OCR Interpretation


Bisbee daily review. [volume] (Bisbee, Ariz.) 1901-1971, August 26, 1904, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024827/1904-08-26/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

V9
I
I 4
VjN6." -. aus. 25. Forecast
. Arizona: Fair In south, thun
A der storma in north Prlday. Sat
M unlay fair, warmer,?
BISBEE DAILY REVIEW;
THE METAL MARKET.
New York, Aug. 25. Silver. C7
l-4c; Mexican dollars, 45 l-4c.
Copper, quiet and unchanged.
!S
i I
Sg;$38KKKttXa
.4$J$'$$5$
REGULAR MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
VOL. VIII
BISBEE, ARIZONA, FRIDAY MORNING, AUGUST 26, 1904.
NO. 93
Ii
TO GET THK NWS ALL OF THE NEWS YOU'LL HAVE TO READ THE REVIEW IT ALL" THERE.
ARCHBISHOP IRELAND.
Archbishop Ireland, of St. Paul, is one of the hosts who entertain Card
1nal Satolli during his present visit to the United States. Archbishop
Ireland has been mentioned as the probable recipient of the Red Hat should
another Cardinal fie created in America. -
Providence Surely Has It In
For the Santa Fe Road
AFTER STARTING THE DELAYED PASSENGER TRAINS FROM
WHERE THEY HAD BEEN HELD UP AT ASHFORK AND
SELIGMAN, BACK TO DEMING TO DETOUR TO CALIFOR
NIA BY WAY OF SOUTHERN PACIFIC, THE TRAINS
AGAIN ENCOUNTER CLOUDBURST AND WASHOUT ON EL
PASO BRANCH, AND NOW THEY ARE UNABLE TO MOVE.
WOMEN AND CHILDREN SICK TEN CARS OF U. S MAIL
DELAYED.
(Special to Review.)
Albuquerque, N. M., Aug. 25. After
moving east 250 miles to detour by
way of New Mexico, the west bound
overland -Santa Fe trains that were
stalled in Arizona for several days ow
ing to washouts, have met with anoth
er obstruction at this end. During
heavy rains this afternoon large wash
outs occurred at Isletta, thirteen miles
south of here on the El Paso branch
of the Santa Fe railroad. Five of the
JArIzona storm bound trains arrived at
'Albuquerque from Seligman and Ash
fork this afternoon. They were to go
to California, by way of Deming, on
the Southern Pacific. The Cuthbert
Canadian party, which left Seligman
at 2 o'clock, passed the fresh damage
safely. Another train with sixteen
cars started toward Deinlng at 4 p.
in., but half an hour.later encountered
EXODUS FROM ZEIGLER.
IMPORTED MEN DISSATISFJED
WITH CONDITIONS CLAIM
THE WERE DECEIVED.
Duquoln, Aug. 25. Exodus of miners
from Zeigler evidently produces no ef
fect on Lelter's determination to oper
ate his mines on a non-union basis.
Parties of men are daily deserting the
town because of dissatisfaction with
the condition of affairs. Within the
last week nearly 100 miners have ef
fected their release in one way or an
other. Of the contingent of Pennsylvania
men Imported Thursday, thirty-two In
number, twenty-seven yesterday de
serted, and, on being refused transpor
tation, were compelled to walk to this
city, sixteen miles dlstanL "being fur
nished with the necessary funds by lo
Two More of the Czar's Boats
- Go Below to Meet the Others
' Tokio, Aug. 25. Two Russian torpe
do boat destroyers slruckra mine at
the entrance of Port Arthur last even
ing. The largest one of the destroy
ers, a four funneled one, was sunk. The
names of the vessels and number of
lives lost Is unknown.
a washout nearly 300 feet long. Sand
at this point Is washed from under the
track, and as water is flooding the road
bed in other sectfons it will be Impos
sible to move a train until repairs are
made. The big train was backed into
Albuquerque, and here the weary trav
elers are again to be delayed indefinite
ly. It is not known at this time what
will be done to move the delayed pas
sengers to their destination.
