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The Denver star. [volume] (Denver, Colo.) 1913-1963, September 27, 1913, Image 7

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DRINK CAPITOL BEER '
; DENVER’S PRIDE
The purity of Capitol Beer is demonstrated by its superior flavor
»nd strength giving qualities. It’s capital.
HAVE A CASE SENT HOME.
The Capitol Brewing Co.
Phone Chi.'ipa 356. Delivered Anywhere.
h. ;
OUR NEW 1913 CATALOG SHOW
FREE NG THE LATEST STYLES IN
RFE COLORED PEOPLE'S HAIR.
■ftlmanufacturers of colored people's hair.
C" "* e Ruarantee our hair to stand comb
y I ing and washing. Our prices are low
er than those quoted elsewhere. We
1% sell hair by the pound, also hair nets
|C" ail( l straightening combs, toilet arti-
C- cles ana all styles of hair. Perfect
C" -la2Lj/ c* satisfaction guaranteed or money
C. back. Send two cent stamp for beau-
HUMANIA HAIR COMPANY,
COLORED PEOPLE'S HAIR. Dept. E.. 23 Duane St., New York City
iUPBiI DO YOU VALUE @
I FORDS PERSONAL *ml
jS£ APPEARANCES? |IJ
| "***if you do
Try FORD’S HAIR POMADE, the old Reliable Remedy
FOR KINKY HAIR
.t*kc* harsh. kinky anJ unruly hair softer. straighfer. easier to comb and put up in anv
style that lh« length will permit. Invigorate* the hair, prevent* dandruff, falling out of
the hair and many scalp diseases. Price 23 and 30 cent* a bottle.
FORD’S ROYAL WHITE SKIN LOTION
Will make the skin lighter Immnibtrlv upon applying, cannot he rubbed off. or de
tected that anything is biting used. Will not blister or injure the most delicate skin.
,* FOR THAT BEAUTIFUL HIGH BROWN COMPLEXION,
and to keep the skin In a nice soft healthy condition, free from blotches. (Ampici and
bumps, use KURD S ROYAL WHITE SKIN LOTION. Plica 25 cent* per bottle.
o « •
fK itfl FORD’S SHAMPOO or HAIR EH ?
sc fl STRAIGHTENING COMB M I
i 19 x
ill for doing the hair after shampooing, when htateJ
fT ||| assists in straightening the hair, to be used with
ZZ M Ford * Hair fumade. |pj 7
I Z FORD’S HAIR STRAICHTENER {M I
j— If 11 Our own patented device for straightening the hair. 2 » *
I < M tt heat and quickest instrument for straightening the ■ £-
j— VT Yv hair, on the market today. Roll* the l.air stiaiglit. Q* c
I -/, 1/ doe* not pull or dc*troy the hair. 9 h 2
• g | if FOR SALK BY DRUGCISTS. W f
I wi Take thl* ad to your druggist, he will supply you. ® / |
I THE OZONIZED OX HARROW CO., 232 W. Lake St-, Chicago, 111. |
'™JL York 4639 1
M. Silverman
"-mEm FINISHED TAILOR
v \ 20 Years of Practical Experience
Come and See Us
Spring and Summer Samples
Direct from the Factory
us and be convinced of the
quality of our t;oods work
aBBB n ’’w'vHw manship, W’e make a specialty of
Ladies' and Gents' Suits, all latest
Styles and Work Guaranteed.
Ladies' Suits made from their own material
Cleaninf, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Prices
1626 E. 25th Ave. Denver, Colo*
ERNEST HOWARD
Carpenter and General Jobbing
PAINTS AND HARDWARES
COAL, WOOD AND EXPRESS
1021 21ft Street Phone Champa 752
*• M - THOMAS
A MOV,NO AND storage.
The largest ttaree-horae van In tba
city; $1.25 per Hour. Furniture and
china packing Phone Main 4834
VACATION WORK AT HAMPTON.
I Students Prtsfit by Special Course In
Music Under Mrs. Hackley.
Hampton, Va.—The class in orato
rio conducted by Mine. E. Azalia
Hackley at the Hampton institute for
a month the past summer was a most
creditable feature of vacation work at
the institute. The oratorio concluded
with a demonstration which Included
a musical .“tug of war” between* so
pranos, altos, tenors and bassos.
There was also a musical “spell
down” between the boys and girls on
the oratorios “The Creation” and
“The Messiah.” Mrs. Hackley made
six foot charts of the music «nd mat
ter to be taught, which enabled the
students to obtain much information
with little effort. As the study of
arithmetic cultivates habits of
bought, so the intelligent study of mu
sic for the Negro, as well as other
races, cultivates abstract mental hab
its which will control thought and emo
tion, to say nothing of the employment
of the idle hour.
