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Richmond planet. [volume] (Richmond, Va.) 1883-1938, December 19, 1903, Image 6

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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19. 1908
CLIMBING.
I atand at the bottom and upwarO 1 gaae;
The fruit sh:U 1 s*-?- 1 sh.juid think would
to* sweet.
I atsn to kava sum'i of it one of the*e daya.
Tha c!iT*b<i<g. h>\\< v?tr, must be quite a
reat.
?"h* footfcolda ara sllght and at beat inat
cure?
Xotnt Ledder runys rottcn I plainly can
aaa
VftuU Ifa worth all tha rlsk I'm not per
fectly aura,
But I'? like to get up to the top of the
taaa
*\> get to the tan I must make up my m!nd
To care nothing for rubs and my hands
I must soii.
I must tread on the heada of these strug
gling bf.S.'.i.tl.
Aa l'm trod uu by those who above me
?till toll.
lt la not a nica thing. just between me and
you.
As I look from the ground lt seems crue!
to me,
?tut of couia* ril b>> given a much brooder
vtaar
When onco I look down from the top of
the tree.
*o?"e cllmb pretty swlftly and othera are
aWw,
a>wt few of the ullmbera are elopplng to
r*st.
a\U brcathlesa and struggling still upwarfl
they go
To where, high above, is th? fruit of the
best.
And the oaes who cllmb hardest are thcae
at the top.
Which is reaily as strange ols a thing may
well be.
T^ere la not the loast cbance that they
ever Wttl stop,
For the-re's no? any top to thla wonderful
tree.
?Chlcago Dafly Ncws.
THE BITTER
PROBLEM ^
NELLIE CRAVEY G1LLM0RE
U>opvr(ght 1K0J, bjr Daily Story l?ul> Co.)
??rfj by o?f, Mrs. Presley's guests had
if desertcd the breakfast-rooni aud
?? parated to their reepectava pursuns.
fcor several miuutts she sat atarlnej
acrose the table at her husband. Her
tlps betrayed an intangible sneer; she
-was wonderlng ho\y iu tbeworlu she ever
<amo \o marry the mau. Otrtalnly, he
..was not good (o look at. nor lntere.stir.g
V.??notrlch. Arui she? Wall, there wcr<.
^ajways moi?, ar.\ number->i them, raad]
(b swoar aUafUuaea.
"Come out l'<ir a wall . WCn't :? . '
Thore's a Bae
the jyreamores,''
TrevTstonV v. . , ddenbraal
in her reaV atioi??? Mn. riaalaj glaaecd
ap, half-startlrd. ibon east a tUTtlYt
. 'look at her husbur.d. bv.t hi* (aag Vai
'*assivc^ altnost atolM, raraallng mth
ThR. she ro?e, after the Inataat's aeel
tatton. and* Joined Treviston on the
*eranda.
"You aren't eold, arn you?"
"Oh. uo." She laughfd Off the little
?hiver of naTTohaPOai as th^y lafl the
*ouse and walked on rapidly down tho
wide aaall :??
"What's tha matter?" Trevi?.-?.on asUd
#re??ntly, nhaanlajaj for the tlrst time
, f
TWICE Hr; K1SSED HKR
how WTatchedlj p ile the wonian looUed,
and the effort ahi WSS making to keep
up.
Mrs Presley did nut answer at once;
aer eyea wera Bxed In a dreamy stareon
Che restiess tree-iops beyond.
After a aonil r.t, ho reached down and
took her hand in his. holdlng it tightlj
?lasped betweea bofh his own. "What
ls it?" ke haaasasa, tryine; to catch a
gilmpse of her n\ertrd face.
In a Uttle whi'r. she turncd hereyes,
inlsty and half-Ftrained. up to his.
"Oh, laaaV she aobbed, "I don't know
?I can't tell; I o %'y l'eel that this can't
go on. The earth seems slipping from
under my feet?it ls all so ttrrible!"
He bent down to her suddrnly; the
perfume ot" her hr.ir swopt ihrough him
like a stimnlant: twico he klsseri her,
three times, on tln lips.
