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Chicago eagle. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1889-19??, July 04, 1903, Image 7

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THE OHIOAOO HSA.OLES.
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HOW DISEASE IS BEING CONQUERED.
By Or. Andrew Wilton,
nil An announcement of much sclcntltlc Interest
J5 appeared In the newspapers recently In the shape
iy of details concerning a remedy for that common
Wl and often dangerous ailment, scarlet fever. Its
Jy promulgator, a Dr. Mosor, of Vienna, Is cahgulno
W concerning Its value In cutting short the ailment.
t He has selected a certain microbe which occurs In
H scarlet fever, and which he regards ns likely
Bfi ,0 represent the jrorm of the disease. This organ
ism Is artificially cultivated so ns to Insure the purity of
Its stock, and to avoid the possibility of the Intrusion of
other species of germs. When a pure culture has been
obtained It Is used to inoculate nn animal. As a result,
there appears to bo developed In the animal's blood a pecu
liar prlnclplo which Is known as an "antitoxin." The word
"scrum" Is a term applied to the tluld part of the blood In
all nnlmnls-lt Is, Indeed, tho blood minus Its corpuscles.
Hence It Is In the serum that the antitoxin Is found, and
this last Is developed ns tho direct result of the growth and
multiplication In It of the germs used for Inoculation.
When the antitoxin tnken from the animal's blood Is
nicd ns an Injection Into the tissues of a human being
attacked by the disease, It has the effect of modifying the
ailment. The development of the microbes In the body of
one animal produces n principle which Is fatal to their
growth In the body of another and different nnlmnl. Vac
cination Itself exemplltles such n process, for smallpox
natter, modified by Its transition through tho calf, nppears
as vaccine lymph, which Is' used for protection against
smallpox attack. Ho that, In reality, we nro thus causing
microbes that arc capable of producing disease to tight their
own kith and kin.
It Is work of this kind which wo may hope has been
accomplished for tho euro of scarlet' fever. Wo have
serums now In use for tho cure of diphtheria, typhoid
fever, cholera, lockjaw and plague. That for diphtheria
hat had a long and extensive trial both In hospitals and
In private practice. The results have been most gratify
ing. The dlsense, a terrible malady, as we all know, can
'be mastered by the use of the serum In a fashion possible
under no previous mode of treatment. Many a poor little
sufferer has had amplo cause to bless the progress of bac
teriological science which has placed the antitoxin In the
physicians' hands. The nntl-typhold scrum Is still on Its
trial, but here ngnln the outlook Is hopeful. Tbero Is like
wise a cholera untltoxln. the use of which has been tested
with success In India.
are taught In the nursery and the schoolroom; that deal
with bows and smiles, knives and forks, demeanor In the
street, and politeness In the home; we nrc probably as well
behaved as ever we were; but It Is In our general conduct
that wo seem, as a nation, to bo deteriorating.
Just think of tho difference there Is between the con
ditions of society at the beginning of the twentieth cen
tury nnd those that existed In tho seventies. Croquet was
Just beginning to give way to lawn tennis. Clolf was un
dreamed of as a gamo In which women might Join As to
cricket, hockey, and football, they were then men's games.
Hut now girls play them nil. Girls pride themselves on
being mnnly, Just ns our nice young mothers nnd our grand
mothers before them prided themselves on being gentle,
feminine creatures. They overdid It. They thought It tho
correct thing to scream If they saw a mouse, nnd to faint
If a finger bled. And our girls overdo tho manliness Juat
ns our mothers overdid the femininity. Aro good manners
generally declining? Or Is It only here and there that we
notice a roughness, nnd because It contrasts with tho rest,
accuse the whole? Is It really true that men nro less pol
ished, women louder of voice and more self-nsertlvc?
ROBERT J. REHSHAW
Painting and Decorating
1438 Wellington Street.
Telephone 141 Lake View,
LUTHIPt LOOMIt
President
WILLIAM LOOMlB JAS. A. HOOAN
Vloe President Cen'l Mgr. and teo'y
0
THE NEED OF RULES OF ETIQUETTE.
By fir. Mumnhr.
To those who desire to mnko their way In so
ciety, Its laws must be known nnd observed. It Is
n fairly laudable ambition, that of attaining and
holding a respectable rank In life; and If the
mlnutlnc of the process appear to bo childish mid
silly to minds occupied with matters of inorp mo
ment, they are reully no more so than the first
steps In any other pursuit tho faltering notes of
the student of piano or violin, the totterlmr ulcus
of the child learning to walk, the unwieldy stitches set In
by the novice tit tho needle.
"Good manners nre tho fruit of noble mind." somebody
ays; but what measure of mentnl nobility will suiiii-n to
Instruct the unlearned In the mysteries of the dinner tnble?
uoou manners nre much more the fruit of being accustomed
to move In wealthy circles than any direct consequence
of possessing n nobla mind.
