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Richmond planet. [volume] (Richmond, Va.) 1883-1938, December 20, 1930, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84025841/1930-12-20/ed-1/seq-3/

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GARDNER'S
“Makes the Hair Shine So”
FOUNDED 1906
24 Yean—“EXPERIENCE COUNTS”
The standard hair dressing used by leaders of the theatrical
profession for the past 24 years. 25-50 cents. Special
theatrical half pound glass jars, $.100,
and don’t forwet—“EXPERIENCE COUNTS
Made only by “THE GOOD HAIR KING” Chappy Gardner
296 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY
national!
DELUXE
Colored Balcoy
Special Rest Rooms
Distinct Comforts
Re A Regular
She’s the most
dangerous girl
that ever stole
a kiss at gunpoint.
The Windy
City’s Big
Blowout
"Widows made wmie you
wait.” is the new racket now.
And when this widow steps
into gangland—what a riot!
With Edward G.
i ROBINSON
i _ JNLIL HAMILTON
/
Alice White
ATTEND OUR
MIDNITE SHOW
INtiVV EV1U
WINNIE LIGHTNER
In
“The Life of the Party
SOUND
IMPORTANT NOTICE
“LOTTERY BRIDE” Which Opens
Monday, Will Run for
FIVE DAYS ONLY
Ending Its Engagement Friday, December 26th
Commencing Saturday, Dec. 27th
Our New Shows Will Begin
^ On Saturdays
I
Thrilling Love and;
Adventure
ALL STAR CAST
UNITED ARTISTS
PICTURE
TALKING Romance for the Ages
Eclipsing the screen’s most bril
liant love dramas, this entrancing
heart adventure rises to new
heights of melodious grandeur in
a tale of great hearts and daring j
exploits. Death scorning rescues!
Air-flights to the poles! A thou
sand and one thrills to give you
the time of your lifel
STARTING ON SAT. “PASSION
^DECEMBE^TTI^^^^^^^^FLOWER”
at THE NATIONAL
THE MARX BROTHER* 'l
to the Paramount Picture
“AuuaaJ Crackete**
WIDOW FROM CHICAGO
The popular conception of gun
men and underworld characters
as being unkept and repulsive in
appearance has had to be revised
to conform with the new school of
cooks, accorrding to Earl Baldwin
who wrote the screen version of
“The Widow from Chicago,” the
new First National thriller which
comes to the National Theatre be
ginning next Monday.
The modern racketeer is often
found to be ultra-scrupuious in
his attire; often he is even some
what refined in appearance,
and boasting a smattering of edu
cation, which he is always proud
to display when he thinks it will
impress his associates, accord
ing to Baldwin, whose hobby it is
to know all about such characters.
Dramatists once presented the
crook as dirty and unshaven, hav
ing beady, shifty eyes and a re
treating forehead. This wTas the
stock conception of him for many
years before organized crime be
gan to attract a shrewder and
more polished type, Baldwin
points out. Of course, he adds, the
essential characteristics of the
criminal remain unchanged!
“The Widow from Chicago” wras
directed by Edward Cline and has
a cast consisting of such names
as Neil Hamilton, Edward G.
Robinson, Frank McHugh, Alice
White,, Lee Shumway, Brooks
Benedict, Betty Francisco, E. H
Calvert and others.
The crooks who play so promi
nent a part in the plot are said to
be of the very latest type.
COLONIAL ATTRACTION
“LOTTERY BRIDES”
Arthur Hammerstein has done
it!
The New Jork impresario, in
his first sceen venture, “Lottery
Bride”, which opens at the Colon
ial Theatre Monday has surpass
ed any and all of his magnificent
stage successes in this United
Artists production presented by i
Joseph M. Schenck.
Any doubt that the screen has
grown up with the developement
of sound can be dispelled by at
tending this dramatic operetta,
unquestionably the most com
plete union of music and drama ,
so far to come from Hollywood.