"It will have to fnd, somehow," she
?want on, aigbing. "Hesospaeta?I'mcon
andeat of that."
i Txevrston rcmnined sllent.
"We can't keep oa being together."
she rosumed. <?vrnly, adding, after a
pause, "aad p. vl aps that's best; God
knowa how it mi. ht all end?the other
way."
They walked on. Bllencebetweenthem.
down the twistiu;*. sun-dappled lane.
"You don't lovo him," sald Trevlston,
ftoalty.
"N?ao."
"And you do lov??me."
I "Hearea help n.e!"
"And you are noing with me?away
kom here?awaj from *-\ < rvthing?
away from hli
Hft looked dowr. at her, fiostrtag, tha
?el?fl in his necL throM
The woman dr? w a qnfcl breatk; the
muscles of b. r f.. oa Iwttebed spafimod
Ically. "That I cannot." she said, in a
ahaaged voiee.
The othor frowj led tihobserved, a look
of 4?texmliiatiqa settin; his face.
"K\thcrir.?'" kt sall sharrly. "you
must!" In a a*C neaft. he continiied. in
a gentler tone: "Be fair to yoursdf?
honeat with me. I've never cared for
any other woman; I never shall care for
any other Ai;d you?you have con
fessed the same for me; do you think
you have any right to ruln your?our
happiness?"
Rhe leaned toward him. resting her
cheek aginst his coat-sleeve.
"I've thought lt all over," she re
plled, after a long silence. "I've calcu
lated every lnch of the cost. If you
had me witb you. we would nelther be
any better off. Oh, don't think I have
not tried to lmagine?to make it other
wise! The whole thing is trite, Dick;
we both know perfectly well what the re
sult would be," she finlshed, dully.
"Trite: that's just it. You lack the
courage. you women. the courage of your
honest irclinatlons." He apoke almost
fiercely, but presently softened and went
on in a low tone: "You are sure, Kate,
are you not, that we would be happy?
together?"
"For a tlme, perhaps."
He bent to look Into her face, forclng
the appeal of his eyea upon her. "And for
a little tlme?just a little year?or a
week?or hour ln the calendar of love? j
what would all eternity matter?"
The woman began to tremble aa she
listencd. "Don't!" she said. choklngly. I
thrustlng out a hand, as though to ward :
off a physical blow.
They moved on ln silence for several
minutes. Treviston was the first to
speak. j
"I shall go, then," he said, slowly, "and
knowlng that you do not love me, In
splte of all your protestations; or know
ing that your love, so boasted, so su
pr^me"?hia volce was keen with irony
?"is nothlng more than?weak watrr!" i
She burst Into passlonate tears, cllng
ing to him in an agony of faillng strengt h.
"I can't glve you up," she said, after
awhile. calnaly. ;
"To-morrow, then," he>explained,hur
riedly, "at ten o'clock?at this spot The
team will be waitlng; there's a steamer
at three; we'll have Just time to catch
It,"
Mrs. Presley whitened to the temples;
once she opened her lips as though to
speak, then closed them again and her
head dropped. I
When Mrs. Presley entered the room,'
Treviston was atanding before an open
window, looking out into the dusk. He
turned at the sound of her step. and came
forwsr-d with outstretched hands.
"Onlv a year." he said, "but it has
seemed like a rcntury!"
She motloned him to a chair. and took
the one opposlte. "A lifetlmp, Dick,"she
returned, with a faint smile, "and. oh,
how I have mlssed you; how I have want
ed yoti!"
"I've been away?very far away," he
explained, "slnce that day?the day you
were taken ill?the day we were to have
commenced a new llfe?together. But
now?" He broke off and the llght came
to hia eyes, deeply. ,
"Now," she too* up his words qulckly.
"now we are back again to the old bltter
problem. In splte of tirne's perspective,
ttaSSS thiugs seldom change." In her
voice was a little tremor of joy, despite
the affumption of regret. She regarded
him. t< nlat i' oly. j
Treviston leaned ciose to the woman,
and again took her hands ln his, press
lng th( m aoftly between his cold fiugers.
