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Bisbee daily review. [volume] (Bisbee, Ariz.) 1901-1971, March 17, 1905, Image 1

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- vai ior Arizona: tain in south,
snow in 'north portion Friday.
BI5BEE DAILY REVIEW
New York. March 1C Silver,
" 58c; Mexican dollara, 45c. Copper,
steady and unchanged.
REGULAR MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
BISBEE, ARIZONA, FRIDAY MORNING, MARCH 17, 1905
NO. 269
VOl- VIII
OUTRAGE ON JUSTICE
MEYER GUGGENHEIM
BILL PASSED IN
COUNCIL PROVIDES APPROPRIATIONS
AFTER HARD FIGHT
COMPROMISE AFTER TUSNING BILL DOWN
CIRCUIT COURT BILL LAST APPOINTMENT MADE
CLOSING SESSION IN FLOOD SURROUNDED CAPITOL
. DEAD IN FLORIDA
PERPETRATED BY COLORADO ASSEMBLY IN
SEATING OF PEABODY
THE COPPER MAGNATE SUC
CUMBS TO AN ATTACK OF
PNEUMONIA.
ACTION YESTERDAY ON COMPROMISE AGREEMENT .
PLEDGE OF RESIGNATION IN LATTER BY PEABODY
SAID HE WILL VIOLATE AND KEEP OFFICE
Denver, March 16. James H. Pea
cody'today won his contest for the of
fice of governor, from which he retir
ed on January 10, after serving a term
of two years, but his victory was
achieved only after he had given his
pledge to resign and surrender the
chair to Lieut. Gov. Jesse F. McDon
aid.
The vote in tho joint convention of
ihe general assembly by which Gov.
Alva Adams was ousted and James H.
Teabody installed was 55 to 41. Ten
Republicans voted with the Demo
cratic members for Adams. It was
more in the nature of a party than a
personal triumph, for both Peabody
and McDonald axe Republicans and
Adams Is'a Democrat
Although the Republican majority
na ioint ballot is 35. the membership
of the legislature being C5 Republi
cans and 31 Democrats, it had been
found impossible to gain for Peabody
enough Republican votes to reinstate
liim as governor for the remainder of
the biennial term ending in January,
1907.
Twenty-two Republican members or
the General Assembly, according to
report, refused to be bound by any ac
tion in caucus on the contest, and en
tered into a compact not to vote for
Peabodv. The majority of them.
however, were in favor of seating the
lieutenant governor" in the governor's
chair. If means could be found to do so
legally.
Finally the leaders of tho opposing
Republican faction arranged a com
promise oy which Peabody could be
vindicated by being decked elected,
and McDonald would oe made gover
nor. At a conference at which the
bargain was made, pledges were given
to the independent Republicans by the
heads of four large corporations which
had been in support of Peabody taat
he would retire after being seated and
penult the lieutenant governor to take J
the office of governor. I
Gov. Peabody's resignation, it is J
said, was placed in the hands of W. S
Bovnton, and will be filed by Mm with
the Secretary of State tomorrow. J
Gov. Adams, who had spent the day
packing his effects, surrendered hlsl
JAPS HAVE TIE PASS
LEAVES MANCHURIA IN THEIR HANDS
RUSSIANSJN RETREAT
f. KKKKKItCK ! K Hm . V, . V. K . V. K K K VL V. . V.
ST. PETERSBURG, MARCH 16. IT IS OFFICIALLY AN-
' NOUNCED THAT GEN. KUROPATKIN WILL BE REPLACED 8
. BY GEN. LINEVITCH AS COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF OF MANCHU-
' RIAN ARMY.
