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Chicago eagle. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1889-19??, February 08, 1902, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84025828/1902-02-08/ed-1/seq-6/

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MR. CHARLES HANNIFIN.
The Popular Proprietor of the Pan-American Is Talked of for County Clerk
THEY TRY NEW CROPS
KANSAS FARMERS ALWAYS READY
TO EXPERIMENT.;
Tlic-y lliif l-'lriu Pii I lh Unit tliu Still
of Their Stutc Will Kul-c Anything
'I he Hcconl-Ilrculiliiu Wheat Crup
of the Vinr 11)01.
The advance of Kansas to the first
idiu-u anions the whont-iirodiioliig coin
iiimiiwciiIMis npilii calls attention to
the wonderful iitotltictlvenoxs of that
.State. .It Is nlo calcnlatcil to make
one rolled on the remarkable' history
f agricultural experiment!! by the
Kan.tas fanners. In the early '60s there
wis hlgh-messme wheat growing, but
It Ulil not reach the volume, nor even
tho relative Importance, of the crops
of tho last few years. The crop of
1001 aggregated more than 00.000.000
bushels, by far the largest of any
.State In the Uulou. This crop Is al
ued ut more than S50.000.000.
Whom raising In Kansas has passed
Ihrough many experimental stages, as
has the growing of many other agri
cultural products. At ilrst It was tup
posed that only xprlng wheat could
Ik; produced with prollt In the State.
This Idea was dispelled by tho demon
utratlons of T. ,. Henry, known as
the "wheat king," who owned at one
time (iO.000 acres of laud near Abilene.
Henry Introduced winter wheat. One
year (187(1) he raised moro than L'OO,
000 bushels which he sold at about
Sl.'JO per bushel. lie revolutionized
wheat raising In his State. At present
the spring wheat crop Is an Inconsid
erable Item In tho total product.
In spite of tho fact that Kansas has
led tho prairie States In agricultural
development, nnd has held tho center
if the Ntngo for many years, thero have
been times In tho experimental pro
cesses when Its people suffered dis
paragement for their foolish and un-
profitable methods. It used to be said
that a Kansan would plan anything;
that ho hnd to be shown that a thing
would not grow before ho would be
lieve his State could not produce it.
Tor example, there are xald to be '-',500
vnrletles of apples. State reports show
that ut least '.',000 of these have been
tried In the Sunflower State, many of
iliom proving utter failures, of course,
but the best varieties being establish
ihI through this Indiscriminate but coti
elusive method of demonstration.
A story Is told of Secretary Mauler
of the agricultural department that ho
once Islted the French market In New
Orleans and thero for tho lirst time
nav macaroni. Ho was Inquisitive
about tho curlous-looklug food prod
uct. Ho was told of the various uses
to which the, article could bo put. Ho
declared that he believed "the stuff
would grow In Kansas," and expressed
his determination to try It.
In recent years tho Kansas farmers
havo learned through their own exper
iments nml through tho useful Infor
mation of tho agricultural schools
what crops aro best adapted to their
holl and climate, what parts of tho
State tiro best for this or that variety,
when to plant and how, how to light
crop enemies, etc. This practical school
applies to cereals, fruits and cattle. It
Is wholly prohablu that tho present
preference for wheat over corn will bo
permanent since It has been demon
strated that as lino winter wheat can
Imj ralhpd in Kansas as In any other
part of tho world and with much moio
certainty of success than attends tho
raising of coin, says tho Kansas City
Stnr.
It seems Improlmblo that tho world's
wheat supply will become orcrlnrgo as
a result of this change In Western
States. Tim product of tho Eastern
Slates 1 1 growing less and less. As
an Illustration: Two counties In Kan
sas produced this year moro than 11,
(Kx),oou bushels of whent-moro than
all the New Kngland States and Jer
sey. iH-iawnre, Alabama, Arkansas,
.Mniitiiiia and .South Carolina combined.
LUXURY IN THE HOUSE.
