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Chicago eagle. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1889-19??, November 05, 1921, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84025828/1921-11-05/ed-1/seq-6/

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I II IN EXACT MODEL I i ' , ir "" : " -"
i j ii
Mack Tracks1
Are purchased and repurchased by truck
operators who have used other kinds of
trucks. They have found the sturdy Mack,
with its long life, superior design, and stal
wart construction cheaper to operate.
Your profits lie between the cost of operation
and the amount you get for the sale of your
services, or the value of the truck to you.
The selling price of your services is deter
mined by competition, so your profits can
only be increased by decreasing your operat
ing cost.
We stand ready to prove that the Mack truck
costs less. May we have the opportunity?
Phone us now for the proof.
Capacities from IV2 to 7Vs! Tons
"Performance Count99.
Mack-International Motor Truck Corp.
Sales Room:
1808 S. Michigan Ave.
Phone Calumet 5411
Service Station:
2338 Indiana Ave.
Phone Calumet 5414
Nashville to Have Perfect Repro
duction of Parthenon.
Finished Structure, It Is Announced,
Will Conform in Every Detail
to the Original.
Congress Hotel and Annex
Samuel R. Kaufman
PRES3DENT
LargestFloorSpace
Devoted to Public
Use of Any Hotel
in the World.
Michigan Boulevard and Congress Street
The Restaurants of
T2H)OQVt
Motel
Invite Your Patronage
The primary purpose of Brevoort Hotel is to pro
vide the best possible accommodation for the trav
eling public. It is essential that the restaurant
service shall be of the very highest order and that
the prices shall be moderate. The net result is bet
ter food, better served in a better environment,
than might reasonably be sought at the same mod
erate cost under other conditions. Permanent resi
dents of Chicago as well as visitors are invited to
take advantage of this at breakfast, luncheon, din
ner and late supper time.
Yd
3
in
2&
reVoon?
Motel
MADISON ST.
EAST OF LA SALLE ST.
No hat checking annoyance.
E.N.MATHEWS R. E. KELLIHER
President and Gen. Mgr. Assistant Manager
i
1
1
PHONE STATE 8949
Bankers' Audit & Appraisal Company
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERS and APPRAISERS
105 West$Monroe Street
CHICAGO, ILL.
Electric Lighting Supplies
' " 1 e
Edison Building, 72 West Adams Street
CARBONS CORDS BRUSHES
SOCKETS SWITCHES MOTORS
Within a year the United States
will have the only exact-to-the-inch
reproduction of the Athenian
Parthenon. The masterpiece at
Athens, conceived and built by Phidias,
the sculptor; Ictinus, the architect,
and Pericles, the statesman, is being
reconstructed at Nashville, Tenn.
When Tennessee's centennial was
celebrated by an international ex-
i position twenty-four years ago the
directors of the fete built in temporary
form a replica of the parthenon. It
was used to house the art exhibit of
that exposition. .Nashville people con
sidered it a partial gratification of
their ambition to make thefr city the
"Athens of the South."
This temporary structure left much
to be desired in the execution of the
delicate ornamentation and the great
number of statues which had to be
reconstructed from the inadequate
drawings then in existence. Yet the
general effect of the cream-colored
structure, with brilliant colors in the
frieze and gables, so overshadowed
all the other buildings that when the
exposition was over the people de
iminded its preservation, and it be
came a shrine to the residents and
visitors of Nashville.
Three years ago disintegration had
progressed to such an extent that the
building had to be closed.
It was finally decided to erect a
permanent replica of the Athenian
temple, using the method known as the
"Mosaic surface" concrete, developed
by John Early of Washington, who
was intrusted with that part of the
work.
There still remained the question of
the red background of the metopes
and gables, the blue of the triglyps
as agreed upon by the majority of
authorkies on Greek architecture.
