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Bisbee daily review. [volume] (Bisbee, Ariz.) 1901-1971, March 16, 1905, Image 1

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BISBEE DAILY REVIEW
New York. March 10. Silver,
58 Wc; Mexican dollars. 45 3-ic.
Copper, firm, 13 3-S131-2c.
t i.i. u in Vnra.
NIVEP.SITY CLUB ft nUl
if. &i. & &). jj.jvj3lv
REGULAR MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
BISBEE, ARIZONA, THURSDAY MORNING, MARCH 16, 1905.
VOL. VIII
NO. 259
LEGIS ATURE IS TORN
IN
THREAT THAT NO APPROPRIATION BILL WILL PASS
BILLS OF SWEEPING IMPORTANCE LOCKED
IN GOHHITTEES SIDCKHEH EXPECT VICTORY
llllP.lllSl!'.!'.!ltt'5''.''.,!,t,',s,',1,;,"i'i,""f
Phoenix. Ariz., March15. A memorial passed by the House to-
day petitions' Congress to Fay legislators $10 per day.
The Bark registration bill was killed in the Council by a vote
ot si xto six. The educational qualification for voters was killed In
the House.
t The live stock bill occupied the House for two hours. It will
not pass as amended by the Council.
The appropriation bill, which passed the House tonight, author
izes the Board of Control to expend $3,000 in safeguarding the city
from Cave Creek, $5,000 in search of artesian water at Benson, $20,-
000 for the Reform School, $15,0rt0 for the Historical Society, and
$13,50u lor clerk hire besides the regular expense of admlntstra-
tior.
.
Phoenix, Ariz., March 15, 11:45 p. ni. forced to listen to his tirades on every-
The night before the fast day of the body and everything in general.
Legislature finds the House and Couu- The insult to the Council came dur
cil deadlocked over-the appropriation ' ing a time when Hon. Mike Nugent
bill. At eight o'clock tonight In the had been invited to appear before the
House, Bailey, of Cochise, under whip
and spur, passed the general appropriu
tion bill. It will make its appearance
in the Council the first thing tomor
row. The Council will promptly re
fuse to pass the measure as it conies
lrom the Hoiise. Then will come the
conference committees and a long
drawn out wrangle. There are threats
on both sides tonight, that there will
he no general appropriation bill pass
ed at this session, but tomorrow will
probably bring a more dispassionate
view of the matter.
The stock law consumed most of the
time in the House today. The bill has
for its purpose the codification of the
present laws. Its hearing will be re
sumed tomorrow at 10 o'clock. Cat
tlemen here tonight from .Cochise
county say the bill will pass both
houses tomorrow.
The legislature just drawing to a
close will go down in history as'a body
which believes in letting -well enough
alone.
Bills of wide sweeping importance
such as anti-gambling, bullion tax,
mine inspector, primary election law,
etc.. tonight remain locked in commit
lee rooms where. In all probability
ihey will remain until the close of the
-session. The bill allowing residents
of Arizona temporarily in Mexico on
business, to vote in Arizona, has pass
cd both houses and is now In the hands
-of the governor. It is expected it will
nrccelve a pocket veto.
The sensation of the House Tuesday
was the speech of Bailey, of Cochise,
in which he arraigned his colleague,
Neville, for an attack made on Bailey,
-charging him with being the special
representative of corporations. Bailey
spoke for more than two hours, and
raked Neville fore and aft, charging
him with insincerity and demagogy
liiroughoui the entire session, anil
"having made assertions o nthe floor of
the House in reference to Cochise
county tha could not be sustained by
ithc facts.