"There is no bitU-r problem, Kate; oniy
life a!i<3 l.opo ?ud love?alwaya."
For a long tilne Mrs. Presley did not
speak; worda seemed out pf pUee TO'
aer sow, At last she glanced up, two
glow'i>3 polnte of color ln her cheeks pro
duclug a.r. almost unnatural contrast to
the rcst of the face, grown, ln the past
year. transparently pale.
For the first tlme. Treviston notlced
thal she waa wearlng all black, and a
suu4vli, lnexplicable uneaslness swept
ovfr him,
"Why dO yo\i wearthoseclothes?" he
asked abruptly.
Mis Presley winced, as though under
a probe, and a flash of team for a mo
ment made her eyes misty. Her glance
fell away from his Pn the pause that fol
lowed.
"Surely." she faUered, "you know?
you have heard ? that my husband?**
She broke off, struggllng for self-mas
tery.
Treviston went white, white as the
shirt he wore. No. he said, he had not
heard. As a matter of fact, his steam?
er had but just arrived; he had aeen
no one that ha knew. He stared at her
stupldly, as he made the announccment.
Mrs. Presley was regarding him with
darkenrd eyes. Her lids contracted as
the llds of one in sudden pain.
Treviston shifted ln his chair, holding
his g'.ance stubhornly averted, but his
eoosclonanass did not escape the ver
dlct of her eyes.
He roaa nieebaaJeally and moved over
to the niantel. For a second he atood
staring oddly at the face of atlny Delft
clock.
A silence, charged with flerce mental
struggle. fell between them. At last
Mrs. Presley left her sc at and CTOSSed tbe
room to his side The linos aLout her
eyes and mouth had deepened for a Mfe
time.
"Good-by." she said with a sort of
strange calm. "gr.od-by for all tim<\ I
mlght have known this. Dick; surely I
might have kr.own!" The lips that
framed the words were as blcodless as
the white roae at her throat.
The sweat broke out on Trevl^ton's
face. When he hnd collected hlmsetf, he
put out his hand. blindly. "Katherii.e! "
he cried.
She turned and looked at him curlous
ly, and a eertain hardness came into hei
face.
A moment later. the door closed noise
lessly behind her.
Too Trlflina ?o Be ItrnifmbrrH.
Lawyer (to promoier)?Is this your
slgnature on this cheok for $234 000 -
000?
Promoter?How much?
"Two hundred and thirty-four niil
lion dollars."
"Let me see the check. Oh, yes;
that's my slgnature all right, but I
hadn't notlced tbe amount whsn I
signed IL"- N. Y. Press.
Crcditors are eftea voted hard-heart
ed when rhey men ly ask men to re
de .
niir siiu Oaataia.
Mdan and Lyons are at ihe head of
the world's silk industry, having respec
tively condltlonod 21.668,570 and 16,763.
163 pounds of silk last year.
A PANCAKE BULLET.
?t Took a Goaeral r>own, Hul Waa Se
KlBI It Didn't Hrr.ik
tke Skla.
"Speaklng of paneake bulleta," sald
the colonel, "I niet G?n. WalterC. New
berry on the street the other day, and
while we atood talk Ing he seemed nerv
oua. throwlng his weight flrat on one
foot and then on the other, epanging
rrequently. But he wasn't nervoua. I
knew that, and I knew also why he
seemed nervous. When the head of our
column crossed the James and advanced
toward Petersburg, Newberry waa lteu
KEWBERRY WENT DOWN.
tenant colonel of the Twenty-fourth
New York cavalry. When what was
left of us got back Newberry was the
senlor oftlcer in the cavalry divislon.