The roadbed is badly crippled in
many points in western Arizona. Pas
sengers are making requests to be sent
over the Santa Fe to Denver and
transferred to the roads that will take
them to their homes. There are many
sick among the women and children
passengers, who have occupied the
chair cars and tourist coaches for a
week. Ten cars U. S. mail are delay,
ed on these trains.
cal miners.
Accompanied by local officials of the
Mine Workers' Union, they appeared
before an attorney and swore to affi
davits against Ldter for misrepresenta
as they, had been promised, they learn
ed that Letter Intended that they do
mine work, to which they objected.
Yesterday afternoon, a few moments
before train time, a number of Italians,
unable to speak English, made an ef
fort to escape from the stockade, but
were prevented from doing so by the
guards. -
Between 150 and 200 tons of coal are
beUng mined, diliyj though the output
will bc:greatly Increased when the
mine Is.farfuTI'operatiori-There are now
In' Zeigler about 200 men.
o
On Legal Business Alex Bryan and
Tom Lyons leave this morning for
Tombstone, where they go on legal bus
iness. Paris, Aug. 25. A"n official dispatch
from Shanghai says th'e Askold and
Grozovol have disarmed. The authori
ties here are awaiting similar notice
from Saigon of the disarmament of the
Il.ana. The French officials are much
relieved at the avoidance of dangerous
possibilities at Shanghai.
DEMOCRATIC
CENTRAL
COM.
MET YESTERDAY IN BISBEE AND
TRANSACTED BUSINESS
QUICKLY.
DOUGLAS PICKS PLUM
And Secures the County Convention.
Most Businesslike Meeting, Promptly
Executed Marcus A. Smith Is En.
dorsed for Arizona's Delegate to
Congress.
It was a businesslike meeting. What
was to be done was done with a snap
and a vim that betokened the confi
dence that is Impressed upon the coun
tenances of every acth e Democrat this
year whether interested locally or na
tionally in the success of the ticket for
which they stand. There was no bick
ering, no hauling, but promptly at 11:30
the Cochise Democratic Central com
mittee came to order ta the parlors of
the Copper Queen Hotel in Bisbee and
went through with what was to be done
by the committee as though it was a
regular daily transaction.
The meeting was called to order by
M. J. Cunningham, who acted as chair
man, and James Henderson was chosen
as secretary pro tem., and these offi
cers acted throughout the meeting.
Upon motion of C. F. Nichols, sec
onded by John J. Bowen, a committee
of three was appointed on credentials,
and during a receS3 of fifteen minutes
the committee retired, examined the
credentials and returned with their re
port, which, upon motion, was accept
ed.
Those present were: I C. Shat
tuck, R. E. Kohler, J. E. Hendersbn,
Jame3 Letson, Geo. M. Porter, J. C. Cal-
laghan, W. B. Kelly. John J. Bow-en M.
J. Cunningham, Richard 'Humphrey, C.
F. Nichols, A. S. Rellly, L. A. Smith, C.
M. McKean.
The following were represented iy
proxies:
M. J. Cunningham for B. A. Packard,
George Dunn, W. C. Read and Henry
W. Etz.
Harry Jennings for J. E. Brophy.
F. A. Sutter for Sid Harris.
N. E. Bailey for B. J. O'Reilly.
Geo. H. Kelly for J. W. Steven3.
C. A. Taylor for L V. McCourt. .
John Imslend for J. P. I.arrleu.
J. T. Ross for J. H. Tevis.
With the committee now In full work
ing order a motion was made by C. F.
Nichols, duly seconded by R. Humph
rey,, that a committee of five be ap
pointed to apportion the delegates
througbout the county to the county
convention, and the chair appointed
Geo. H. Kelly, C. M. McKean, L. C.
Shattuck, N. E. Bailey and James Let
son, and at this point a motion was
made to take a recess until 1:30 p.
m. for dinner.
At 1:30 p. m. the committee was
again called to order and the last com
mittee presented Its report as follows:
Bisbee, Ariz., Aug. 25, 1904.
