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The Wisconsin weekly blade. [volume] (Madison, Wis.) 1916-1925, February 22, 1917, Image 2

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The
Wisconsin Weekly Blade
A National Journal of Opinion and
Circulation.
V.ntpred as second-class matter
June 8. 1916, at the post office at
Wadi son. Wis., unde rthe Act of
March 3, 1879.
jsSPw
Address all communications to
The Wisconsin Weekly Blade, 312
N. Henry St. Money sent by express
money order, or registered letter at
our own risk, otherwise at risk of the
sender.
J. A. Josey, Editor and Manager.
Phones 6756—3369.
L. J. Ousley, Contributing Editor.
SUBSCRIPTION:
One year $1.50
Six months 1.00
Three months 50
NOTICE.
The D. G. L. is not responsible
for any financial obligation of The
Blade.
NOTICE.
The Blade is fur sale at Scott’s
News Stand, 283 4th St., Milwaukee.
Robinson and Heard, 3129 State St.,
Chicago, 111.
Little Dandy Hotel, Rockford, 111.
Percy Hill’s, 426 Race St., Beloit,
Wis.
Hill’s Grocery Store, 651 E. Day
ton St., Madison, Wis.
Trotter and Hopkins Pool and Bil
liard Parlors, 222 E. Main St., Madi
son, Wis.
News for publication may lie left
at either of these places.
Colored folks can pray, and colored
folks can “cuss" too.
People who claim that they do not
maker mough to save sheuld also say
that they do not make enough to
spend.
Remember that this is a world of
trouble. Eight out of every ten peo
ple will try ti> make trouble for you.
Enter the Blade's Heading and
Motto Contest.
WHO DEFEATED THE BENNETT
BILL?
Now that the Bennett Bill has met
the fate of its predecessors, the ques
tion may he expected to arise it al
most always does under like circum
stances who was its executioner?
What person or agency accomplished
its defeat?
In order to forestall such a con
troversy, and the ill feeling that may
be engendered thereby, we purpose
to give the credit where in our .iudg
ntent it rightly belongs: and in doing
so we disclaim any intention of un
dervaluing the work of any individ
ua! or organization.
The bill was defeated, as it should
be, by the combined efforts of every
person or group of persons opposed
to its passage. Each contributed his
share to the one end some by cash
contributions to defray expenses, ~tl\.
ers by personal services, and -till otll
ers by that undolinable something
called moral support of those engaged
in the light. And the last but not
the least of these agencies, was that
healthy public sentiment of the Sta*e
against the pas .age of a bill so vio
lative of Mu " d-div-ate phase of
personal liberty
To these the bill owes its defeat
and the State of Wisconsin its escape
from a foul blot upon its good name.
THE JEW VXD THE NEGRO.
Kal'l'i Samuel Hirsohberp of Mil
w.iukor, in a recent sermon on “Tho
t : ss of tho .low." says: “Tho
•low i I not from choice build h:<
■:ln'’:ivs iiv<i isolate hittisolf. It was
I'. ird ami cruel compulsion. Who is
tot aware of those lines so drawn
oat certain promises that a .low’s
foot would SOmohovv dotilo'.’"
’ l'ho reason for tho clannishness of
the Jew lies net with him. hut with
1 o world which will not a opt him
upon the same common grounds that
it is ready to ac opt other men."
We can \ ip] ri i ite all • t
the Ktlbbi s.iv s here. a> we t-H' h&M’
been constant sutTereis in this re
spect. With so much in common, is
it not about time that the Jew and
the Negro were more tolerant of each
other? He who sutlers much oupht
to sympathize much
WOMAN’S REALM
Conducted by Miss Marie A. Burgette
NOTE —All communication to this department must be
signed. The name will not be published unless desired
NOT THEY WHO SOAR.
Not they who soar, but they who plod
Their rugged way unhelped to God
Are heroes; they who higher fare
And flying, fan the upper air
Miss all the toil that hugs the sod.
’Tis they whose backs have felt the
rod
Whose feet have pressed the path un
shod,
May smile upon defeated care.
Not they who soar.
