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Bisbee daily review. [volume] (Bisbee, Ariz.) 1901-1971, November 01, 1918, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024827/1918-11-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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WEATHER
Arizona: Fri. and Sat
(air; not mucn change
in temperature.
Associated Press Special Leased Wire Service.
VOL 21, NO. 121.
THE BISBEE DAILY REVIEW, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1918.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
F
n
Ifatlkf
1
MSP
KEY
WAR:
SUiMG
FD
ARM
rail
BADLY DEFEATED IN BAHLE
SHE SEEKS TO QUIET CHAOS
WITH I HER BORDERS BY PACT
ONLY RESULT THUS FAR HAS
BEEN TO INCREASE FEROCITY
OF ALLIED ATTACK UPON AU
STRIAN ARMIES WHICH RAPID
LY ARE DISINTEGRATING
NOW IN FULL FLIGHT
INTENSIVE OPERATIONS OF AIR
MEN ON WESTERN FRONT PRE
SAGE EARLY RESUMPTION OF
BATTLES OF MAJOR IMPORT
ANCE IN THIS ZONE
LONDON, Oct. 31, (10:50 p. m.)
High placed German officials at
Copenhagen this afternoon re
ceived information that the Ger
man emperor had abdicated, ac
cording to the Copenhagen corre
spondent of the Exchange Tele
graph company, who adds:
"Nothing is said about the crown
prince."
UNDATED WAR LEAD. (By the
Associated Press.) Turkey is out of
the war and Germany's remaining ally,
Austria-Hungary, badly defeated on
the field of battle, her battle line rent
in twain and with chaos reigning in
side her border, is pleading for an
armistice. Thus far her importuni
ties have received no better answer
than the redoubling of the efforts of
the allies 10 crush utte'rly her war
riors. The capitulation of Turkey is be
lieved to have been an unconditional
one. The victories or the allied forces
over the Austro-Hungarians threaten
to send what remains of the enemy
armies reeling back to their border
line shattered anc completely van
quished. .
More than 50,000 prisoners have
been taken by the Italian, British,
French, American and Czecho-Slovak
forces and everywhere, from tho
mountain region to the plains of Ve
netia the enemy Is being sorely tried.
In the mountains, where stiff re
sistance bad been offered to keep
the foe from entering the back door
of Austria, the enemy's front is crack
ing under the violence of the attacks
and important strategic positions are
being lost. To the east of the Piave
the allies have driven in a sharp
'wedge to the northeast of Belluno.
some 20 miles from their original
point of departure, and severed con
nection between the armies in the
north and those on the Venetian
plauis.
Over the plains leading toward the
Austrian frontier at the Isonzo river
tie invaders everywhere are in fuil
flight, with the allied troops press
ing them hard. Here the debacle
seems to be complete. The enemy in
his flight is leaving behind large
numbers of guns and great quantities
of war stores as he endeavors to
reach the passages over the Taglia
mento river. It seems not improbable
on the plains and in the region east
.and west of Belluno large numbers of
the enemy are destined to be cap
tured. On the western battle front there
still is little fighting of a violent
character, but the intensive opera
tions of the airmen seems to presage
an early return of battles of major
importance. In Belgium both the.
(Continued on Pac ThrM)
Mexico Abandons Effort to
Segregate Dead From Flu;
Burying in Party Graves
(By Review Leeaea Wire)
JUAREZ. Mex., Oct, 31. All
efforts to bury the dead from
Spanish influenza In individual
graves and in coffins have been
abandoned in Mexico and com
munity graves are being dug in
many towns where bodies are be
ing buried at the 'rate of from
50 to 100 daily, letters received
here from the interior today
stated. The cemeteries have even
been abandoned as burying places
and the open fields used because
of the large number of deaths
from the disease.
The epidemic is now Invading
the isolated communities away
from the railroad and because of
GENERAL DIAZ ISUES
BULLETIN CALLING FOR
RENEWED WAR EFFORT
ITALIAN ARMY HEADQUAR
TERS, Wednesday, Oct 30, 8 p. m.