Neville deliberately insulted the
Council as a body, on the floor of the
House, by terming 'that body a band
of grafters. All through the session
this member from Cochise has heaped
abuse of the vilest sort upon Individ'
uals here and in his own county,' and
is detested for "his petty spite work
2iot only by members of the legisla
ture, but by the citizens of the Territo
ry at large, who have been present dur
lng sessions of Che legislature
and
CAMPBELL NAMED JUDGE
BY PRESIDENT IN NOMINATION
FOR NEW ARIZONA SEAT
"Washington, March 15. The Presi
dent today nominated John H. Camp
bell, at present Assistant United
States Attorney .for Arizona, to bo an
Associate Justice in the Territory. The
.position is that created by Congress
Just prior to adJournmcnL
Judge Camp"beil was for several
.years identified with the department
of justice here, and won a enviable
reputation for integrity and ability
among those who came in contact witn
him. In February he came to he
city from Arizona to urge the previa
ion for the office that-ie has beea ap
pointed to, and made so forceful a pre
sentation of the need of Arizona for
the Increased service that he succeed'
edjin...carrylgiif8poInt, though sot
WITH DISSENSIONS
ITS CLOSING HOUR
House on a bill affecting Yuma coun
ty. Nugent represents luma county
in the Council, and is a pioneer of the
territory. The President of the Coun
ell today denounce Neville for his un
called for attacks.
Phoenix, March 15. The freight
rate and fare bill, introduced by Mr.
;Neal, promises to result in a lively dis
cussion. While there is general ad
mission that passenger and freight
rates are pretty steep in the territory
and that reduction might be made to
the advantage of the public and with
out hurt to the railroads, when it
comes to a vote it will bo a source Of
surprise If the Influence of the rail
roads Is nut felt In instance of present
rates. It is understood the Southern
Pacific and Santa Fe will combine
forces to fight the issue.
A bill by Mr. Cobb- to change the
time of electing precinct officers, so
thatTthey will be elected at different
times than county officersV-ls before
the House.
A bill reducing the number of jurors
in misdemeanor cases from twelve to
six was turned down by the Council.
H. B. No. S4, by Sir. Neal, was also
killed in the upper house.
Mr. Bristol's bill relating to the
filling of vacancies in town councils,
was slightly .amended and passed. The
amendment was concurred in by the
House. Mr. Tlmmons" bill providing
for the bonding of Yuma county for a
court house was amended and passed.
It is somewhat doubtful If the House
will concur in the amendment.
The suggestion of the governor, rec
ommending that a bill be introduced
relative t othe joint statehood question,
is approved by all. This bill pro-
videsxlhat an election shall be held, at
a lime to be designated by the gover
nor, to vote upon the question of
whetner joint statehood wouid he pre
ferrable to the present condition.
The House, by holding sessions ear
ly and late,- has been able to dispose
of many bills recently. Among those
passod are the following:
H. B. No. G8, by Mr. Pickrell, provid
ing that the records of county treasur
ers and county school superintend
ents be kept in account books specially
ruled and printed for the purpose, such
books to be uniform all over the Ter
ritory. H. B. No. 125, by Mr. Wilson, provid
ing a salary of $25 a month for clerks
of school boards, in districts having an
average attendance of 750 pupils.
until the very last was it considered In
the least possible that the new judge
ship woula be created.
Jndge Campbell, since the creation
by Congress of the new judgeship, Tias
been considered throughout Arizona
as the logical man to ffil the important
post, both from the point of acquaint
ance with the needs of the Territory
and ability to fill these as well as from
the fact that his splendid -efforts at the
capital stemmed the tide that .was op
crating against granting or the mnch
needed new judicial district. In Bis
"bee, as wel as In cvery'other quarter
of the territory, many friends will ex
tend to .Judge, Campbell'the congfat
illations fiat are his due.
3S33S$0""&3
FATAL ACCIDENT AT CAN
ANEA. Cananea, March 13. Fran
cisco Bertram, employed at tho
Puertecltos mine, was Instant
ly killed yesterday morning, by
the explosion of a dynamite
charge which he was preparing
near a Are. His body was hor
ribly mangled.
One of the Mexican laborers
at the smelter got in the way
of the huge electric crane yes
terday afternoon and was
crushed to a pulp.
$38&3&S$$$
o
BANKER GONE; DEBTS $143,000
Warrant for E. E. Snyder of Oline Is
in Hands of Officers.
Des Moines, March 15. E. E. Sny
der, the Oline banker who made an
assignment last December, has left
here, and his whereabouts Is un
known. A warrant has been issued
for his arrest, but when an attempt
was made to serve it the departure
of Snyder and his wife was disclosed.
The 'completed report of Snyder's
liabilities shows debts amounting to
$143,000, most of which were bank
deposits. The creditors and those
having claims against Snyder will
not receive more than 10 to 15 cents
on the dollar.