There'is no people so completely un
der the power of music and no people
who could be so molded through the
power of music as are the Afro-Ameri
cans. Mrs. Ilackley recommends the
study of oratorio especially because
the religious character or oratorio mu
sic appeals to the masses of our peo
ple. They sing this class of music
with marvelous feeling when they
have absorbed its beauties and con
quered Its difficulties. An intellect is
put into the construction of good mu
sic, so intellect must feel its reception,
and to appreciate this music it must
be studied intelligently.
In the future Mrs. Hackley will de
vote her energies anil time toward ed
ucating I lie masses of colored people
in music. She will have a memorial
normal school voice culture institute
in Chicago especially to train vocal
teachers for the colored schools, and
! she will hold vocal institutes in vari
j ous sections of the country.
Nearly the whole of 1012 was given
to her musical mission. She Instructed
nearly Cl.ooo ui her method of voice
culture, in one day teaching 3,000
school children lessons in breathing
and the elements of voice culture.
Even In the rural schools the children
grasped every point that she present
ed. and the teachers rei>ort that the
lessons will never be forgotten.
BIG CROWDS AT EXPOSITION.

Bishop Tyree and Other Noted Divines
and Educators Deliver Addresses.
Philadelphia The program for
: Wednesday. Thursday and Krlday.
Sept 17. IS and 1!». at the eniunclpa
lion exjKJsition exercises in this city
was full of interest and intruded by
great throngs of visitors, l! was as
i follows:
\W«li.«**tln > . S< pt 17. religious congress.
) Bishop C. T. Shaffer. D. U . presiding
, l*ra> er. Hon 11. C McDuffey.
Address. 'M<*ral Condition of the Negro
j R act,' It. I*. Vann.
Address. Religious Condition of Ne-
I groes.'' Bishop Kvans Tyree. D. D.
Five minute addresses by Revs. E. \V.
• Moore. Matthew Anderson. Bishop G. I
* Hl-.ck'|VeH. W. I. Lm. I N Hoss. Hon J
C. Asbury.
Benediction Rev. R. W. Goff.
Dr. William A. Sinclair presiding 3 p in
Prayer, Rev G W. Parks. D. D
Addrc.s*- "The Future of the Negro
Church." lion. J C. Dancy.
Discussions. Revs. Scott Bond. S. R.
Mossell. W. 11 I! Butler.
Sociological congress. Thursday. Sept.
18, Rev. Matthew Anderson. D. D.. chair
man sociological committee, presiding.
Address of welcome. Hon 11. W. Bass,
secretary of committee.
Paper. "The Physique of the Negio."
Professor Kelly Miller, dean Howard uni
versity.
Paper. Professor Earl Finch. Wilber
force.
Discussions by Drs. A B. Jackson. R.
j W. Bailov and N. F. Mossell.
Dr. R. It. Wright. Jr., presiding. 3 p m.
General subject. "The IToblems of tho
Negro."
Papers, "The Negro's Industrial Prob
lem." Professor M. N. Work; "The Ne
gro's Problem of Education." Professor
W. H Crogmnn. "The Problem of the
Negro In the City," Dr. G. E Haynes;
"The Problem of tho Negro In tho Rural
Districts." Henry Wilbur; “The Problem
of tlie Negro in the North," Hon. E J
Waring; “The Problem of the Negro in
Politics," Hon. Gcorgo 11. White.
Discussions, three minutes each. Mrs. S
W. Dayton. Miss Nannie 11. Burroughs.
Mrs R. W. Bailey. Georg® W Mitchell.
Esq., and N. Carl Bolivar.
Professor Carl Kelsey. University of
Pennsylvania, presiding. S p. m.
Prayer. Rev. J. F. Handy.
General subject. "Raco Adjustment."
Papers, "Basis of Racial Adjustment,"
Dr. Simon N Patton; "Basis of Racial Ad
justment," Professor Alain Leroy Locke.
"Wlmt the White Man Expects of tlie
Negro." Rev. John Little; "What tho Ne
gro Expects of the White Man." Dr C. V
Roman.
Honedictlon. Rev. W. T. Ilemsley.
10:30 a. m. Friday. ’Sept. 10. sociological
congress. Bishop W. D. Chnpelle presid
ing.
Prayer, Rev. R. 11. Tabh.
General "Object. "Race Prejudice.'* Pi
pers. "What Is Raco Prejudice?" Profes
sor W. E. IV Dußois; "Raco Prejudice,"
Professor J. P. Llchtenbcrger. Congress
man W. S. Varo and Post.
