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The Denver star. [volume] (Denver, Colo.) 1913-1963, March 22, 1913, Image 2

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FOR RENT "* ™"
FCXR RENT —Wnen you want par*
ilcular rooms for particular people,
call up York 1633, at 2oO* Clarkson
street. A strictly first-class, modern
bouse. Up-to-date accommodations at
reasonable rates. On car line.
Mrs.E.L. Wright,
2244 Welton Street
Furnished Rooms Modern a
pleasant place for pleasant
people.
For Rent— A five room
brick, entirely modern except
furnace. Call at 2337 Glen,
arm Place.
Front Room For Rent
2515 Curtis Street
Phone Olive 1155
Can Call Night or Morning
FOR RENT j
Furnished Room Modern!
House. Phone Olive 1155. I
For Rent One large front
room in strictly modern house
near car line at 2926 Glenarm
Place. Phone Main 2075.
FOR RENT THREE UN
FURNISHED ROOMS
Kitchen privileges. Private
Apartments with bath. Every
thing up to date. Phone,
Main 7416. Right on car
line. Rent $13.00
FURNISHED ROOMS--
Modern. Gentlemen prefer
red. Near 3 car lines. Rates
reasonable. Mrs. E. W. Moore,
2329 Lafayette St. York 6342.
Olive 1576
Mrs. M.J. Franklin —Mod-
ern rooms for rent; nicely fur
nished. 2450 Tremont Place.
Joseph Carter — Express,
coal and wood, Phone Main
6544. 2425 Washington St.
Prompt delivery.
■ For Rent —Nicely furnished
rooms, near two car lines.
'2607 Glenarm Place. Phone
Champa 2423.
Mrs. J. A. L. Rice.
For RENT-Furnished rooms,
'permanent and transient.
Mrs. Singleton.
,2443 Tremont Place. Phone
Champa 278.
For Rent —Two nice, large
furnished rooms at reasonable
rates. Mrs. Matilda Jarobs,
2812 Welton St. Olive 1285,
For Rent —Furnished rooms
by day, week or month. Rates
reasonable. Phone Main 5011.
2125 Arapahoe St.
Mrs. Person, Prop.
For Rent —Furnished rooms
at 2045 Arapahoe St. Phone
Olive 1115.
Mrs. Delia Evans.
For Rent — or
without board. Best of board.
Satisfaction guaranteed. A
trial convinces you.
2019 Arapahoe St.
Mrs. Hattie Cooley.
Furnished Rooms, modern,
to rent to desirable parties.
J. A. Dorsey, 2252 Cleveland
Place.
Furnished rooms, perma
nent and transient. Hot and
cold baths. Main 8034.
Mrs. Nancy Johnson,
220 Q Welton St.
For Rent —Two furnished
rooms; prices reasonable and
modern equipments.
Miss blanche Boone,
Phone 2549 Clarkson.
Nicely furnished rooms for
rent in strictly modern house.
2218 Clarkson street. Phone
York 6121.
For Rent —Neatly furnish
ed rooms, cheap. 2314 Ara
pahoe St. Mrs. Lottie New
land.
Phone 158. Furnished rooms
in modern house. 2801 Cur
tis St. Mrs. M. B. Brown.
Furnished rooms for light
housekeeping. Suite of rooms.
$2 a week; kitchen privileges,
George Conway, 2042 Arapa
hoe St.
For Rent. Furnished rooms.
Strictly first class. 2041 Ara
pahoe St. Mrs. M, Baker.
For Rent—Rooms, perma
nent and transient. Modern.
Board. Phone n 17. 2121
Arapahoe St. L. P. Holmes.
FOR SALE
7-Room Brick, modern ex
cept furance, on 1 lot East
■front, 2 car.lines, $2100.00
The Colored American Loan
& Realty Co., 9i3~2ist St.
Phone Main 5554
For Sale —12 room furnish
ed house, close in. Cheap
rent. Price $250.00. •$ 50.00
cash. Balance on time. See
The Colored American Loan
& Realty Co. 913 21st street.
FOR SALE
A 6 Room Brick, water in
house 1 lot, on E~sth Ave.
2500 block, only one block t 6
Car Line.
For Quick Sale $1750.00
The Colored American Loan
& Realty Co., 9i3-2tst St.
Fhone Main 5554
WANTED
T. Ernest McClain, A.B.D.
D. S. —Sundays and nigbts by
appointment. Office hours, 8,
a.m. to 12 m., ip.m. to 6 p.-ei.
