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Bisbee daily review. [volume] (Bisbee, Ariz.) 1901-1971, October 31, 1918, Image 1

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WEATHER
Arizona: Thursday
ana Friday fair; warm
er Thursday.
Associated Press Special Leased Wire Service,
VOL. 21, NO. 120.
THE BISBEE DAILY REVIEW, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1918.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
H fl
AMY
Ml IP
Y
BROKEN A S
BEING CHASED
BY CAVALRY
MASS OF PRISONERS ALREADY
TAKEN PROMISES TO BE ADDED
TO LARGELY WHILE ENEMY
WILL HAVE NO CHANCE TO RE
FORM SHORT OF HIS BORDER
GREAT VICTORY GAINED
ON WESTERN FRONT EXCEPT
FOR FRENCHATTACK ON
8HORT FRONT, THERE HAS
BEEN LITTLE ACTIVITY EXCEPT
ARTILLERY-PATROL ACTIONS
UNDATED WAR LEAD, (By
the Associated Press.) Over a.,
front of, some 60 miles from the
Brenta fiver in northern Italy to
the vicinity of the Adriatic sea,
the Austro-Hungarians are being
violently attacked by Italian, Bri
tish, French and American troops.
In the mountain region the en
emy is resisting desperately and
holding his ground fairly well.
But east of the Piave river he
is in flight across the plains of
Treviso, shaping his course over
the same territory through which
he drove the Italians a year ago
and reached the eastern edge of
the plains of Venetia.
Already numerous towns have been
liberated, 33,000 prisoners have been
taken and large numbers of guns and
machine guns and huge quantities of
stores have fallen into hands of the
allied troopB. Far behind the lines al
lied aviators are heavily bombing en
emy columns in dense masses which
are in retreat over the badly congest
ed roads leading eastward toward the
Austrian frontier.
Judging the situation from the rapid
advance the allies are making it
would appear that the entire enemy
front has been broken east of the
Piave and that with the cavalry oper
ating far in advance of the foot troops
the enemy forces will be unable to
reform their battle line until the Au
strian border is reached. It is not un
likely that many of the Austro-Hungarians
are doomed to capture or ex
termination by the allies.
On the western front in France and
Belgium there has been a marked di
minution in the intensity of the in
fantry activity. Along the British
line there have been only patrol en
counters and recipocal bombardments.
The French have, however, are en
gaged in another attack on a front
of about seven and a half miles be
. tween St Quentin-Iepetit and Herpy,
in the general direction of the en
emy's communication lines running
eastward from the old St. Quentin and
La on sectors and also with the pur
pose cf driving a wedge into this
part of the southern battle line and
thereby compel the enemy to readjust
his front through Champagne to the
Meuse.
Aiound Grand Pre, north of "the Ar
gonne foiest, the Americans have ma
terially bettered their positions in at
tacks against the Germans. The Belle
joyuse farm which for several days
has been No Man's Land now is virtu
ally all held by the Americans. East
of the Meuso there .has been consid
erable fighting, but it has resulted in
no great change in positions.
The big American guns are continu-l they tave neTer Been 8Uch bItter and
lng to shell German positions far be- j strong feeling pervade the house of
hind the lines nd bombing planes commons. The same feeling has in
also are intensively active against . fecte(i the whole country. The only
troop concentration points. j group of memoers who held aloof was
I a handful of pacifists, who appear to
ON ITALIAN FRONT 1 object to any unpleasant word3 about
LONDON, Oct. 30. The text of thfci Germany more than they object to
British ar office announcement on 'the war.
operations on the. Italian front fol
lows. "The tenth army has reached ap
nroximatelv Roucadelle. Ormelle. Fon-
tainelle and the line of the river
'Oontlnuoil on Pmt Two)
Attrocities of Such Nature As to Forbid of Their
Being Read in House of Commons, Says Secretary
LONDON, Oct. 30 (British Wire
less Service). Sir George Cave,
the home secretary, discussing the
treatment of British prisoners in
Germany, said fe had report
which could not be read to the
house because of the character of
the atrocities. In one catnp since
November, 1916, more than 2000
prisoners of all nations died.