"In that advance, when we reached
the Petersburg & Norfolk railroad, we
ran up against the reai thing in the way
of defensive v*>rks. Col. Newberry led
the advance and struck an angle of the
works and soon his line was in the atr,
the supports not being able to get up be
cause ol the enemy's terrific fire. Three
brigade commanders fell in the attempt
to reach Newberry, but he did not re
tlre untll the enemy began to envelope
his flanks. The line went back in some
disorder, but Newberry was cool and de
liberate, and when we got under cover
of the creek he went back with a squad
to make a lodgtnent in front
"As usual. the colonel was ln the lead.
and after he had posted the boya to his
satisfartion he started to rejoin us in
line. When he got down under the brow
of the little hill and only his head and
shoulders were exposed, a southern
sharpshooter biased away at him. Tho
bullet struck a big oak iree. flattening
out like a paaoalra, glanred off. and
Struck N^wbexrj an. tUc too of his
head in front. The ballel had | flat sur
face, nearly as large aa a silver dollar.
and when It struck hil head Newberry
went dowu as though he had been shot
throngh the heart.
"Almoal lauaedjiteh he nut hja hand |
fo Ui hea4 elVeouaa tu nfcd biood. As|
his sens^s i-( lururd he looked at hl3
hand and tkafl feh iiis headagain. Find
Ing no blood an exprrssion of dlsgust
came over his fa<e. he helievlng that he
had been struck by a spent ball. Huw
ever, that paneake bullet affected the
muscles of tlie general's left side and
ever since he has appeared nervous on
hla feet. It lsn't nerves, however; lt ia
a case of paneake bullet, a case of a
wound that did not break the akin, but
left its mark."
JOHN ?kOWN?3 WBlSTLE.
The One That Sltcnnlcil Hla Fnllonrri
at Uarper'a Ferry Htlll ln
K*l?tenee.
The ailver boatswain's whlstle, with
which John Brown piped orders to hii
men while th?y were at Harper'a Ferry
has been diseovered ln Washington bj
the officers of the Kansa? Hiatorical so?
clety. An effort ?? msfclng to aecure tht
Inatrument for the socit'y'a nuiaeuro
says the Detrolt Free P.'ess. When Joht
Brown gathered his men around Harper'i
Ferry and began preparatlons for tht
seizure of the arsenal, he iuatructed
them. accordlng to the story. to hidt
themselves in the mountain foreats an<!
to refraln from being seen together
Then he gave them Instructions tolistet
for their orders each day at sunrlse an?5
sunsrt whlch would be plped to them
with the boatswain's whlstle. These ln
structious were carrled out tothe lettet
and for some days precedlng the attaek
on the arsenal the people of Harpcr's
Ferry heard the mysterious piping from
Brewn's headquarters. The notes would
be taken up by the nearest of his fol
lowers and sent on over the mountaina
untll the farthest dlstant of the band
had received the wordof thecommarder.
When Brown was captured.the whistle
was taken from hlm by I.leut. Stewart. of
the regnlar army, who afterwards be
came a lieutenant general ln the confed
eraey. Stewart finally gave lt to Col.
I Washington, who in turn presented it
to John Cassin, then a well known lawyer
ln Washington. The whistle ls now ln
possession of Mrs. Mary A. Caasln, who
resides in Georgetown.
Only a ?iiks?iIoii.
The young offlcer, in his white dnck
trousers, was moving gallantly among
the ladies who were visiting the battle
shlp that lay off Newport He was not
aware that he had sat down ln paint,
or in plaln dlrt. and that his trousers
were not spotlessly clean. Flnally
someone on one of the small boats that
were circllng about thebattleshlpcallad
out in a rlch Irish voice: "Och, Mister
Liftinant, wudn't yer duckB be betiher
for a ahwlm?"?Wa8hington Star.
Proof PoaltlT*.
Singleton?Ia young Pillabury a good
doctor?
Wederly?Sure. Ha attended my
wife'a mother when she waa 111 last
month.
"And he pulled her through, did har*
"No. he pushed her through-"?Chi
cago DaPv N*?wa
Had 1.o?y KorFlipiid.
Kaut, Germany's greatest philoso
pher, had a large head, but an unusually
low forehead.
Well Sapplted.
Sir Henry Irving is aaid to have no
fewer than 60 pairs of eye glasses and
spectacles.