2 U'4-4'ri--rf'4'- 'A It 'A "A 'A 'A 'A 'A
St. Petersburg, March 1C With the
evacuation of Tie Pass Wednesday
night the Russian army abandoned
the last stronghold in Southern Man-J
churia, and definitely turned over that
section to the Japanese for the cam
paign of 1905. No other strategy
seems possible for Gen. Kuropatkin, in
view of his scanty supplies of ammu
nition and stores, shattered condition
of his army, and wide enveloping
movements which the Japanese have
continued almost without stop since
the Russian defeat at Mukden. '
Nothing has been heard of the part
which Gen. Kawamura's army is tak - '
ing in these operations, but Gens. Oku
and Nogi, operating in the low hills of
Tie Pass gorge ,were sufficient them
selves to turn the shattered Russian
army out of the fortifications which
had been prepared with a view to
being held by the army after it should
"have been withdrawn from Mukden.
The Japanese evidently are doing
their utmost to accomplish envelop
ment of the Russian army, which all
but succeeded at Mukden, but Gen.
Kuropatkin, with the railroad for a
line of retreat, probably will be able
to keep ahead of his pursuers. A
constant succession of delays by rear
guard encounters may be expected.
Military men here have but the
haziest ideas as to where the next
stand will be made. Apparently there
are no more fortified positions in read
iness, and' retirement probably will not
stop short of Kirin or Kuancheatzy,
on the railway line, and if the Japan-
ese press pursuit the Russians may
retire beyond and up the Sungarl riv -
er.there, to await new levies, the mo -
b'llization' of which will begin Immedl-(Tsu
aieiy in -luspia. ,
office to Governor Peabody shortly
after 5 o'clock this afternoon. Scores
of letterfa, telegrams and telephone
messages had reached the executive
chamber during the day urging Gov.
Adams to hold his seat by foice, nut
he decided to ignore this advice. In
conversation he said he felt outraged
at the action of the general assembly,
and expressed surprise that Peabody
should become a party to what he
termed a conspiracy to secure the of
fice of governor for a man who had
no claim whatever on the place. Lat
er Governor Adams will issue a for
mal statement to the public regarding
the result of the contest.
Gov. Peabody was escorted before
the joint assembly by a committee af
ter adoption of the report, and tho
resolutions restoring him to office,
fie was greeted with cheers. The
oath was administered him by Chief
Justice Gabbert.
REPUBLICAN CHAIRMAN SAYS
PEABODY WILL NOT RESIGN.
Denver, March 1C. Standing on the
portico of Gov. Peabody's residence to
night, while the band played and a
chorus of voices shouted congratula
tions to the governor, D. B. Fairley,
chairman of the Republican State
Central Committee, engaged in con
versation with a representative of the
Associated Press.
"Will Peabody resign?" He was ask
ed. "I think not," was the reply.
"Has he signed a resignation?"
"A tentative one, yes."
"What will-be done with it?"
"Nothing," said the Republican
chairman.
"Was this part of the plan to seat
him, Mr. Fairley?" the reporter asked.
"I believe so," responded Mr.' Fair
ley. Tho appearance at the door of Mr.
Peabody interrupted the talk. Later
the governor himseir came out upou
tie portico and addressed the crowd.
He thanked his friends for their loj-
alty, but made no reference to his in
tentions regarding the governorship.
.1
'A . 'A 'A 'A "A 'A 'A 'A 'A 'A 'A 'A 'A 'A 'A 'A X
AMERICAN EMBASSY HAS
PALACE AT ST. PETERSBURG.
St. Petersburg, March 1C. George
v.on L- Meyer has leased the famous
-nieiiucuei raiacu mr ins residence
during his term as American ambas
sador here. It is an imposing struc
ture, located on the fashionable Ser
geiefskaia, near the French and other
embassies. Its Interior is one of the
most gorgeous in St. Petersburg. The
palace has been the scene in the past
of many famous entertainments. The
family of Kleinmichel was ennobled
by Catherine the Great. Since the
Aariy f tIiu 1-to ffim "matnmtftYxat
hI ,,, hna ,.-,, iha -,,., T,
- was occupied for several years by
Frincc Pio, the Spanish ambassador.
but for some years has been unoccu
pied4 .
PEASANT RISINGS SERIOUS.
