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Chicago eagle. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1889-19??, December 23, 1916, Image 1

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Entered at Second Clats Matter October 11. 1889, at the Pott
Office at Chicago, llllnolt, under Act of March 3, 1870,
INDEPENDENT IN ALL THINGS, NEUTRAL IN NONE.
Entered at Second Clan Matter October 11, 1889, at the Pott
Office at Chleano, llllnolt, under Act of March 3, 1879.
TWENTY-ElttHTII YEAH, NO. 15).
BRUNDAGE LEADS
Popular New Attorney General is Now
the Main Controlling Force in Cook
County Republican Politics.
Edward J. Druudagc Is the control
ling power in Republican Cook Coun
ty polltlcH. ilia followers and frlcndx
hnvo gained control of the Cook
county central committee, having a
majority vote over the Dcncen and
Thompson forces combined.
This was disclosed when tho first
test vote was recorded by tho county
committee since tho recent election
on tho resolution to dump all tho
county, city, and Btnte patrouago into
ono basket.
Under the primary law the ward
committeeman has a total voting
strength on the county committco of
ono voto for each fifty votes cast for
governor and ono additional voto for
each precinct In tho ward.
The big vote that I-owden polled In
the wards where tho neutrals elected
their committeemen, tho final ofllcial
figures show, gives tho neutrals a ma
jority of sixty of the voting strength
of the entire county:
The revised figures are:
Neutrals 3,842
Thompson 2,376
Dcncen 1,3 14
Necessary to cholco 3,782
Neutral majority CO
Tho districts controlled by the neu
trals in arriving at tho total are tho
six country town districts and tho
following wards:
Third, Eighth, Eleventh, Eighteenth,
Twenty-flrBt, Twenty-second, Twenty
third, Twenty-fourth, Twenty-fifth,
Twenty-sixth, Twenty-sovontli, Twenty-ninth,
and Thirty-second.
The Thompson wards are:
First, Second, Fourth, Ninth, Tenth,
Twelfth, Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Nine
teenth, Twentieth. Thirty-first, Thirty
third, Thirty-fourth, and Thlrty-llfth.
Tho Dcucou wards:
Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Sixteenth,
Seventeenth, Twenty-eighth, and Thir
tieth. The resolution providing for tho
"jack-pottlng" of tho patronngo was
adopted by a vote of 21) to 0. County
llocordor Haas was not present and
E. It. Lltlngor, mnmlior of tho board
of review, did not vote. Tho other
six Dcncen men contended that mora
timo should be given to considor the
mutter. Tho resolution wns drawn by
DiMindage, Homer K. Gnlpln, William
W. Weber, and W. II. Held, tho latter
roprcHontlng tho city hall.
This committco was authorized to
wait on nil tho new Republican coun
ty olllclals and nscortuin whothor they
will put their pntrouago into ono pot
for n division "equitably" among all
factions. Mr. Haas will not return
boforo the forepart of next month.
MONEY FOR ALDERMEN
Appropriations for council commit
tees luivo been cut appreciably, while
tho $111,000 which tho Chicago plun
commission got this year and tho
$21,000 which it asked for next year
tho committco has llxed for 1917 at
$10,000.
A light Is almost certain to come
up In tho council when tho budgot Is
considered over tho question of alder
manic salaries. Ily a baro majority
tho council last spring voted that al
dermen should rocolvo tho limit al
lowed by tho Btate law, which Is
$3,500 a year. Their present salary Is
$3,000.
When tho council considers tho
budgot ono set of aldcrmon Is Ilkoly
to try to boost tho aldermanlc pay to
$3,500, while another set will try to
rescind tho $500 salary raise ordi
nance of last spring.
OPEN THESE STREETS
AND HELP CHICAGO
Eight million dollars of new street
extensions, widening and connections
aro in prospect for tho great West
Sldo district of Chicago as a result
of action taken by tho Chlcngo Plan
Commission. The work will mnrk tho
first unfolding of tho Plan of Chicago
in Its aim for better tralllo conditions
throughout tho West Sldo.