It has exquisite songs and mel
odies by Rudolf Friml, foremost
living composer of light opera,
who gave the stage such memor
able scores as were contained in
“Rose Marie,” “Firefly”, “Katin
ka”, and “High Jinks”.
Jeanette MacDonald, the lead
ing lady, proves her right to the
title of prima donna of pictures
She is not only a songstress ofex
ceptional charm but an actress of
great ability. The cast in general
is of stellar quality. John Gar
rick, the young English actor, <
plays opposite Miss MacDonald 1
and steps into the front ranks of ?
popularity. Honors are by Joseph »
Macaulay and Robert Chisholm, i
both well known on the New I
York stage. A comedy trio con- |
sisting of Joe E. Brown, Zasu g
Pitts and Harry Gribbon leave j
nothing to be desired in the way \
of laughs, and excellent charac- ;
terizations are given by the youth- ;
ful Carroll Nye and the veteran, f
Max Davidson. |
One of the most striking fea- 5
tures of the production is the )
artistry of the settings by Wil- ?
liam Cameron Menzies- In design- *
ing the backgrounds, which range «
from scenes in Norway to the ice X
fields of the Arctic, he has given ^
an enlightening illustration of g
how well modernistic and impres- *
sionistic settings are adapted to \
the new type of musical screen >
I Play.
At The Colonial
A SCENE EROM THE "LOTTERY BRIDE"
ADULTS
25c.
All The Time
KIDS
10c.
All The Time
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday
BROUGHT BACK BY POPULAR DEMAJND—
GREATEST OF ALL THRILLERS ^
t The dramatic
Sensation of the
Year! Alice Duel*
Miller’s tremendous
love drama on tne taut
lV ■ ing screen! See ^
Manslaughter
CL (paramount Qktux
Also
A Big
Short
Program
With
CLAUDETTE COLBERT
And
FREDERIC MARCH
LAST HALF OF WEEK—STARTS THURSDAY
TAKE OUR TIP—COME EARLY
Right out of a jungle of joy the greatest hilarity
hunters on earth are bringing you the comedy catch
of the season!
BROTHERS.
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SOUTHERN BEAUTY TO JION
“BLACKBIRDS”
Among the many Southern brown
skin beauties that have invaded Har
lem, seeking a professional career
on the legitimate stage, is, Miss
Mazie Gordon, who hails from the
state of Virginia, which is noted for
its beautiful girls and hospitality in
abundance. Miss Gordon is planning
to join Lew Leslie’s “Blackbirds”
now in rehearsal. Besides being
pretty and blessed with a symmetry
of figure that would rival one of
Ziegfield’s beauties, this cute little
Miss possesses a beautiful soprano
voice that would due credit to any
musical comedy producer who is for
tunate enough to secure her services.
Here’s wishing her much success in
her new field of endeavor. Yes boys,
she is still single!
STOP! The holidays are here!
Merry Christmas! Glad New Year!
May good health and friendship true
Be with you in all you do.
Gershman’s Meat Market
2 E. Leigh at St. James Dial 2-9768
TOY LAND
-i* : tBTN
This Darling Baby Doll
Is longing for a loving
mother’s care
CTURMAN’S HARDWARE STORC
^ 602 N. Second St.
A DILEMMA SOLVED J
Courttsy—Tf. i::rvt(|
Distracted Mother: “Oh DOCTOR, Jimmie has licked
the gum off all the Christmas Seals. What SHALL I do?”
Doctor’s Voice on telephone: “Buy some more seals,
madam, They’re only a penny a piece.” /
Gang Way Gabriel As
Harlem Buries Wes Hill
Harlem called out “Gangway for
Gabriel!”
“Gangway for Gabriel! He’s gwine
to climb the golden stair!”
In life, Wesley Hill, the Gabriel
in Marc Connelly’s “The Green Pas
tures,” was just “Gabe” to his color
ed fellow actors of the scriptural
piece.