Sir George said nine men drove
picks Into their feet in order to
get away from a mining camp. In
wm WILL
HSTEB
Di
ALL PRISONERS MUST BE RE
LEASED AND SIR GEORGE CAVE
DECLARES IN HOUSE OF COM
MONS SAME TERMS WILL BE
EXACTED AS FROM BULGARIA
BADLY iTREAT BRITONS
WHOLE NATION GREATLY MOVED
BY RECITATION OF HORRIBLE
TREATMENT ACCORDED PRIS
ONERS;' QUESTION . WILSON'S
FREEDOM OF SEAS EXPRESSION
LONDON, Oct 30. That im
mediate release of all British pris
ners will be insisted on, by the
government as part of armistice
terms is expected here. Sir
George Cave, home secretary, an
nounced in the house of commons
yesterday the same- conditions im
posed on Bulgaria would be in
sisted on in any truce with Ger
many or Austria and Gen. Allenby
has been instructed to follow the
same policy with the Turks.
There is plenty of evidence that
British prisoners have received worse
treatment throughout the war than
others, except Russian.
Snch a demand will be a very im
portant factor and it is not likely that
ths other allies will show less regard
for their nationals who are suffering
in German camps.
Events since German peace over
tures began have not tended to instil
in the British hearts a spirit of con;
ciliation, forgiveness or leniency to
ward the enemy.
Sinking of the Lelnster followed
closely the German note; evacuation
of Belgium and French towns, for
years under German rule, has opened
what has heretofore been largely a
sealed book of rumors, and authentic
stories from truthful people about
German barbarism toward inhabitants
have been flooding out.
Finally yesterday's discussions in
the house of commons of tne treat
ment of British prisoners appeared
to have been about the last straw,
breaking the back of British patlencf
patience which the country gener
ally seni 8 now to thiifk has been car
ried much too far. The Germans have
only themselves to blame that these
revelations came at a time so. un
fortunate for German interests.
The topic was forced on the house
by a strong public demand for light on
the circumstances of what it terms
German blackmalj In refusing to
ratify an argument for equitable ex
change of prisoners unless the British
consented to give guarantees against
deportation of Germans from China.
Capt. Craig, member of the house,
an exchanged prisoner, told with emo
tion of bis experiences in German
prison camps.
! Sir George Cave, home secretary,
jpate authentic details of wholesale
j deaths of British soldiers, kept ragged,
! starving and verminous. ait 3 compelled
to work long hours in salt mines and
j under fire at the front, contrary to
I rules of The Hague convention, beaten
i and tortured and shot for petty or no
: offenses.
Old narllampntarv rfnorters sav
The general nature of the military
guarantees which the allies will re
quire has been outlined as the occupa
tion of strategical German bases,- as
well as retirement of the German
(Continued on Page Eight)
a salt mine a prisoner was beaten
unconscious and when he recover
ed was beaten unconscious again.
Officers and superintendents who
carried out the outrages against
prisoners were known. Reports
of what bad happened In factories
could not be read without some
thing more than anger.
Regarding the treatment of Brit
ish prisoners behind the firing
line, Sir George said General Lud
endorff had promised redress, but
EfiiJW
ALLIES MAY OCCUPY COBLENZ AS GUARANTEE THAT GERMANS
WILL KEEP ARMISTICE IF ONE IS GRANTED THEM BY POWERS
1 ZLXXXZ
Coblcnz, Metx and other import-
ant German towns may be held by
the allies during an armistice,
f hould Germany be granted one by
the allies, as a guarantee that the
STATEMENTS ARE
POLITICAL MIXUP
j
Redfield, Lane and Daniels!
i
Attack Republicans, While)
Uncle Joe Cannon Defends
Them Vigorously ,
r
WASHINGTON, bit. 30.--et refary
Lane and Redfield today authorized
statements of why they bslieved the
country should return a democratic
congress next week.
Secretary Lane said:
"At the head of our state is the
man whom' the world looks to for
guidance in this contest. To back
him to the limit and enable him to
look the kaiser in the eye and tell
him what the conscience of the world
commands is our duty irrespective of
party. He must not be discredited,
weakened or worried by any apparent
hesitation on the part of the people
to generously support him.
"The kaiser knows he is a demo
crat, and those who have been loyal
to him as the exponent of the na
tion's will should be sent to congress
that they may prosecute the war and
lead in the great period of reconstruc
tion that is to follow a period in
which larger consideration must be
given to the needs and rights of those
who suffer the handicap of poverty
or ignorance than ever before. . . .