If tho plans olllclally brought for-
FOUNDED 1889
Largeit Weekly Circulation Among
People ef Influence and Standing
word for prompt nctlon by tho city
authorities prevail, the following no
tablo street projects will bo carried
out:
Ogdcn avenue will bo extended
from Union Park on tho West Sldo to
Lincoln Park on the North Side, at
a width of 108 feet. Tho now diag
onal thoroughfare will terminate nt
Lincoln Park nt tho foot of Lincoln
avenue. Estimated cost, $4,040,000.
North Ashland nvcnuo will be
opened as a through tralllc way, con
necting tho North and West Sides by
a now viaduct and bridge connection
across tho north branch of tho river.
It will become a 100-foot street be
tween Cortland street and Fullerton
nvenue. Tho estlmnted cost, Includ
ing the bridge, is $1,275,000.
In addition the plan commission
directed Its officers nnd technical
staff to complete plans for opening,
widening and extending both Robey
street nnd Western avenuo through
out tho city. Ashland avenuo is to
bo opened, also, on tho South Side
through to tho city limits.
These thrco thoroughfares nro
planned to provide much needed new
connections between the North, West
and South Sides. Tho estimated cost
of the Robey street connections, using
subways at the river crossings, is
$5,700,000; using viaducts and bridges,
$3,238,500.
NO DRY PRIMARY
J1EXT SPRING
Polltlcnl leaders without regard to
their leanings on the saloon question
have awakened to tho fact that sub
mission of the Dry Chicago Federa
tion's proposition to the voters In the
spring of 1018 might sorlously Inter
fere with regular politics. Thorororo
they are hacking away from tho Idea,
which previously had found much
favor, of advancing tho primary for
stato nnd county offices from Septem
ber to April. They fear to Involve
the United Stntes sonntorshlp and
tho legislative nominations in a "wot"
and "dry" campaign.
ANYTHING BUT STUDY
Twelve men, nppoluted to ho mem
bors of a commission to consider the
question of military training In tho
public schools, propnred for tholr first
coiihultntUMi. Tho men were appoint
ed In lino with tho suggestion or Ja
cob M. I.oeb, In his Inaugural ad
dress as president of tho board of edu
cation. They aro:
John W. Eckhnrt, chairman; AInJ.
Abel Davis, First Infantry, Illinois
national guard; Capt. Raymond Shel
don, U. S. A.; Muj. Fred Ulaynoy,
chief surgeon, Second infantry, Illi
nois national guard; Dr. Emit O.
Illrsch, lllshop Samuel Fallows, Don
uls F. Kolly, Edward .1. Plggott, Er
nest J. Kruotgen, Chnrlos S. Poterson,
John 1). Shoop and President Loch,
ex-olllclo.
ALDERMEN SAVED
POOR CITY EM
PLOYES SOAKED
More than u fourth of Chicago's
pollcomon and flremon may huvo to
bo laid off next month, Comptroller
Pike said, whllo a largo numbor of
street lights will have to bu aban
doned during January. Tho city coun
cil will have to aniond meotlng its
retrenchment ordinauco adopted in
order to prevent n fourth of tho nlder
mon from joining tho ranks of unem
ployed city officials during tho month
of Jnnunry.
Mr. Plko told Mayor Thompson
that ho called upon Chairman Rlchert
of tho finance committco to ask him
whethor one-fourth of tho aldermen
or whether all of thorn should bo laid
off without pay noxt month for a week.
"The ordinauco passed last Wednes
day plainly provided that ono-fourth
of tho expenditures In overy branch
of tho city govornmont must bo saved
noxt month, the saving to bo based
on tho amount spont by tho various
branches last January," explalnod
Comptroller Plko. "Theroforo it cer
tainly applied to tho aldormen thorn
solves. Aid. Rlchert promptly In
formed mo that tho council will have
to adopt an amendment ut Its noxt
session exempting aldormen, tho
CHICAGO,
mayor, the city clerk, tho city treas
urer, municipal judges and all othor
elective officers of tho city govern
ment." "That means then that civil service
employes and others of tho more
poorly paid men nnd women working
for tho city must be laid off In even
greater numbers in order to permit
olective officers who nro moro highly
paid, to got their full salaries," in
terposed Mayor Thompson.