Discussion, three minutes each. Rev. H
I*. Phillips. Charles H. Brooks, David 11.
Italic, G. L. Clack Well and Mrs. G. E
Dickerson.
Benediction, Rev. W. 11. Davis.
Rov. 11. L. Phillips presiding. 3 p. m.
Report of progress x>f Negroes In dif
ferent states by special representatives
appointed by governors.
Paper. "Tho Emancipation and t?.** Ne
gro/' Bishop C. S. Smith, D. D.
Paper, "Social Justice For the Negro,"
Rabbi Joseph Krauskopf.
Discussion, Hon. H. W. Bass. Bishop G.
L. Blackwell. Miss Caroline R. LeCount.
Miss Jessie Faucet.
Benediction, Rev. Charles A. BlackwfU
Scranton** Enterprising Business Man
Among the business enterprises op
era ted by colored men in Scranton.
Pu.. rarely found among our people Is
a large storage warehouse owned by
tHeorgo W. Brown. The building,
which was recently completed. Is mod
ern la every respect. The business b
valued at and Is lucreasina
rapidly. Mr. Brown Is well thought
of by his neighbors, and. hit indueutv
Is Widely felt. ’
WASHINGTON AND
LAND IN SOUTH
Queries About Source of Great
Educator’s Information.
LABORS OF MONROE N. WORK
New York Emancipation Exposition
Commission Employs Statistician of
Well Known Southern School to Pre
pare Charts and Diagrams Illustrat
ing Economic Progress of the Race.
New York.—A New York paper, the
latest addition to the ranks of the
Negropltobe. philo-Yardaman journals
of the metropolis, chose as the subject
of one of its frequent anti-Negro ful
minatii'iis a statement attributed to
Dr. ‘Booker T. Washington at the re
cent convention of the National Negro
Business league relative to the vast
ness of the unoccupied lands In the
south. The lands, it says, await the
toil of black hands and the sweat of
black brows to make them fields bear
ing fruit* for the benefit of Major
Bales of Cottonville and Colonel Julep
of Min i boro.
“Tbi.*- Washington.” says the paper
in question in its usual sarcastic tone,
•‘has a vertiable head for figures, but
it will be interesting to know where
he get.- them. It may be that in the
uext twenty years or so the rural
Negro population In the south will
increas- by 900.000, but that that sec
tion now has lands awaiting that num
ber of Negro settlers nobody will be
lieve. Where does Washington get his
figures, anyway?”
lie g» rs them from Monroe N. Work,
the cipher man of Tuskegee Institute,
and he -;ets them from somebody who
knows what he is talking about For
this re «on also Mr. Work has been
engaged to prepare charts and dia
grams illustrating the economic and
social progress of the Negro for the
emancipation exposition to be held In
this city next month.
Histor an Who Knows His Business.
Mr. W->rk knows about the vacant
lauds In the south, because, as be says,
he was rn "in the woods” of Iredell
county. N C. His steady upward
climb t • the place he now holds has
given him an intimate acquaintance
MON HOE N. WORK.
with the woods and Helds of practical
ly every southern state. In fact, be
bad <o much to do with the soil in
Pixie that it was not until he had
tea* ! ••d bis twenty third year that he
had a chance to so to high school at
Ark • sas City. Kan.
A lazy man would have said be was
too old to so to school at that time of
lif»\ Put Monroe N. Work stuck to it
and rapidly overcame the disadvan
tapes and lack of opportunity of his
earlier years. Graduating from high
school, he attended the Chicago Theo
logical seminary.
lie then entered the University of
Chi* . 40, where in 1002 he received the
degree of Ph. R. Another year of
graduate study in sociology and eco
nom - brought him the M. A. degree,
for which he presented a thesis ou the
• Negro Real Kstate Owners of Chica
go. " Since 1003 he has taught at the
Georgia/ Suite Industrial college, at
Savannah, and at Tuskcgco. where, in
addition to his duties of furnishing the
figures for Dr. Washington’s lectures,
he compiles the admirable Negro Year
Book.
Typical Son of the Sunny Southland.
Mr Work’s career is typical of the
possibilities for broad culture and all
around development open to the am
bitious and industrious colored man.
Born on a farm, appreciating the im
portance of agricultural training for
the Negro. Monroe N Work knew that
he could brondou his sphere of useful
ness to himself and to society by go
ing to high school to prepare himself
for entry and a successful course of
study in one of the leading Institutions
for higher education In the country
The New York emancipation com
mission's best guarantee of the neon
racy of his figures and calculations il
lust rating Negro progress is his own
prominent figure ns a successful, pro
gressive Negro. Those who seek In
formation or have qny to otter rein
five t«» his work for the exposition
should address him at Kmanclpatlon
pr:n l unation commission. 2217 Seventh
avenue. New York city.
