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The Denver star. [volume] (Denver, Colo.) 1913-1963, March 21, 1914, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84025887/1914-03-21/ed-1/seq-7/

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Business Directory
A merchant to succeed must a.m to expand his business and
his ideas. The two are necessary compliments to each
other and should go hand in hand, consequently the
Progressive and Practical man of affairs of this
age is continually on the watch for new
ideas and unexplored territories for the
introduction of his commodities.
~ „ i~=3fr-r wr
All merchants and business men whose “ad” appears in this
directory cater to your patronage. Give it to them and
say you saw their “ad” in The Denver Star. It en
courages them to advertise .n our race papers.
Those who don’t advertise for your busi
ness, either don't care for it or feel that
they will get it without sol.c'tation.
AUTOMOBILE SERVICE.
Oliver Hardwick, stand 27th and Wei-! 1
ton St. l'liones Champa 3262, York
2070.
BARBER SHOP 9.
Carrie ft Carrie —1831 Arapahoe.
The Jewell—lo 22 19th St.
O. K. Shop—lB34 Arapahoe.
Elite—l 223 19th St. 1
The Star —2232 Larimer.
Bolden 8r05—926 19th St.
BIRDS.
Sullivan Bird & Seed Store —534 loth
St
CAFES.
Oklahoma 2731 W elton St
Barnes —2741 Wellon.
Keystone —1857 Champa St
CARPENTER.
J M. Nickersou, 2218 Champa street
COAL, FEED AND EXPRESS.
Ham llrown —1314 21st St.
C W. Bridßes 619 2Ttli St.
Anderson—2239 Washington
\V. O. Simonds. 2029 eliampa St.
Carter—24ls Washington.
Tbo Little Cottage Coal Co.
1117 22nd St
CONFECTIONERS.
The Maceo —2715 Welton.
Hire A Rice — °632 Welton. *
Julian's—2lss Larimer St
DENTIST.
T K McClain—2Bo2 Welton.
DRUG STORES. j
Champa Pharmacy—2oth A Champa
Elite Drug Store . . . 21st & Arapahoe
Atlas Drug Co 2,01 Welton
EYE SPECIALISTS.
Swiften Bros. —1650 California.
FURNITURE AND REPAIRING.
J. 11. lllgglna—l4l7 B. 24th Are.
The Welton Strew rur. C0—.621
Welton.
FURRIERS.
Youman, 422-24 15th street.
groceries and markets.
Walter East —2300 1-arltner.
tv. H. Wren. 24th Ave. and Washing
ton St . ...
o. W. Ulcnn A Bro 2t3. Welton St
Cash Progress —2824 Welton St.
HARDWARE.
Five Points H. Co. —2643 Welton.
HAIR SPECIALISTS.
Pope-Turnt>o —3100 Pino St.. SL Imull
Mine. M. 1. Johnson —081 Sbawmui
Arc., Boston.
The IA-ader —2108 Larimer.
HALLS FOR RENT.
Eureka —2235 Arapahoe.
Vern—27ll Welton
INSURANCE.
Union Health A AcctJenl Co.—Central
Natl. Bank Bldg.
Weßlern Life & Accident Co. —Gas ft
Electric Bldg.
LOANS AND REAL ESTATE.
Colored American —913 21st SL
A J. Arfsten—294s 1-nrlmer.
LAWYERS.
George O. Boss—2o9 Klttredge Bldg.
LIGHT AND FIXTURES.
Decker ft Co.. 1432 Curtis St.
LIQL'CRS.
Znng B. Co. —Phone aallup 895.
Capitol Browing Co., phono Champs
356.
ORCHESTRA.
Geo. Morrison Phone Hickory 1418
ORTHOPEDIC APPLIANCES.
tVm. Jones — 808 14th SL
MUBIC INSTRUCTION.
George Morrison. Violin — 4242 Tejon
BL
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS.
Justlana Ford —2336 Arapahoe.