Office 2802 Welton St., Ron
delein Bldg., Phone Main 7446
Res. 822 32nd St., Phone Main
■"S-*/- -
MRS. JOHN R. HALLO
WELL, Ladies’ Shampooing
and Hair Dressing. Orna
mental Hair Work Made to
Order. Parties attended at
their residence at any time
desired. Hair Dressing and
Curling a Specialty. Reason
able charges. 2108 Larimer st.
MRS. I. M. McGUIRE
DRESSMAKING
Champa 878
Residence 1625 E. 34th Ave.
Mrs. Starns Cafe —Home
cooking reminds you of home
Open 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
iooB-i9th St.
The Jewel Barber Shop
102219th St. First Class To
psorial Artists. G. B. Ric
hardson and J. A. Whittaker.
The O.K. Barber Shop-1834
Arapahoe St., Baths. R.B.
Bolden, Foreman. - ,
P. L. Caldweil, I '{
Ed. Fountain, Prop.
Phone Champa 2571. 1
The Elite Barber Shop and
Bath Rooms —1223 19th St.
Geo. C. and Lillian, Sample,
Props.
BUSINESS DIRECTORY.
MRS. N. J. SKILLERN
MODISTE
1904 E. 2Qth Ave. York 2178
The Little Republic Barber
Shop, 2208 Larimer. Shave
ioc, Hair Cut 25c, Children
15c. —Z. Bricklcr.
Carrie &. Carrie —Tonsorial
Parlor, hand and electrical
face massage. CALL 1831
Arapahoe St. Phone Res. York
7335- J.W. Carrie, Sr. and J.
W. Carrie, Jr. Props.
Five Points Barber Shop
and Bath Room— 2727 Wel
ton St. Phone Champa 471.
I-B. Minter, Prop.
S. H. Tarbet & Co., Men-of
all-work, paper hanging, cal
jcimining, furnace cleaning
and repairing. All kinds of
' job work done. Phone Cham
| pa 2571.
Phone Champa 1385
Little Casino
HOUSE CLEANING BUREAU
: Work done by hour, day or
contract at reasonable rates.
Satisfaction guaranteed. All
kinds of colored help fur
nished. Ladies’ and Gents’
Shoe Shining Parlor in con
nection.
1857 Lawrence St.
PROF. LENZY, 2444 Glen
arm Place, Trans Medium
and Spiritualist. Tells the
present, past and future busi
ness matters of any kind.
I will Bell you the best massage
vibrator, the White Cross, for »i„
as good as any $25.00 machine made
Call or write to Vibrator Co., 538 14 th
street.
RAGE PROGRESS
IN KENTUCKY
Broad Achievements of Mrs.
Daisy M. Saffeil.
LEADER IN GOOD MOVEMENTS
Plenty of Business In Old Blue Grass
Bt«te—Admirable Career of a Former
Publio School Teacher, Whose Activi
ties Are Included In a Wide Boope of
Racial Interests.
Sbelbyville, Ky.—That the race is
making progress is shown by the suc
cessful men and women in various
parts of the country who are making
headway in the trades, business and
professions. Their success is pro ving
to be au inspiration to the boys and
girls who are to be the future men aud
women.
Mrs. Daisy M. Saffeil of this city is
an example of what industry, honesty,
ability and push will do for one pos
sessing these qualities can do for her
self. She was born in Louisville, Ky..
and educated in the public schools of
that city, completing the high school
course, then going to Fisk university,
where she took on the finishing touches.
MKH. DAISY M. SAFFELL
Sbe studied music in nddition to her !
literary work, studying at St. Joseph
Catholic academy and Fisk university, j
After finishing her studies Mrs.JJafTell I
turned her attention to She 1
spent fifteen years teaching at Frank
fort, thence to La wreuceburg, Ky.,
where she was principal.
Later Mrs. SafTell decided to enter
the business world; hence there was
some more training necessary in order
to make a success. She resigned school
teaching and entered Clark's College
of Embalming in Cincinnati. 0.. gradu
ating with honors. She is the only
woman in Kentucky who is a ! eased
embalmer. and in this she stands at the
bead of the class.
She is deeply interested in the prog
ress of her race and i< found in every
thing that means racial uplift and
progress. She is editor of tin* Ken
tucky Club Woman, the oflh ini organ
of the Kentucky State Fedcrn!ion of
Colored Women’s Clubs. She is secre
tary of the Colored Funeral I Mrectors’
Association of Kentucky and treasurer
of the National Association of Colored
Funeral Directors.
