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The national leader. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1888-1889, March 09, 1889, Image 1

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ATIONAL LEADER, EsrABLISHED 1888.
OL. 11.
~ DAVIS’ 1
TANTANEOUS PICTURES.
Made equally as good in cloudy as fair weather.
$5.00 WrI.I. &ET
e and beautiful GRAYON PORTRAIT of yourself, with
one dozen GABINET PICTURES, finely finished.
No. 723 Seventh Street, N. W.,
WASEINGTON, D. C.
>No copnection with any gallery in this city. g
'OTOMAC RIVER
LUE STONE,
’ & ik &
H. P. GILBERT, l
rdware i and ¢+ Harness,
1208 and 1210 32nd [High] Street, :
Georgetown, D. C.
IPHONE CALL, 236-2. no3-tf
| S. K. BROWN & SON,
H STREET AND PENNA. AVE,N. W,
Washington, D. C.
W Store! New Groods!
isisting of a full line Dining, Parlor -and Chamber Fur
. Also, Carpets, Oil Cloths, Window Shades, Crockery,
ware, Willow-ware, Tin and Wooden-ware. In fact,
hing that can be found in a first-class house.
s S. K. BROWN & SON, 20th & Penna. Ave., N. W,
H. D. BARR,
l
MERGHANT TAILOR
11 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE,
Washington, D. C.
‘ ESTABLISHED 1839.
UINNIP & CO,,
Foreign and Domestic
)RY GOODS,
404-406 Tth Street, N. W.,
WASHINGTON, D. C.
<~ Specialties in Cloaks. L
B. RICH & SONS,
LOTHES, SHOES,
HATS AND FURNISHINGS,
o and 1832 Seventh Street,
Washington, D. C. Rt
B.H.Warner & Co.,
' te Deal
eal Estate Dealers,
916 F. STREET, N. W,
wvHINCTON. D. C; e
IPHONE CALL, 236-2.
WASHINGTON. D C., SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 1889,
FPPlanNnos.,
The Sweetest Toned Piano Made.
Pianos and Organs, slightly used, at great
Bargains for Cash.
Pianos and Organs
old on
Easy Monthly
' Payments
By purchasing of me you deal direct with the man
ufacturer, which means Factory Prices.
SEND FOR CATALOCUE AND PRICE LIST.
FREEBORN G. SMITH,
1225 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D. C.
nov24-tf
MANUFACTURERS OF
HAND - MADE
N 0.208 Tenth St, N.W,
- Washington, D. C.
All kinds of Horse Blankets,
Whips, Ete.
Repairing promptly done.
novio-tf
MONEY TO LOAN
L
Large and Small Sums.
Rents Collected and Houses
y
for Sale.
APPLY AT
The “National Leader” Of
[ooal Leader 06,
Rosins’ Buiupineg (Roou 16,)
Corner 7th and F Streets N. W.
WASHINGTON, D. C.
ja26-1y
THE CGREAT
» °
Atlantic and Pacific
Tea Company,
TMPORTERS AND RETAILERS,
803 Tth 5%., and 1620 14th St., n. w.,
3104 M St., Georgetown,
fMaz concluded, in order to introduce and at the
same time push their unexcelled baking powders
and T'nea Nectar Teas, to give either & handsome
p.ate or a beautiful cup and saucer. They will
also pive an elexant pitcher, a useful whisk-broom
ho'der, and many useful and ornamental articles
10 every purchaser who buys a pound of either
their infallible baking powders or Thea Nectar
Tear.
; It w 11 pay you not to forget their very fine aro
matic Java and Mocha coffees at 30c,
fine coflees at 20c., 22c., 36¢c., and 28c.
Consumers can save from 20 to 30 per cent. by
buying their Teas, Coffees, Saugars, and Baking
L owders from us,
Coffee ground Iresh while waiting by aid of our
new electric Motor,
Our B’clock Breakfast Coffee at 25c. per pound is
the best, cheapest, and mos: economical in the
warket.
Drink Thea-Nectar, Pare Chinese Tea; will suit
a') tastes; the standard tea of the United States.
Sold at 60c. per pound; present with every pound.
Great reductions 1n all grades of pure sugars.