I'miner Mciiilur Ih AiiiiihI nt HU'h
i:l 11 i pint'ii t nml Dcciinitliiii". '"'
"Slmdo of iilll llolmau! It's enough
to make the old man turn over In his
grave! And if Dookery of Mlz.oura
vus hero he'd lioro fall In a lit on tho
iloor."
Ho sto.-l in the hall of tho IIouso of
ItepresoiitathL-s contemplating tho
rich innhogati desks, tho hnudsomo
furnishings, tho gilt and decorations,
with a choleric and deprecatory eye.
Ho was attired In black broadcloth,
tho vest cut low, showing u wldo ex-
pause of unstarched shirt front, cross
ed by a !ltt:l: string tie. Ills thin
soled boots of soft leather were care
fully polished, and he held a black
slouch hat In his hand.
"I was In Congress In the dnys or
'retrenchment and reform,' " ho said,
"and we had no such ilolti's as these.
Them chairs, with a little 1 ecu 11 lug,
was good fo ten years longer, ami
thero wasn't nary 1111 Initial enrved In
the desks, lit my day the red plush
sofys In tho lobby was a dream of ori
ental splendor, and 1 see they mint
have lino leather sofys now.
"And as for these new committee
rooms, tho appropriations In particu
lar, they air n scene of Imperialistic
sump'shusnos that the Caesars never
Imagined 1 walked through this morn
ing, my feet sinking to tho ankles in
velvet carpets, and every inovo rolled
ed In the polish of tho inahog'ny tables,
desks mid chairs. These hero plain
Congressmen, corn-fed products of the
West, must feel mighty out of place
amid such surrotindlii's of luxurious
uess and regal splendor. They tell me
there Is $1,000 world of gold In the
ceilings of tho Speaker's room, by way
of decoration, and that a third of a mil
lion dollars has been put In tiling and
inahog'ny. leather, gilt and palntln'.
"Well, I reckon after all there ain't
not bin' too good for tho great Ameri
can people, and theso nlr tho represen
tatives of tho people, nnd tho people
they pays the freight," whereat he
shook his head, says tho Washington
Star, and walked away.
COCKATOO KILLS CAT.
I'ellne AttackH liO-Ycar-Olil lllril n ml
MeelH Ileal h.
This Is a story of n poor pussy and
"lllniico," a pugnaelous cockatoo own
ed by Policeman Charles McKcunn. It
happened Friday. Itlauco, as usual,
was lu tho yard and was engaged In
picking a bono from n pinto of scraps,
when tho cat, ti tierce, hungry-looking
feline, inado Its appearance. Slowly
crouching ready to spring, It nindo Its
way Inch by Inch toward the suppos
edly unsuspecting bird, which was
watching tho feline's movements from
tho corner of its eye. At tho distance
of a yard tho cat made tho spring.
Llko a yellow streak Its body leaped
toward tho cockatoo. Quick us lis
leap was It was not uulek enough Tor
tho sagacious Illauco. As the cat
leaped Into tho air Hlauco met the ani
mal with his great horn-llko claws,
strlklug It Mjunroly In tho face.
.Surprised, but not shaken lu courage,
tho cm rolled over and over, and after
recovering Itself gave a faint cry and
leaped again. Tills time Itlauco struck
It viciously with 0110 claw and one
wing, knocking it spinning, nt the
same time shrieking out In his high
voice: "Illanco, lllanco! Scat! seat
Aw, poor pussy, poor pussy."
Again the cat came to time, and
again did tho bird meet it squarely in
tho face with Its claws, and then, be
fore It could recover Itself to spring
again, Itlauco Jumped on Its hack,
picking its body with a vengeance that
made tho fur tly. For over ll vo min
utes both bird and niilmal waged bat
tle, until weakened by loss of blood
ami the terrllle drubbing admiulsteied
to it by tho bird, tho cat crawled out
In tho alloy, where It dropped dead,
pursued lu tho hist by Itlauco, Hushed
with tho glory of victory. Itlaneo sus
tained but few Injuries from the bat
tle, and doplto a little stiffness and a
slight loss of appetite he was all light
tile next day.