High up there are no thorns to prod,
Nor boulders lurking ’neath the sod
To turn the keenness of the share
For flight is ever free and rare
But heroes they the soil who’ve trod
Not they who soar.
— Dunbar.
There is such a wealth of consola
tion in that little poem of Dunbar’s
that it deserves a place in the mind
and heart of every woman. Some
time when we look about and see how
many there are whose path seems
strewn with roses, whoes every ambi
tion seems fulfilled and whose every
desire gratified we feel as if we had
no place in the world and that it is
useless to try to make our presence
felt—but here from the pen of our
beloved poet who trod the shoals and
depths of unhappiness and still wrote
with optimism and cheer, comes anew
note of inspiration. We have seen
repeatedly that the flight of those who
soar has resulted in glory and fame
and yet who can say that they have
been happier for the result.
There comes to every woman at
some time a great desire to he able
to enjoy the comfort and ease of life
which wealth can afford, there are
those who long most for the educa
tional opportunities that others en
joy all wish for the unattainable—
wish to soar, hut I think deep in her
soul she feels something of this note
which the poet has sung that after
all there is no feeling of greater ex
ultation than that which comes from
having conquered an adverse condi
tion.
Some of that pleasure comes with
the making of a neat and artistic gar
ment. of inexpensive material; from
the nmkirqf over of a Jhild’s suit from
an old suit of dad’s. All of these lit
tle joys come to the woman in the
home, some of those that seem to plod
and they are indeed the heroines who
enrich the world.
Men and women who have attained
the great heights, who have reached
the places fo recognition in their
chosen field were first of all among
the plodders. Few indeed are they
who are born on the heights and
even these must labor to remain there.
Those who, to our obscure vision
seem to float about leisurely on the
mount of Parnassus unmolested by
the petty cares of the day may in
their be suffering greater uneasiness,
greater anxiety than we in our hum
ble.- estate can comprehend.
In a world where there are so many
types of individuals, no two alike in
any way, there must be those who plod
and those who soar. Granted that we
are among the plodders, our songs of
" i' r. a- we go about our daily task
may reach the ear of one who seems
far above us and yet who may be at
that moment in the slough of despoil
deucy from which our song will raise
and revive him. So let each do his
Mile share, down here amid the
thorns and rocks of daily encounter j
with the thought that our smile o'er,
a defeated care means as much to
our Father as the highest eulogy of
"them that soar."
(The following paper is submitted
to the public by request. It was read
at the Douglass Centennial celebra
tion of the Women's Improvement
Club, Milwaukee.)
INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT
FREDERICK DOI'GI.ASS
Rv Mrs. Adeline Merritt.
Eehruary, 11117, i> the one hun
dredth anniversary of the creates;
\meriean Nepro known, who by his
own enerpy and force of character
demanded tho riphts of a Nation.
This preut Nepro was horn in :i
little town called 'l'uckahoo situated
on the eastern short's of Maryland
There in the early life of this child
of slave-birth were several incidents
that marked him for hipher destmi -
Those hauntinp memories of ; ng
slaves ki'led, thrashed and punished
m every way imapinahle is enouph to
say that this lad with keen eves and
susceptible feelings was an eye wit
ness to these e\,is to which s'averv
pave birth.
When nine years of ape this lad
was sent to Baltimore which was de
cidedly one of the most important
events in his life because it s there
he was taupht to read by tho aid of
his new’ mistress, an old blue hack
spcllinp book, and the “Columbia Ora
tor“; the latter was his confidential
companion. The first twenty-three
years of this young man’s life wers
of slavery obscurity, and degradation,
which made him determined to gain
liberty at any cost. To begin his ca
reer he escaped from bondage, and
for some reason changed his name
from Frederic Augustus Washington
Bailey to simple Fredric Douglass.
As he hoped, today it has become
one of the greatest names known and
holds place in the highest rank of
American statesmen.
Mr. Douglass now entered upon
that epoch of his areer which brought
the hitherto obscure refugee promi
nently before the public, and in
which his service as an anti-slavery
orator and reformer established his
chief aim to enduring recollection.
He was consequently appointed lec
turer of the anti-slavery meetings
and was introduced as “a graduate
from slavery with his diploma writ
ten an his hack.”
