook for victory for the striking
workmen Is brighter than ever.
During the afternoon tuere was an
attempt on the part of disinterested
parties to induce President Donnelly,
PRESBYTERIAN MISSIONARIES
MAKE APPEAL FOR INDIANS
Washington, July 31. An appeal
was made to President Roosevelt to
day by a committee representing the
Presbyterian Beard of Home Missions,
In. behalf of the Pima Indians, about
5,000 in number. In Arizona, who are
said to be perishing owing to the fact
that the waters of Ihe Gila river have
been diverted from their reservation.
The committee stated that no water
was available for the Irrigation of the
Indians lands, and the Indians aro
said to be on the verge of starvation
because of the failure of their crops.
The President promised an Investi
gation, which has been before the In
terior department for a long time.
The Pima Indian reservation Is lo
y3g5S33S5
of the Butchers' Union, to appeal to
President Roosevelt to offer his good
offices and bring the strike to a close.
Mr. Donnelly refused to consider the
proposition.
'WeXTre winning the strike, -.and
need no help from the president," said
Mr. Donnelly. "There may be a few
desertions from our ranks, but they
are comparatively few, and do not
hurt our cause to any great extent. All
taik about the strikers being on the
verge of starvation is nonsense. Up
to date there have been about two hun
dred of the entire number of strikers
who have applied for relief. We are
prepared to carry the strike on indefi
nitely and are having stations well
equipped for the purpose of supplying
all our men with food, and the distrib
ution will be increased as the strike
continues."
Relief stations were opened today
by the strikers' relief committee, and
all day men and women were coming
and going for food. By evening all
the supplies of the station had been
given away. Many persons had to be
turned away. The strikers say the
reason the supplies save out so quick
ly was because hundreds of outsiders
took advantage of the opportunity to
secure free provisions.
cated in Pima and Maricopa counties.
and Lacaton is the agency headquar
ters. These Indians at one time were
a prosperous tribe. They tilled the
soil and sold their products at Phoe'
nix and Tucson. But the white set
tiers on the Giia river, above Florence,
year by year, diverted more water
from the river, until the Indians' crops
withered and died from lack of irrl-
gating water. Last year the Indian
Department was forced to make an ap
propriation for the sustenance of these
Indians. The underground water of
the Gila river In the Pima reservation,
was recently reported on la a favora
ble manner by Willis T. Lee, of the
geological survey.
GOVERNMENT
WILL DO
NOTHING
NOTHING WILL BE DONE ABOUT
MURDER OF AMERICANS IN
MEXICO.
CONSUL ISA PUPPET
American Consul in the Land of
Teres Will Report as Mexican Offi
cer Dictates State Department Will
Accept Doctored Report.
El Paso, July 20. As the days go by
and there seems to bo no disposition
on the part of the American authori
ties to force the Mexican governmeat
vo punish th- Mexican assassin who so
wantonly and cowardly murdered
Clarence Way and Latimer, at the in
st.gatlon of the alcalde, at their house
In Aguascalientes. the friends of those
meu. and part.cularly of Way, are be
ginning to talk of taking the matter
Into their own hands and forcing a
tnorcugh investigation.
From reports that have been receiv
ed hers from men who have resided in
Aguascalientes and the State of Sina
Ioa, It seems that General Torres Is all
powerful, and he bulldozes the Ameri
can officials there into doing Just as he
sajs and making the reports that he
seems St n connection with any mat
ter tlm Investigation is demanded
upon by the American government
In this case the state department at
Washington and the Mexican depart
ment of the Interior have no official in
formation in regard to the matter. AH
"hey know of it, or claim to know. Is
Just such information as has been furn
ished by closely censored press dis
patches. In ilew of these facts it is not at al;
ImDrobable that the matter of this
cowardly assassination wilj be allowed
to go by, as many of like character
have before. The following is me on
ly report that the stale department at
Washington has received from the
American consul at Mazatlan. the
nearest point, shows that there will be
a report rendered that will tend to ex
onerate Torres and his puppets, who
were sent by him to commit the mur
der The report Is as follows:
"Washington, July 28 The Ameri
can consul at Mazatlan, Mexjco, has
reported to the state department on the
recent shooting of two Americans at
Aguascalientes. He says that the al
calde went to the office of the record
er and asked him to arrest Clarence
Way. which he refused to do, claim
ing there was no reason therefor. The
alcalde then made out the warrant
himself. The commissioners met Mr
Way in front of his house and showed
him the order of arrest, and he replied
that he would accompany them as soon
as he had eaten his breakfast and
changed his clothes. They objected
to this and undertook to carry him,
when Mr. Way called the cook, Lati
mer, who came out unarmed, and tried
to prevent the arrest. After Mr. Way
had been forcibly taken Latimer start
ed into the house, and one Castro,
thinking he had gone for arm3, shot
and wounded him. Mr. Way, seeing
this, attempted to enter the house
whereup Castro fired twice, killing him
instantly. The alcalde and two com
missioners are now In Jail."