Tho cockatoo has been lu tho Me
Keiina family for nearly sixty yearn,
having been handed down liom' three
generations. It Is a handsome bird of
tho South Africa variety, while lu col
or, with n beautiful yellow topnot.
i'hlladelphla Inquirer.
ON A DOWN GRADE,
AilMMitiirnii Trip of 1.10 .Mile- on 11
llniiclrur.
Sir Martin I'miwuy, ilurlir- his trav
elling III the llollvlau Andes, ellllibed
Ciisapnlca by rail, a height of l.'i.iiOil
feet. Then ho was given a handcar,
four wheels, a platform, a seat and a
brake-mid on that oonvoynnco inado
a memorable trip back to I.lnm.
Cravltatlon was our engine, ho says.
It gripped us lu tho midnight dark
ness of the tunnel, where, sightless, wo
felt tin ground as If It wero sliding out
beneath us. Tho wheels whirred.
There was tho sense, If not tho aspect,
of motion, till tho tunnel's eyo camo lu
view ahead, a inero speck of light re
vealing stalactite Icicles on walls and
roof. Larger ami brighter It grow; llko
a bomb from a mortar wo burst forth
into the day.
Down wo went, down nnd down. Tho
kilometer posts How by us like a rail
ing. We wero swunp, round corners
and plunged lu mid out of the night of
tunnel". These, when curved, as they
frequently were, seemed to screw
about tts with a motion of their own.
Wo dashed along the margin of giddy
preelplies, and over unpaved bridges
with giddy depths below, llanglwent
the wheels against a stone fallen upon
the ralN. Tho ear was Hung Into the
air, but fell safely back.
Tho brief twilight was soon over, and
solid nlu'ht eiuno on. Then began the
romance of this loO-mlle ride, and fan
cy was turned free to dignify our High!
with Imaginary terrors.
There was no inoon. but .luplter and
Venus were bright enough to east a
shadow. The Southern Cross was vis
ible Just ahead. The Milky Way shone
bright. Meteors dinted across the sky
and the hilltops reflected Hashes of
summoi' Huhttilng.
Now and again We passed the house
of some railroad employe, where a light
shone ami dogs rushed barking forth;
nut we hurried on unceasingly, down
and down, rejoicing In our furious
night.
The next morning the end of the run
came, without accident, at Lima,
Youth's Companion.
Sciii-I'plii Collector. CT
Collectors of scarf plus or tlo pins.
to bo more correct tiro one of tho fads
of .Now lork men. The recent robbery
of l'aul (Illicit Thebuud by his vnlct
revealed that Mr. Thcbaud was one
who cultivated this hobby.
One of the largest collections of the
kind was left some years ago by ",11m
mle" Wood, an eccentric bachelor, well
known In New York society, who lived
at the old New York hotel. Mr. Wood
left nearly Sou pins, which were dis
tributed to various friends. He was a
bachelor and a native of Ihiltlmore. His
hair and whiskers wero llery red. and
lor a long time he dyed them, making
them almost supernatural and Mcplils
tophelcan lu their effect. Suddenly ho
gave up the deception, and afterward
appeared with suow-whlto hair ami
side appendage. He was always lu
love with the last society beauty, hut
he would never propose, and he took
deepest umbrage If any of them mar
ried. To 0110 daughter of a socially
prominent family, a famous beauty
still, he had left a huge sum lu his will.
On her marriage, however, he maniiged
to ehango tho amount of zeros and the
punctuation points so that her dowry
from him fell from thousands to hun
dredsnot being Inclined to further ex
press his dissatisfaction lu a legal codi
cil. William Cutting and Center Hitch
cock have collections of tie pins almost
as extensive as Is that of Mr. Thehaud.
Many of these were given them at wed
dings at which they were ushers.
New York Times.
t WHAT
.YOUR KYKft
mJ-
jy
JMZOS
CVRM ALL EVE DISUSES,
INflAMtO MS.6CAUD0N U90.&
OFIANULATION ETC. '
MURINE CURES PINK EYE
STRENGTHENS lEAI EYES.