About that time George Julian
Zolnay, sculptor, was- making experi
ments in the production of a durable
material other than the costly stone
and bronze, realizing that not until
the sculptor's work can be successfully
reproduced in less expensive yet dur
able materials will sculpture become
a truly democratic art.
lie secured a synthetic stone,
which not only "poured" but could be
made of any color. Zolnay was com
missioned by the Nashville park board
to reconstruct the figures of the great
temple and then to reproduce them in
this artificial stone.
Whether the original parthenon had
an open roof or whether there was
some structural arrangement with
side lights masked by the cornice has
never been determined. The Nash
ville parthenon will have a flat sky
light following the slope of the roof
and so arranged as to obtain the best
possible light within, where an art
museum will be located eventually.
Explorer's Memorial.
On the island of Esteves, in Lake
Titicaca, Peru, a memorial designed
in the style of the ancient Incas has
been dedicated at the grave of James
Orton, explorer and scientist. These
ceremonies that were participated in
by representatives from Peru, Bolivia
and the United States were held on the
Forty-fourth anniversary of Orton's
death, which occurred while he was re
turning under terrible hardships from a
trip of exploration. The monument
was erected by the alumnae of Vas
sar, where Orton was professor of
natural history.
Professor Orton made three trips
of scientific explorations to the Andes
and Amazon regions of South Amer
ica which brought to light many funda
mental facts of natural history and
geography and which added to the
collections of many American museums.
Youngster Not Belligerent.
The following amusing little incident
occurred recently in one of the branch
libraries of the city. A little Italian
boy about eight years old asked the
young woman behind the desk to find
him a fairy tale book. "I wanna read
about the prince what kills the dragin
with a crystal s-word." he announced.
The librarian consulted the shelves
and found that every single book of
the sort had been taken out. She
was extremely sorry that such was
the case and smiling down at the lit
tle fellow, said, "Sonny, I'm afraid
there isn't a story like that left."
"Aw, teacher," he grinned broadly, "it
don't matter, ye needn't be 'afraid,' I
ain't a goin' to do nuthin' to ye."
"Thank you," she said with a solemn
face which belied the twinkle in her
eye, "I'll try to do better next time."
Louisville Courier-Journal.
Satisfied.
A Grand avenue school teacher was
relating some of her experiences in
different schools throughout the coun
try. "I taught school among my own
people in the Tennessee mountains
for several years after I graduated
from college. Funny things happened.
"Hearing a boy say I ain't gwine
thar,' I said to him: 'That's no
way to speak. Listen: I am not go
ing there; you are not going there;
he is not going there; we are not go
ing there; you are not going there;
they are not going there.' Do you
get the idea?' 'Yessum, I gits it
all right. They ain't nobody gwine.'
It Wasn't Hers.
I was on a chair car one evening. A
big awkward looking suitcase fell into
the aisle just beside my seat. People
coming and going made many unkind
remarks to me about my baggage be
ing in the way. At last I determined
to make the first remark to the next
person passing that way.
A young man stopped and looked m
a displeased manner at the suitcase
beside me, so I said: "If that were
mine I would move it, but it isn't."
I was much embarrassed to have
him reply: "Well, it's mine and 1
can move it." Chicago Tribune.
- -fit' -s,
v - A. vs - c -i " t -
I -. r t? 5 3 A J ' "v V ' -
J .-v
V
J
CHRISTOPHER MAMER,
One of the Most Popular Republican Leaders in Chicago, Former Senator
and Former Clerk of the Supreme Court.
THE CITY COUNCIL
Elected 1921.