COOK COUNTY IN 1916
County Agent William H. Eho
innnn reports tho county gavo relief to
39,600 poor persons and to 10,000 poor
families during tho .year; $210,000 was
expended on outdoor relief, $213,000
paid to widows with largo families
and $24,000 to tho blind.
Jury Commissioners During the
year 30,315 men were drawn for Jury
service. Of theso 17,216 served,
' Illinois
11,240 woro oxcusod, 2,175 made no
nnswor, 400 woro not summoned,
1,410 woro not found nnd 775 proved
to bo exempt.
County Court Clerk Robert M.
Sweltzor roports nn Increaso of nearly
300 Insanity cases, 257 applications
for help by tho blind, deaf and dumb
and the feoblo-mlnded, nnd a doorcase
of 91 pauper and support cases during
1016.
County Civil Sorvlco Commission
notes n marked docreaso in tho num
ber of applicants for positions of com
mon grades, owing to larger demand
for such labor and hlghor prices paid
therefor In tho compotlng commercial
service. It nsks for n comprehensive
civil servlco act for tho county.
County Treasurer Honry Stucknrt
roports tho county's rovonuo from his
olllco in tho way of interest returned
was $733,000, whoroas thu total ap
propriations by tho county board for
tho niatntennnco of tho offico for tho
year was $411,911.
SATURDAY, DECEAI1IE11 2, 1910.
TO APPOINT
TREASURER AND
CITY CLERK
A radical reorganization of the city's
flnnnclnl machinery wns recommended
to tho council flnnnco committco by
Aid. H. D. Cnpltaln's subcommittee
on consolidation.
Tho proposed program as worked
out by tho flnnnco committee stnff
provides for creating tho clectlvo
office of city auditor and mnking the
offices of city treasurer and city clerk
appointive instead of elective. Un
der this schemo the auditor would
servo as n check on tho treasurer, who
would bo appointed by the mayor and
hnvo chargo of all financial depart
ments, Including tho controller's offico
and tho collector's office.
Aid. Cnpltaln, who is pushing tho
schojno, says It will mako for econo
my nnd a shorter ballot.
HOYNEWILLINFORCE
-CIVIL SERVICE LAWS
State's Attorney Itoyno mndo an
announcement In keeping with ono
of his campaign pledges. It has to
do with honest administration of tho
city civil service law. Tho county
prosecutor says ho has assigned
Charles C. Cnso, ono of his assistants,
to look nftor prosecutions of criminal
violations of tho city civil service
Mr. Cnso has headquarters on the
fifth floor of the county building,
where complaints of violations of tho
municipal civil service may bo lodged.
"It has been tho policy of Mr.
Itoyno to promoto efficiency by as
signing cases of a similar naturo to
tho same assistant state's attorney,"
EDWARD J. BRUNDAGE,
New Attorney General and Republican
said Mr. Case. "In this connection,
however, It should bo understood that
tho official duties of the state's attor
ney relato only to violations of tho
criminal codo, so, although I shall bo
glad to listen to any complaints mado,
yet I must conlluo my services to
thoso casos In which tho ovldouco
shows tho commission of a crime."
PITY THE POOR
TAXPAYER
All taxable property In Cook county
Is vnluod nt $3,345,541,791, according
to figures received by tho county
board through tho county clerk
from tho various tax levying and tax
extending bodies. On tho basis of an
average tax rate of $6.20 on each $100
of assessed valuation, which Is one
third tho full vnluo, taxpayers noxt
year will pay taxes approximating
$66,000,830.
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LOWDEjTS PLANS
Governor-Elect Will Recommend Consol
idation of a Large Number of State
Departments for Better Efficiency.
Governor-elect Frank O. Lowdcn
proposes to group all of the agencies
of the stato government Into depart
ments. "I am having outlines of consolida
tion bills prepared," said Colonel
Lowden. "This docs not mean that
all the details will bo worked out by
tho tlmo the legislature convenes.
Hut tho day after I ant inaugurated
there will bo ready bills which will
sorvo as a starting point for detailed
discussion.