At a meeting hold in connection with
the National Negro Business lengue in
Chicago In 11)12 Mrs. SafTell attracted
much attention by the report made to
the business league In her address de
livered before that body. She Is a
typical Kentuckian.
In secret society work she is secre
tary of the District Household of Ruth
of Kentucky, which has won for her
many friends among the women. She
was active at the session of the bien
nial movable committee held in Sep
tember, 1912. in Atlanta, Ga., where
she delivered an address.
“I believe that there Is a place for
every girl of my race.” says .Mrs. Saf*
fell. “The .only thing is for her to
make up her mind to find It. She must
not sit Idle, but be up and doing. She
must make each day count for some
thing.
“There Is plenty of room outside of
school teaching, and our girls must
find it in the business arena. Some
have made success as lawyers, doctors,
stenographers, clerks and along other
lines, and I am proud of them.”
Mrs. SafTell was married in 1897 to
Mr. G. W. SafTell. who is the principal
of the Shelbyville high school.
Boydton Citizens to Hold Celebration.
Boydton, the county seat of Meck
lenburg county, in Virginia, is one of
the oldest and most favorably known
inland towns in the state. One mile
west of the town in a beautiful oak
grove is the Boydton institute, former
ly the old Itnndolph-Mason college.
The building is of red brick and is
very picturesque In appearance. It
was one of the leading schools for
white students just before and after
the civil war. About thirty-four years
ago it was opened by northern philan
thropists for the education of Afro-
Americans. The late Dr. Charles Cul
lis of Boston and Mrs. Helen B.
Sharpe of Old Orchard, Me., who i*
rftlll living, were among the lenders in
the work when.the school was opened
in 1879. The citizens of Boydton will
hold a big fiftieth anuiversur- eelebra
tion on Wednesday. April J).
PHELPS-STOKES LECTURES.
Optimism the Keynote of 8eries De
livered at Southern College.
By W. ANTHONY AERY.
Richmond, Va.—Significant at this
date, when current journals say so
much of the fiftieth anniversary of
the emancipaton proclamation, are the
four Phelps-Stokes lectures on the
Negro problem, which were delivered
during January and February at the
University of Virginia under the
Phelps-Stokes foundation. This is the
first time such a series of lectures has
ever been given in a southern univer
sity, a fact indicative of the growing
consciousness in this section that this
problem may be partially solved by
scientific and sympathetic investiga
tion.
According to Dr. James H. Dillard of
the Jeanes foundation, who opened the
series with a discussion of “Race Ad
justment In the South,” the majority
of white southerners have for the last
fifty years exercised a sort of benevo
lent tolerance lu their dealings with
the race question. They have worked
amicably with their colored neighbors
and have helped them, but they have
never looked upon their economic, civil
or intellectual position as a matter of
study.
That the matter is worthy of study
has been vividly demonstrated by Dr.
W. D. Weatherford in his two books.
“Negro Life In the South” and “Pres
ent Forces In Negro Progress,” de
signed primarily for the use of south
ern college men and extensively read in
the college Y. M. C. A. mission study
groups. The tardy realization, which
Dr. Weatherford has helped to bring
about, that the condition of the race Is
of vital importance is blazing a trail
for such a recognition of the problem
as the Phelps-Stokes lectures Indicate.
In suggesting remedies for the in
competency of Negro education and
religion—two important phases of the
problem—Dr. Dillard said that “justice
demands a larger appropriation to in
crease the efficiency of the public
schools by the introduction of home in
dustries and by relating them to the
life of the people” and that the charac
ter of much of the preaching by the
colored clergy should be changed to
show that religion has its relation to
this world ns well as to the next.
The three other lectures were: “Black
Belt Negro Uabor—lts Efficiency and
Its Cost,” by Dr. Ulrich B. Phillips,
professor of American history at the
University of Michigan: “The Econom
ic Negro.” by Dr. Alfred Ilolt Stone of
Dunleith. Miss., and “The Social and
Economic Significance of the Mentally
Defective Negro.” by Dr. James Bar
din of the University of Virginia.
INFLUENCE OF TUSKEGEE
INSTITUTE IN PORTO RICO
Striking Exhibit at Insular Fair In
Charga of Felix Reina.
San Juan, Porto Rico.—Jerome B.
Peterson, deputy collector of Internal
revenue, who has been stationed at
San Juan. Porto Rico, for the past two
months, writing about the third Insu
lar fair, held here Feb. 22 to March 2,
says:
•‘While the agricultural, educational
and sanitary exhibits were remarkable
as a revelation of the marvelous rich
ness of tho natural resources of the
Island and the rapid growth both ma
terially and mentally under American
guidance and stimulus, the most strik
ing feature to my mind was the ex
hibit <of the public school at Juncos, a
town In the district of fJuayama. cred
ited by the census of 11)10 with a little
over 4.000 population.