To show what the Americans who
are in touch, with the situation at
Aguascalientes and In possession of all
the facta think of the matter, the fol
lolng lettter wa3 received In this city
yesterday by a well known real estate
firm from a personal friend of one of
the members who is mining in that
district. He says in part:
'Of course you have read the ac
count of the assass.nation of Clarence
Way and his companion. I was in
deed aorry to hear of it, but not sur
prised, as General Torres Is "all of If
on the Pacific side and the power and
privileges extend to the family I am
also sorry for the American consul and
for Mr. Roosevelt aid the secretary of
state, because the consul must make
the assassination Justifiable, even If it
Is necessary to say that Way and his
friend were instigating the Yaquis in
their war againp' the government, or
that they were organized bandits, or
any other evil thing, and, knowing
that their guilt had been discovered,
they resisted arrest and in conse
quence were killed. I Dresume thai
General Torres will instruct the con
sul, and, measuring him by all of the
other American onsuls that I have
seen in Meico, he will prove obedient to
his Instructions, and his evidence will
relieve Mr. Roosevelt and the secreta
ry of State from doing anything that
would jeopardize the peace of the
country, for, in case the peace was
Jeopardized, naturally it would tend
towards a depreciation of Meican
(Continued on Page Eight.)
Awful Havoc
Floods In Northern Arizona
Kingman. Ariz., July 31. The heavy rains In the mountains east S
of Truxaton last night sent down a wall of water tw enty feet high
through the-canyon, washing out the Santa Fe R. R. track, embank-
ments, bridges, telegraph poles anj ever thing movable for a dls-
tance of twelve miles. The great steel bridges were taken from r
their foundations and piled up against the walls of the canyon.
Massive stone abutments crumbled and were carried away.
At Croz.er everything movable lncludins the station signal, tel- S
elegraph poies and box cars, were piled on the big steel bridge to $
the west of the station. i-
At Hackberry the pump house and machinery w-ere destroyed
and swept into the valley miles away. The big well was filled to 5
brim w,th debris. Houses high above all heretofore known high v
water marks were flooded and much damage was done. 4
Hundreds of men have been hurried to the washout by the San- ?
ta Fe, but it will be some time before the water subsides sufficient- 5
ly to allow the workment to reconstruct the roadbed and bridges. 5
Many miles of telegraph lines are down and It will take some time
for repairs. ' ?
?$ s ? ? i J -Jw. ;. s. s a ,
Santa Fe Train
1 Cuts Down Barber
FLAGSTAFF MAN IS INSTANTLY
KILLED BY A LIMITED
TRAIN.
, Thursday afternoon J. E. Wyjal left
his barber shop on Railroad aveiue m
flagstaff with his gun and do? for a
Sunt east of town, expecting to return
ijefore dark, says the Sun. Not rc-
Iurning his brother became anxious
s to his brother's safety and, with a
number of others. Joined In a search
for the hunter. The searchers could
find no trace of the missing man, al
though the country east of and ad
Joining town was thorji-ti'y search
ed.
About half-past ten Yaron Berg and
Bernard Wells, who were returnliijr to
Cliffs from Flagstaff on c velocipede
car, discovered the boiy of a man on
the Santa Fe track, in a cut about a
mile and a half east of the depot
They returned to Hagstaff and nolifl-
4 Agent Sullivan, who with a number
St others went to the l.laeo, Indicated
and the body pr.ifui to be that cf
Ed Wysal. He had evidently been
walking on the trac when stuck by
the westbound Iwn presumably the
limited.
His body was horribly mangled and
cut in three places. His gun, which
had not teen fired, was lying a short
distance to the west, and nis nat sev
eral feet in the opposite direction.
Coroner Qulnlan was notified and a
Jury summoned, who investigated the
afair and returned a verdict to the
effect that Wjgal met his death in an
accidental manner.
o
MEXICAN OFFICIAL ARRESTED.
Tn..nn aIi inlv SO. Gilbert Lar-
rea, director of the Federal Telegraph
company at Mazatlan. Mexico, was ar-i-octd
atiirdav. charged with the em
bezzlement of $13,117 of the funds of
his ofiice. HI defalcations nave ex
tended over a period of years
I.arrea is a man of prominence In
the State of Sinaloa.
v n Stiles and Garnett King, of
th traffic denartment of the E. P. &.
S. W., arrived yesterday to personally
conduct the big excursion to Douglas.
Mr. Stiles has been connected witn tne
E. P. & S. W for the past thirteen
years.
j. ,: s, $, S 4. 5S, 4 S - A - 3 3 S S - i S v s 5 $- y S J- ? ' i' 5 "i" 5 . " ? "S"
RETVISAN, TORPEDOED AT PORT ART HUR.