Don’t Forget to Order a Case of
Columbine, Vienna Export
or Pilsiner
The BEERS Specially Brewed by the
Ph. Zang Brewing Co.
For Table Use
- Telephone Gallup 355 for a Trial Case
When in' Need of Anything Abeua
Hog Except the Squeal
' COME TO
WALTER EAST
2300 Larimer St. Phone Main 401
HOME-MADEfLARD and SAUSAGE A SPECIALTY
LAWRENCE STEPHENS '„E. T. HOGAN
Tols. Calumet 85S: Auto 73-248
The Little Savoy Buffet and Cafe
The['Leading Pleasure Reiort
of Chicago
Invite their friends to call and spend their
idle moments. Strict order and comfort assured
2034 State Street;
Cafe Open All Night
L Everybody Goes to the
CHAMPA PHARMACY
2oth and Champa Sts.
For the Best Drugs. Chemicals, Patent Medicines, Etc.
COLD DRINKS SERVED
Prescriptions Ovir Specialty
Phone Main 2425 JAS. E. THRALL, Prop.
COOPS PELIVEREP TO ALL PARTS OF THU CITY
Great
Sacrifice
Sale
DURING MONTH OF AUGUST
FUR COATS
as Natural and Black
Ponies, Maimotts, Coneys ai:d
Seal, sets. Also all FuPCollars
and Muffs.
"n A small deposit will secure
any garment in this store.
Youman’s Fur Company
Phone Main 5045 15th Street
Madam, Read McCall’s
The Fashion Authority ipyi2j24ljElgßjH|
* McCAIX’S i. • Ur«« irtutic, k.nd
•otnely illustrated 100-pa«a monthly
Macaaina that u addin, to the ‘'appi- Sm .rt m *n. ©lever talker*.
"••• -4 .ift«i..«r of 1,100,0c'
woman each month * truly noutlerfiil i>mi.«itiou
Kao*' Issue 1* brim fill of fashions, ftuicy* for mou like y ou, Woutart v'jt Wk
work, Interesting short stories, aiul xcoree *“ * l4l !5' r ' ,,^ > lu I r ‘TT\tKln™ JtVv\ HtTV
of lubor sav luk ami money-savins Ideu* n' 1 laVt. rW m^ku *G t. till adavft k /jHT/hf A
for women. Then* an* more than Wof « . . dT HMI rmM'TI
the newest designs of llit* celebrated B* It Mon«y-MaK6r! \
Wa'AU. I'ATTKRNS In each Issue. Look PrOiptfOlftl V* i
McOALI. PATTERNS are fiunous R»r »v .. , «
,c>u.. 1C slmwirtly »ud cv-ouomor. Oul, ” • ,fc M?*. m“w Ki IttViW
10 Mid lo emu Nih. *,,.1 ~«K y . Mix with pnH| M Tom »»*o|4«.
The publishers of McCAIX’S will spend l >r> -- >'» U*J> of m* te. Our m**u fjgfHTJJR
thousands of dollars extra in the conn us an ‘ l*oint**d out h« top-uvtcAcr*. via- Ifllkwi' .
months In order U» keep McCALI/S bead uer-*. »m tod by all. ■{TlflfMf 1
and shoulders al*«ve all other women's Grand FREE Outfit - CRM
magazine* nt any price. However. »»/,».. a„ r «a a ■ I3HnB
MrCAhl/S is only 50c a year ; positively wni# *°r ■* *PO«y VIWVf
worth $l.OO. This his. wealthy tailoring concur* iHKI
T». M-. S.U.I A., Ck. UrC.II ruam Fm -“".Ylll
«*;•» >r r "Tir"" 1 ' ° r accAix-s. if
sulwctibe quickly. r everything free. V* money or exwrlonoe ■M
THE McCALL COiPAHT, 236 Vsrf 37* St. *• Ysrk nwc ** , * r ' J«rt write.
NOTE—-AOt tor a hee'cepy of fclcCAl.t.'SaoetWr- |l ■
Ir.l nf, I'rrm um nnloguc, Sunpk (ufjr uul twt> E in apar# I HUB ißr
irmiatEloxueabelwEoaiequMC I] Toner dolt. Whole time or apare Urn*. For It
.-,,1 ft year!* thin company has boon famous for inahin-t Ike
” | *wvllo«t. I ***wt. lilting, I u.cyst-wearing mu Jo to anuwins
i c'othoa. Write today for Outfit. <IS)
M£ PROCftkSS TAILORING CO~ kst Ml CWaapi ~

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