Watfr-I.lly aa Pood.
The water lily ls largely used ln aome
porta of. lndla by tbe natlves aa food.
rialaaT ? -i ? n ^^BB^^S^^^&^&^^^^i
THE WHITE FRONT^f
PRINTINQ HOUSE,
.311 N. 4th St., Richmond, Va.
li
rWE PRINT..
EVERYTHING
From a Dodger to a Threcsheet Ptoa**, P-vsiness Card.s of all
sizea.
Note, Letter and BiJl-heads, Piacards, Stat" Trents, Envdopos, Chtcks,
Financial Cards, Ordermd Financial ^ook. for Lodges aud Socictics,
Policies, Application Blanks, Medtal Certificates, Tags, Labels,
?efreoeeee?eoeeaeeo<>?o<ioj?o9oao>a>??<?seee? Minutes, Lodge and Society CoDc***tl1 ti^ns.
IOur Job Department L_?- -?-, i
8 IS THOROUGIILY EQUIPPED FOR THE PROMPT DE- lt?"'"? FHIl I i
? IS THOROUGIILY EQUIPPED FOR THE PROMPT DE- it?*"*
UVERY OF ALL KINDS OF JOB WORK. OUR PRICES ! 9 VOII
l|L Tuu
i^iv^rvi v.t a\i.i, fsii\i^ ^r? )vn wukk, uur pricks i ol vmin Tnnnr
ARE THE LOWKST, CONS1STENT WITH FINE STOCK \\ lUuH KfluL
AND GOOD WORK. * L - WW,t linu1-1
tMflen9aaap>>co>a?im?>?^eo?e??eo>oMc
OUR LATEST DESIGNS IN STATIONERY FOR BALLS, PARTIES. ENTERT/2K?nrra
MAY BE SEEN AT THIS OFFICE.
laf-XTbc IRicbmonb BManet-^
As *a Ad feg Mediam cannot be surpassed. Our Solicitor will quofe you Special Rates. As a
k |
H ir:i * *P**t l :; n?H to he excelled in any quatter. ?t ?? known of all men. One Year, $(.50;Six Montha,
i ?ro " * Fct further iuforniadou. call on
3 JOHN MITCHELL JR., Proprieto*,
m
9 ?a*w 'leiepiume, 326. 3* * N. *th St., Richmcnd, Va.
MR8. MAKTH, tho t irld rencwaaa ah.1
highly celebrated Bu.sir ? and Test Medlfem.
reveala every thing. N: iiupoerition. Can be
connulted upon all affait t ihfe, tnv'.iieaa, love
and marrmge a speclalt, Ev?*rv mvMery ra
venlcd, alao of absvn< faoaaaaS and living
fnenda. Remores all troublw and estrange
ments, ohnl!f:v?"i Miy Med'umn who can n
ceed her in st.'irMing nve'ations of th? paat,
present, fnture events of onw'a life. Kemember
sh?- will not for any prrr-c ftntter you; you may
rest assured you wlll gain facts without non
?enw; She can be coriMultcd u|>on all aflairs of
Life, Love, Courtnh'.j>, Marriago Friei os, Ktc.,
with full dewertptton of your futnre icmpan-'
lon. iSheis very aocuratein fieataung nuss
hig frinnds, ettcmiea etc, husinesa, law suita
loumeys, eofrteated wills, divorae and Hpecula
lion is vnlual.l. and reliable. HM laafi your
destiny?trood or tmd ; ah* wltholda nothing.
MUS. MAKTH tells your cntire life paat and
present and f utur** in a DKAD TRANCR, haa
ihe power of ar iwu Mediums yx>u ever mat.
Jn ti-sts she 'flN your mother's full nanie be?
fore marriagc, the aaaMaof all your fjuaily,
tbefr ages anddescription, the naine and busi
neas of your present husband. the name of your
ne>fl if you are to have one, tho name of the
yoeng man who now calls on yon, the name of
ytrar future huHlmnd, and the day, month and
year of your marriagc, how many children you
have or will have: whether your present
aweetheart will be true to yon ?n<' fhe wil
marry you ; if you have no sweetheart she will
tell you when you wili have one and his name,
boaUMaa and Untc of aetjuaintaneo. All your '
future will !*? toldin an Sonaat, clear and
plain n.anner and in a dead trance. Mothers
ahould know the suocens of their huabanda and
children ; young lariu*- should know every thing
about their sweethearfcs or intended husband.