This man, a chattel slave of a hated
and cruelly wronged race, in the teeth
of American prejudice and in the
face of every kind of hindrance and
drawback became one of the foremost
orators known, and has widely estab
lished a reputation on both sides of
the Atlantic.
Fred Douglass’ rank is high and
justly so. His writings are even
more meritorious than his speaking.
For many years, as editor of news
papers, and contributor to magazines,
and his written productions compared
favorably with the most cultivated
writers.
His visits to England not only gave
him great opportunities to influence
British public against slavery but the
material benefit to himself was ines
timable. It was in England that
$750.00 was raised to pay for his
freedom and $2,500 as a gift which
he brought to the United States and
established the North Star, subse
quently renamed Fredric Douglass’
Paper.
Fredric Douglass had a deep and
abiding interest in the education of
his people and he believed in the pos
sible schools for the masses. Hence
it was that in addressing the students
at Tuskegee on the subject “Self-*
made Men” he laid special stress on
f b" necessity of learning trades in .
. • n nee tion with other training and
said, “The earth has no prejudice
against color, corps yield as readily
to the touch of the black man’s hand
as of the white man’s hand."
Douglass was not only an Ameri
can, he was a gentleman and what is
more a Negro gentleman sharing eon
vietions and aspirations of the most I
progressive men of his day. His life
of seventy-eight years was a lesson
to those a’ho had suffered in slavery,
to those who had battled for liberty,
brotherhood and citizenship, and to
those who lived to enjoy the fruits
of liberty and rejoice - his career was
guided and inspired by the highest
religious and moral motives.
Ever mindful of his people and
seeking always to promote their wel
fare, Douglass was one of those who
urged in his address the abolition of
slavery and the employment of Ne
gro troops in the Union Army. In
spite of all assertions to the contrary
he foresaw in the war the end of
slavery, for on the battlefield lies lib
erty and he who would lie free must
strike the first blow. Hence the fifty-
I fourth and fifty-fifth regiments were
| formed and the Union saved by the
iaid of the black man's hand, the shed
ding of black man’s blood and the
appealing of the black man’s voice.
Fredric Douglass was in slavery
born
And lived his life in a world of
scorn
Yet he fought for slaves and for
liberty,
And reached a higher destiny.
Is there another to take the place-
Of this "Grand Old Man of the
Negro Race?
NEXT WEEK The work of the
National Xssociation of Colored Wo
men for l'.H? ls hy Mrs Rel>ecca
I/Opan, Milwaukee, Wis.
Y ANKEE CI.EANER looks clean,
smells clean, is clean, does clean and
as a friend puts it “V AXK E E
CI.I-.ANER cleans everything hut a
guilty conscience."
Ask your grocer foe The Globe
Bread. For Bir*hday and Wedding
cakes yhone 533, The Globe Bakery
Cos.
Call 77? and you will get Velvet
Ice Cream. It’s all Cream.
If you fail to pet The Blade re
member you have failed to pay your
subscription.
Yankee Cleaning.
Mitchall Appointed Deputy Sheriff.
The National Negro Press associa
tion extends congratulations to the
Hon. J. E. Mitchell, managing editoi
of the St. Louis Argus, on his appoint
ment as deputy sheriff in the office of
Sheriff G. W. Weinbrenner at St.
Louis. Mr. Mitchell is an nctivo inom
t>er of the Press association and has
made good as an editor.
New Cattle (Pa.) Elbe Install Officers.
Lawrence lodge No. 18. Order of
Elks, at New Castle. Pa., is growing in
membership and usefulness. Regular
meetings arc held, and the members
evince keen interest in the work of
the organization. The officers for 1917
were recently Installed by Grand Dis
trict Deputy J. W. Miller.
HINRICHS
DRY
GOODS
COMPANY
NEW
SPRING
STOCK
LADIES’
WAISTS,
SUITS,
COATS,
NECKWEAR
THREE
SOUTH
PINCKNEY
Typewiters..
All Makes
$7.50 to $55.00
SEE OUR STOCK
Madison Typewriter Cos.,
GROUND FLOOR
Phone 422 113 State St.
Madison, Wis.