T'he best Standard Granulated Sugar at Bc. per
pound; the best Standard A Sugar at 7Xc. jer
pound; the best White Extra C Sugar at 7c. per
pound; the best Light C. Sugar at 6c. per pound;
the best Cut Sugar at Bl¢c. per pound; the best
Powdered Sugar at 8)c. per pound. !
Handsome presents in the way of Crockery,
Glassware, &c , given to all purchasers of our fine
Teas and Coffees. We also give checks with every
25 cents’ worth of Tea, Coffee, and Baking Pow
ders.
g Remember our Stores:
503 Tth st. n. w., 1620 14th st. n. w.,3104 M st.
Georgetown; 58, 59, and 60 Center Market; 94
Western Marke!; 8 and 9 O st. Market; 101 North
ern Liberty Market,
NEWTON H. BOWMAN,
0c27-t4 MANAGER.
-
AL A A T S
THE MAIL AND EXPRESS.
The Leading Evening Paper.
Stands for the Republican Party and
the Rights of Labor.
Main Office, 23 Park Row, New York
1 ec2J- 88-1 y
JOHN AMBLER SMITH,
Counselor at Law,
Practices Before all the Courts and Depart
ments.
Water’s Building,looB & 1010 F St.,N.W
WASHINGTON. D. C.
Land Claims, Patents amd all Claims attended to,
Decls-BS-1y
{ L
0 My Farons and riends
GREETING!
After being in your service nearly twelve
months catering for your wants on the mutunal
benefit system, I can but express thanks for the
liberal patronage extended we during the brief
period. In the future I will endeavor to merit a
continuance of your patronage, having secured
the
i
EASTERN MARKETS
I am now prepared to Show Immense bargains in
a great variety of goods which 1 wil name in
art—
’ Dr. Warner’s, warranted, all-whalebone Cor
sets, 50 cents.
Dr. M arner’s Corcline Corsets, 95 cents.
Dr. Warner’s Hea!th Corsets, $1.19.
Mme. Warren's Dress Form, $1.25.
Many other styles fiom zs¢. up.
Zepnyr, all colors, 5 cents per ounce.
Imported Saxony, 10 cents per hank.
Germantown knitting yarn 10 cents per hank,
=
Dry Coods:
Yard-Wide Tricot, 3714 cents.
Diagonals, all-colors, 124 cents.
Short lengths in Dress Goous, 8 cents, worth
121 cents.
Cashmere, Dress Flannels,Brown and Bleached
Muslins, Sheetings, Tickings, etc.
Special Bargains in Ladies’, Misses’ and Chil
dreu’s Hose; also, Ladies’ and Gentiemen’s Cotton
and Flannel Underwear, and many other articles
100 nuMerous te mention.
A cali will convince,
Very respectfully,
. 2. BT TE.
3065 M STREET,
WEST WASHINGTON, D. C.
no3-3m
102,104 & 146 W. 37th St.,
New York City, N. Y.
The best located house in the city.
Special attention given to the traveling
public, at reasonable rates.
C. M, HILL, Proprietor.
Decg-'sS-tf
The Bostor
I.o€o 000 and 107.000 Different Kinds o}
Goods,
YOUNG’S
ONE-PRICE
924 7th St., bet. 1 & K Sts.,N.W.,
Washington, D. C.
Useful household articles 5, 19, 15, 25 and T 8
ecents, and $l.OO,
Holiday Presents for the Million. Fair Com
m ttees Will do well to call at YOUN'S,
Remember the number, §#7924 7th St., N, Y.
"‘s STOPPED_ FREE
- e Persons
Oy i denk
NERVE REST&I:ER
fi'dl’t,snm : NERVE ng:'m& :
orve m
INFALLIBLE if taken as directed. mw
doy's we. Treatise and §2 trie b::d.onhob
e ets, MKW ARE L MITATING PRAUDE
Palacs and
New England
Organs, in
Endless Variely
CORPSE-QUAK®™,
A Strange Nervous Malady Which
Sometimes Attacks Grave-Diggers
A strange sort of mental affection,
known as *‘corpse quake,’”” has often
keen found to exist among grave dig
gers. It is no uncommon occurrence
that a person employed in cemeteries
for many years is suddenly afflicted
with a shaking similar to that experi
enced by persons suffering from ague.
A grave digger who has been em
ployed at the Cypress Hills Cemetery
for fifteen years was seen recently by a
reporter of the New York World.