The democratic party should and must
take the lead in the evolution of a
more intensely socialized life. It ha
the right symptoms and It has tho
sympathetic and balanced leader
ship." Secretary Redfield said.
"Ordinary common sense shows
that the interest of the country re
quires the election of a congress (both
bouses) in political sympathy with
the administration. One does not
swap horses white crossing the stream
save in an emergency. No emergency
calling for the swap exists. The pres
ent team Is well matched, pulling to
gether and doing the Job well. One
cannot say how the new horses would
behave. Let it be admitted for the
sake of argument, that he has offi
cially pulled fairly straight much, per
haps most, of the time thus far.
There are exceptions and" often a vis
ible tendency to kick over the traces.
. . . Under our party system It is
normal that the republicans should
seek In advance a basis on which to
found their campaign of 1920. Such
a basis they hope to find, they can
only find, by pecking at the admin
istration between iiow and then. It
is certain, therefore, that the election
of a republican congress now must
fPnntlmiM on Par Tnr
his promise was unfulfilled. Men
were put to work within range
of the British shell fire and had
to carry munitions and do other
work which prisoners should not
be put to.
Sir George said that in the
bad treatment of prisoners Turk
ey has proved a fit ally to Ger
many as had Bulgaria, but happily
the suffering of the captives there
was over and they were being
brought out of the country.
CONTINUING
i, v. s -
T --A-.l ,.5--J"S
Coblcnz.
treacherous Germans would keep
j the armistice. It has been sug-
pested also that allied troops com-
mand every brieve tcross the
I Rhine during the armistice. The
MEN OF NEW DRAFT AGES ARE TO BE !
CALLED OUT RAPIDLY, STARTING EARLY j
IN NOVEMBER 200.0C0 TO MOVE SOON J
WASHINGTON', Oct. 33. Men
mobilized in large numbers early
fti preparation at Provost Marshal
the entrainment of more than 200.000 men qualified for general military
service. They will be furnished in proportionate numbers by every state '
in the union.
Draft calls suspended during October because of the influenza epi
demic have been renewed in sections
British Troops Resting on
Arms While Hun Contin
ues to Move Out of Terri
tory Long Held
WITH THE BRITISH ARMY IN
FRANCE AND BELGIUM, Oct. 30 (By
the Associated Press) 3 p. m. The
victorious British troops in the Va-lenciennes-Courtral
sector were rest
ing on their arms this morning, with
their line for the greater part of the
way &iug up against the Scheldt
river and canal to which they had
forced the enemy. On th1 other side
cf these natural defenses the unhappy
Germans are still clinging to positions
which they hoped would aflord them
pi election in a further withdrawal
In the meantime preparations for
a retirement - to a line further back
was going on apace in the enemy for
ward areas.
Railway communications were be
ing (destroyed and highways being
blown up as fast as the war materials
could be removed. The new German
line would depend largely on events,
but indications are that the enemy
would stand temporarily on the Den
dre river, which affords an excellent
defense.
Civilians have not been withdraw
ing in great numbers. Tournai for
example, which is closely invested by
the British appears to be full of ci
vilians, who, thanks to the chivalry of
the British forces are in no danger,
except from the Huns. The British
have religiously refrained from shell
ing towns along the line, even though
it might be of -military advantage to
do so.
On the other hand the enemy has
been venting his hate on villages in
the allied territory along the line
Last night such places were shelled
with high explosives and gas shells,
and casualties were caused among the
Inhabitants.
Fighting last night was confined to
local engagements. South of Valen
ciennca the British extended their
bridge-head on the Rhonello river, east
of Artrea. A counter move of the en
emy north of here came to grief. The '
Germans put down an artillery bar-1
rnge northwest of Faruiars but Brlt-
ish gunners so badly smashed them !
thnt the attack did not materialize.
Further north a hard engagement
was fought on the Scheldt river. Hero i
the British attempted to cross under
artillery support and a battle devel
oped at two destroyed bridges. At
tacking forces essayed a crossing:
twice, but the advantage was always
VICTORS RESTING
WHILE VANQUISHED
ARE WITHDRAWING
(Continued o raa Bix)
Mil
f picture shows Cobtena. The eitj
ie at the junction of the Rhine
and Moselle rivers. The American
and allied forces near Meti are 120
miles from Coblenz.