General Diaz, the Italian com
j mander in chief, has issued the fol-
lowing bulletin to his troops:
"Soldiers, forward! In Italy s
.name we will place the wreath of
victory on the tombs of our glori
ous dead. Forward! Our immortal
milntir f n 1 1 a '
FOR THIS MEET
Allied CouncU Will , Debate
Terms of Armistice and
Peace Under Strong Guard
to Ensure Quiet
(By Review Leaaed Wire)
PARIS, Oct. 31. (By the Asso
icitaed Press.) On the eve of the
meeting of. the supreme war council
the very atmosphere of Versailles is
surcharged with the importance of
pending events. The presence of
numerous uniformed officials of the
allied nations, with councillors, prime
ministers and personages of high
estate, lends to the scene of dignity
which reflects the nature of the colos
sal questions to be decided, directing
the destiny of the new order of world
politics. Automobiles glide over the asphalt
and cobblestone streets of France's
ancient seat of government, bearing
world figures; some carry the highest
army staffs in dazzling uniforms;
pthers bear naval chlets In their
black uniforms, variegated with gold
stripes in profusion and patterned
according to their country's orders,
while now and then limousines with
distinguished civilians rush by, claim
ing the right of way seemingly be
cause of the high positions of the
occupants in world affairs.
Trianon palace has been Isolated.
The deliberations of the premiers.
ministers and naval and military chiefs
will be conducted amidst the quietude
of a woodland dell, retained in all
its beauty by the French government
since tne aays ol louis s.v, ana usea
afterwards by successive sovereigns,
including Napoleon.
Trianon palace, nestling in clusters
of giant trees, surrounded by a pic
turesque park and resplendent with
flower gardens and serpentine walks,
stands within the very shadow of the
Louis XIV palace, in the north wing
of which, in the "Galerie Des Glaces,"
Wilhelm I, grandfather of the present
German emperor and then king of
Prussia,, was proclaimed first Ger
man emperor in 1871.
To make more secure tne isolation
of the palace for the conferences
which will begin tomorrow, all traffic
in its direction will be stopped.
Guards of French, British, American
and Italian soldiers stand on duty at
various posts. When the council
(Continued on P&ga Two)
the scarcity of medical supplies
and the absence of doctors, the
fatalities are unusually heavy.
One hundred deaths occurred in
Parral on Sunday. Fifty deaths
have been occurring daily In
Chihuahua City. 100 Caily in Tor
reon and in Saltillo, Monterey and
other northern and central Mexi
can tilies. The supplies of drugs
have been exhausted and, in
many Instances, whole families
have died without medical treat
ment or drugs. Volunteers are
joining the White Cross, the or
ganization In Mexico similar to
the American Red Cross and phys
icians are being sent from place
to place to care for the sick.
SECRECY
EVIDENT
PREPARATION
HUGHES TELLS OF
l!
AIR PROGRAM
Former Republican Candidate
for President, Appointed by
Wilson to Probe Situation,
Renders Report
(By Review T.eaied Wlrs)
WASHINGTON, Oct. 31. The long
awaited report on the aircraft inves
tigation, conducted during the last
five months by Charles E. Hughes,
and Attorney General Gregory was
placed before President Wilson today
and made public.
Delays and wastes of the production
program, the report declares, were
due chiefjy to "defective organiaztion
of the work of aircraft production and
the serious lack of competent direc
tion of that work by the responsible
officers of the signal corps."
No fault is found with the manage
ment of aircrawt affairs since the re
organization of last May which placed
John D. Ryan in charge. The civilian
personnel of the aircraft production
boar J is exonerated of wrong doing.
Attorney General Gregory, in a let
ter transmitting the report to Presi
dent Wilson says he is in "substantial
accord" with the findings by Mr.
Hughes.
The report finds no "graft" in the
generally accepted sense, but makes
recommendations for proceedings
against army officers held guilty or
dealing with corporations in which
they were interested.
