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The Denver star. [volume] (Denver, Colo.) 1913-1963, May 24, 1913, Image 3

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DRINK CAPITOL BEER
DENVER’S PRIDE
The purity of Capitol Beer la demonstrated by itfl superior flavor
•ad strength-giving qualities. It’s capital.
IHAVE A CASE SENT HOME.
The Capitol Brewing Co.
Phone Chi.-npa 356. Delivered Anywhere.
'
' ■ ■ i ■■
Shirt Waist Ball
Decoration Day
May 30th, 1913
EUREKA HALL
Return Checks Good for Afternoon
and Evening from 1 p. m. to 2 a. m.
Webster’s
Orchestra
Admission 50c
.. . *. •
GRAND SEASON
Opening' Ball !
Temple Theatre
Tuesday Eve’g', June 3
Colorado Springs
FINK’S ORCHESTRA
MUSIC FROM 9 TO I
A Treat of the Season
Admission 50c $1 Per Couple
RALPH MOTELY, Floor Mgr.
Sincerely,
B. H. SPEARS.
* York 4639
M. Silverman
FINIHSED TAILOR
20 Years of Practical Experience
Como and See Us
Spring and Summer Samples
Direct from the Factory
Try us and be convinced of the
quality of our goods and work
manship, We make a specialty of
Ladies’ and Gents’ Suits, all latest
Styles and Work-Guaranteed.
Ladies’ Suits made from their own material
Clearing, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Prices _____
1626 E. 25th Ave. Denver, Colo.
GREAT CENTER
OF EDUCATION
Chances For Advancement at
Wiley University.
HI6H GRADE CURRICULUM.
Founded Forty Years Ago For the Full
Mental and MoVal Development of
Its Students, the Institution Wields a
Most Helpful Influence Throughout
the Community and State.
Marshall. Tex.—Wiley university was
established in 1873. It is said to have
more students in the college depart
ment than any other school in the
state. The faculty is made up of a
splendid group of men and women
from such well known institutions of
learning as Harvard. Yale. University
of Chicago. New Orleans university.
Fisk. Walden, Clark and Biddle.
The music department is one of the
best in the entire south. Professor
Harry Webber, the principal, is assist
ed by four regular teachers in giving
systematic instruction to more than a
hundred pupils. Fourteen pianos and
three organs are constantly in use.
The choir renders classical selections
from “The Messiah. “The Creator/*
MATTHEW W. DOOA3C.
•‘Elijah.** etc., and sings with great
feeling and tenderness the old planta
tion melodies.
Wiley stands for the highest form of
mental development The different
courses of study have been carefully
selected, and the best teachers avalla
ble have been employed. There are at
the presetit time fifty in the college
classes.
Wiley takes a position of uncompro
mislng opposition to the saloon. Dur
lng a recent local option campaign the
college brass band played free of
charge at many of the meetings, and
the Young Men's Christian association
of 150 members held meetings In all
sections of the state. The drys won by
a decisive majority.
The state school commissioners re
cently placed Wiley on their accredited
list, which gives the graduates from
the college department a first class cer
tlficate for life to teach, without exam
inntion. in the public schools of the
state. . Only three colored schools are
granted this privilege throughout the
country, and Wiley is one of them.
The Industrial work is of the most
practical kind. Farming, electrical
engineering, broommaking, carpentry,
masonry, printing, sewing, dressmak
ing. millinery and cooking are taught
Matthew W. Dogan. president of
Wiley university, has had a unique
and Interesting career. De was born
on a Mississippi cotton plantation of
slave parents, and in the early days
of his childhood he determined to get
an education by which be could be
come of large service to his people.
By chance the family removed to
Holly Springs, the seat of Rust univer
sity. V
This gave young Dogan the opportu
nity for which for so many years he
had been longing. The family, how
ever. was poor, the father earning a
scanty living as proprietor of a barber
shop. Young Dogan at once started
to school, largely supporting himself
by working as a bootblack In his fa
ther's shop. Many a day while Shill
ing shoes” he kept hia eye on the open
page, his book lying under the chair,
and In this way he often prepared his
lesson for school.
He graduated from Rust university
with honors and was accredited as the
best mathematician in hla class. He
subsequently became professor of
mathematics in hla alma mater and
remained there four years, when he
became professor of mathematics In
Central Tennessee college, now Wal
den university, at Nashville. In this
capacity he became the main support
of Dr. Braden, the president, especial
ly interesting himself In the young
men and women of the Institution.
Fourteen years ago. on the reconi
mendatlon of Bishop J. C. Hartzell. at
that time corresponding secretary of
the Freedmen'a Aid society, he was
elected president of Wiley university
He accepted the position with a full
appreciation of tho grave responsibili
ties assumed and threw himself fnto
the work with vigor and enthusiasm.
VIRGINIA'S IDEAL
TRADE SCHOOL
Great Uplift Work of the
Hampton Institute.
NOTABLES AT CELEBRATION
In Thrilling Address at Forty-fifth An
niversary of Famous Institutio.
Founded by General Samuel Chap
man Armstrong Dr. Buttrick Says I
Is the Real American University.
By W. ANTHONY AERY.
Hampton, Va.—Echoes of the forty
fifth anniversary of the Hampton in
stitute held here the last week in April
are still fresh in the the stu
dei ts and the hundreds of visitors,
many of whom came from a long dis
tance. With striking demonstrations
by students in framing a hip roof,
making a bed, bricklaying and cook
ing, the celebration closed in the pres
ence of distinguished visitors who
joined with the people of the vicinity
in showing their high appreciation of
[ the work of the school.
| Interesting addresses were delivered
by Dr. Wallace Buttrick, secretary of
the general education board of New
! York city; Rev. Dr. Wilton Merle-
Smith. Mrs. Walter C. Roe of Colony,
Ok la.; Starr J. Murphy of New York
ami Job E. Hedges of New York. On
the second day of the Hampton anni
versary the program included an in
spection by the special Hampton par
ty of the Whittier school, the school
far:::, barn and trade school; a review
of the battalion, the girls and Whittier
children; luncheon at the mansion
house and procession to the gymna
sium.