VALUABLE PROPERTY BURNED
St. Petersburg, March 1C. Events
vpstprflflv Hrpw nttpntinn tn thfi seri
ousness of the peasant risings, the lat
est of which is near Kieff. Here
three, sugar: refineries were burned, in
eluding one belonging to. Grand Duke
Michael Alcxandrovlch and one be
longing to the Baron Meyendorff. At
Kouska the property of Prince Baria
tinsky has been pillaged. At Tarn
boff also the peasants are rising.
JAPAN SEIZES BRITISH SHIP
BOUND FOR VLADIVOSTOCK,
Tokio, March 16. The British
steamer Saxon Prince, bound for Vlad
'Ivoatok with a cargo of steel rails, was
' seized March 9 by the Japanese in the
Straits and taken to Sasebo for
. iriai
$$S8S3$33SS3S3 5
DOMINICAN TREATY WILL
PROBABLY DIE. ?-
Washington, March 10. Re
publican leaders of the Senate
are all at sea respecting action
advisahle to take in regard to
Santo Domingo treaty.
Recognizing that the Demo
crats control more than one
third of the votes, and that
two-thirds are required to rat
ify the convention, the senti
ment of Republican leaders is
that the treaty should be with
drawn by the President.
On this subject the Senate
and the President do not agree,
and the idea prevails that arter
one or two days more of in
consequential discussion the
special meeting' will be allow
ed to adjourn without date, in
which event the treaty will
lapse. This plan, however,
is not popular In the Senate,
and a way to avoid it is being
sought.
S
S
jSc$85S5SS$sSSS3S
STRIKE DIFFICULTIES NOT OVER.
New York Transportation Companies
Find It Necessary to Take Back
Many of Old Men.
6 ,
New York, March 1C. Traffic ori
the elevated roads and In the subway
has not yet been regulated in a man
ner that gives adequate service during
the rush hours. A number of old
employes who have been reinstated
have charge of the express trains, but
the irregularity of locals run by strike
breakers have rendered efforts to im
prove the service fruitless.
Over a thousand strikers have been
given their old positions, and the com
pany is considering the applications
of many others. Several minor ac
cidents have occurred In the last few
days.
ATTEMPTED STABBING.-
Mexican
Unlimbers a Knife on
huahua Hill.
Chi
For attempting to stab a fellow
Mexican on Chihuahua Hiir yesterday,
Juan Palos was sent to jail for fifteen
days. The affray grew out of a
drunken brawl. Officer White was
summoned to arrest the knife-user by
the man he attempted to stab. In
court the evidence was of such a
rambling kind, mixed with all the in
trlcacies that the witnesses could sum-
mon, that the court at the conclusion
of the hearing could not determine
from what had been told whether
there was an attempt at cutting or
not. The man with the knife was,
however, clearly shown to have been
disorderly.
o
Y. M. C. A. OFFICIALS
Arrive at Douglas to Look After New
Building.
Douglas, March 1C G. D. McDill
who has general supervision of the
buildings erected by the Y. M. C. A. In
the United States, arrived in town yes
terday. He was accompanied by P.
P. Kelly, of Boston, an architect and
superintendent, who will have charge
of superintending the work on the
Douglas Y. M. C. A. building. Mr.
McDill expects to return to Chicago
tonight but Mr. Kelly will remain here
and give his entire time to superin
tending the construction of the new
building.
Contractors Stewart and Crawford
have the work welL- under way on
the excavating and will commence
laying the concrete some time next
week.
BOARD OF PARDONS
For
Second Time Saves Lives
Condemned 'Murderers.
of
Harrisburg, Pa., March 1C. The
Pennsylvania Supreme Court, having
decided yesterday to send the case of
Samuel G reason, colored, under sen
tence of death In Reading for the mur
der of John Edwards in 1901, back to
Baker County court, the Board of Par
dons today granted continuance in his
case" and also in that of Mrs. Kate
Edwards, white, who Is also condemn
ed to death for the same crime. The
Board of Pardons has twice refuse to
commute her sentence.
o
PROMINENT CATTLEMAN
Of Southwest Dies Suddenly in New
Mexico.