Etiquette naturally divides Itself Into two seetlo me
that deals with good umnnerH of the superficial, every day
kind; and tho other thnt concerns tactful behavior. A man
or woman may bo perfectly equipped with the out waul
forms of courtesy and yet convey studied Insults by look,
or tone, or manner. In fact, It has often been said that no
one can bo so execrably rude ns a woman of tho highest
society who can administer a snub In a manner In which
no fault can bo found on the scoro of politeness.
So far ns superficial manners nro concerned, those thnt
PROBLEM OF THE DUST OF THE AIR.
Br Andrew Wlhon.
i The publication of Tyndnll's Instructive book
Kj entitled "The Floating Matter of the Air." marked
LI an era not only In respect of science at large but
fjl also In respect of many problems of public health.
Kf The demonstration of the nlr as a "stirabout" of
W floating dust particles opened the eyes of thoo
JL who rend to tho enormous dust cloud which is
Bk comprised In the great air ocean that surrounds
our globe. "Dust and disease" has become n
phrase which we accept because of the demonstration that
the latter often arises out of the former. We nrc safe In
saying thnt If we could abolish dust we should find many
diseases to disappear. It would be a gross mistake to sup
pose that dust Is universally dangerous. Much of It con
sists of mineral particles; some of It Is represented by
shreds of our clothing; some of It Is dead particles derived
from the bodies of animals and plants; some of It represents
the germs or spores of molds and yeasts and other form of
lower plant life; and some of It finally consists of disease
producing microbes. Of the universal diffusion of dust
nothing need be said. We only escape contact with It If
we go to tho mountain tops, or flush our lungs with tho
air of tho open sen. When wc enter the abodes of men
our Invasion by dust particles Is full nnd complete. In n
cubic meter of air taken from the open sea or mountain
tops there were found only six or ten germs. In old houses
In I'nrls the quantity found was 70,000 and over.
In our grent centers of population we have to fnee a
perpetual bombardment by dust particles of nil species.
.Sweeping arrangements of ordinary kind only distribute
them. The same may bo said of tho household sweeper
and the familiar duster. Thoro Is displacement of dust,
but no destruction. Even the corners of our rooms nnd the
crevices of our cornices nro harbors of refuge for the dust
atoms. That Is why In hospitals there nre no oiil-Ios In
the walls, but rounded surfaces Instead. Tho plan of the
housewife who uses damp tea leaves preparatory to her
swooping down with her broom or sweeper Is a concession
to an old Idea. For so long ns dust Is kept wetted It Is
not dangerous. It Is found thnt flushing the streets Is n
vastly superior process to sweeping them. The dust cart
Mioiild Im ii thing of tho past. Especially In summer should
Hushing bo carried out. Jt Is then that dirt dries and be
comes dust. It Is then nlso that we get food tainted', nnd
especially milk, with the result that the little children die
off In thousands from Infantile cholera, due "to the tainting
of their food. If to water disinfectants nre added wc ren
tier ourselves doubly safe. In the future we shall find
the housewife denllng with dust ns science recommends. I
read nlso of a system of cleaning carpets and other things
by sucking tho dust out of them by a vacuum process. Let
us bethink ourselves of n crusade against dust. Once
undertaken, tho grievous tlmo represented by the "spring
cleaning" may become a thing of tho pnst."
ILLINOIS STONE CO..
Dimension and Rubble Stone
QUARRIES AT LEHONT.
Main Office, cor. 22d and Lumber Sts.
TELetHOHE CANAl IJe.
Vitrei No. I. Yard No. a.
22d Lumber 8ta. CH ICAOO Eltton b., 1 Blk. North Dliltioi
Tal. Canal 136. Tel. Monroe eoi.
OLDEST LIVING MINISTER
' NEARS THE CENTURY MARK
r I AlvVvl
it a. Ti
m it r f jj s
M4y$kM7
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Rev. William Howe, D. D of 010
Massachusetts avenue, Cambridge,
Mass., la 07 years old. It Is believed
thnt Dr. Howe Is
the oldest living
clergyman In this
country. For n mnn
of bis ago ho Is re-
nmrkab'.o active.
Only a few weeks
ngp Dr. Howo out
dated at the funer
al of J. 8. Paine,
the well known
furnlturo manufac
turer. Dr. Howe observ-
bkv. wi. iiowk. ed his DOtn blth
day last year by preaching for fifty
minutes without notes at the Uroad
way Baptist Church. Cambridge.
lie was born In Worcester, and re
ceived an academic education In Am
herst academy. He graduated from
Colby University, then named Water
Vlllo College, In 1833, and from the
Newton Theological Seminary In 1830.