1 Michael Kenna Dcm.
2 Louis B. Anderson .'.........Rep.
3 John H. Johntry Rep.
4 Timothy A. Hogan... Dem
5 Joseph B. McDonough......Dem.
6 Charles Scribner Eaton- Rep.
7 Guy Guernsey ..Rep.
8 Ross A. Woodhull Dem.
9 Guy Madderom Rsp.
10 James McNichols Dem.
11 Dennis A. Horan Dem.
12 Anton J. Cermak Dem.
13 Samuel O. Shaffer Rep.
14 George M. Maypole Dem.
15 Edward J. Kaindl Dem.
16 John Czekala Dem.
17 Thomas P. Devereux Rep.
18 John Touhy Dem.
19 John Powers Dem.
20 Henry Fick Dem.
21 Dorsey R. Crowe Dem.
22 Arthur F. Albert Rep.
23 Thomas O. Wallace" Rep
24 Leo M. Brieske Nonp
25 E. I. Frankhauser Rep.
26 Charles G: Hendricks Rep.
27 Edward R. Armitage Rep.
28 Henry Schlegel Rep.
29 James F. Kovarik Dem.
30 William J. Lynch Dem.
31 Scott M. Hogan Rep.
32 Benjamin S. Wilson Rep.
33 John P. Garner Rep.
34 Joseph O. Kostner Dem
35 John S. Clark Dem
Holdover Members.
1 John J. Coughlin Dem.
2 Robert R. Jackson Rep.
3 Ulysses S. Schwartz Dem.
4 John A. Richert Dem.
5 Robert J. Mulcahy Dem.
8 Martin S. Furman Dem.
9 Sheldon W. Govier Dem.
11 Leonard Rutkowski Dem.
12 Joseph Cepak Dem.
13 John G. Home Dtm.
14 Joseph H. Smith Dem.
15 Oscar H. Olsen Rep.
16 John A. Piotrowski Dem.
17 S. S. Walkowiak Dem.
18 M. F. Kavanagh Dem.
19 James B. Bowler Dem.
20 Matt Franz Dem.
21 Charles J. Agnew Rep. 1
21 Leo C. Klein Dem.
23 Walter P. Steffen Rep.
24 John Haierlein Dem.
25 Frank J. Link Rep.
26 Thomas R. Casptrg Dem.
27 Christ A. Jensen Dem.
28 Max Adamowskl Dem.
29 Thomas F. Byrne Dem.
30 William R. OToole Dem.
31 Terence F. Moran Dem.
32 John H. Lyle Rep.
33 A. O. Anderson Rep.
34 John Toman Dem.
35 Thomas J. Lynch Dem.
Mayor Thompson's great fight for a
5-cent street car fare has the people
behind it. The millions who use the
surface lines feel that they are paying
far too much for the service they get
especially when the fact that the sur
face lines are making a profit of
nearly a million dollars a month out
of the S-cent fare dawns upon them.
John E. Traeger who made a fine
record as Coroner and Sheriff of Cook
county and who is now a member of
the Constitutional Convention has a
growing boom for Mayor.
William H. Malone has always been
victorious in politics because he is al
ways on the side of truth and justice.
Daniel Ryan gives general satis
faction as president of the county
board.
John J. Garrity
BONDING and INSURANCE
Phone Franklin 1898
Room 352
154 West Randolph Street
CHICAGO
SHORT-MYNAUGH CONTRACTING CO.
MACHINERY MOVERS AND ERECTORS
Power Plants Erected Complete
Word done in
Any Part of the
United States
and Canada
Machinery offAll Kinds 'Installed Structural
Steel, Engines, j Boilers, Stokers, Smokestacks,
Ice Machinery, Tanks, Pumps and Vaults Erect
ed Entire Plants Dismantled. Moved and Erect
ed Complete Ready for Testing
SHORT-MYNAUGH CONTRACTING CO.
Branch Offices: General Offices:
NewYork Philadelphia 26 N. DespIainesSt., CHICAGO,Tels. Mon.3260
810 Bellevue Ave., Detroit, Mich., Phone: Melrose 3643
Do You Need Capital J
Are You Expanding Your Business o
The expansion of a business demands two factors MEN and
MONEY. Either would be cf little value without the
other. Without money men- cannot achieve. Without men
capital lies Idle.
THE EDWARD MILLER COMPANY having recognized this
underlying principle knows that financing an Industry Is but
half a service.
It is as Important to create and supply a working organization
that can wrest the greatest value from the capital Invested.
If your company has been in business for over two years and
can stand a rigid investigation by our Auditing Department,
our Financial Department, our Legal Department and our
Engineering Department, write us in detail of your wants.