WAR ON $1,000,000 TO HARVARD
Heirs of William F. Milton Prepare
to Contest the Will.
Pittsfield, Mass., March 15. It is
said today on good authority that
there is likely to be a contest over
the will of William F. Milton, by
which Harvard University is to re
ceive $1,000,000. It is stated rela
tives of the testator are not satisfied
to have Harvard receive such a lega
cy, and they will contest the validity
of the will in the courts.
OVERTURNS OLD ' -
CANCER THEORIES
BERLIN SCIENTISTS DECLARE
THE DISEASE NEITHER PAR
ASITIC NOR CONTAGIOUS.
No Ground for Assumption That Can
cer Is on Increase-! The Apparent
Growth of Disease Due to Better
Ability to Make Diagnosis.
Berlin. March K. Professor Jo
hannes Orth, successor of Virchow in
the chair of pathology at Berlin Un
ivcrslty, and one of the noted pathol
ogists of the world, created conster
nation in the Berlin Medical Society
last nicht by the declaration that
cancer Is neither parasitic nor con-
facrinus. Professor Hansemann,
quite the equal of Professor Orth as
a scientist, agreed fully with Profes
sor Orth's statements. This declara
tion, in the foremost scientific body
in the world, came as the revival of
an old theory, buried years ago by
Vlrchow, Niemeyer, Billroth and oth
ers. Professor Orth himself assisting
at the obsequies.
Professor Orth asserted that there
was no good ground forthe assump
tion that cancer was on the Increase
or that it was contagious, evmn to the
slightest degree. The apparent In
crease in the number of cases, he
held, was due to a better ability to
make a diagnosis, many cases in the
old days going to their graves undei
some mistaken diagnosis. Both he
and Professor Hansemann said their
exhaustive investigations permitted
them to state that the disease is nev
er unduly prevalent in particular lo
calities, inferring infection or conta
gion, and likewise that it is never
specially prevalent in certain fami
lies, as indicatng heredity.
o
SENTENCED FOR FRAUDS
Men Convicted at Denver Sent to the
Penitentiary.
Denver, March 15. Judge Booth M.
Malone-today sentenced Peter Miller
and Michael Doud, found guilty of
stealing 318 ballots at the November
election and substituting others for
them, each to three to five years'
imprisonmenL The judge character
ized the crime a treason and said the
persons who paid for such work were
worse than those who performed the
act.
o
NEW ANTHRACITE SCALE
Mitchell to Go to Pennsylvania
Avert Renewal of Fight.
to
Indianapolis, March 15. President
John Mitchell of the mine workers'
national v organization r is preparing
for an extended trip through the
Pennsylvania anthracite region next
month. 'He will confer with repre
sentatives of the locals as to the poli
cy that will be pursued next year.
The wage scale agreement that was
signed as a compromise after the
strike of 1902 will expire a. year from
next April, and It is feared that a
similar agreement will not be ef
fected. To meet this contingency
the miners" organizations are at work
collecting funds that may be instant
ly available a strike cannot be
averted. President Mitchell will
see President Barr and officials of
the coal road.
o
OKLAHOMA BANK CLOSED
Lawton Institution
Is Placed In the
Hands of
a Receiver.
Lawton, Oklahoma, March 15. The
Bank of Lawton. capital $100,000, con
trolled by McDuffle Bros, of this city,
closed Its doors today and has been
placed In the hands of Paul F. Coop
er as receiver. The city had $25,000
on deposit in the bank. J. S. McDuf
fle, the cashier is also the. city treas
urer. Lisbon, Ohio, March 15. Shilling
& Co., private bankers, of Colum
biana assigned today to Charles E.
Smith, former county treasurer. The
assets and liabilities are not given.
but the proprietors declare they ex-f
pect to pay dollar for dollar.
o
CNSTRUCTION MAN RESIGNS.
Mr. Horton, for Some Time With C.
A., Takes Up Private Interests.
Announcement was made yesterday
by IL K. Horton that he had lesigned
from the post of superintendent of
construction and civil engineer with
the C. & A., a position he has held for
about a year and a half. The resigna
tion becomes effective on the 20th ot
this month. Who. Mr. Horton's sue
cessor will be is not ret known.