The chief waste from the original
appropriation of $691,851,866 the re
port says was in the abandonment of
two types of airplanes one of them
the Bristol and failure to salvage, ag
gregating about $24,000,000. : Figures
show that last May $134,000,000 of
that great appropriation had teen dis
bursed and up to October 1, the exM
penJiture had reached about $140,000,
000 for all aviation purposes. This did
not include expeditures of the sales
department which buys material and
resells it to manufacturers and for
advances for building plants. Con
tracts let however, committed about
$470,000,000 of the fund. The figures
are given in .nswer to the general
charge that the sum had all been ex
pended with practically no results.
The attorney general concludes In
his letter of transmittal "that no such
profits have been allowed as to justify
a charge of bad faith."
Coi. E. A. Deeds, about whom raged
most of the charges which brought on
the investigation, the report recom
mends, should be brought before a
court martial for sending confidential
war department information on the
aircraft situation to former business
associates in Dayton, Ohio, and for
being sponsor last February for a
"grossly misleading statement" to the
effect that the "first American built
battle planes are today en route to
the front in France
Criminal prosecutions of three army
officers are recommended on the
ground that they transacted business
with corporations in which they were
financially interested. These officers
are: Lt. Col. J. G. Vincent, forme?
vice-president of the Packard Motor
Car company, now in charge of the
airplane engineering division of the
aircraft production bureau;. Lt. Col.
George W. Mixter, a stockholder in
the Cnrtiss Airplane and Motor cor
poration, production manager of the
aircraft bureau, and Sec. Lt. Samuel
B. Vrooman, jr., inspector of propeller
lumber, and stockholder in the S. B.
Vrooman company of Philadelphia,
which sold mahogany to the govern
ment for airplanes.
Mr. Hughes concluded his report
with the- statement that "it is not
within the province of this report to
make recommendations with respect
to administrative policy, but it should
be said that under the direction of Mr.
Ryan and Mr. Potter there has been
improvement in organization and pro
gress has been made in gratifying
measures."
William C. Potter, to whom Mr.
Hughes referred, is assistant director
of aircraft production.
The general conclusions and recom
mendations by Mr. Hughes follow:
"The evidence discloses conduct,
which although of a reprehensible
character cannot be regarded as af
fording a sufficient basis for charges
under existing statutes but there are
certain acts shown, not only highly
improper in themselves but of special
significance, which should lead to dis
ciplinary measures. The evidence I
with respect to Col. Edward A. Deeds
should be presented to the secretary
of war to the end that Colonel Deeds
may be tried by court-martial under
articles 95 and 96 of the articles of
war for his conduct (1) in acting as
confidential advisor of his former
business associate, H. E. Talbott of
the Dayton Wright Airplane company.
IS
FINDINGS
:-
(Continued on Pace Two)
PEACE RESTS
WITH ALLIED
Ul
FORMALLY AS WELL AS IN REAL
ITY, PRESIDENT WILSON
WASHES HIS HANDS FINALLY
OF MATTER AS NEWS OF TUR
KEY'S WITHDRAWAL ARRIVES
CABINET IS IN SESSION
ARMISTICE PROGRAM TO BE SUB
MITTED TO GERMANY WILL
CONTAIN ONEROUS CONDITIONS
TO WHICH SHE MUST SUBMIT
FOR TEMPORARY PEACE
(By Review Leased Wire)
WASHINGTON, Oct. 31. Presi
dent Wilson cleared np today his
task as intermediary for armistice
and peace pleas of the central
powers, just as press dispatches
were bringing news of Turkey's
surrender and of events foreshad
owing an early collapse of Austro
Hungarian arms.
Formally as well as actually the
whole question of the conditions
on which the war may end now is
before the American and allied
representatives in Paris. The next
step probably will be the decision
of these representatives on armis
tice terms, unless before this is
reached Austria follows the exam
ple of Bulgaria and Turkey and
capitulates in the field before the
great drive that is cutting her
forces to pieces in Italy.
