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The Denver star. [volume] (Denver, Colo.) 1913-1963, April 26, 1913, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84025887/1913-04-26/ed-1/seq-3/

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' DRINK CAPITOL BEER
DENVER’B PRIDE
The purity of Capitol Beer is demonstrated by Its superior flavor
and strength-giving qualities. It’s capital.
HAVE A CASE BENT HOME.
• The Capitol Brewing Co. •
Phone Chi.-ipa 356. Delivered Anywhere.
The Palmer Hotel Restaurant
has changed hands, now known as
“HOLMES CAFE”
MRS. L. C. HOLMES, Proprietress
iSE.2: T aßa o 2130 Arapahoe St.
Candidate for City Auditor
•a
DR. P. E. SPRATLIN
Dear Voter: lam a candidate for City Auditor. The election will be
held May 20th. ! want your support and your vote. I am the only colored
candidate on the ticket lam not the candidate of any party. The Com
inisHion Form of Government that is now the law in Denver does away with
party tickets. I am running Just for the same reason that actuates more
than 100 candidates. I want the office. The Auditor's duties are more
like that of a bookkeeper than the duties of the Commissioners. I will, if
elected, have nothing to do with making laws nor executing laws. I am
in favor of colored men and wonifcn getting appointments in all the Depart
ments of the City Government. Other nationalities in Denver have candi
dates running and they are demanding that the candidates when elected
shall give their people city Jobs. I promise, if elected, to fill one Depart
ment at the City Hall with nothing but colored clerks and Inspectors. The
bond required by the charter is a large one and I have made arrangements
for qualifying under it. 1 ask every colored man and woman in Denver
to advocate my election. When Ihe Swedes? the Irish, the German, the Ital
ians and other white candidates ask for your support I wish you would also
demand that they give a vote for the colored man on the same ticket.
2 4'U Yours for a square deal,
P. E. SPRAT LIN, A. M . M. D.
EVERYBODY COES TO THE
CHAMPA PHARMACY
L 2oth AND CHAMPA STREETS
For the Best Drugs, Chemicals, Patent Medicines
HOT DRINKS SERVED
PRESCRIPTIONS OUR SPECIALTY
Phone Main 2428 JAS. E. r THRALL, Prop.
00008 DELIVERED TO ALL PARTS OF THE CITY!
«York 4639 8
M. Silverman
FINIHSED TAILOR
20 Years of Practical Experience
Come and See Us
Spring and Summer Sample*
■ Direct from the Factory
V Try us and be convinced of the
W quality of our goods apd work
r manship, We make a specialty of
Ladies’ and Gents’ Suits, all latest
Styles and Work Guaranteed.
Ladies’ Suits made from their own material
Cleaning, Preuing and Repairing at Reasonable Prices
1626 E. 25th Ave. Denver, Colo*
PROGRESS MADE
IN GREAT CAUSE
City of Brotherly Love Wel
comes National Association.
SERIES OF LIVELY MEETINGS
Fifth Annual Conference of Notable
Organization For the Advancement
of Colored Americana Attended by
Hundreds Mayor Blankenburg’s
Warm Greeting.
By N. BARNETT DODSON.
Philadelphia. This gracious City
of Brotherly Love has just concluded
playing host to more than 200 dele
gates who attended the fifth annual
conference of the National Association
For the Advancement of Colored Peo
ple. which met here from Wednesday.
April 23. until Friday. April 25.
Seldom if ever In the history of this
city, where the' see<!Pof every humani
tarian movement has found fertile
soil and its tender sprout been nur
tured and fostered into a full grown
and healthy tree, has such a repre
sentative body of faithful workers
been gathered at one and the same
time in so worthy a cause.
Millionaire and laborer, clergyman
and laymen, jurists, editors, legisla
tors, white men and women as well as
black, foregathered to debate and de
liberate upon the condition of a fallen
and downtrodden minority. The key
note of the conference from Its open
ing session to the parting word was
“equality of opportunity, equality at
the ballot box and in the courts of the
land.’*
Possibilities of the Race Outlined.
Able spokesmen of their own ap
pea red to lay l»efore the assembled
delegates the possibilities of the color
ed race. Noble examples themselves
<sf the possibilities of a people If given
the long withheld and looked for op
portunities. they came to plead the
cause of their brethren who were still
kept down. And their appeal found
an answering note, not only In the
words of encouragement, in the ap
plause and band clapping that greet
ed their efforts on the part of their
Caucasian brethren, but in the gener
ous offers of moral and financial as
sistance.
Mayor Blnnkenbnrg. carried into of
fice two years ago on the crest of a
great reform wave that swept the
country and washed Pldladelpblu in
Its course, ever n champion of right
against wrong and sturdy friend ot
the downtrodden and oppressed, wet
comet! the assembled delegates at tin
opening session in liencseth Israel tern
pie.