To the Chairman and Members of the
Democratic Central County Commit
tee: We, your committee on apportion
ment, beg to submit the following re
port on the apportionment of delegates
to the county convention, based on the
yoteast for Hon. J. F. Wilson for del
egate to congress in the last election
one delegate being allowed for each
fifteen votes cast. We have deemed
It just that each voting precinct be rep
resented, and have therefore allowed
such precincts one delegate where the
vote did not reach the required num
ber of fifteen.
(Signed.)
L. C. SHATTUCK,
GEO. H. KELLY,
JAMES LETSON.
CHAS. M. M'KEAN,
N. E. BAILEY.
The report of the committee was inv.
mediately adopted, and will give the
precincts a total representation in the
county convention of one hundred and
eight votes, apportioned as follows:
Tombstone 10
nisbee 41
Naco and Osborne :. 10
Douglas 15
Hereford . ., 2
Carr's Canyon 1
West and Fort Huachuca 1
Fairbank ' 1
Curtis .... 1
St David 2
Benson 4
Johnson . ... 1
Cochise 1
Dos Cabesas . 1
San Simon 1
Rucker 1
Gieason 2
Eagle City 1
San Bernardino 1
WIllcox 3
Teviston .- ".. 1
Paradise 1
Pearce .....; 4
More Devastation Is
Wrought by Cloud Bursts
and Washouts in Tonopah
. THE WIDE SPREAD DESOLATION IN NORTHERN ARIZONA
DURING THE PAST WEEK HAS MOVED OVER INTO NEVA-
DA THIS TIME TONOPAH IS STORMSWEPT TRACK IS
WASHED AWAY AND UNDER WATER FOR MILES GREAT
CHASMS WASHED IN THE DESERT TRAFFIC ENTIRELY
SUSPENDED PROVISIONS RUNNINB SHORT, AND WAG
ON TRAINS DOING BEST THEY CAN TO RUSH IN FOOD
SUPPLIES.
I
Redo, Nev., Aug. 25. Cloudbursts
and washouts along the lines of the
Tonopah and Carson and Colorado rail
roads Is. the most disastrous in the his
tory of these districts. On the Tono
pah road all the track rebuilt after the
last washouts have been swept away,
aud it will be aweek at least before
any traffic can be moved.
At Walker Lake, near Hawthorne,
the track Is under three feet of water
for nearly four miles, and the lake 13
rising above its level from three to
nine feet. Great chasms have been
washed in the desert, and traffic Is in a
Extraordinary Is This
Statement by Premier
London, Aug. 25. Premier Ua'iour
announced this evening tat the Brit
ish government had ordered two cruis
ers from the s.quadron at Cape of
Coo Hope to locale the Russian vol
urjear steamers Smolensk-and Peters
burg and convey to them the orders
of the Russian government that they
must not further interfere with neu
tral shipping. The premier stated that
this action was taken at the request' of
the Russian government.
This extraordinary statement was
made when the premier by appoint
ment received a deputation of the Lon
don Chamber of Commerce.
Black Diamond 1
Wilger's 1
Total ., 10S
J. P. Callaghan and C. F. Nichols, a
committee appointed to report upon the
manner In which the delegates should
be chosen, reported that where a com
mitteeman resided within the precinct,
he should appoint the delegates, and
where there was no member of the
committee the selection should be by
mas3 meeting.
Upon motion of C. F. Nichols the date
for holding the primaries was set for
September 10, and the date for hold
ing the county convention September
24th.
On motion of Geo. H. Kelly, and sec
anded by C. F. Nichols, the place of
meeting for the county convention wa3
chosen, and Douglas carried off the
plum.
C. F. Nichols moved that a commit
tee be appointed to select the thirty
delegates to the territorial convention,
and when the same was carried, the
chair.appdnted W. B. Kelly, J. P. Cal
laghan, C. F. Nichols, C. W. McKean
and N. E. Bailey, and a recess of fifteen
minutes was taken to enable the com
mittee just appointed to perform the,
duty assigned them
The committee reported as follows '.
Your committee on apportionment
and selection of delegates from Cochise
county to the territorial convention (in
Phoenix, September 15, beg leave to
submit the following:
Tombstone, three: S. A. D. Upton,
J. C. Callaghan and Martin Costello.
Bisbee, twelve: L. C. Shattuck, W.