Terms of Armistice
It may be stated that, while the
armistice program which the Germans
await may not differ essentially from
predictions fhat lt will include sur
render of the German navy, disarma
ment of the German armies and occu
pation of German strongholds, the
framing of the program has not been
completed and any informal announce
ments are premature.. Exchanges be
tween the American and allied gov
ernments and discussion among1 the
representatives in France still are in
progress. It was intimated today that
purely military phases of the prob
lem probably had been worked out in
advance by the supreme war council.
but that unhurried deliberations are
necessary to dispose of questions in
volved in the making of permanent
peace which must be dealt with by
finally fixing terms of an armistice.
Sent to Council
Secretary Lansing made public dur
ing the day a note handed to Ambas-
(Contlnued on Paga Two)
FIRE DAM TO
SUPPLIES QUITE
HEAVY YESTERDAY
Mine Supply Department of
Copper Queen Crippled by
Early Morning Blaze; Will
Rebuild Immediately
A fire of mysterious origin, starting
about 5:10 o'clock yesterday morning,
completely razed the building occu
pied by the supply department of the
Copper Queen branch of the Phelps
Dodge company. No estimate of dam
age has been obtainable, for the rea
son that insurance was carried and it
was impossible to estimate until the
ruins cooled off sufficiently for work
ers to get at It, just what amount of
salvage there would be. There was
several hundred thousand dollars
worth of supplies In the building.
Plans already have been drawn and
the company will rebuild at once on
the same site.
The company was at a loss yester
day to account for the possible origin
of the fire. The watchman, Charles
Ilinos, said he had been in the supply
house at 4:45 and went from there
to ti;o mnclilne shops on his regular
rounds. At that time there was no
smoke or otTier sicn of fire. Arthur
Fisher, engineer, who passed the sup
ply house at 5 o'clock, said at that
time there was no fire visible.
Between 10 and 15 minutes later
'AD Ml MP I
fill uUUIlUIL
(Continues on Page Two)
SUGARLESS BOWLS WILL NOW BE FILLED BY
I UUVtKINMtUNl a I'UULI
PER CENT INCREASE, OR
WASHINGTON, Oct. 21. The sugar allowance of two pounds monthly
a person for householders was increased to three pounds monthly today
by Food Administrator Hoover, effective tomorrow. The sugar regulations
also were revised to permit the purchase of the entire month's supply for a
family at one time. This relaxation of the restrictions placed on the use
of sugar four months ago yas made possible. Mr. Hoover's statement said.,
through the rapid manufacture of the beet sugar crop in the west, the new
cane crop in the south, reductions of consumption in manufacturing, freer
transportation conditions and patriotic conservation by the public.
LEADER
ISSUE
STATEMENT FOR
E
Roosevelt and Taft Join in
Public Statement, Setting
Forth in Logical Terms
Their Position
(By Review Leased Wire)
NEW YORK, Oct. 31. Theodore
Roosevelt and Wm. II. Taft issued
here today a joint appeal for elec
tion cf a republican majority in con
gress. The statement was said to
be the first ever composed and signed
by two former presidents of the
United States.
Seated at a table in the Union
League club, they prepared the state
ment which fallows:
"We approach this subject as Ameri
cans and only as Americans. When
this war broke out we would have
welcome action by the president which
would have eliminated all questions
of party politics. Instead cf this, par
tisian lines have been strictly drawn
from the first and now the president
announces that ' only democrats can
be entrusted with future power and
only those democrats who do his will.
Because of the reflection on other pa
triotic Americans we appeal for fai
play. '
"Tlje next congress will serve from
March" 4, 1919, to March 4. 1921. In
that period the war must be fought
to unconditional surrender, unless this
is achieved before.
"The terms of world peace must be
settled.
"The democratic administration,
after expending billions of treasure
and exercising more absolute power
than any administration in our his
tory must give an account of its stew
ardship. "The change from war conditions to
peace must be brought about with the
least disturbance and the work of re
construction must be broadly begun.
"A republican congress will be much
better qualified than one controlled by
democrats to aid the country in adopt
ing the measures needed for these four
great fasks. First, even as a min
ority party the republicans made the
winning of the war possible by pass
ing the original draft bill. Without
this we could not have trained and
landed the two millions of men now
in France. As a minority party the
republicans forced upon a reluctant
president and secretary of war, aftei
an injurious delay of four month's the
amended draft act, without which we
could not put two more millions as
the front next July. The speaker, the
leader and the chairman of the mili
tary committee of the democratic
bouse opposed the original draft with
all the vigor possible.