It has been found very difficult to smuggle out of Port Arthur photojraph3 of the crippled Russian $
vessels and the damaged portions of the town. The Retvlsan Is an armored cruiser of the first class, and
one of the most powerful vessels in the original Port Arthur fleet of the Russians. The vessel was tor-
pedoed weeks agoly Admiral Togo's fleet, and was beached by her captain Just inside the gateway to the
Inner Port Arthur harbor. She has never apparently been moved, and will doabt!e3s be blown up by the
Russians Just before the Japs capture Port Arthur from the land side. 1 ,
Wrought by
. a, s j s, s a, -s, ;, j : s. i s, . j
Battle Front Was
Nine Miles In Length
NEW
MINISTER OF INTERIOR
WILL BE COUNT
IGNATIEFF.
St. Petersburg, July 30. The report
ct Gen Zaroubaieff, which was given
out tonight, furnishes the first detail
ed account rece.ved here of the battle
of July 24, and leading up to the evac
uation of Ta Tche Kiao. the fruits of
which are already apparent in the oc
cupation of New Chwang by the Japs.
Gen. Zaroubaieff says that the attack
followed a Junction of the armies of
Gens. Oku and Nodzu. and that at
least two divisions, greatly superior In
number and guns, participated in the
assaults on the Russian position, which
was held by only eighteen bat'alions
over a front of nine miles.
The determined nature of the as
sault and the defense Is shown by the
fact that there was a continuous fight
of fifteen and a half hours, during
which the Russians held their posl
tlons.,retirlng,thenext day only in.tba
face'orthe advance ofthe whole of the
Japanese armies, consisting of more
than seven divisions.
Russian loss i3 estimated at 20 offi
cers and 3U0 men, and the Japanese
losses are estimated as "greater than
ours." This probably 13 correct. In
view of the fact that the Japanese oc
cupied the attacking positions.
Before the withdrawal of the Rus
sians, the report sajs, they captured
considerable small arms and ammuni
tion during four successful bayonet
charges, while the batteries, which
were excellently served, several times
silenced the Japanese artilley at ari-
ous points along the fighting line.
o
Von Plehve's Successor.
London, July 30. A special dispatch
from St. Petersburg to the Agencie
Russ says that Count Ignatleff will
succeed the late Von Plehve as Minis
ter of the Interior.
o
H. M. Woods embarked for Tomb
stone yesterday, but was forced to
turn hack at N'aco on account of the
washouts.
ft
L. A. Nemick. of the old Alhambra
firm of N'emick & Thomas, has pur
chased the entire interest of Mr. Thom
as, and will conduct the business alone
in the future.
SAN PEDRO
BRIDGES
GONE
RIVER HIGHEST STAGE YESTER
DAY IN RECOLLECTION OF
OLDEST INHABITANT.
HEAVIEST FL00D YET
Doubtful If Train From Benson Will
Arrive in Bisbee Before Monday S.
p. Branch to Noga'es Tied Up All
Bridges on San Pedro Washed Away.
No trains arrived in this city yester
day from Benson, and according to re
ports received late last night it is
doubtful whether any tra.n nill arrive
fiom the west before Monday.
The heaviest flood known in this
section swept down the San Pedro on
yesterday, and the passenger train
bound for El Paso from Benson was
caught between Fairbank and Lewis
Springs, and forced to return to the
latter station and tie up. In the mean
time the big bridge across the San Pe
dro below Fairbank, ca which the train
had crossed a few minutes before, was
swept away, aud the passengers found
themselves water bound at Fairbank.
During the day the Tombstone train
made a special run to Fairbank, and
most of the passesngers went to Tomb
stone, where they spent the night.
It is reported that yesterday at 3
o'clock a mile of track between Fair
bank and Lewis Springs was under
water. Several stretches of irack are
gone in this vicinity, and must be re
paired before the pile driver can reach
the big bridge on the San Pedro. The
S. P. bridge on the Nogales branch i3
also gone, but the big steel bridge on
the main line of the S. P., at Benson,
has so far withstood the floods.
The Huachuca band, which was bill
ed for a concert In Bisbee last even
ing,, failed to arrive, but wevt to
Tombstone. Three hacks were cent -to
Tombstone-last night""bytheT3owen'H',r"
& Henderson stables to bring the band
to this city, where they will arrive tils
morning to take the excursion train
for Douglas, where the big celebration
will be held as advertised.
Excursion trains will run from Bis
bee and Naco, and will leave Bisbee
for Douglas at 9:20 this morning. Ten
passenger coaches were In the yards
last evening for the purpose of carry
ing the excursionists to the smelter
city.
President of Columbia
Declared a Traitor
PRESIDENT-ELECT FACES SAME
CHARGE REBELLION IS
RAMPANT IN BOGOTA.
Colon, Colombia, July 30. News
from the coast of Cartagena says ru
mors are In circulation of an uheav
al in Bogota. President Marroquln
and President-Elect Reyes are, rumor
3ays, declared to be traitors, and con
gress has been closed.
The town is frantic, and the people
of Cartagena are anxiously awaiting
confirmation of the rumors.
1
; i
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A
nik.A!
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