PLUMBERS.
M C. Bradley. 609 H 27th St.
Eire Points Plumbing Co. —713 E.
26th Ave.
SHOE REPAIRING.
Hew Way—lB67 Chumps.
Walter Cambers. 1023 18th street.
SHINING PARLORS.
Ed Jackson —1«2« Curtis St.
THEATERS
Grand 20,7 Lnrlmor St
2715 Welton St
TAILOR.
Sanitary Clothes Cleaners, 2622 Wcl
ton streeL
Southern 2144 Stout 8t
UNDERTAKERS.
Douglas to. —183/ Arapahoe.
WATCH REPAIRING.
Wm. Voights—6ll 27th St. <
WET WASH.
Sanitary—2s3s Washington.
KICKAPOO WORM KILLER EXPELS
WORMS.
The cause of your child's ills —The
foul, fetid. offensive breath—The
tarting up with terror and grinding
f teeth while asleep—The sallow I
omplexlon—The dark circles under
he eyes—Are all indications of I
vorms. Kickapoor Worm Killer is
.hat your child needs; it expels the
vorms, the cause of the child's un
healthy condition. For the removal
of seat, stomacn amt pin worms, Kick
apool Worm Killer gives sure relief.
Its laxative effect adds tone to the J
today. Price 25c. All druggists or i
by mail.
•eneral system. Supplied as a candy
confection—childrtn like it. Safe and
sure relief. Guaranteed. Buy a box
Kickapoo Indian Med. Co., Philadel
phia or St. Louis.
I• » '
i
I I
HRS. A: N. POPE fURNBO
PROPRIETOR
“Poro” College
3100 Pine St. • St Louis. No.
THK -PORO" SYSTKM nf Sculp ami
A Hair treatment is based on the lat
est scientific and sanitary methods,
effecting a healthy scalp thus promot
ing a growth of beautiful hair.
The "Poro” preparations used in con
nection with the treatment are made
and sold exclusively by myself, having
the exclusive right to that name; and
I. alone, know the secret of the com
position that bears that name. Our
claim has always been that when the
hair begins to grow ns the result of j
the use of 4t F*ORO, ” it will ’
continue to do so if only thescalp
and hair be kcot clean. This san
itary method o. treatment is also
having the desired qfTect in helping
to prevent the spread of diseases, for
it is a fact that hair in an unsanitary
condition carries the genns of disease
which often prove fatal to innocent
persons coming in contact with them.
For treatment, call on or address;
MRS. R. H. LEE
1329 South Logan St.. Denver.
Phone Ellsworth 1773.
Agent for "PORO”
Business Phone Residence Phon |
Champa 3262 Vork“
HARDWICK AUTO SERVICE”
OLIVER HAROWICK„M(r.
SERVICE BY TRIP OR HOUR
STAND AT ATLAS DRUG STORE, 270 J WELTON ST.
«If It Is For Your Lodge
WE HJWE IT!
We manufacture Lodge Regalia for cvcr\
Fraternal Society. Cash or Installment
,3 Plan. Cheapest Badge House in the Couut-
1 ' ry. Catalogue for your Society FREE.
] CENTRAL REGALIA CO.
The Negro Regatta House. JOS. L. JONES. Pres.
N. E. Cor. Bth & Plum
Cincinnati, Ohio
REV. JAMES H. GORDON D’ES
Head of Orphan School Passes Awa
In Brooklyn After Brief Illness.
Brooklyn.—Jn the death of the Re\
James II Gordon, superintendent o
the Howard Colored Orphanage and In <
dustrial school, located at King's Park.
N. Y., the institution loses one of its
most stanch friends and tireless work i
ers. Superintendent Gordon died in 1
the German hospital in this city on i
Tuesday. March 3. after an iilness ol
only ten days, lie had been superin
tendent of the orphanage for eleven
years. lie was a well known Baptist
preacher and had been pastor of a
church in Nicetown. Pa., and the Bap
tist temple on West Fifty-ninth street.