Do not kaap company, marry or go into bua
ineaa nntil you know all, do not let Hilly relig
lous seruples prevent your consulting.
Madame ia the only one in the world who can
tell you the full nanae of yo-ir future husband
with age and date of marrie ge, and tella wheth
er tha one you love is true c r fal.se.
There are Home peraona who believe that
there is no truth to be gnin< 1 from consulting
a Medium, but such beliefs re contrary to the
truth. It is only from the ack of discrimina
tion that suelj a conclusion an be reached. It
ia not every one who placai Js himaelf or her
aelf aa a medium that can stand the test of what
he or she claims.
And a person of an inquiring naind may aak
the reason why. It is simply that these adver
tisers do not take the trouble to atudy human
nature. They do not spend their thoughts for
a moment with acqulring the art of phraseology
andjcindred brancnes that wlll have atendency
to make the pathway to the road of the buav
ness clear and devoid of all obataclee.
It ia and undeniable fact that persona will
come for advice in full knowledge of what they
want to know, and yet aa seon as they confront
a medium they try their utmost endeavor to
dispel from their minds what they know ao aa
to hear if it will be rehearaed by the Medium.
To get the secret out of a person by unfair
and dishonest meaiu is the art used by many
nnprincipled Mediums, but to take holil of the
hand and gain control of the ruind themby ia a
matter of impoasibility to niost of them.
And yet this can be done and by consulting
Mrs. Marth the aeemingly mystery becomee a
re&lization.
This subject haa received no little attention
by eminent men and even college professora.
80 it proves concluaively that although there
are infringers in onr midat with oily tongnes,
perhaps the gates of wisdora have not been
closed to the entire profesaion.
It takea a great deal of study to beeome an
accomplished medium and by a contiauona and
nntiring cffort. the key to the well of apparent
ly unfatRomable mysteriea haa been aecurad bv
MRS. MARTK for the beneflt of hnmanity.
-ADVIOE BY LETTER, ifl.OO._
Hours From 10 A. M. 10 9 P. M
MRS. M. B. MARTH,
246 W. 3ist 5t. (Near 8th Avenoe.)
NEW YORK CITY.
Enclose Stamp for reply.
M^*Flease mentioa the Flajtit.
"THE ECONOMY."
803 X. 3rd St.,
Fine Taiioring,
CLEANING,
DYEING,
AND REPAIRING,
W. O. TURNER, PROPRIETOR.
-i
W. S. SELDEN,
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
AND EMBALMER.
Warerooms:
\ 505 E. Broad Street,
OLD 'FIIOKE, 1484
RESIDENCE,
1308 E.Leigh St.
Richmond, Virginia.
S. J. CILPIN,
506 E. BROAD STREET,
Ricnmond, Va.
DEALER LN at%
Fine Boots, Shoes,
and Ladies Gafters,
Aii Kinds of Fine Footwear.
H. F. JONATHAN
Pisb Oysters & Prodnce
1
1 20 N. 17th St., RICH/IOND, VA
ALL ORDERS WILL REOKIVK
PKOMPT ATTENTION.
Lonj DlaUnce Phone, 752.
New Phone, 478.
ROBT. S. FORRESTER
-EEFLORIST^
2*5 E.Leigh Street,
RIOHMOND, ? ? VIRGJSNIA
Plant Deoorationa, Oholee Roaebnda.
Cat Flowere, FuneraJ DaalRna, Houaa
Deoorationa for W edding, Partiea, Ao.,
a apeoialty. Oire me a oall.
, _ 3 Inoh. 3m. j
JOHN M. US,
DKALER IN
CHOICE GROCERIES,
WINES LIQUORS,
AND CIGARS.