*I know of a number of such cases,”
said be. *‘Ten years ago we had three
diggers here who had worked together
for quite a while. One of the three
who used to be a very lively chap and
always willing and ready to tell a good
yarn, became very quilet all at once.
His companions noticed this, and,
thinking that Joe was not feeling well,
let him alone., There was to be a fu
neral in the afternoon and we went
over to dig the grave. As soon as Joe
stuck his spade in the ground he began
to shake. His companions told him to
stop working if he didn’t feel well, but
Joe pald no attention and continued
with his work until the job had been
finished. Three or four more graves
were made that day, and every lime
Joe put down his spade he shook. The
other two tried to make fun of him by
imitating his shaking while at work.
A few days later Joe’s companions had
the corpse-quake, too, and a week later
had to stop work entirely.
] thought that the three men had
contracted malaria, but, strange tosay,
they never would have that peculiar
shake while away from the cemetery.
Joe came back to us, but every time he
would pick up a spade and try to work
that old trouble would come back. We
insisted upon h's giving up the job, s
he was falling away. He remained at
home for about a week, and his wife
told us that Joe was getting better
again, when one day his boy mentioned
the word °‘spade’ in his father’s pres
ence. It was the strangest thing in the
world—no sooner had the boy said
‘spade’ than Joe took the corpse-quake
again. He didn’t last long after that.
He would be thinking about digging
graves all the time, and this made him
80 sick that he died shortly after. I
don’t remember what became of the
other two men. They had to give up
the job, and, I think, moved away
from here altogether.”’
Superintendent Thomas Marchant of
Greenwood Cemetery, said that his
men had never been affected by corpse
quake, *“‘Our men are old hands at the
business,’’ said he, ‘‘and I have never
known one to suffer from any such
trou Je.” ‘
The Secret of a Good Complexion. {
A French savant discourses upon I
good and bad complexions as follows:
The woman who would have a good‘
complexion must live plainly, avoiding
too much game, rich meats, highly sea- 1
soned made dishes and rich wines, '
Why is it that fine ccmplexions are so
rare among the aristocracy and wealthy |
classes? The aristocracy bave frequent- ‘
ly fiine features, but the complexion is |
apt to very be coarse or very sallow and i
faded. Why? Simply because they
sit up late and get up late, thus losing ‘
the health giving morning air; they feed ‘
too richly, dress too fashionably,
swathing themselves in fursat 2 o’clock
in the afternoon and having next to no
clothing on the upper part of the body
at 12 p. m., and yet experts tell us that
the skin to remain pure and soft must
not be exposed to sudden changes, to
extremes of heat and cold, must not
have its healthy prespiration suddenly
checked. Who can wonder that the
quieter women of the middle classes
possess the best complexions? Oue
seeks it in vain among fashionable folk
over 17 years of age, for generations of
spoiled complexions are generating rad
ically coarse or dry skins, which lose
all beauty after infancy.
e e AQe
Small Houses in Philadelphia.
One family of about five persons to a
dwelling is the usual Philadelphia rule,
Taking that as the average, Philadel
phia vuilt dwelling houses in 1888 for
7,673 families, or 38,365 people. = That
the love of home—a separate dwelling
for each family—holds Itsown in Phila
delphia 1s shown by the increased pro
portion of two story dwellings erected
in 1888, nearly 6,000 of these little
houses, provided with *“‘modern conve
niences,*’ having been erected during
the year. l
—Women wiil be interested to learn
that the train of the dress worn at the
fuveral of Crown Prince Rudolph by
the Crown Princess was made of the
mourning dress used by the great Em
press Maria Theresa at the burlsl of
her hasband, Francis of Lorraine,
PRICE FIVR CENTS.
] .
- NEWS IN BRIEF.
! —Miss Catharine Lee Bates of Wel
lesley College has won the first prize
of $7OO, offered by the Congregational
Sunday-school and Publishing Com
pany, for the MS. best suited for a
i Sunday-scbool book,
| —Jersey City has abolished its
Newsboys’ Home. It was found that
the boys used it for a loafing place,
and that four-fifths of its lodgers were
i boys who ran away from home and had
' no real need for its conveniences.
~ -—Benjamin Frankhn’s watch is
owned by a Lancaster (Pa.) gentleman,
who still carries It and says it keeps
good time. It is of silver, shaped like
a biscuit, and has engraved on its back:
‘*Ben Franklin, 1776, Philadelphia.”