Cures issl I'ii.'lliN.
Villi". It'll I'JIM.
Cures Murmur eyes.
Cures liilliiimil t-yes.
Ciiiin Dye Hit's eyes.
Itelluvrsc)!) iln.
l.'mi! irr:iiiiiWt!im.
'Is 1111 oyu food.
lU'lllllVI'H IIIHIIIIIKXIKIIS
I'uivs oMTwnW.i'rt eves
C'uiTi rmizliiivisof 1I1U
Cures llii-lmiglnixcyu!i
Cures ulcers 1111 uyes.
Cons chililrt'ii's eyes.
'T? I'uivs houluson eyelid
1' Kvilori's eyelashes.
c, curesiteuuiguuuuurn
3 log.
1 1 1 : 1 i:VKS Inmicillutch- I'i'sti 1 111 ilielc
tui tin at lii'llllmicv liv tun ill s nf Miii'Iuk.
Murine will ireveiit eye tt'iilllilesiif KI'IIOUI,
iiii.lillli.s Him sllenuilii'ii tlielr eyes IT
weak. iqinlTSHIONAI. MUX tulil stilileiits
nun 11 menu 111 .Murine.
siu.it nv am. nitrouisTs ami opti.
cians.
RICHES IN THE TROPIC8.
Ki'-i'iirclii'M liiThiiNuHculouH Arul'rov
Inu In lie Very I'rolitiilile.
l'ew persons havo any Idea what
prospects of wealth are opening lu
tropical countiles. It Is only within
a few years that any attention has
been paid to many huge areas that are
now found to bo rich in commodities
which the world needs. Of course, this
work of studying the tropical world Is
still In Its early stages and much ro
main to be done, even to procure 11
comparatively complete list of the
tropical plant that are. most useful.
In tho Inst two or thiee years It has
been feared that the demand for rub
ber would exceed the supply. Hnt re
cent studies have revealed new Holds
that are already beginning to contrib
ute to tho rubber supply. The list of
rubber plants Is eoiistnntly growing.
Within two years a number of trees
and vines never before utilized havo
begun to yield a harvest of rubber.
This valuable ptodiict bids fair to play
in the humid regions or tho tropics
about the same part as the precious
meiiils do lu temperate legions, says
the New Ynri; Sun.
In the last ten years the Congo Tree
Slate, I'reiieh i.'.ilana, Madagascar ami
l.ngos hoo niHauceil eiioruiotisly In
the value ol their exports, the basis of
their prospeilty being duo 10 India rub.
her. 'I ho latest declined expoits fiom
(ho I'reiieii Congo, amounting to about
M, -in 1.1 km 1, were half India rubber.
Alter tho (all of Khartum. W. CmisIIh
a Trench economist, cxprcNscd the
opinion tluit the valley ol the Upper
Mle. iiiyasiaieii lor mi many years by
tho Multilists, would contribute prac
tically nothing to tho wealth or the
win Id for the next half century. Hut
tho l.'pper Nllo has since Ihen lidded
f.'jo tons ol rubber. In l-'ieuch luilo-
China is the largo legion known as Up
per l.:t-H and thu Laotian Shan .States,
which until iccently havo never been
of tho slight-Mi economic Importance
lu tho foreign trade. In ISO!), after
French expeils had reported that theso
regions wero rich in valuable resoiuces,
a little rubber began to be sent to mar
ket, lu tho Hist year only Hfly tons
wero oxporu'd. but In tho year follow
ing l!)0O), tilu tons wero exported, al
most nil of It from tho Trail Nlnh dls
trlct, which .'s only a very small part
of tho areas In which rubber Is found
to tlirlro.
Tho advance of our Unowlcdgo of
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ILLINOIS
WILLIAM C. KUESTER,
SUPERINTENDENT.
1994 N. Western Avenue, CHICAGO.
Telephone Lake View 270.