"My plan is to have ono gcnoral bill
that will provide for a grouping of nil
tho agencies of stato government su
pervised by tho governor Jnto seven,
eight or nlno departments. This bill
will bo general In Its nnturc.
"Then I shall have as many sup
plemental bills as there aro depart
ments In tho main bill. Theso bills
will provldo for the organization In
dotall of tho various departments."
Colonel I.owdcu Is going right nt
Leader,
tho needs of tho stato In his Inaugural
messngo as governor of Illinois.
Tho grontor part of tho messago
will bo devoted to tho govomor-oloct's
program for tho consolidation of over
lapping stato bureaus and commis
sions. Ho has served notlco that
othor legislation must wait Its turn.
Following out this idon, Colonel
Lowden probably will touch lightly
on various othor propositions to
which tho Republican administration
Is pledged.
In lino with Colonel Lowdon's an
nouncement thnt tho consolidation
bills In preparation under his direc
tion will bo mainly outlines of what
ho desires accomplished, tho mossngo
will not attempt to set forth In arbi
trary manner how all tho changes In
tho governmental structuro should bo
mndo.
Somo of Colonel Lowdon's frlonds
regrot that he does not intond to hnvo
all details worked out boforo tho ses
sion convones. Thoy fear that thoro
9M4ntBCOPY
F1VBCEOTS
will be so mnny points in dispute tlmt
thu conferences of legislators planned
by tho governor-elect will drag along
through tho entire session nnd that
In the rush of the final weeks tho
bills will ho slaughtered.
That somo of tho Republicans will
not shed uny toars If tho proposed
consolidation is not effected, thus
avoiding the elimination of numerous
Jobs, Is well known. Tho Democrats
In tho legislature predict positively
that tho Republican organization will
go to pieces and thnt Democratic
votes will be needed to pass tho ad
ministration measures.
Governor Dunne Is preparing a fare
well message for Inauguration day.
Tills message will bo largely n rovlow
of tho last four years and will not
attempt to make many recommenda
tions for the future.
GOV. DUNNE FOR JUDGE
A dlspntch from Washington, D. C,
says: Governor Dunno of Illinois, who
will retire from offico enrlv In Jnnu
nry, nnd Attorney E. C. Kramer of
East St. Louis uro slated for federal
Judgeships if Congress passes the
pending bill authorizing the president
to appoint additional Judges to assist
those over 70 years who rofuse to
take advantage of the retirement
clnuso In the existing statute.
Gov. Dunne, according to report
here, will bo named by the President
ns tho colleaguo of .lutlgo Kohlsant
of Chicago, whllo .Mr. Kramer will he
appointed to aid Judge Wright In thu
Danville district.
Efforts aro now being mndo by Sen
ator Lewis and othor members of tho
Illinois delegation to have an addi
tional federal circuit created In south
ern Illinois, which would provide for
u Judge at East St. Louis in addition
to one nt Danville.
If tho new district should bo estab
lished, Mr. Kramer, It Is understood,
will bo urged ns a new Judge, but If
not he will be lecoiumended ns aid
to Judge Wright.
GEORGE A. BABBITT
FOR SECRETARY
A number of the friends of George
A. Ilabhltt, tho veteran newspaper
man, nro hoping that he will bo ap
pointed secretary of the City Civil
Service Commission. A university
graduate and n man of wide expo
rlonco and culture, he would make an
Ideal official. The list of ellglhles for
tho place under the rules of tho civil
service expired automatically Monday
after having been on Die for two
years.
"Tho olllco Is an extremely Impor
tant ono," Capt. Collin said, "anil wo
are anxious to get u lesponslhle man.
Wo do nut know yet whom wo may
select. There are a number of good
men on the old list and tho choice
may fall on ono of them or wo nm
deem It wise to hold another examina
tion." Tho office wns loft vacant u few
days ago on tho assignation of Arthur
M, Swauson hecausu of 111 health.
Tho position pays $3,500 a year and
Is regarded as ono of tho civil servlco
"plums."