Moorefield Storey of Boston, nation:)
president of the association, presided
at the opening session of the confe’
ence. which was called to order lu tin
Jewish temple on Wednesday even in-
Rabbi Joseph Knmkopf of Kenese'h
Israel followed Mayor Rlankenburg
and delivered au Inspiring address, ,n
which he addressed himself part leu
larly to those men aud women who n
other fields and In different denomin i
tions had ever championed broaducss
and fair play.
Oswald Garrison Villard to the Fore.
Oswald Carrison Villa rd of New
York, chairman of the executive board
of the national association, also spoke
lu the course of his remarks Mr VII
lard quoted from a recent address bj
Charles Edward Russell of New York
recently candidate for governor on the
Socialist ticket.
“ ‘The nation cannot endure half with
rights and half with none. - “ he quoted
‘any more than it could endure half
slave and half free. It Is not merely
the black disgrace before the world of
au eulightcijed people that plays these
sorry tricks upon a defenseless rniuori
ty. There is also the other fact that
whenever the rights of oue man are
destroyed the rights of all men an
impaired.
** ‘Every time Justice has been per
verted to wreak popular prejudice upon
a colored man the whole system of
justice has been weakened for every
body. Organised society will not
stand such strains. You cannot dellb
erntely foster ignorance 'and lawless
ness without paying the price.’
“This is practically the crux of the
situation which the National Associa
tlon Tor (be Advancement of Colored •
People is trying to obviate/* continued
Mr. Villard. “It does not even ask :■
special indulgence for any of their
shortcomings or beg for them uniisnai
economic and educational opportunl I
ties because of their disadvantages;
and the frightful Inheritance of vice
and Ignorance which was the chief
bequest of slavery. It merely asks
equality of opportunity, equality at the I
ballot box ftnd In the courts of the j
land.’* \
The Struggle For Land and Property
An afternqon and evening session
occupied the attention of the delegates
on Thursday. April 24. Both sessions
were held In the Friends* meeting
house. Fifteenth and Race streets,
members of which society showed a
keen Interest in the progress of the
conference, not only while it was In
session, but for weeks before, while
preparations were being made and as
members of the honorary committee.
At tbe afternoon session the subject
of discussion was tbe "Struggle For
Land nnd Property." Henry Wilbur,
millionaire manufacturer and phllen*
thropist and a member of the Society
of Friends, opened the discussion with
a personal narrative of land conditions
in the south. He was followed by John
Mitchell, the colored president of the
Mechanics* bank of Kichmond. Va.,
the strongest financial institution in
that ity; John Hope, president of the
Atlanta Baptist college, who talked of
the recent crisis in Georgia, and W.
Ash hie Hawkins, an attorney of Balti
more
The last three speakers made a pro
found impression on the conference,
not only by their clear and careful ex
posit!'-ns of problems among the south
ern Negroes, but by their suggestions
for improved conditions, which they
proved were the result of deep and ma
ture -,udy of a subject which had been
brought home to them by actual ex
perience throughout their lives and in
spite of their more elevated positions
over the bulk of those who are the suf
fer< rs from oppression by southern
whiter and to aid whom the national
ass< ation was primarily founded.
Du Bois and Haynes on Wages.
•*TI e Problem of Work and Wages”
wa.‘ e subject of the evening session.
Bis nip L. J. Coppin presided. Dr. W.
E. 1 • 1 Bols. the able editor of the
Cri; a publication devoted to the
adv cement of the colored race, and
Dr. Haynes of Fisk university were
the akers. Dr. Du Bois spoke of
the aims of the organization and of the
beneficial effects of its work up to the
pres* :.t time.
He made an earnest plea for a
chance in those social and economic
con ations which have made criminals
of :r. y members of his race, assert
ing that just as soon as these condi
tloi s were improved there would be a
general improvement throughout the
lan L
T final day of the conference was
tak up with three sessions. The
morning session was taken up with
hearing reports of the various
bra:dies of the organization and with
planning work for the ensuing year.
At the afternoon session, over which
Mo field Storey presided, the “New
Sot:them Attitude” was the topic of
discussion. The speakers were Mrs
Beverly Munford. Dr. James H. Dil
lan: F. D. Weatherford. Joseph C.
Manning and Dr. M. C. B. Mason.
Closing Session In Witherspoon Hall.
T closing session of the confer
ence and by far the most enthusiastic
w* !:dd in Witherspoon hall. Juniper
and Chestnut streets. More than 1.200
people attended to hear addresses by
Un 1 States Senator Moses E Clapp
of Minnesota and Justice Wendell
Phi lips Stafford of the supreme court
of he District of Columbia
The honorary committee iu charge
of arrangements for the conference
wn> composed of the following:
Mayor Rudolph Rlankenburg. Miss
Lid Stokes Adams. Miss Frances
Bartholomew. Rev Samuel 7. Batten
Ratal Henry Berkowitz. Mrs Edward
tV. * Biddle. Mr. and Mrs Jasper
Yeates Brlntou. George Burnham. Jr.