SIMEON W. KING
LAWYER, UNITED STATES COMMISSIONER
Commissioner of Deeds for all the States
and Territories and
Passport Agent
MONADNOOK BTTTXjiDXlKrG-
Qll
Union Lock Poultry Fence.
For Poultry, Rabbits, g. Orchards, Gardens, etc.
ro
mtt
sJ
m
3833
I'.utuajuly ll. um
Stronger nnd donor apaclnjg thon any otlior make.
Our Union Lock Hog, Flold and Cattlo Fence. Union Lawn
Fonco Gates, etc., guaranteed first class.
C Your dealnr should handlo this line ir not, write U9 fol
prices. Catnlo-uo :ree.
UNION FENCE CO.. DE KALB, ILL., U. S. A.
rubber plants hi tin- tropic Is only ouo
phiixo of the activity of botanical ex
ploration there for tlu bouollt of coin,
inerce. Annates do CcoKi'aphlo mi.vh
that systematic elloi'ts nru now bulnj;
untile to cttend the cultivation of thu
raiule tlbor plant. Plantation owners,
experimental station and coiiki'cxxcm,
lu which expel Is discuss the ilestlon
lu all Its bearliipi. nro now cooperat
ing to develo,i a new Industry on a
hirsa Willi", l!:iniU or China pra, of
the nettle family. Is kcowii largely In
China, .lapitn :ind the Malay Aiclilprl
ttpi for cimrv "lot tin mid corihiKc It
forms a luro part of the cloihln of
the Chlueso peasantry who. even in
the roldest weather, wear nothing but
China srifs or cotton, Tim variety
which h t'lown most largely In South
ern China and Northern ludo China Is
expelled to a considerable extent to
Kiurluud Another variety Known as
Kreeii ramie thrives best lu .lava and
tho Suiiila Islands. Iloth plants mo
sensitive to cold, but the variety
known as wtiltc iiiinle stand moder
ate fiosts and thrive lu temperate cli
mates with proper soil and cultiva
tion. The d'oiclopiucnt of the ramie In
dustry has been retarded by the fact
that It is dlltlcult to obtain the liher.
which Is protected by a touch sl;ln that
resists most chemical dlssnlvuuts.
Great effort ire now belli); made to
overcome this dllllculty. A raiule con
Kress held two rtesslons last year and
It Is believed that the dllllculty will be
overcome.
Tho tllli'i icuco lu color between kiccu
mid bind; tea ha been ascribed to va
rious causes. Heccutly Mr. A so, or the
agricultural college at Tokyo, him In
vestigated tho subject, and ho oilers,
lu substance, the following explana
tion: in making green tea tho leaves
nro steamed as soon as gathered; lu tho
enho of black tea tho leaves are allowed
to ferment beforo drying. Tho resultJ
Is that the finished black tea contains
much less tautilii than the green con
tains. The original tea-leaf possesses
an oNldl.lug enzyme, which Is destroyed
in tuo green tea by steaming., in black
Urn, during fermentation, the enzyme
oxidizes the tannin and gives rise to u
brownlshcolorcd product.
SANITARY DISTRICT OF CHICAGO, l
Notice to Contractors.