CITY TO OWN ALL CARS
Figures rogordlng flnnnclnl nnd
othor phnsos of tho vast problem of
tho building of Chicago's subway sys
tem and tho unification and recon
struction of the surfneo nnd elevated
lines have been worked out with grcnt
euro by tho city's export subway and
traction commission. Thoy form tho
basis of tho entlro plan of tho city's
oxperts, which Is to go boforo tho
city council noxt Wednesday, and will,
In detailed form, constitute an appen
dix to tho report.
According to tho exports' estimates,
If their proposals and plans nro car
ried through, by the timo tho $260,
000,000 Is oxpondod for tho carrying
out of tho subway and transportation
problem In 1019, tho city's Invest
ment of Its 55 per cent Incomo from
tho traction properties plus tho In
como from Interest during tho poriod
up to that year will amount to $100,
261,000. This, with tho $20,000,000 of
tho traction fund to bo put Into tho
Sixteen Paget.
WHOLE NUMBER 1, 118
properties In carrying out the new
plan will make the cltv's lnvputi.ir.nf
at that time $180,000,000.
GOV. ELECT LOW
DEN AND THE JOBS
Governor-elect Frank O. Lowdon
mndo it plain to tho Job huntora thnt
tho patronngo plea will not bo cut
until the consolidation and economy
bills nro In tho oven at Springfield.
Ilcforo departing for Slnlsslppl, his
country cstnto, tho colonel Issuod n
formal statement thnt so far ho has
tendered nppolntmonts to only two
men, whoso names aro withhold for
tho present, nnd that ho will not con
sider Jobs nnd nppolntmonts until tho
constructive program of tho a. O. P,
Peoria platform hits tho homostrotch.
Ho says tho peoplo nro moro con
cerned in reorgnnlzntion of, tho stuto
machinery than In tho dlstrlbuti.on",of
tho polltlcnl plums. J
So yesterday ho went to his farm
for tho purposo of mapping out tho
details of tho Rcpubllcnn legislative
program.
JAIL FOR SPEAK-EASY-'S
Possibility of n penitentiary sen
tence for saloonkeopers who kcop
their places open Sundays Is the suro
cure for that olTense, Mayor Thomp
son declared.
"There has been no sincere offort
to get convictions under tho present
law," ho said. "It might not do uny
harm to try, though, In tho future.
I believe that If the amendment 1
have proposed, making tho offenso
punishable by penitentiary sentence,
were ndopted, saloons throughout tho
stato would bo closed."
NORTH SIDE "L"
SERVICEJMPROVED
Improved North Sldo "L" sorvlco,
dully except Saturdays and Sundays,
for tho evening rush hours, was an
nounced. Rnvonswood trains will run oxnress
from Chicago avenuo to Southport
uvonue between 5:01 nnd 0:16 p. m.
Evnnston trains leaving tho loop bo
tweon I: IS nnd 6:19 p. m. will not
stop botweon Chlcngo avenuo nnd
Argylo street.
Additional service will bo provided
from tho North Water street stub
tonnlnal. which will bo open from
1:50 to 6:20 p. in. ltavenswood trains
from the stub will stop nt Klnzlo
street, Chicago avenuo. Fullerton and
Ilolmont uvoniies and all ltavens
wood branch stations.
TONY WILL
HELP HIS MEN
Hallllf Cerinuk of tho Municipal
Court accompanied a statement that
lie would draw $10,000 out of a bank
to pay his employes with nn addi
tional declaration that tho amount
tho city will owe his olllco force will
totnl $18,316 ami thai he Is going to
withhold his fees until tho city
squares up. Tho fees collected In his
olllco approxlmnto $10,000 a month.
"There nro more than 100 employes
In my olllco who need their monoy
and 1 am going to ndvanco them
onough on their salaries to enablo
thorn to enjoy a morry Christinas,"
said Mr. Cerniuk. "My employes hnvo
been compollod to start mandamus
proceedings to try to secure tholr snln
rlos, and I nm going to glvo tho city
a little of Its own medlelno by forcing
It to start similar proceedings to got
tho fees I collect and which 1 hnvo
boon In tho habit of turning ovor
Monthly, although there Is nothing In
tho law that says I should turn them
ovor overy month,"
FOUNDED 1889
Largest Weekly Circulauen Aaeag
People of Influence and Standing

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