B. Kelly-, F. A. Sutter, Chas. Strong, M.
J. Cunningham, J. S. Taylor, Mike Han-
non, S.'J. Ford, James Letson, J. J.
Bowen, Harry Barkdoll and C. A. Mc
Donald.
Naco, three: B. A- Packard, N. E.
Bailey. B. J. O'Reilly.
Douglas, five: Geo. H. Kelly, C. A.
Taylor, C. F. Nichols, William Dawson,
J. M. Sparks.
Hereford, one: F. B. Moson.
St. DavVd and Fairbank, one: A. H.
Wien.
Wilcox and Dos Cabesas, one: L. V.
McCourt.
Teviston and Paradise, one: Capt.
J. H. Tevis.
Pearce, Black Diamond, Wilger's,
Rucker and Gieason, one: C. M. Mc
Kean.
The report of the committee was
unanimously adopted.
W, B. Kelly then offered the follow
ing resolution, which wa3 unanimous
ly adopted: "
"Resolved, That the Democrats of
(Continued on Page Eight)
state of chaos.
Tonopah and Goldfields, which are oa
the verge of starvation, are being tem
porarily relieved by wagon trains, but
this 13 only temporary, as over five
thousand people must be fed In the dif
ferent camps, and extraordinary meas
ures must be .taken for their relief.
Food supplies at camp are practically
exhausted, and only canned goods re
main. While the situation is critical
and much suffering must be endured.
It lie. linnail ta mOvt foir Have Till! r!nS
I about better conditions. No lives have
been lost.
At a meeting of the Chamber of
Commerce the above committee wa3
appointed was appointed, and a letter
prepared, addressed to Lord Lands
downe, m which It was stated that the
continuance of the present system was
having a disastrous effect on shipping,
and wa3 causing Irreparable damage to
the whole course of trade with Japan
and the Far EasL The letter further
said that the commercial community
would welcome any measure, however
stringent, that might be necessary to
place British commerce on the same
footing with that of other non-belligerent
countries and in the treatment of
so-called contraband of war.
A DELIGHTFUL SERENADE.
The Copper Queen Band Generously
Remembers Grateful Friends.
Last everiing the Copper Queca
Band, rejuvenated and reorganized un
der the leadership of Professor Win
stein as director, called at the business
office of tho Review and tendered the
paper a most enjoyable serenade. The
boys have taken a fresh grip on the
music problem of Bisbee, In which of
late It must be said they have been
somewhat lax. This the Review at
tributes to the infrequency with which
they appear in public. Though they
may indulge in private practice much
or little, if they appear on St. Pat
rick's Day, the Fourth of July and La
bor Day, that (is not enough, for the
people would gladly support a good
band In Bisbee, and the Copper Queen
Band is composed of material that will
make a reputation If they seize the
opportunity.
A number Of thp hnva AU o-rtoTTant
musicians to the writer's knowledge.
Nothing advertises a town mnn than
a good band and the course Professor
wmstan Is pursuing Is just what Is
needed, namely, to have the band ap
pear frequently In public, permitting
the-citizens, of Bisbee to mark their
progress, keeping them constantly be
fore the public eye, and It begets con
fidence among the players.
The Review bees to return Ifa fhanV-c:
to the director and his band for the en
tertainment or last evening, and In
dies mem to can again.
r0. ioa '.'
May Return Douhls P: , u-.wt i
expected home tomorrow' from his trip
east ana to the Catalfna Islands.'
Among his friends there Is some specu
lation aS tO Whether h will return
alone or with a better half. That
matrimony was among the possibilities
attendant upon the trip was auoiig
rumors current when Mr. Henkel loft
the city.