Si'iiIimI ih'iiiiiiim iiiIiIitnm'iI to (lie Itimul of
l'nitei' nr tin. Siinliiirv lllxtrlci of i'IiL-mlm
llllll llllllllM'll. "I'l-IIIIIIKIlN fill- I 111. lIllllll'kM
nf Die Wiiti'i- Power I'liuil ut tin' I'liiiliullliii.-
Hui'i. Heir i.iit'Hpiii'i, ill,," win In- uri'lM'il
l.v the I'lii , or the Midi Sanitary IHmiIh nt
llooiii II III SiTiillty lUllliUIU.', rninipi, in.,
until 1- in iHiiinilmil llnici. of WnlncMliiy,
llli M'rom! ihic nl Ani'll. A. I). It'ti-' iiiiiI ulll
lie imlillrli oii-ni'il hy Midi Ito.inl of Tinsli'rs
in ii o un. oi Hie 110,1111 ni'in iniu iiii.i,
No Mil v ill ,e n-relvi'il llllll iIi'his1i-i mi
Ii-m iii-t-itini, mli-il iy iuu iinmlli'il nml Hfly
ti' ilolliii'K In iiimii-y in- ii i-i'ii'i
i'ln-i'1. i Un, mi im- iiiiniinil on niiic
reHiiiiiMi,i,. iv iiotni; liiislms in
tlie ('In of I'lilnipi. to In- nmiti'
ln.tiilii' in tin, niiii't- (r Hie I Ink of
ini Miniiuii nihtlli'l, liiii liioiii' nl' i In' I,
ulll In- iiiiiuii'il to Hie lililili'i- nnli'Ks r it
h'liril In tin, iitiiiniloniiii'iit ot tin- iiminKil
lllll'll llllllll.l- ullilll flllllll.il Will, lilu 1,1.1
HIII'll lll'lllll Hll'l'illl'llll'IIH llllll lilllU lilts lS
me i-nlli-il foi- hy Hat yi'iii'r.il hii'ililniii, H
of tlie x.iiiiuiy HlHtllii, nml i-lial - i.i, ill
Willi till Un eonilllliins In s.ilil h'1-iu-r il wpiei
lll-llllllllH. I Opll-S llf till' U'l'lll-I'lll hlll-l llll-ll
tloim mill in,, Hlii'i't of iIi'iimIiih un I ..- nl,
Inlllrll ill Un, nilli'i'M of tin. l'lil,.i' I'i,..l
llf till- SlIllllHiy JlUtl'llt.
A lininl or mi tiiirmei1 Miirty i iiiiiiuiiiy
lll lie ii'.iulri'il fur the t nl t liTnl iiciioim
mire of Hi.' i'uitiriM-1 In Hie Mini nf twelve
Iiiiniinil Kl :i(i) iliilliiis,
Tin- liiinii'x hIiiiII he fiillilsliril i ntniilete In
I'WT.) ili'tiill mn lenity lor h'it.iIiih wltlilii
lolly iIids iifini- Hie ilnle or Hit- oi.- o
lieglii wniK ii, lie IhmhmI I the I'lili-f llnal
lieer. 'l'lu lliiimi of TriiHti'c i-ui-hi.v ri'cnoK
the ilulit to reject miy or nil hlds.
lllililels niukt iireseiil evlili'iii'n kiilUfiutrii'y
to tlie llii.uil or TriiRlei's Hint tliey me rnllv
eoinin'leiit, linvf- Hie iii'iesnry fnillllli'S unit
pcrniilnry iinnirecs to pet form Hie work
reqiilicil In a MitlxfiM'tiiry iiimincr nml wltle
In tlin time sieeltleil.
HAMTAUV IIIKTIIICT III' CIllCACO.
Ily TlliniAtt A, .SMITH, Pivulilent.
A. II. I'dllTl.'lt. Clerk,
i'lilenue, 1'elJiusry 1, 100X
BRICK CO.
Canada.
xl(lllilllllllHttHT
"" fSr K
ga' SAL"".".".
D 17
Si
l!elc. WiiiikcKiui HrcwIimCoiiipniij.
It I with pleasure that wo cull the
j attention of tho trade, and private fam
ines, 10 me inci mat owing to tuo in
creasing demand for bottled ale and
porter of undoubted purity and of the
llnest quality, wo are I'ow bottling the
same, under our owu supervision.
Tho ireuuent use of adulterants nud
substitutes for mult and hops lu tho
manufacture of malt liquor has re
sulted In an liujulry for un article of
domestic manufacture, wholly free
from anything of u harmful or deleteri
ous nature, and at a price that would
commend Its use to all. Tho failure
hitherto to obtain such an artlclo has
led consumers to purchase I m nor ted
'goods at a high price.
Therefore we aro prepared to place
on tho market bottled alo uud porter
unexcelled lu quality, equal lu every
respect to tho Imported, at a much
lower price.