New York, previous to taking charge
of the Howard orphanage.
The institution was located on Troy
avenue at Bergen street in Brooklyn
when Rev. Mr. Gordon became its su
perintendent. Under his able and
businesslike administration the work
took on new life, and it was found
necessary to seek larger quarters in
order to accommodate the great num
ber of children whom the home was
constantly receiving, and also room
was needed for the industrial work
which Rev. Mr. Gordon had put in op
• •ration. A suitable tract of land and
a few buildings wore purchased at
King'* Park, .and til.- institution was
removed to that place a few years ago
While in charge Mr. Gordon aimed
to put the Howard orphanage on a
par with Tnskegee institute in A la \
!m in.a. and lie worked untiringly t*
that end. making good success.
Through Mr. Gordon's persona lit;
, and activities new lib* was infused
into the institution, end strong sr.b
'tantial white friends by the Imii
drods were won to the cause. One *»
the features of popularity in eoune •
tion with the asylum was the Intro
duetion of an annual southern dinner
which soon became a function to
which both white and colored jiersons
looked with pHde.
The Rev. Mr. Gordon was a native
of Virginia, having been born in
Sparksbor • that state, fifty-six years
ago. lie was a mail of broad eX|M»ri
dice and devoted Ids life to uplift
work among our people along many
11 Is n ed by Mrs Mary
S Gordon, his widow, and an only
daughter. Miss Fditli Gordon.
RICHARD B. THORNE WINS
SUIT AGAINST EMPLOYERS.
New York The sait of Richard B
Tliorne against Johnson. Ailnm &
G reason. roil estate tirni at i»S4
Broadway, this city, for injuries re
• •• i In uu ele\ it »r . cci lent while
in tlu* cmplo\ »if the said titun last D**-
ocinber wn- settled by a jury in t! •
supreme > otirt before Justice Phil
<•11 Saturday. Feb 28, by awarding
injured man the sum of >00
Thorne’8 back was broken, and I s
lx‘en lying in St Vincent's hospit ii>
a helpless condition since the v •
December. I'.iKi
The evidence showed that Thorne
was sent to the pit of an elevator
shaft to replace the cables on the
drum. While he was at work the ele
vator was brought down,
Thorno against the machinery and e •
vator pit. Thorne was taken to tin
hospital at once, and Mr. Almy :,nd
Ilenry C. Meyer, attorneys, were in
structed to sue for damages.
The suit was brought under the new
employers’ liability law. It was tin
contention of the attorneys for Th . n<
that the engineer of the buildiiu:. w
under the law was Thorne's suporir.
ti ndent temporarily, was negligent in
permitting the elevator to be operated
below the first floor after he h; id
sured Thorne that he would see • .*
' the car was not run to the basem.-i
Because of Thorne’s helpless d.
I tion it was impossible to produce h
in court. Dr. Jesse D. Hand and in
Robert J. McGuire, both house -
ireons at SL Vincent’s. testitle<l that
Thorne would be paralyzed from
waist down for life. It therefore
came necessary to take the tot in.
of the injured man at the hospital
The attorneys went to the ho; •
and Thorne’s testimony was take
This testimony was read to the jun
Robert II. McCormick of 43 Willi,
street. New York, counsel for the d
fendnuts. endeavored to show that h 1
not Thorne been careless he would r -
have been injured.
DISCUSSION ON
LABOR UNIONS
Speech of Judge Kavanaugh
Provokes Wide Comment.
OMITS IMPORTANT FACTS.
List of Organizations In Which Afro-
Americans Hold Membership Shows
That an Attitude of Fairness Pre
va.ls —Colored Tradesmen Are Hon
orable. Says One Official.