John C. Fisher of Lynchburg, Va.,
who is a candidate for a Hampton
academic diploma, assisted by Benja
mii F. Jones of Danville, Ivy., another
candidate, gave an excellent demon
stration of the framing of a hip roof, i
Fisher and Jones worked with un
usr. I dexterity In putting together the
mij.i.iture rafters in their hip roof.
Tb« •• Hampton students showed clear
ly that they knew the how and why of
their work.
K te W. Ruff of Ruff, Va., used a
plain iron bed to demonstrate the prop-1
er methods of airing the bedclothes
and f making a bed that would be j
con ' rtable and attractive in appear-;
ancr. She showed very cleverly how |
aim; le beds and furnishings could be
managed ao as to provide a sanitary
comfortable resting place. Here
again reasons were given for each in
the demonstration.
Hugh C. Smith of King William.
Va., with the aid of mortar, bricks and:
simple tools, outlined his first steps in |
bricklaying and related the difficulties,
which a greeu boy encounters when
he attempts to do the simple operations i
required in beginning his trade course,
lie related that on one occasion when
he had received a little encouragement
from his Instructor he was so proud of
bricklaying that he wore his work
shoes to the dining hall so that every
l*ody should know he was a coming
bricklayer.
Louisa M. IL Reynolds of Wilming
ton, Del., outlined the principles which
: must underlie the making of a well
balanced menu and indicated with the
■ aid of a chart how the proper kiud of
f'.'od could be supplied for a family of
i two adults and two children at $1 a
day. Then she gave a demonstration
In the preparation of oatmeal.
Frank J. Stoney of Sumter, S. C.,
i told of his life as n boy. “When I was
a ltd,'* said Stoney, “I had many wrong
>1 dres. As 1 grew older I made up
*my mind to do better. I came to this
school in 190 G. I have worked hard
I ever since, and now I am a candidate
fv r an academic diploma.’*
1 riilfin E. Oliver of Crewe. Va., a
graduate of the Hampton institute,
clmss of ISS3. told the vivid story of
better living in the country which has
cviae through the introduction of farm
demonstration work. He showed clear
ly that as men have secured better
crop returns they have improved their
h« ines, their front and back yards,
t! oir stock, their supply of farm imple
ment* and machinery.
Every time I think of Hampton I
get a new definition of education and
!! »ew ideal for human training,” said
Dr. Wallace Buttrick. “I believe that
this is after all the real American uni
versity. I believe that this institution
coiue* nearer having found the ciew to
the maze in this great process of train
li'g people for life. In and by life, than
n. y other institution in tho world.”
P Buttrick declared that Hampton
Institute has been doing an important
worts for many years in teaching stu
dent* the fine art of how to live to
gether In peace.
Dr. Merle-Smith read the following
telegram from Robert C. Ogden, presi
dent of the Hampton institute board
of trustees; “1 send 110 thanks for
youf breezy and encouraging mes
sage*. Absent in the body, lam with
you In spirit I hope you will have a
jolly time throughout In giving en
dowment to Hampton you help the in
stitution that is doing tho best work
for peace in tho country. There is vi
tality In its spirit and wisdom in its
methods.**
This was in reply to a telegram sent
by the special Hampton party: “Re
ralllng the sweet fellowship of bygone
years and rejoicing In your glorious
work here. Hampton pilgrims send af
fectionate greetings."
Don’t Forget to Order a Case of
Columbine, Vienna Export
or Pilsiner
The BEERS Specially Brewed by the
Ph. Zang Brewing Co.
For Table Use
Telephone Gallup 395 for a Trial Case
LAWRENCE STEPHENS E. T. HOGAN
Tel*. Calumet SSSt Auto 73-24 S
The Little Savoy Buffet and Cafe
The Leading Pleasure Retort
oi Chicago
Invite their friends to call and spend their
idle moments. Strict order and comfort assured
2634 STATE STREET
CAFE OPEN ALL NIGHT
When in Need of Anything About a
Hog, Except the Squeal
come to v
WALTER EAST
2300 Larimer St. Phone Main 461
HOME MADE LARD and SAUSAGE A SPECIALTY
R. WEBER
Grocer and Market
Game, Poultry and Oysters
IN SEASON
Telephone Champa 2121 2962 Weltoa Street
E. R. PAGE. PHONE
Proprietor Main 2759
PAGE'S PARLOR
CIGARS AND SOFT DRINKS
2710 Welton Street, Denver. Colorado
■ -
ZOBEL BROS.
SAMPLE ROOM
1004 19TH STREET
CORNER OF CURTIS
FINE WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
COOK'S CELEBRATED BEER ON TAP.
PHONE CHAMPA 2M. DENVER COLO.
I. M. THOMAS
|c? \ MOVING AND STORAGE.
I The largest three-horse van in the
B. ■ * V 1 city; $1.25 per hoar. Furniture and
china packing. Phone Main 4834.
QUICK SERVICE OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
Phene Champa 2310
The Montreal Lunch Room
E. WILLIAMS, Prop.
5, 10 and 15 Cent Meals
1916 Arapahoe St Denver, Colo.
ERNEST HOWARD
Carpenter and General Jobbing
PAINTS AND HARDWARE
COAL, WOOD AND EXPRESS
1021 21st Street Phone Champa 752

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