Following his studies at Newton he
established a circuit of eight mission
schools In Boston, One was In a sail
loft on Commercial street, from which
developed the Baptist Bethel on Han
over street. From another mission on
Friend street came the Union Baptist
church. Dr. Howo was ordained to
the ministry at Dr. Malcom's church,
then on Federal street, now the pres
ent Clarendon Street church. From
18(13 to 18T0 he was pastor of the
Broadway Baptist church, Cambridge.
He was one 'of the originators of the
Boston Associated Charities, and was
a member of the Boston School Board.
THE WEALTH OE THE WORLD IS
ESTIMATED TO BE $400,000,000,000
THE total wealth of tho world, while not exactly known, has been esti
mated at $400,000,000,000, sajs (lunton's Mngnzlnc. This is probably
an underestimate of the actual amount of money and property In
seml-elvlllxcd lands. Of this total the greater part Is owned by Ameri
cans and Europeans. Tho United States has somewhere near $100,000,000,000,
or nbout one-fourth of tho whole. The united kingdom Is the richest country
of Europe, Its wealth being estimated nt 11,800,000,000 or 302 per capita.
Of tho total England's share was 10,002,000,000; Scotland's 1,004,000,000;
Ireland's, 030,000,000, In American money (at $4.80 pound sterling) Great
Britain's wealth In 1805 was $50,008,800,000. A recent estimate makes It
$00,000,000,000, or $1,442 per capita (In 1001). Tho annual Income of Eng
land's population Is said to be $r.,G00,000,000, while the yearly saving Is
$1,048,000,000. It should be remembered that a largo amount of British
capital is nlso Invested In tho colonies of the empire and In foreign lands.
Franco Is tho next richest nntlou of Europe. Mulhnll estimated Its wealth
In 1803 at 0,000,000,000, or 252 per capita. A recent estlmato of France's
wealth makes $48,000,000,000, or $1,257 per capita (1001). According to Mul
hnll Germany's wealth In 1805 was 8,052,000,000, or 130 per capita. Prus
sia's share was more than half (4,040,000,000); Bavaria's, 040,000,000; Snx
on 's, 450,000,000; Wurtteraburg's, 37,00.000, whllo tho smaller Uennun
stites bad 1.337,000,000. According to n more receut estlmato Germany's
wealth Is $40,000,000,000, or $700 per capita (1001), German money loaned or
Invested nbroad amounts to $8,000,000,000 or more. Russia's wealth In 1805,
as Mulhnll estimated It. amounted to 0.425,000,000, or. 01 per capita. A
recent estlmnte places Russia's wealth at $32,000,000,000, or about $200 per
capita (estimating the population In 1801 at 108,000,000).
COATSKIN CHURNS USED
BY THE PERSIAN NOMADS
A method so primitive that It Is al
most unknown elsewhere Is still used
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dumped. Then It Is rocked gently by
bund until tho separation of the fat
from the milk Is complete, when the
resultant oily mass, unsalted as Is
all oriental butter, Is ready for tho
consumer.
There are few more Interesting peo
ple, In these days of rapid progress,
than tho Persian nomad. His home
Is where night overtakes him, nnd he
sleeps when weariness suggests that
ho fall. Ordinarily his roof Is heav
en's starry dome, but In case of storms
he crawls Into the shelter of bis little
goatskin tent, where a surprisingly
large family can be made comfortable.
The Persian, like tho Moor, sdoes
not encourage the establishment of
prisons, death being a quicker and less
expensive method of punishing crimi
nals. Torture In countless forms Is so
common a sight as to attract little at
tention, and when death supervenes
the body lies where It falls until taken
away by relatives.
TEA GROWING IN TEXAS.
tmmmvn or raaiu.
by Am
tlST
It fwasM a
la
la caaiatag
f taa foatakla tsa
mamsia, ait
i tft'saaa Is
aid to Bs Promising- Fruit is
California.
L. Beabrook, of Port Lavaca, ona.ot
the Southern Pacific Immigration
workers, states that practical steps will
m taken to start tea culture In the
vtclalty of Port Lavaca, says the Gal
veston (Tax.) News.
"Tta growing In this country Is no
longer an aiperlment," said he. "The
crop la now regularly cultivated for
tno markets on the coast of South
Carolina and la found to bo highly
profitable and has coma to star. Tat
la a plant that thrives to bast advant
age la eoatt cauntlrsa, where there la
a oaaat atmasebare, and aa tears are
away ajmllar potato In a ritaudc asaaa
stwssa tat Carolina lowland raft
nnd tho Texns coast It hns long been
thought that tho crop could bo made to
pay wiii us.