Henry I- Davis. Paschal! Gogglns
Esq.; Rev. Sydney Herbert Cox. Dr
Edwin Hey I Delk. Rev K E Evans
Judge James Gay Gordon. Dr. How
nrd F. Bnnsell. Rev T. W. I liman.
Miss Mary 11. Ingham. Alba B. John
son. Dr W. NY. Keen. Rabbi Joseph
Krauskopf. Rabbi Isaac Landman.
Right Rev. Joseph May. Rabbi Eli
Mayer. E. B Morris. Rev. George
Chalmers Richmond. J. G. Rosengar
ten. Miss Florence L. Sanville. Repre
sentative and Mrs Samuel B. Scott.
Judge Mayer Sulzberger. Right Rev.
Floyd W. Tomkins. Dr. James Tyson.
Samuel S. Pels, NY. B Patterson. Roy
Wallace Smith. Herbert Welsh. S
Burns Weston. Henry Wilbur and Rev.
I .eon Kurtz Wlllmnn.
THE TAFT MEMORIAL HALL.
P an* Drawn For Industrial School
Building In Sierra Leone.
Preliminary sketches have been
awn by Edgar II Rentzel. instruc
r In drafting at the Hampton (Va.)
stltute. for the proposed Taft Memo
I hall. Freetown. Sierra Leone,
ileh Rev. E. (I Granville-Sutton of
o Liberal Christian church is plan
tig to build.
I'he Taft memorial will be 1GS feet
de by 50> feet deep, exclusive of of
es and entry. The first floor plan
jvides for a printing department
d shops for shoemaking, painting,
smithing and carpentry. The sec
d floor will contain an auditorium.
classrooms and a vestry room. The
story will be used as a dormitory
d study hall.
Governor Sulzer Sign* the Levy Bill.
The Levy bill making discrimina
>n on account of race, color or creed
l ( came n law on April 12, when Gor
nor William Sulzer of New-York at
'hcd his official signature to the
»asure. The bill prevents discriin
ltlon for the above causes In places'
public accommodations In New York
»te such as a place of resort, amuse
ont. any Inn. tavern or hotel, whoth
conducted for the entertnlument of
tnnsient guests or for the aecommo
tioo of those seeking health, recre
ion or rest, and any restaurant, eat
ing house, public conveyance, inland
or water, bathhouse, barber shop, thea
ter or music hall.
Prsif* For th* BartUtt High School.
The manual training department and
the department of dome*tlc science of
the Bartlett high school In St Joseph.
Mo, are attracting considerable atten
tion in educational circles on account
of the excellent work which the stu
dent* of these two sections of the
school are doing The enrollment of
s;udonts Is 320. The faculty is rated
ns being highly proficient In Its work.
Professor Rims directs the affairs of
the echos! with skill and splendid busi
ness methods in all departments.
Don’t Forget to Order a Case of
COLUMBINE
VIENNA EXPORT
PILSENER
The BEERS specially brewed by
THE PH. ZANG BREWING CO.
for table use
Telephone Gallup 395 for a trial case
-
LAWRENCE STEPHENS E. T. HCCAN
Tels. Calumet 655: Auto 73-243
The Little Savoy Buffet and Cafe
The Leading Pleasure Resort
of Chicago
Invite their friends to call and spend their
idle moments. Strict order and comfort assured
2634 STATE STREET
CAFE OPEN ALL NIGHT
When in Need of Anything About a
Hog, Except the Squeal
COME TO %>
WALTER EAST
2300 Larimer St. Phone Main 461
HOME MADE LARD and SAUSAGE A SPECIALTY
R. WEBER
Grocer and Market
Game, Poultry and Oysters
IN SEASON
Telephone Champa 2121 2962 Welton. Street
E. R. PAGE. PHONE.
Proprietor Main 2759
PAGE'S POOLandBILLIARD PARLOR
CIGARS AND SOFT DRINKS
2710 Welton Street. Denver. Colorado
ZOBEL BROS.
SAMPLE ROOM
1004 19TH STREET
* CORNER OF CURTIS
FINE WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
COOR'S CELEBRATED BEER ON TAP.
PHONE CHAMPA 280. DENVER COLO.
t. M. THOMAS
5 MOVING AND STORAGE.
The largest throe-horse van In the
W ottr: 11-15 per nour. Furniture and
china packing. Phone Main 4534.
QUICK SERVICE OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
Phone Champa 2310
The Montreal Lunch Room
MRS. T. H. JOHNSON, Prop.
*
5, lO and 15 Cent Meals
1916 Arapahoe St. Denver, Col
ERNEST HOWARD
Carpenter and General Jobbing
PAINTS AND HARDWARE
COAL, WOOD AND EXPRESS
1021 21st Street Phone Chsunpa 752

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