“This exhibit took the shape of a
model cottage of four rooms, built to a
scale of half the normal size, and part
ly furnished, all the handiwork of the
pupils. There were steps leading to
the front porch, and stooping one could
enter the doorway to the front room,
which contained table, chairs and a
book case. To the side was a bedroom,
with the bed. and in tho rear dining
room and kitchen. Miniature plumb
ing fixtures had been installed, to
gether with water supply and electric
lighting.
“But the principal feature and the
lesson that the exhibit was intended
to teacii the people of Porto Rico was
shown in the treatment of the quarter
acre plot that surrounded the cottage.
On tills had been planted and were
growing all sorts of vegetables, cab
bages. beets, lettuce, radishes, pota
toes, etc.
“As was stated to me by the young
man in charge of the exhibit, the pri
mary object was to show the masses
of the people what could be done by
those holding a small plot of ground in
raising their own vegetables and thus
reducing the high cost of living, which
has also entered this insular possession
with the other American notions. Ac
cording to his statement, ail these veg
etables had been planted Jan. 8 and
were in full growth for the opening of
the fair.
“The name of this young man is Fe
lix Reina. and he was formerly a stu
dent at Tuskegee institute, a signifi
cant fact In tliis connection. That he
also worked for a short time In the of
fice of the New York Age while wait
ing to return to his home in Porto Rico
does not lessen the interest of the
story."
Business Men to Meet In Weco June 4.
The annual meeting of the Texns
State Negro Business league will be
held 4n Waco, Tex., for two days be
ginning on Wednesday. June 4. Both
colored and white citizens of the town
are Interested In the plans which have
already been mapped out for the en
tertainment of delegutes rod visitors
to the meeting.
ARTHUR JACKSON’S
ORCHESTRA
Rehearsals Tuesday and
Friday Nights,
Public cordially invited
Phone Main 5300, Call for E. Caldwell
Roar 2746 Arapahoe Street
PHONE YORK 3597
WEBSTER’S
ORCHESTRA
5EP r "~ (COLORED) _
"MUSIC FURNISHED
FOR ALL OCCASIONS
EMMETT WEBSTER, - Manager
S POMADE FOR THE HAIR
o
gg w ® wish to advise oar friends and customers that wo 3K
have a tall line of Toilet Preparations, Perfumes, ManJ-
U core Supplies, Brushes of every description. Toilet K
35 Soaps, Cutlery, etc.
g The Denver Barbers Supply Co. |
1827 Glenarni Street
M Formerly at 1006 18th St. X
< Phone Main 7221 Denver, Colo.
® POMADE FOR THE HAIR IS,
1 *
»
ICE CREAM
The Five Points Creamery Makes the
Best Cream in the City, and Retails *
it at $1.25 per gallon. Special Rates
to Organizations and Churches.
Phone us. we will deliver promptly j
817 E. 26th AVE. PHONE MAIN 4306 J
=====
THE NAME OF THAT GOOD GIN IS ‘
EL BART
MADE IN UNITED STATES
Hotel Byron
E. WILLIAMS, Mgr.
Strictly Modern, First-Class in Every Respect*
HOME-COOKED MEALS j
Neat, Clean Rooms at Reasonable Prices. 1822 Arapahoe St. I
1? ~\ MOVING AyiD STORAGE.
' IT l ® largest three-horse ran in then
c,t r; tl- 26 p®r nour. Furniture and B
For Up-to-Date
AND CL D ‘ • CT/lc! V M
fine onoe Kepairmg vsr \ m
Buckeye shop- IfiM
Your Patronage Will . 9B£|
Be Appreciated ,fc/'
t O e A. M. GOLDBAUM VR
q 1624 E. 25th Ave. Btl Fr *"^“, 4 G ®P i
out trade mask Phone York 4638 J
SEEING IS
BELIEVING
Tne finest and largest stock of Ladles
and Gents’ slightly used clothing la
the West. Theatrical Gowns, Ehrenlng
Gowns. Flno Full Dross Suita foe
rant. Ws buy and sell good olothlng
only. Also traveling man’s samples,
new, at wholesale prices.
A. E. LEONARD PROPRIETOR.
THE
ORIGINAL
6*B 16th Street Phone Main Mil
60' YEARS*
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