The occasion for his resignation is
slated by Mr. Horton to be private
mining interests which he is nolong-
er able to look after properly, and at
the same time continue the duties he
has had with theC. & A. It is his
purpose to devote his full time in the
future to his own interests. The lat
ter are in both Warren district and
Sonora, and are said to comprise som
very promising prospects.
new riinTiiuN '
ON REEO SMOOT
MOTHERS' CONGRESS PLANS RE
NEWAL OF EFFORT TO OUST
UTAH SENATOR.
Want to Force Prompt Action and
to that End Will Demand Report
From the Elections Committee
Which Investigated the Case.
Washington, Mar. 15. Reed Smoot,
senator from Utah, and the Senate
committee on privileges and elec
tions, will be the target at which
the Mothers' Congress, now In ses
sion here, will aim its' darts. The
Mothers' Congress was one of the or-
ganizations which started the move-
menl against the seating of Apostle
Smoot on th ground that he was a
Mormon; that the Mormon church
still countenanced polygamy, and that
its teachings placed polygamy high
er than the Constitution of the Unit
ed States. Proceedings were brought
against Apostle Smoot, but he was
permitted to take his seat.
Then an effort was made by the
women of the countryto unseat him.
The committee on privileges and
elections held hearings through two
sessions of Congress, and the case
was closed long ago, but the commit
tee has not acted. A majority of the
members believe the ca3e against
Senator Smoot was made out, and
that he is not entitled to his seat,
but they are not disposed to go to
the extreme of unseating a senator.
There has been talk of further in
vestigations, but it is becoming clear
to the counsel for the Mothers' Con
gress that the Senate does not mean
to act, and that Mr. Smoot will be
permitted to serve out his term. All
the energy of the congress now in
session will be directed toward forc
ing the Senate committee to report
the case to the Senate, and then
forcing the Senate to unseat Apos
tle Smoot
o
CIRCUS IN APRIL.
Floto Aggregation Will Pitch Tents at
Lowell.
W. A. Faris In advance of the Floto
circus was in the city yesterday to ar
range for performances of his show
here and at Douglas. The BIsbce
date will be April 5th.
Mr. Faris yesterday secured ground:
for his tents at Lowell, where the per
formances icr Bisbee will be given.
Special train service has. been arrang
ed for with the E. P. & S.-Wfor the
occasion. The Floto clrcusjwfconics
highly spoken of,-and willr" doubtless
play to big audleh"ce3iat IheHlBIsheo
stand. . j
FORCED JAPS BACK
DO RUSSIANS
BELOW TIE PASS
JAPANESE HURLED BACK WITH HEAVY LOSS
INTEREST TURNS TO NAVAL MOVEMENTS
LONDON BELIEF IN NEARNESS OF PEACE
- at tt K n
(ASSOCIATED PRESS SUMMARY.)
' Meager reports have been received from Russian sources of a
fight eight mlles south of Tie Pa between the Russian force under
Gen. Mischenko and a Japanese column, the identity of which is un
known. Tho Japanese were repulsed, it is said, with a loss of 1000
killed.
The rumor that after the fall of Mukden eighty foreigners. In
cluding an American newspaper correspondent, were murdered by
Chinese, is discredited by the fact that the correspondent In question
reporttd to his paper on March 14, that he had been captured by the
Japanese, and was being taken to Kobe.
Steamers arriving at Singapore report having passed a squadron
of 22 Japanese warships about twenty miles east of tho entrance to
the straits of Malacca. Two Japanese cruisers nnd two auxiliary
cruisers previously arrived at Singapore. Presumably these vessels
are on the way westward In search of the Russian Second Pacific
Squadron, last reported In Madaga ear waters.
NAVAL DEVELOPMENTS ARE
NOW CENTER OF INTEREST.
London, March 15. A dispatch from
Singapore to the Daily Express, date3
March 15, says: "The Jap fleet start
ed this afternoon." '
The appearance of Vice Admiral To
go's fleet in the track that would be
used in any attempt by Vice Admiral
Rojestvensky to make for Vladlvostock
is the most interesting news of the
day. Naval experts here believe To
go will not come further In quest of
the Baltic squadron, on the ground
that he can not afford to run unneces
sary risks.
BELIEVE NEW ARMY A BLUFF,
AND FRANCE FORCING FINISH.