VISIT THE
Park Hotel Pool and
Billiard Parlors
Under New Management
J. S. Wadworth, Mgr.
TO GET A REAL SQUARE DEAL
TO GET THE BEST THERE IS
when in Rockford, 111., stop at
LITTLE DANDY HOTEL
318 S. WYMAN ST. and be Served Right
M. B. BAXTER, Prop.
MEALS SERVED AT ALL HOURS
Cigars and Tobacco Barber Shop in Connection
St. Benedict Settlement
823 WINNEBAGO STREET
MILWAUKEE, VMS.
Home for Colored Working Girls
and Women Strangers
in the City.
Either Catholics or Protestants
All are Welcome.
Either with or without means.
MRS. L. DUNCAN
THE ARMSTRONG HOUSE
C. S. ARMSTRONG, Proprietor
BREWTON, - ALABAMA
Just Two Blocks North of Depot
Everything Clean and
Up-To-Date
FIRST-CLASS BARBER
SHOP IN CONNECTION
One [ofthe most! conveniently
located places in the city
Right in the business portion of
the colored population
THE HOME OF
Fine Stationery
Office Supplies
Greeting Cards
of all kinds
Job Printing-Seals--Stencils
H. C. NETHERWQOD
PRINTING CO.
24 N. Garroil Street
The Oldest Trust Company in the
State of Wisconsin
The
Savings Loan&T rust
Company
Steensland Building, Madison, Wis.
Capital and Surplus, $300,000
Pays 4 per cent, for Your Money.
Debentures, Certificates,
Savings, Trusts
Make your Deposits by Mail.

Money to Loan on Real
Estate Security
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
K. B. Steensland, Pres, and Treas.
W A. P. Morris. Vice-Pres.
J. G. O. Zehnter. Vice-Pres.
FT. P\ Riley, See’y and Trust Officer.
T. M Kittleson, Assistant See’y.
W. I). Curtis Stanjord P. Starks
A FT. Proudfit A. F\ Menfes
S. T. Sw arisen Herman Pfund
Professional people get
HOME-COOKING
of MRS. SCOFIELD
322 Fourth St., Cor. Prairie St
MILWAUKEE, WIS’ '
FARMER'S LODGING
HOUSES
Rooms 15c and 25c per night
$2.50 per week
213 Fourth Street
917 Clybourn Street
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
WHY SUFFER? Let
PROF. G. W. MURPHY
Treat your feet, remove the
bunions, corns and in
grown nails
Office: Kirby House
East Water and Mason Sts.
Milwaukee, Wis.
RESTAURANT
When in Milwaukee visit the
ELITE CAFE
Meals at all hours
Lunches 10-15-20 c and up
ROBERT WHITE, Prop.
267 Fourth St.
KEYSTONE RESTAURANT 7
OPEN ALL HOURS
D. MOORE, Prop.
251 Fouth St., Milwaukee, Wis.
ROOMS —For nice rooms see
Mrs. M. Ward, 1706 Prairie
St., Milwaukee, Wis.
J. BECKETT
FINE GROCERIES AND
PROVISIONS
622 Vliet St., Milwaukee, Wis.
BROOK’S CAFE
First Class Service
Home Cooking
.... 288 Fourth Street
Milwaukee, - . YVis
S. BENISH
Meat Market
Fancy Cuts a Specialty
Poultry,Game, Oysters in Season
Tel. 720 Winnebago St.
Grand 2194 Milwaukee
MRS. LEPGOLD’S
Employment Office
is able to furnish women
with general housework
May go home nights
Office 314 4th St.
MILWAUKEE, WIS.
Learn To Dance
LOUISE
DANCING ACADEMY
Every Thursday Evening
Admission 25 cts per couple
Hall for rent other
evenings
Terms Reasonable
Mme. Louise Milligan-Shaw.
Manager
302 sth St., Milwaukee, Wij
JAMES ROBERSON
FAMOUS HOT TIMALIE
MAN
722 Winnebago Street
Milwaukee, Wis.
Velvet Ice Creanj
It’s A!! Cream |
Kennedy Dairy Col
618 University Ave. 1
Phone 778

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