Santa Fe, N. M March 16. Gen. B,
S. Benson, one of the best known cat
tlemen of the Southwest, and who
held important positions in Iowa be-
.fore coming to New Mexico, droppedTleftyesterdayHor'avisitia'UPasadena
--.. .-J 1- ,.., At--. 1. l - . .-rTTi.- .1-!Tt-- , ..
aeaa ioaay wmic siiung on uie-poruu
of Ills ranch house south of Carlsbad.
Was Nearing 80 Years of Age Man
Who Began Wonderfully Successful
Career Peddling Stove Polish, Died
Worth Millions.
New York, March 1C. A dispatch
from Palm Beach, Fla., reports the
death of Meyer Guggenheim, tho cop
per capitalist. Death was caused by
pneumonia. He was 78 years old.
Mr. Guggenheim was the Head of
the firm of M. Guggenheim's Sots,
owners of mining and smelting enter
prises In the United States and
throughout Mexico.
He began his career as an itinerant
vendor of stove polish. Accumulat
ing some money, he Invested it In Col
orado mines, and later went into tho
smelting business at Denver. Ho
also erected a large smelter at Pueb
lo, Colorado.
The fortune left by the deceased
will amount high in the millions. He
had given liberally to philanthropic
enterprises, and his name was well
known in municipal affairs and civic
reform.
DRILL FOR THE TRANSVAAL.
Superintendent Neer Will Have Dia
mond for Sonora Property.
C. L. Neer. of the Transvaal, re
turned to the mine yesterday after
spending several days here watching
the operations of diamond drills. He
was so well satisfied that he will rec
ommend that one be installed at the
Cobre Rico mine to explore the al
leady well developed ore body.
A new ore strike has been made in
the shaft of the Transvaal mine No. 1
on the 400 foot level. Water in large
volume has Interfered with the devel
oping of the new strike; but at the
last report the water had been lower
ed to nearly one-fourth its original
volume by the big pumps recently In
stalled. Two cars of CO per cent
matte are awaiting transportation at
the new smelter, and work on the big
smelter at the Cumpas river is being
carried on as rapidly as the arrival of
material will permit. Twenty-six
cars of smelter material are in transit.
o
BRITAIN STORM SWEPT
GREAT DAMAGE AND MUCH LOSS
OF LIFE ON THE COASTS
of England' and Ireland North of Lat
ter Heavily Stricken in Early Morn
ing Ship Goes Down with 23 of
Crew.
London, March 16. A storm of hur
ricane force burst over the Irish and
English coasts during the night and
It is feared many disasters have oc
curred. Telegraph lines are broken
at many points, j
The British ship Khyber has been
totally wrecked off the Corean coast.
Twenty-three of her crew were drown
ed. Only three were saved. The Khy
ber sailed from Melbourne, October
20, for Queenstown.
The storm swept over the nortn of
Ireland In the early morning and did
great damage to property, fears arc
entertained for the safetv of the fish-!
ing fleets. High winds have caused
terrible havoc along the coast3 of the
United Kingdom.
.Life boat stations are busy and ships
everywhere are seeking shelter. A
number of minor wrecks, accompanied
by loss of life, have been reported.
Terrific seas are running.
o
Had Stormy Passage Miss Lola
Gasper has returned from a three
months visit in California. Miss
Gasper was a passenger on the steam
er Queen during passage south, in the
worst sto-m on the coast In sixteen
years. All of the stale rooms on
the seaboard side of the steamer
were flooded on the main deck at one
time during the trip.
-b
Coast Lines Crippled. All the coast
lines of railroad are reported severe
ly crippled as the result of the recent
storm. Between Los Angeles and San
Francisco traffic Is practically sus
pended. The Santa Fe is in little bet
ter shape entering San Francisco than
is the S. P. The through trains of
the latter have all been off of time
on the main line at Benson for the
last several days.