Our Roods being manufactured front
tho choicest barley malt ami tho best
hops In tho market, no substitutes
whatever being used, and, being bottled
by ourselves nt Waukegan, enables us
to offer to our customers nn absolute
guaranty of their purity and quality.
Families can obtain tbeso goods of
nil the leading fancy grocers, tho prin
cipal hotels, restaurants and druggists.
BK8LEY'S VYAKEGAN IUtEWIXU
CH).
Fortune' Hottlct! Hecr.
The Fortune Brewing Company has
added to Its large plant a mugulucent
bottling establishment. The new works
adjoin tho browcry on Van Buren
street, west of Desplalnes, nud are fit
ted up with the latest and most Im
proved machinery. Thclreapacltylsvery
great, and the quality of tho goods turn,
ed out of the ory best. Ouo of the
features of tho plant Is the arrange,
incut for cooling tho beer. Not only
has the latest cooling machinery been
Introduced, but tho building In which
the bottling It done Is adjoined by an
other building In which freezing ap
paratus Is placed. This keeps the torn,
pcraturo of the very walls at freezing
point all the time. Tho Fortune Brew
ery produces a beer which Is famous
tho world over. Now that Its bottling
works are completed, no residence
should be without It. Telephone "Mo
roo 40."
An nlr-eoollng system on a vast scab)
Is to be tried at the St Louis exposition.
Great fans will bring down a current
of cold nlr from a height of 800 feet
above tho earth nud pour It over the
grounds on hot days.
ELMER E. BEACH RAYMOND W. BEACH
Beach & Beach
LAWYERS
i ..ii - I, .I,
Suite 1501, Ashland Block,
CHICAGO.
Tolophono Control 1227.
I. H. WILLIAMS
69 Dearborn Street.
Room 20.
LOANS
On Furniture, Pianos, etc., with
out removal, t lowest pesiiblc ratM
4 Aflll H, ll.
HENRY B. TEFFT,
529 Stock Exchange Bldg.
CHICAGO.
CONTRACTING
ENGINEER
SPECIALTY:
POWER PLANTS,
HEA VY BUILDINGS,
HEA VY FOUND A TONS.
Phone Main 3689.
JOS. J. DUFFY.
JOSEPH J.
GENERAL
CONTRACTORS
907 Chamber
Telephone
IE0.W. JACKSON, JOHN J. CORBETT, W.E.BELL. CORNELIUS HOOAN,
PrwUMt ki.rtil.'cil. Onml Mtaiftr.
Telephone Central I BOO.
Telephone Main 3776. w
Jackson & Corbett Company
General Contractors
1104 Ashland Block, 59 Clark St.,
CHICAGO.
Corporation Work of Every Description.
W A.lYDOH.PfM. H.C.LVOON. F.C DREWS, 0. MCCARTHY.
y. Am. Soo. CX. Sfreurjp. Ooit'lSupt Supl. DndslBR and Dooklnn.
The Lydon & Drews Company
CONTRACTORS
FOR
Bridging, Docking, and Qtniral PiU Driving
ALSO DESIGNERS AND BUILDERS OK
Foundations, Bridges, Piers, Breakwatnra,
Lighthouses, Tunnels.
Pneumatic and Submarine Work.
Ylte'tJBSJiir w"1""" L!M! !: OHIOAGO
TELEPHONE, MAIN 700.
ASSERT
CEMENT PAVING
"177 LA SALLE ST.
gfflCAGO
TELEPHONE
MEAGHAM & WRIGHT,
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS FOR
Mica Hydraulic Cement
AND DEALERS IN
IMPORTED AND AMERICAN PORTLAND CEMENT.
Telephone Main 50.
108 and 309 Chamber ot Commerce Building, - CHICAGOr
M. J. SCANLAN
DUFFY & CO.,
of Commerce.
Main 4588.
ftSSfe
CENTRAL 2504.
-
' .. . H' i v.. j, ..A. - m j. v.

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