&e_m the four women who received
tltle Crimean medal from Queen Vie
toria, one, Mrs, Newton, of Toronto, is
alive. She was a nurse all through the
Crimean war, and was shot through
the knee in a trench before the Redan.
The Queen herself pinned the medal on
her breast. =
—James G Blame has developed into
a great theater-goer, He has attended
every new performance given in Wash
ington since he reached that city a few
weeks ago. He enjoys low comedy
especially, and bis laugh does not
sound as though he was in delicate
health,
—A valuable white pearl was recently
found in the stomach of a clam by
Captain Lemuel . Staplins, a veteran
clam digger at Stonington, Conn.
Staplins has refused an offer of $75 for
it, © Another fisherman at Stonington
recently found a diamond in the
s.omach of a mackerel.
—lt 1s reported that Prince Luitpold,
the Regent of Bavaria, has condemned
Ccuntess Larish, the daughter of Duke
Louils, of Bavaria, to perpetual exile
for the prominent part she played in
the events which led to the death of
the Archduke Rudolph, the - Crown
Prince of Austria,
—About nine-terths of all the clay
pipes manutactured in the TUnited
States are made in Brooklyn, N. Y.,
where three factories are located that
turn out 15,000 gross annually. The
clay comes from Woodbridge, N. J.,
and costs at the factory $6 per ton.
—~Charles H. Lanier, who acted as
General Harrison’s barber, has been re
tained to act as valet to the President
elect at Washington. As the Indian
apolis Journal sapplies this news, it is
reliable enough to discourage others
from making a brush for the place.
—Libby Prison is to go to Chicago
after all. The work of taking apart
the old structure is now going on in
Richmond, Va., and as the bricks and
beams are displaced they are num
bered, so that the building can be put
together again just as it stood in Vir
ginia. The interior of the old prison is
to be used as a sort of war museum.
—lllinois census returns show that
outside of the cities the population is
decreasing. The school eensus of 1888
shows that in July last there were in
the State 843,976 males under twenty
years of age. In 1880 there were 789,-
676. This is a gain of 54,300, but the
gain 1n Cook County was 83,217, so
that the loss in the rest of the State
was 28,917.
—lt is an interesting fact that the
majority of Presidents have had blue
eyes, Mr, Harrison’s eyes conform to
this rule. Mr. Cleveland’s eyes are
brown, as were those of Arthur. Wil
liam Henry Harrison had dark eyes.
President Plerce’s eyes were Intensely
black, as was his hair. Thomas Jeffer
son’s hair was red, and looked well in
tle White House, :
—At a recent dinner given by the
Crown Prince of Servia te the oflicers
of the battalion he commands, one of
the guests asked His Royal Highness
to propose a toast, The boy, who is 12
years old, without hesitation proposed
the health of his dearly-beloved mother.
The officers were painfully embarrassed,
but after a short pause they all drank
the health of **Their Crown Prince’s
Mother,”” without calling her *‘Queen,”’
—lt would be interesting to know,
though 1t 18 not easy at a glance to
see, on what principle Mdme., Patti
regulates her scale of charges. When
she was singing 1n the United States
as a member of Mr. Mapleson’s Com
pany she received £l,OOO a night.
Soon afterwards, at the Royal Italian
Opera, under the same manager, her
fee was £5OO. At the Paris Opera
House she consented to sing at the
representations recently given of
Gounod’s “Romeo and Juliet’” for
£200; and it appears that at a charita
ble performance about to be given at
Brussels she will sing for nothing.
—*l suppose I shall not meet you
again before your departure for Wash
ington,” remarked a lady visitor to
General Harrison: “I want to express
my wishes for your success, and I hope
you will be re-elected for another
term.” *‘l thank you,”” replied Gen
eral Harrison,with a serious expression
of countenance, ‘‘but I am not sure
that I care to be re-elected.”’ .
In speaking to General Fred Knefer,
an old friend, about his departure, he
said: **l am beginning to realize that
it 18 a lonesome thing to be Presl
dent.”
—The chair in which President
Cleveland has sat for four years is one
that he had made to order and paid for
binself. It 13 maae of light oak to
match the desk made from the timber
of the Resolute and sent to the White
House by Queen Victoria. It is a
great wide-spreading revolving chair,
with a seat and back of split cane, and
a heavy frame tastefully carved,
NO. 9,

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