6
Harold Beecher, In advance of the
"Hills of California Co.," which ap
pears at the Opera House In this city
Sunday evening, arrived in town yes-
terday from Phoenix, Mr. Beecher
should have been here last Sunday, tural or grazing lands have been is
but was delayed three days at Phoenix sued on the same tracts. Coal lands
by reasou of railroads out of( the town
being closed.
rfr-
Wm. Truax left this week for Los
Angeles, where he expects to make
his future headquarters. With his
departure he disposed of his interest
in the English Kitchen to L.' A. Brown.
o 1
Judge Haleand wife,.aftVri a sever -
ml -r.aaV, wlalt-'ln Ilia Mltw rnM T,1t,IV
'oeioro reiurningsio, ineir nome in me
East." "UyJjilPF
Phoenix, March 1C. The governor
today presented a list of appointments
which was approved by the Council.
They were as follows:
Public Administrator W. C. Foster,
Phoenix.
Live Stock Board Hurst, Phoenix;
Geo. Pusch, Tucson; II. A. Perkins,
Yavapai.
Equalization Board Same as Live
Stock Board, with the addition of tho
name of J. Wood Winslow.
Regents of the University Walter
Talbot, Phoenix; M. Freeman, George
Uoskruge, Chas. Bayless, Tucson.
Dental Board Sims, of Phoenix, and
Rhone, of Douglas.
Webb's primary election law passed
the Council. The bill redistrictlng
the Arizona judiciary becomes a law.
The governor vetoed the Scott
White relief bill.
The Council passed the following
House memorials: Petitioning Con
gress for $75,000 to complete the cap-
itol; to raise the governor's salary to
$0,000, for $10,000 for purchase otl
Xavier Church, Tucson.
The live stock bill as amended by
the Council, was concurred in by the
House by a vote of 14 to 10.
EL TIGRE ANNUAL
Meeting Postooned a Month on Ac -
count of Eastern Interests.
The regular time for holding the
annual meeting of the stockholders
of El Tigre Mining company is on
the 18th of March, next Saturday.
President Graham states the annual
meeting will not be held at that time
as the directors and stockholders
from Kansas City cannot then attend
The meeting will be called by Presi
dent Graham and then postponement
will be taken to April 26th, when the
Eastern stockholders and directors
will be on hand-
Regarding progress at El Tigre Pres
ident Graham states that he is in re
ceipt of most satisfactory reports, but
that he was unable to reach the camp
last week when he tried to, do so. At
the Yaqui river he intended to cross
on the cable and ride Horseback from
there to the camp. In trying to swim
the horse across the river the animal
was drowned, so Mr. Graham returned.
All the supplies for El Tigre camp are
crossed the -river in boxes swung on
cables and then packed to camp. The
continued heavy rains during the win
ter have made much trouble for the
EI Tigre and other mining camps in
Sonora.
AGUA PRIETA FIGHT.
$1 for the Round Trip Rate Announc
ed by Railroad.
A rait; of SI for Uie round trip wiii
prevail on the E. P. & S. W. to Doug
las and return Sunday on account of
the Agua Prieta bull fight. No special
train will be run, extra coaches be
ing provided on the regular trains.
At Agua Prieta the same bull fighters
will appear who gave so much satis
faction at Naco last Sunday and the
prospects are fair for a better attend
ance from Bisbee than an Agua Prieta
engagement has1 drawn in a long time.
-d
Mrs. Ed Hughes and Mrs. Manley
left yesterday for Cananea.
EXTENSIVE ARE FRA
UNEARTHED
Salt Lake City, Utah, March 16.
Government officials investigating the
sale of public lands in Utah have dis
covered that thousands of acres of
coal lands, valued at millions of dol
lars, have been secured by questiona
ble methods. Lands have been filed
upon as coal lands and filings allow-
ed to lapse, while patents as agricul-
cost 20 per acre, while agricultural
or grazing lands may be bought for
$1.50 an acre.