We are not Interested in any other type of enterprise.
The Edward Miller Company
BUSINESS BUILDERS
Furmshing MEN and MONEY 222 Upper Michigan Blvd.
LUBUNER & TOKZ
Owning and Operating the Follow
ing Hierh Class Th M f
- vuu bo
BIOGRAPH THEATRE
2433 LINCOLN AVENUE
COVENT GARDEN THEATRE
2653 N. CLARK STREET
CRAWFORD THEATRE
19 S. CRAWFORD
ELLENTEE THEATRE
DEVON AND CLARK STREETS
KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE
6219 BROADWAY
LAKESIDE THEATRE
4730 SHERIDAN ROAD
LOGAN SQUARE THEATRE
2542 MILWAUKEE AVENUE
MADISON SQUARE THEATRE
4730 W. MADISON
MICHIGAN THEATRE
55TH AND MICHIGAN BLVD.
OAK PARK THEATRE
OAK PARK, ILL.
PANTHEON THEATRE
4624-42 SHERIDAN ROAD
PARAMOUNT THEATRE
2648 MILWAUKEE AVENUE
PERSUING THEATRE
4614 32 LINCOLN AVENUE
SENATE THEATRE
3128-48 W. MADISON STREET
VITAGRAPH THEATRE
3133 LINCOLN AVENUE
WEST END THEATRE
121 NORTH CICERO AVENUE
WILSON THEATRIC
2408-18 W. MADISON STREET
Harry M. Lubliner & Joseph Trinz
801 to 806 Kimball Building
25 East Jackson Boulevard
TELEPHONES HARRISON
9581
9582
9583
9584
9585
BUSH TEMPLE THEATRE
Conrad Seidemann, Mgr.
Comer North Clark Street and Chicago Avenue Phone Superior 4819
Fifty First Class Actors and Vocal Artists
(25 Ladies and 25 Gentlemen)
Chorus of 24 Ladies and Gentlemen
Large Orchestra
Ballet Extra-Ordinary
Drama, Comedy, Opera, Operetta,
Farce will comprise a varied repertoire
PERFORMANCES DAILY - EVENING PERFORMANCE .t 8:15 P. M
MATINEE PERFORMANCES on SUNDAYS and HOLIDAYS MATINEE at 2:4S P. M.
ANNOUNCEMENT
FULTON & COMPANY
Dealers in
Stocks and Bonds for Corporations and individuals.
At any time you are desirous of reliable
brokerage service give us a call.
56 VV. Washington Street
suite 510
FULTON & COMPANY
Phone all departments
Randolph 5837
WHERE TO EAT
.Briggs House Cafe
Newly Remodeled
Open from 7 a. m. till 9 p. m.
Serve $1.00 Table d'Hote Dinner
Every Night from 6 to 9 p. m.
BRIGGS HOTEL COMPANY
Fred F. Hagel, Vice-President
W. H. Sturmer, Secretary and General Manager
Northeast Corner of Randolph and Wells Streets
Chicago
(NEW)
HOTEL GAULT
AHERN BROS.
RATES $1.50 UP
Tel. FRANKLIN 2300
Madison and Market Streets
CHICAGO
John Raklios & Co., Inc
RESTAURANTS
Office and Commissary: 125 W. Ohio Street
Phones Superior 8975, 8976
CHICAGO
ALL OVER THE LOOP
PHONE
No. 5541 North Wells St Superior 3934
No. 7 5 North Wells St Franklin 1961
No. 10 3 North Clark St.... Dearborn 6209
No. 12142 W. Van Buren St.... Wabash 8387
No. 19 83 W. Randolph St.... Dearborn 4848
No. 20 12 W. Jackson Blvd Wabash 8558
No. 21 60 W. Adams St Dearborn 5207
No. 22126 W. Madison St Franklin 2485
No. 23148 W. Van Buren St Wabash 6613
No. 24174 W. Jackson Blvd Wabash 6220
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