"The new senate must approve, by
two-thirds vote, the terms of peace.
These terms should be settled not
by one man only. It is one man con
trol we are fighting in this war to
suppress. The peace treaty must be
approved by the great body of the
American people. The president has
indicated a willingness to make a
peace by negotiations. He has not de
manded as he might have done in
three notes that which the American
people demand, an unconditional sur
render. His exchange of notes with
Germany has caused a deep concern
among our people lest he may by his
partying with her, concede her a peace
around a council table Instead of a
sentence from a court. The fourteen
points which the president and Ger
many assume that they have already
agreed upon are so general and vague
that such a peace would be no treaty
at all, but only a protocol to an in
terminable discussion. The president
Is without final power to bind the
United States to those fourteen points
although his language does not sug:
gest lt. Still less has he power to
hind our noble allies. We do not know
hat these points include all that our
illies may Justly demand, cr do not
concede something they may Justly
withhold. For what they have done
or us, we -owe our allies the highest
Tood faith. It Is of capital Import
ance that we Bhould now elect a sen-
REPUBLICAN SID
(Continued on Pag Two)
UJr ALL.UW1HU fir II
THREE POUNDS PERSON
L
"FLU" FOR WEEK
Steady Improvement in Train
ing Camps Noted; Theaters
Reopen in Chicago, Denot
ing Betterment
" (Br Review Leased Wire)
WASHINGTON, Oct. 31. Steady
improvement In health conditions at
army camps and cantonments for the
week ending October 25 is noted in
the health report, made public tonight
at the office of the surgeon general
of the army. With new influenza
cases totaling a little more than 19,-
000 (Decrease of more than 60 per
cent from the previous week) and
pneumonia cases (5,961) showing pro
portionate decrease, hospital admis
sion rate dropped to 1792 and death
rate to 92 per 1000 from the previ
ous week's 190 per 1000.
While the figures show that the
crest of the epidemic is well passed,
the report said influenza and paeu
monia probably would be present . in
the camps for' some weeks, possibly
through the winter, due chiefly to the
constant arrival cf new men not be
fore exposed to the disease.
New cases of influenza in the camps
reported for the 24 hours ending at
noon today totalled 2246 against 3105
the day before. Pneumonia cases
numbered 3S4 today, against 398 yes
terday. Deaths reported at 135 were
fewer than since the epidemic began
September 13.
MINNESOTA HEALTH RECORD
(By Review Leased Wire)
ST. PAUL, Minn., Oct. 31. Influ
enza reports to the state board of
health today showed 1690 new influ
enza cases, 1S9 of pneumonia and S3
deaths in 111 towns sending tele
graphic reports. The list included
250 new cases in St. Paul.
More than 150 fire refugees in the
Cloquet fire district now are suffer
ing with influenza, according to a mes.
sage received late today at state mili
tary headquarters from Adjutant Gen
eral W. F. Rhinow. who Is at Cloquet.
EPIDEMIC IS GROWING
(Bv Review Leaaed Wire)
CASPER. Wyo., Oct. 31. The in
fluenza epidemic set a new record here
tonight, when 37 new cases were re
ported as having developed with in
the last 24 hours. Twenty-seven deaths
have thus far resulted from the di
sease. Reports here are to the effect
that the Big Horn basin district of
Wyoming is hit harder by the epidem
ic than other portions of the state.
NO BETTERMENT NOTED
(By Revjew Leased Wire)
DENVER, Colo.. Oct. 31 No ma
terial change was noted by officers
of the state health board in the fig
ures on the influenza epidemic, sub
mitted to them from various cities
and counties of the state today. To
tals of 967 new cases reported and
sixty deaths led to the assertion that
the lifting of the ban on public gath-
(Continued on Poe Two)
ARMY
HAS
ES
ENDING THURSDAY
Russian People and Army
Give Ovation to Soldiers
And Commander of British
(By Review Leased Wire)
TOKIO, Tuesday. Oct. 29. (By
the Associated I'ress. ) A war
office communication issued to
day says:
"Gen. Knox, chief ot tne Brit
ish military mission In Siberia,
arrived at Omsk last Saturday.