Double filings were necessary to the
scheme, and were made possible by
the use of the two land offices in the
state. The filings as coal lands were
made In tho government land office,
thus keeping others off the property.
1 while the filings as agricultural or
wiTiflP InnH TOPrft THAila With the State
land board. ' .
r .. AAA, mtABllniKllitA fil.
ui uiuiu man .,vuu iiuuu-u-v u.
" Ings sixty were made by an employe
GORP
I A big fight in the Council over the
buciai aypruynauon uiu, on account,
of the Reform School appropriation,
resulted In tho defeat this afternoon
of the entire bill by a vote of six to
six. The Benson school adherents
were Roeraer, Bernard, Rice, Page,
Ruiz and Nugent.
A forty thousand dollar Yuma prison
appropriation passed the House this
afternoon.
Phoenix, March 10, 11:55 p. m. The
general appropriation bill was held up
by the Council for three hours tonight
on account of the reform school ap
propriation clause. Roemer, in se
cret caucus, after a bitter fight, secur
ed an agreement for $7,500 per annum
for the institution. The House con
curred. The appropriation bill gives the At
torney General $2,400.
The Circuit Court bill was killed in
the House. The Yuma lgison appro
priation passed the Council unani-
mously.
Large crowds are in attendance at
the last session. While it is in pro- ,
gress three feet of flood water from y
Cave Creek surrounds the capitol
building.
WHITEMAN INDICTED.
. New Mexican Adjutant General Fares
Badly.
Santa Fe, N. M., March 10. Gen. W.
H. Whiteman was indicted by the
grand jury today on a charge of ob
taining public funds under false pre
tenses. He was at one time a Justice
of the New Mexico Supreme Court,
and for the past seven years adjutant
general of the territory, until removed
a month ago by Governor Otero,
against whom Whiteman filed volumin
ous charges, accusing that executive
of misappropriating military equip
ment furnished by the United States.
o
Darlington, S. C. March 15. Bob
Smalls, convicted of killing Frank
Scott, a negro, and Sam Marks, a ne
gro, convicted murderer of Hillary
Lanston, white, were sentenced to
death today on the same gallows
May 5.
Evansviile, Ind., March 16. Th
Ohio river is rising rapidly because
of melting snows and late rains, reach
ing above the danger line today. Lit
tle damage has been done so far.
3-?$S3S3S-3S$S
DIVORCE SUIT
AGAINST COL.
BROUGHT
MARTIN.
Tucson, March 16. Mrs. J.
H. Martin, daughter of the late
Judge Barnes, filed suit here
iuuay for divorce from Col.
Martin, of New York. Eugene
Ives appears for the plaintiff,
and Hereford & Hazzard for
the defendant.
There are two grown daugh
ters and one bon in the fami
ly, all society people. The
charge is incompatibility. Mar
tin is said to be worth a quar
ter of a million. Mrs. Martin
has a large share of Judge
Barnes' estate.
i
'Sj3-$'J'S33!isSS3S
COMPROMISING
ORATIONS IN UTAH
I
of the Utah Fuel Company, acting as
agent for the entrymen. The Utah
Fuel Company is a Gould-Rockefeller
corporation, and, through traffic ar
rangements with the Rio Grande Rail
roads, controls the coal output of tao
state. Many innocent persons have
been induced to allow their names to
be used for filing purposes under the
Impression that they were exercising
a right. They were paid an average
price of $25 each for the use of their
.names.
Upon receiving the report of the in
vestigation it is expected President
Roosevelt will Immediately order a.
thorough examination into the Utah
situatioa. Thescheme Is viewed hero
as an attempt to secure absolute con
trol of all the coal deposits of the
.state. The territory affected In
volves parts of two counties In tho
eastern part of the state, much of It
adjacent to coal mines now being op
erated by the Utah Fuel Company.

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