"The first experiment will bo mnilo
on lands of tho Placedo Canal and Ir
rigation Company, eight miles nbovo
Port Luvaca, and innnnged by Ross
Clark. ,
"There Is n greater rainfall on the
Carolina coast than nt Port Lnvnca,
and tho rulo Is ttyit tho ntmosphere Is
mora humid, but tho company has nn
amplo rlco irrigation plant and In dry
spells tho rainfall will bo supplement
ed with artificial water. Dr. Shcpard,
the famous Carolina tea grower, be
lieves in irrigation nnd recommends
It. If tho crop proves a success at
Port Lavaca, nnd doubtless It will, a
labor supply In tho picking seuson cnu
be depouded upon, for negro women
and children can be had In adjoining
counties, and Mexican labor, also wo
men and children, can be brought In
from Corpus Chrlstl nnd other poiuts
farther south on the coast.
"The experiment to be made near
Port Lavaca will be watched with In
terest over the State, for lta success
will mean a new and highly profitable
crop added to the list and big increase
In tho land values of the const coun
try." Mr. Seabrook said the facts aro to
bo, had and that tea farming as a
moosmaking means will equal any
fruit orchard In Florida or California.
. Foreigners past -Register,
The Spanish government haa revived
tae regulation requiring forelgaan real,
daat In or visiting Spain to register
tats names at their eontulatea,
About the safe gt-rtti sjsjIaH
Mb w la to saarrjr aa bauoaa. ,
tJ.44.JAJ-AAAJ!.l1 .,.a.4,4.44.4a,4,4.4.a.4.4 f4
UfHEELER k WILSON
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MACHINES
Arc known throughout the world.
- They arc in daily use in factories, in
Ivmes sewing all grades of work,
horn heavy leather to finest mull.
Not How Cheap
But How Good!
Slimdd be your guide in purchasing
a Sewing Machine and do not be
satisfied without first giving the
"No. 9" a trial.
Wheeler & Wilson Manufacturing Co.
72 & 74 Wabnar- f.v-4.. Chlcaaro. Ills.
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PRa-D W. UPHAM,
President.
O. O. AOLIP),
See. and Troaa
rmntosi, laks view laa.
HENRY E. BRANDT,
Paints and Wali Paper,
440 4 44 Lincoln Avcmu.
s.intinsj, Paparhaknsjinsjr and Dajsjearamtliiai.
Fred W.Uptiam Lumber Co.
WISCONSIN
HARDWOOD
FWU: Is. 419 rtaat . AvM ssr. lliltk Its. "iSOTl
WM. LORIMBR, Prss. and Tress. WM. J. MURPHY, See.
J. J. McKENNA, Vice-Pros.
Murphy & Lorimer
Brick Company
639 Rookery Building,
Chicago
Yards Archer and California Aves.
Telephone Office, Harrison 933.
iSSBOTGSEfe
CEMfNT PAVING
177 LA
ST.
SALLE
CHICAGO
TILIPHONE CINTRAL 2BG4.
JOS. J. DUFFY.
M. J. SCANLAN
JOSEPH J. DUFFY S CO.,
GENERAL
CONTRACTORS
, 907 Chamber of Commerce.
Telephone Main 4688.
MIMA
Red Elephant
Spiff
f
On Sale
Everywhere.
"TIN fllM TURK
III IIN Mori"
"Yn Km."
f
'IbEh
')
2
1 a
A ,
V
ROOM 1470, OLD COLONY BUILDING
Phone Harrison 781.
I A ! A 41 1 i
REE
HT
OMCES
WEST SIDE BUREAU
I to 9 South Canal Street
TELEPHONE MA.IIS OOl
I : NO CHARGES OF ANY KIND MADE TO EMPLOYER OR EM-
; PLOYE FOR FURNISHING ALL KINDS OF EMPLOYMENT
FOR MALE OR FEMALE HELP. ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY
1 1 ATTENDED TO
S. P. REVERE, Superintendent
.l.i..l....l.4i.i-..4HK.....fc
FURNITURE!
Carpets, Stoves,
Crockery, Rugs,
Brass and Iron Beds,
Lace Curtains and Shades.
Cheapest Cash House in the City)
HENRY STUCKART,
2509 to 25 I 9 Archer Ave.
PHONB YARDS 37.
CHAS. G. BREYER
PlumberGasfitter
187 W. DIVISION ST., Near Milwaukee Av.
Telephone Monroe 575.
House Draining a Specialty.
Dealer in All Kinds Gas Fixtures.
Jobbing Promptly Attended To
Tanner & Conley,
MERCHANT TAILORS
First-Class Work at Moderate Frioes.
REAPER BLOCK
99 Washington Street, CHICAGO
TIUIPHONE CINTRAL 084.
W. M. HOYT COMPANY,
WHOLESALE GROCERS 1
turoBTua aid iwini et
TEASI
fcU5.U9icttuinmii!ttiML
.
t
- KHilsttBtt- "Vf --'a -fesfe
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