Loss of. Life at Port Arthur
Running Into Appalling Figures
Chee Foo, Aug. 25. Russian advices
received here say that the Japanese
assaults on Port Arthur of August 21
and 22 were Tepulsed with tremendous
losses. This Information says also
that the Japanese attempt to capture
Fort No. 1 cost the Jap3 10,000 men,
and that thdr attack on Fort Eeteshan
THE MINER
SAYS IT'S
EASY
MUNROE BELIEVES HE HAS VIC
TORY CINCHED TO
NIGHT. JFFFRIES SAYS NOT SO
Jeffries Is Equally Confident, and
Says He Is Not Going to Take Any
Chances Trying Any Fancy and Dan
gerous Punches.
San Francisco, Aug. 25. Both Jef
fries and Munroe are ready for tha
sound of the gong tomorrow night.
Ea;h one expresses himself as flL-anJ
confident of winning.
Champion Jeffries made thi3 state
ment: .., ;
"Thi3 Is all poppycock to say lUat
this other fellow is a pudding. He Is
big and strong, and on one cat: tell
what will happen when he gets Into
the ring. I don't want to win on a
dangerous punch it I can win easier on
a decision. I am not going to fake auy
chances for the sake of winning ta a
certain number of rounds."
Munroe said: " ""
"I am glad the hard work Is over,
and I am in as good shape a3 It is pos
sible to be. I am confident of win
ning, notwithstanding the odds and the
way the public look at It."
TEN ROUNDS SAYS JEFFRIES.
JIM THINKS MUNROE WILL NOT
LAST LONGER THAN
TEN.
San Francisco, Aug. 25. Although
Jeffries 13 very reticent and seldom
talk? to any reporter about his plans,
and the night before he left Harbin the
champion relaxed and said:
"Well, I think I'm in good condition
to go ten fast rounds, and If the fight
lasts to twenty L ought to be in shapo
for that."
His expression said certainly that he
didn't think tt would go beyond ten.
From what "Jeff has let drop to his
trainers it !3 evident that he is mad
clean through against Munroe, but
chiefly against Pollock, who Intimated
when "Jeff" had a sore knee that the
fchamplon was afraid of the nflner.
Then, too. all of "Jeff's" backers are
j betting that the fight will not last be-
yona ten rounos. so "Jell" may be
counted on to take the aggressive.
Jeffries has notified the club people
that he doesn't care whether the-e 13
! $1,000 or $30,000 in the house on the
night of the fight, and that he will re
main away from San Francisco until
the night of the contest. The ttg
boiler-maker weighs about 220 pounds,
and will enter the ring welghipyf 216
pounds.
Munroe, who has been carefully
coached by Kid McCoy, Is looking re
markably well, and says that his
health was never better. The wily
McCoy says that the miner pugilist
has 'improved wonderfully since his
meeting with Tom Sharkey, and that
he will furnish pugilistic experts with a
surprise when he faces Jeffries in the
Yosemite Club's arena Friday night.
McCoy points out that Munroe Js a
stronger and more youthful man than
any of Jeffries' recent opponents.
Working in the mines for year3, McCoy
says, has made Munroe a strong, rug
ged fellow, and he believes that if the
miner does not have an attack of stage
fright whence faces the champion the
pugilistic crown will change hands on
Friday night.
Football Players. All the members
of last season's football team and any.
candidates for a place thereon are re
quested to meet at the Bisbee gymna
sium this evening at 7 o'clock for the
purpose of organization. Cananea,
Clifton, Douglas, the University of
Tucson, Phoenix. Indians and the Nor
mals, who were the champions of the
season of 1903-1904, are desirous of
meeting Bisbee. This will make a
fine circuit, and from the reputation
Bisbee enjoyed in the past in the foot
ball arena she should be able to put up
the material that would make these
clubs "go way back and take a rear
seat"
resulted In their losing 3000 men killed
or wounded. Port Dalny Is said to be
filled with wounded men. The Japan
ese are hiring laborers here for serv
ice on the Llao Tung peninsula. It Is
reported that the Japanese are obtain
ing provisions through the Port ot
Wei-Hal-We!.
A -rSv-i
SsasuLT
asBWKSJT,
.
?vL. &;.
matmnmssL'H S"M5S!SSSffPiWiWilBBSL
TTMSBafMMtF . J . .SJMBKi. T MT" fl
at -w
Sr'-"-- .-j "kuk&h&b&4P J&k

xml | txt