He was warmly welcomed by a
large number of officials of the
government and eunrds of honor.
The commander-in-chief of the
Russian troops held a review at
noon, which was participated In
by all the Omsk garrison, who
cheered Gen. Knox.
"British troops arrived in Omsk
AUSTRIA ASKS
FOR TERMS OF
HER ENEMIES
DEPUTATION IS ALLOWED TO
CROSS ITALIAN FIGHTING
FRONT FOR PRELIMINARY
POUR PARLERS ACCORDING TO
VIENNA COMMUNICATION
AUSTRIANS ARE IN ROUT
MORE THAN 50,000 CAPTURED
WHILE 300 GUNS, VAST STORES
OF MUNITIONS AND STORES
HAVE BEEN CAPTURED: EN
TIRE ARMY ENDANGERED
VIENNA, via London, Oct. 31.
An Austrian deputation has bee.i
permitted to cross the fighting line
for preliminary pour parlers with
the Italian commander, according
to the official announcement to
night. AUSTRIANS ARE ROUTED.
(By Review Leased Wire)
WASHINGTON. Oct. 31. Austrians
have been completely routed east of
the Piave and with great difficulty
are sustaining the incessant pressure
of the Italian troops in file mountain
region, in the plain and in the Alpine
foothills of Veuetia. Enemy masses
are described as "streaming In con
fusion" down the mountain valleys in
attempts to reach passes on the Tag
liamento. I - Prisoners, guns, war mat-riaL. and
storehouses, scarcely touched, fell
into the hands of the Italians. Czecho
slovak troops are operating with the
third Italian army, which is pushing
ahead, overwhelming and capfuring
the enemy.
In the Grappa region, the Italians
renewed the attack today and cap
tured the plateau of Asiaso, the
salient of Solaro, Mounts Suinoncia
and Prassaolan, Asolone and Col Cap
rile and Col Houatto.
The total number of prisoners cap
tured now exceeds 50.000 and of the
gun3 'captured more than 3H have
been counted.
"The successes of- our armies are
becoming more and more stupendous."
said the dispatch. "The enemy is
completely routed east of the Piave
and the enemy is with great diffi
culty sustaining the incessant pres
sure of our troops in the mountain
region, in the plain and in the Alpine
foothills of Venetia. Our armies are
aiming irresistibly toward the objec
tives which have been designated.
"The enemy masses are streaming
in confusion down the mountain val
leys in'an attempt to reach passes
on the Tagliamento. Prisoners, guns,
war materials and store houses,
scarcely touched, fell into our hands.
"The twelfth army, after having
completely taken possession of the
height of Cesene. is fighting to con
quer the pass of Quero. The eighth
army has conquered the ridge be
tween, the valley of Follina and tho
valley of the Piave and has occupied
the pass of Serravalle. advancing to
ward the plain of Consignlio. aiming
at the plain of Pordenone. The tenth
army has brought its front on the
l.ivenza.
"The third army is pushing ahead
overwhelmingly and capturing .'the
enemy who offers a bitter resistance.
Czecho-Slovak troops are participat
ing iu the action.
"In the Grappa region our troops
renewed their attack and this morn
ing succeeded in conquering Col Cap-
(Continued on Pae Three)
on Sunday. Gen. Vologvosky,
commander of the Russian troops,
received them. A trmmphal
arch which had been built at the
entrance to the railroad station
was decorated with the Union
Jack. The Russian troops and
the populace generally. Including
school children, lined the streets
and gave the Britishers an ova
tion. Great Britain was hailed
as the savior of Russia. The
Siberian government distributed
publications welcoming the vis
itors, while the newspapers en
thusiastically praised British,
chivalry in rescuing Russia."

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