PURE GOODS, FULL VALUE FOB
THE MONEY.
*6J0East Franklia Street
[Near Old Maiket.]
RlCUMOND, - VlRGIKli
S. W. ROBINSON, '
NO. 23 NORTH 18TH ST.i
niCAt.ER IN
FINE WINES, LIQUORS,
CIGARS, &c.
tkiTAII Stock Sold as Ouaranteed.-^t
PROMPT ATTENTION.
Your patronagc is respectlully solicited.
'Phone, 1589. Residcnce No. 911 33d
Street.
ROBT. W. ULUAIS,
FUNERAL DIRECTOR &
EMBALMER.
NO. 3019 P. STREET, BETWEEN
30TH AND 31ST STREETS.
RICHMOND, - - - VA.
Special attention given to all business
enirusted to me. Cariiages for funer
als, receptious and marriages at all
hours. Satialaction guaranteed to all.
tilu-20-'04
A. Hayes
OFFICE AND WARE-ROOMS,
727 Nofth Second Street
? RESIDENCE, 725 N. 2nd St.
First-class Hacks and Caskets of all dfr
scriptiou6. I have a spare room for bod
ies when the family have not ? suitable
place. All country orders utt giver
special attention. Your special artentios
is called to the new style Oak Caaketa.
Call and see me and you shall be waltev
on kindly. ~ ?.--.?..-. , .
'Phone, 2778.
The Castalo Honsi.
702 E. BROAD ST.
Havieg remodeled my bar, and ftav?
tag an up-^o-date piaee, L am pzapam*
to oerve my friendt and ihe paalatt
ihe same oll starul.
Ci\otQe Wines, Uqxiors an*
Claars.
TRST CLASS RESTAURAN
iMeals At All Honrs,
New'Phone. 1281 Wm. Oaatalo. *w? !
MRS. P. C. EASlEY
V
6X5 N. SecondSt.
IC? CREAM, CONFrXTIOMRlBfc
-| CAKEs, ETC. |
Lawn and Piouio Partiea,
vala, Weddinga etc, forniahed witfe
the best high-grade Ioe Qreem oai
the Shorteat Notice.
Satlsicatton Cruaranieed.
3-7-8mo8.
Wbe. M Are Sick
fnre and Freah Madiemei oniy wQ|
?ure yon then pnrohaia yow 4
DrugaaVid Mediaiae trcaa; f*
Leonard't
Reliable
Prcicriptiom
Drug ?tom
724, North Second Street. 4
, SECOND TO NONE. '
WOMflN'S CORNER-STONE
gENEFlClAL QSSOCIRTION.
INCORPORATKO, lfaJtCB, 1897.
Office: - 502W.LeighSt.
AuthorUed Capltal, $5,000:
Claims proaaptly paid aa eooa a* satia*
faotory nonee 01 aickneaf <>r death la
placed in hoaaa><*?Boe.
OFKH'ERS:
LOU1SA E. WILLIAMS, rnaWiiaJ
KATBHOLMBS, - Virr Frraidcaaf
BETTIE BROWN, - Treaaurer
MILDRED COOKE JONES,
Secretary and Business Man&ger
? BOARI? Ol* DIRKCTORS:
Louisa E. Wii.uams, Katk Hor,MBs*
Mattik F. Johnson, Ann M. Johnson,
Bettik Brown. Mh.hrkdC. Toftrae.
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BEFORE
MAKING
J
u
R
G
E
N
S
?Your purohaae yon woold d a wall
to call at the most reliable f uraitota
house in the eity and aee the fk?
line of
Refrlgerators,
Qatting*, OH-gioth*,
And in faet everything that ia need
ed in hoaae f arniahinga.
RUQ3 AND CARFBT3.
Of every deaeription: alao the lae-'
*ai deaigns in ROOKERS and apea
ial OHalRS. Our gooda are the
beat for the priee and the prioe If
very low.
G. 6. Jnrgen's Son
431 EAST BROiD 8T.% A
between 4th and 5th Btreet
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