of the new draft ages will first be
In November under the draft call now
General Crowder's office. It calls for
where the ep!emic has moderated. J
AFTERPR01G
Unofficial Report Says Repub
lican Leader Finds Little
Fault With General Plan
and Its Execution
(By Review Leased Wire)
WASHINGTON, Oct. 30. Govern
ment plans for turning out quantities
of airplanes and results achieved
through co-operation of manufacturers,
are generally commended in the re
port of Charles E. Hughes, on the
air craft investigation to be sent to
President Wilson tomorrow by
At-1
tcrncv General Gregory and made pub
HUGHES PRAISES
AIRPLANE WORK
lie then. A number of specific acts The administration was said to be
and plans involved in the big task I wel! convinced now that Austria Bl
ot DreDarlng the nation for warfare red' nearly out of the war and
in the air declared subject to criticism.
but tn the light of later developments,
some of these are held to be ex -
mcnhlP .
CUsaDie.
Officials who have been in touch
with the investigation emphasize to
day this is not to be Interpreted as
meaning blanket approval of the way
the program has been carried out Is
given. Plenty of evidence of ineffi
ciency in manufacturing plants and
waste of money and time is presented
they said. Indicating that expection of
the government's plans might have
been much better by government ag
encies and contractors for airplanes
Although President Wilson has not
seen the report, he has been told its
substance.
. Attorney General Gregory devoted
most of his time today and this even
ing to-perusal of Mr. Hughes report
and prepared a letter of transmittal
In which he is expected to offer his
Individual comment. His attitude is
understood not to differ radically from
that cf Mr. Hughes.
Desirability of speed In putting fin
ishing touches on the document was
said to have been urged on Mr. Greg
ory today by Postmaster General tur
leson and Secretary Tumulty. After
their visit to the departmeut of Jus
tice it was said the report would be
sent to the White House early In thej
morning and probably would be made;
public before noon.
ON STARVATION'S VERGE
(Bv Review I.eaae.1 Wire)
WASHINGTON, Oct. 30 Red Cross
; workers who recently returned to
i Archangel from a trip to isolated
towns along the coast of the White
.. .w tliA Inhahftflnf a An ihn
and Bonie f the!
villages without flour and sugar for
two years. A cablegram today to Red
Cross headquarters said Red Cross
workers distributed 100 tons of pro
visions, medicines and other supplies.
FflE IS BEYOND
CONTROL OF WAR
LEADERS BELIEF
Germans and Austrian Orig
inally Meant Only to Give
Armies Chance to Rest but
People Intervened
LONDON, Oct 30. "If the mo
ment comes when the Interests of
Germany demand it, I should ab
dicate without hesitation ; but the
moment dees not seem to have
come."
Emperor William Is quoted as
having said this in an address to
a number of members of the Ger
man reichstag, according to a dis
patch to the Exchange Telegraph
from Amsterdam, quoting advices
from L'erlin.
The emperor said the people
must not think that he had de
cided to remain on the throne at
all costs.
The dispatch adds that it is
generally believed in Berlin that
if the emperor abdicates, it will
be in favor of Prince William,
the eldest son of thf German
crown prince.
(By Review Leawd Wire)
WASHINGTON, Oct. 30. The gen
ii eral opinion among officials and dip
Jilomats here is that the German pro
posal for an armistice and peace while
having its origin in a plan to gain
time for strengthening the army and
restoring its shattered morale, has
gotten beyond the control of the mili
tary party, and that the German
j people are the force which is driving
me uerman government to make a
move for ending the war. '
Another note from the German gov
ernment explanatory of the changes
that have been made or are projected
iu the German constitution and form
j of government was received today
I through the Swiss legation, but the
j state department did not make it
I public. This note was understood to
I be supplementary to the preceding
German communication saying to the
president that he roust have knowl
edge of the efforts that have been
made to democratize Germany.
President Wilson was at work to
day on bis reply to Austria's re
newed plea for an armistice and peace
and it was expected that it would be
dispatched before night, but lat?r to
day it was said at the state depart
ment that there would be no an
nouncement regarding the reply to
night. It was understood that in the note
the president planned to touch on the
steps thai Austria and Hungary have
taken in releasing subject peoples
Irora political bondage, but that the
Austrian government's plea would be
' rofDrrarl tf Inn nMloH ffiti-eratiinlii
, f"r , Pece.. is lmvll tured. It is impossible to calculate the
tapered by a natural JlUon ton
1 et thf, ,bast terms possible short of : , h
.unconditional surrender. I , 7 . . .