But in the solemnities of funeral
rites this week at St- Mark’s Method
ist Episcopal church 138th St., and
St. Nicholas Ave., he was “Gabriel,
Servant of the Lord.”
The church, the most imposing in
Harlem, was packed with members
of both races. The Rev. Dr. John
W. Robinosn, pastor, chose his text
form Luke 1, 18-20, the prophecy of
the angel Gabriel to Zacharias.
But Harlem took for its farewell
a paraphrase of Wesley Hill’s line
form the show: “Ganway for de
Lawd!”
And the preacher recognized this
in his sermon as he described the
actor’s death on Wednesday, when
Hill was struck by a taxicab.
“He stood there in the shadows
of the elevated,” said the minister
with emotion, “ and neither right
nor to the left was there any gang
way for Gabriel.”
The venerable Richard Harrison,
De Lawd of the play, sat behind the
altar with the ministers. Adam and
Eve were there. And so were Abra
ham, Moses, Shem, Ham, Cain, and
Japheth.
Daniel Hayes, Adam in the play,
sat with Marc Connelly, the author.
The Lord delivered the eulogy and
Adam traced Gabe’s career from
medicine shows to Broadway via
ministrels and vaudeville.
Spingarn Heads N.A.A.C.P.
(Continued from Page 1)
Century,” Goethe’s Literary Essays,
“Criticism in America,” and has pub
lished at his horn ein Amema, New
York, the “Troutbeck Leaflets.” His
poems are included in many anthol
ogies, among them, Stevenson’s
Home Book of Verse, the Home Book
of Modern Verse, Braithwaite’s 192(3
Anthology and others.
Among the tributes to Mr. Spin
gain’s work in behalf of the Negro
is the following:
Dr. DuBois in the Crisis, January,
1918: “No more earnest and sincere
friend of the Negro has arisen since
the Civil Ward.”
MR. SPINGARN’S LETTER
Mr. Spingarn’s letter to the N. A.
A. C. P. Board of Directors, accept
ing the election as President, is as
follows:
“To the Board of Directors of the
National Association for the Ad
vancement of Colored People:
“I am touched and honored by the
unanimous vote by which you have
asked me to be president of this As
sociation. It is a real honor to be
asked to succeed Moorfield Storey,
who as the young secretary of
Charles Sumner shines in the pages
of *‘The Education of (Henry
Adams” and who in his older age
represented the nobility of purpose,
the dignity and charm, of a day that
can never come again. But more
than this, I am honored by your
confidence—the confidence of men
and women who have been my
friends and colleagues for so many
years. I have tried to persuade you
that there are others who could serve
far more worthily than I, but I re
alize your predicament, and I see
no way of evading my clear duty that
I serve until you can decide on a
more appropriate choice. I therefore
accept what you so generously of
fer, regretting only that I cannot
bring the weight of more honors to
help in the cause to which this
Association is dedicated.
“Perhaps few of us realize what
an exti’aordinary Association ous
really is. Every shade of opinion, po
litical, economic, social, and relig
ious, is represented on our Board
and in our membership. It is one
of the few organizations in the world
in which men and women who be
lieve in things as they are and those
who advocate a complete reconstruc
tion of the social order have been
able to work in harmony, and to
serve a single cause, side by side. It
is my dearest wish that this, which is
one of the main sources of our
strength, may not be altered, and
that hand in hand we may continue
to give hope and guidance to the
millions who look to us for militant
and disinterested help.”
_
/WELL/NEL
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PROBABLV l BECAUSE I SAV/
(JET ALL i THEM UP IN /
THOSE \ THE ATTIC//
“Pvnfcjf*
J IMGLES'
SBMO Ufl A JINf51_e —
DAO/ WILL SANTA CLAUS
BRING Me A 'LECTRIC TRAIN;
1 SO I WON'T BE CROSS
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*0CKHARr, rSMAS.

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