Louuon, March 15. The papers con
tinue in the belief that .to all intents
HOTEL MAN ATTACKS GUEST.
Latter Roughly Used in Family Row
at Douglas.
S
(Special to Review.)
Douglas. March 15. W. C. Miller.
proprietor of the International hotel
of this city, is under arrest on the
charge of assault preferred by Ben
Willard. The two jvere engaged in a
fight, from which Willard, Tho Is an
old gentleman, got very much the
worst of it, a stick of stove wood be
ing the weapon said to have been used
by Miller.
In the melee Miller is understood to
have struck Mrs. Miller. A family
quarrel is said to have been at the
bottom pf the trouble. It is reported
that Miller had beea for several days
more or less under the influence of
'liquor, and was in trouble in Agua
Prieta a few days previous for a sim
ilar offense. Miller was letigo on 350
bond, which he furnished. His trial
is set for Wednesday.
o
SENATE LIKELY TO TURN DOWN
PRESIDENT.
Washington, March 15. The discus
sion of the Dominican treaty in the
Seuate today resulted in the drawing
of party lines. Democrats who have
been leported as likely to support the
treaty will return to the fold, it is
said, and on both sides of the chamber
it is admitted there Is little frospect
that the convention will be ratified.
OUOLAS WOMAN DEAD
FROM MOPHINE POISONING
Douglas, March 15. Mrs. Frank Far
"el died here today as the result of
morphine believed to have been taken
with suicidal Intent on Monday. Un-I
finished notes found in her room arc
believed to indicate the cause of the
rash act us disappointment in a love
affair, coupled with a severe struggle
for existence that the young woman
had been under for a year or more. I
Mabel Cavenas, as she is known in
Naco, where she lived since childhood
began her romantic, though sorrowful;
career at the early age of 13, when she
married a. Mexican bull fighter named
Alfonso Armenia; who deserted her
soon after they were married. Sha
v
AT CENTER
and purposes the campaign is closed;
that it will ba next to impossible for
Russia to put a new army in the field,
and that talk of doing so is mere bluff.
Intended to Influence the Inevitable
negotiations for peace. It is also be
lieved the French government has
utilized the financial lever to convey to
Russia her view that the proper Course
is to seek to arrange terms of peace.
KUROPATKIN REPORTS RE
PULSE OF JAP ATTACK.
St. Petersburg. March 15. Gen. Ku
ropatkln has forwarded the following
dispatch:
"A fierce attack on the center of our
position at Ti Fan river (about 13
miles south of Tie Pass) has been re
pulsed. More than a thousand dead
bodies remain at the front of our post'
Hon,"
GOLD NUGGET STOCK
Advances Monday, When the
Mill Will Start.
Stamp
The Gold Nugget yesterday wired to
Fred Hagan. who has been disposing
of stock in Michigan, announcing that
the price of the stock would be ad
vanced on Monday to $1 per share, par
value.
The advance will mark the starting
of the mill at the property, the stamps
of which are now expected to get in
motion on Monday.
-b
Mrs. J. E. Mosher plans to spend a
month In Phoenix soon.
o
MRS STANFORD DIED
FROM NATURAL CAUSES.
Honolulu, March 15. That
Mrs. Stanford died a natural
death will probably be the
conclusion of those who are
now investigating the case.
President Jordan, of Stan
ford University, has emphatic
ally expressed the opinon that
Mrs. Stanford's death was not
due to strychnine poisoning.
He Is a doctor of medicine and
says since he has learned the
amount of strychnine taken
by Mrs. Stanford, that it was
not beyond a medical dose, he
is more sure than ever she
was not poisoned.
Y HER OWN HAND
went by that name until she came to
this city, when she lived with a man
named Frank Farrell. who left her and
wentto El Paso four months ago. Two
months ago she asked for a position at
the Avenue hotel, and was given one
as waitress. According to the propri
etor of the hotel, she was very satis
factory and a general favorite about
the place, due to her cheerfulness and
desire to please. She leaves a two-year-old
boy, who lives with her moth
er in Pirtieville.
Her suicide was wholly unexpected
and a shock to those who knew her
since she .has been at the hotel, and
them are many conjectures as to what
was'lhe actual causs of the rash act.
I ..

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