. .. "In AlhaniM our troODH after Iwat-
i ne report mat t ount Anaressy, tne
new Austrian premier, is about to sue
direcily to Italy for peace on the
ground that Italy Is Austria's "sole
antagonist" is generally regarded ns
confirmatory of this'understanding of
the hopeless situation in the dual em
pire. It was pointed out that since
Italy solemnly engaged with other en
tente powers not o make a separate
peace, if Austria carries out this piau
it would be referred by Italy to the
supreme war council.
There was no official information
here today as to progress of delibera
tions of the supreme war council and
notes was taken of reserved attitude
of the council in issuing any state
ments. Inference is drawn that a
definite policy lias been agreed on
to withhold all information regarding
fCnnt!niie1 on Pas Two!
Germans Strip
Valuables As
Occupied
LONDON, Oct. 30. (By British
Wireless.) Conditirns in Rus
sian territory Ck-cupied by the
Germans are described In an offi
cial Russian wireless message,
which says:
"From al regions now In Ger
man occupation it is believed the
German military authorities are
carrying off everything that It is
possible to take to Germany.
They are devastating the country.
"In White Russia there are no
horses and no cattle because the
33,G0O TOTAL
PRISONERS
LATEST DRIVE
UP TO PRESENT THAT NUMBER
OF AUSTRIANS, WITH INNUMER
ABLE MACHINE GUNS AND HUN
DREDS OF CANNON HAVE BEEN
TAKEN ON ITALIAN FRONT
AMERICANS IN FIGHT
MORE THAN ONE HUNDRED VIL
LAGES LIBERATED BY CON
QUERING ALLIED TROOPS AS
THEY DRIVE BACK GERMANY'S
ALLIES ON LEFT FLANK
(By Review Leased Wire
WASHINGTON, Oct. 20. Thir-
ty-three thousand Austrian troops,
hundreds of gun and innumerable
machine guna have been captured
by Italian and allied force on the
talian front, said an official dis
patch today from Rome. The
332d American infantry regiment
has gone into action and the fight
ing now extends practically all
along the course of the Piav
river.
The Austriaus are resisting stub
bornly, throwing in many new divi
sions but have not been able to stop
the advancing forces. The disputch
follows:
"Our offensive is developing farther
south," - said the dispatch, "and
stretches practically along the course
of the Piave. The third army is now
in action successfully. The line be
tween th lirenta . and the aea la
strongly held by the greater part o
the Italian army alongside of which
is the Hth army corps of British
troops and a French division. The
332d American regiment is also now
in action.
"The enemy is resisting with excep
tional stubbornness and is throwing
into the fray new divisions without,
however, being successful in holding
back our troops. On the Grappa region
the troops of the first Italian amy
with the support of the 12th array has
bo-en successful in. beating the enemy
at Segurtno and has conquered Mont
Gesen. The Eighth army has occupied
the narrow pass of Follina and has al
ready reached Vittorio. The 10th army
atter having established solid bridge
heads over the Montyano river has
crossed the river and is advancing
along the road Conegliano-Odrzo. ' The
third army after neutralizing the
I formidable artillery fire of the enemy
has crossed the Piave at San Dona Di
Piave and east of Zenson.
"The number of prisoners captured
up to the present moment amounts
to $02 officers and 32.19S men. Hun
dreds of guns have also been cap-
i , : ,
"n tne '?. of h
j hav,e occuvM San Giovanni Di Medua
and are rapidly advancing on Scutari.'
An early official dispatch from
Rome said that more than 100 villages
and towns had been liberated since
the offensive began and that the Au
strian army corps on the left had re
tired In disorder leaving behind war
materials and several hundred guns.
The position of the sixth Austrian
army was described as very critical.
332D REGIMENT ENGAGED
ROME. Oct. 30. The 332d American
Infantry regiment is participating in
the battle in the Brenta region, ac
cording to the war office announce
ment tonight.
Since October 24 the allies have
(Continued on Pire Three)
Russia of
Troops Leave
Soil for Home
Germans have taken thenvilL In
the regions where evacuation is
pending the fields remain un
sown because the Germans have
left no seed. Children are dying
of starvation. Milk cannot be
obtained.
"Household furniture, tele
graphic and telephonic Instru
ments and appliances from many
towas have been sent to Ger
many. The railway lines have
been stripped, only wrecked and
useless cars being left behind.'

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