Cl ago.—Comments on the speech j
of .1 .dge Marcus A. Kavanaugh. deliv- I
er* »efore the Irish Fellowship club j
in i .s city not long ago. are still be- I
.:ule both" 1 in the newspapers and
by .lividuals. The full text of the
sp* ■■ :i has been carried' by a large
nu . t of papers belonging to the Na
tl* : Negro Press association more
th once, and the race press generally
ha- _ von liberal space to the various
| pi. - of the learned judge’s great de
l lb • nee.
| T • Daily News of this city, through
oi if its correspondents, who is a |
ui ii ier of onr race, comments at
lei.-’.li on this statement in the judge’s
s] och—namely:
Lot a bin* k man get work of equal
r: among white brick masons. elec
ti i.-. ' lerks. bookkeepers, and what
i h; onsV Fvery white employee will
quit the j«*h as though the place had
boon covered by a pestilence.”
I" This correspondent declares that in
h - "\vn experience the contrary has
; p:..v**d to be the case. He is sustain-
II <m: in some measure at least by a study
of the “Negro American Artisan,” t
, in; do by Atlanta university, which |
• t: its rather exhaustively of the rela-
I ti is of Negroes with trade unions.
Acc ording to this report, some unions
, admit Negroes in considerable num
bor- The Tunnel and Subway Con
ti ;ot-s" International union of New
V rk city. f*>r example, reported about
I Negro members and added. “in
our trade they are as good as there are
in the business." The tobacco work
ers report «m1 400 or 500 members, a de- !
crease, however, from the 1.500 they |
: 1. 1 in 1000. The United Mine Work j
j er> of America reported 25.000 colored j
! members, while Negro members pre- i
dominated in the largest local organi- j
j nation of the union. The secretary of
the organization described them as
intelligent, honorable, progressive and
j good workmen."
Fifty Negro members were enrolled
iu the Brotherhood of Kail road Freight
Handlers, while the Hod Carriers and
Building laborers’ union included
i about 1.000 Negro members. Several
hundred were roporttMl as members of
the Bricklayers. Masons and Plaster
ers’ union, the constitution of which
provides for a line for discrimination
against workers on account of their
color.
From the secretary of the Amalga
rtiaf• si Society of Carpenters and Join
ers came this reply to the request for
information: “Our constitution does
not discrimii te against Negro mem
bership. although to the best of my
: knowledge, so far as the United States
is concerned, they are a very rare ex
ception, probably owing to the fact
that we have but very few locals es
tablisluMl In the south. 1 have ticve»*
heard any uncomplimentary remarks
made against any Negro that has been
admitted into our organization."
The secretary of the International
Typographical union has this to say
“Competent persons of both races have
always been eligible to membership in
our organization In some of our south
ern unions there are objections to the
admission *»f Negroes. This is a nat
ural condition which time will proba
bly eliminate An enlightened position
was taken by the Molders’ union The
editor of the International Molders'
Journal wrote, “The International
Molders' Union of North America, now
■ iu its fifty-third year of existence, has
never In its laws discriminated against
the Negro niolders.” lie explained that
some difficulty had been experienced
In local unions iu the south, though
i “here and there, in the east, north,
central west and Pacific coast. Ne
groes have been taken into member
ship and placed on an equality with
the other members.**
In the summary of the report relat
ing to conditions in Illinois the Chi
cago Federation of Labor is recorded
as replying that “we have one local
union comprising all Negro members
the Asphalt Pavers and Helpers’ union.
No. 25—who are regularly affiliated
with the international, which is a fill I
atod with the American Federation of
I.li bor. We have Negro delegates from
several organizations. 1 know of no
onion affiliated with the federation
that prevents Negroes from joining -
at least, this office has never received
any complaint from that direction. We
often try to organize the Negro, but
find It difficult for one reason or anoth
er; principally the employer is always
getting some Negro to tell others that
organize! lat»or is not their best friend,
etc. Tile employer always has in mliul
it Is to his best Interest to keep the
negroes uiiorganlziMl.’’
Tin* trade and labor eouneil of Dan
ville. II! . bad about 7<H» Negro mem
bers in the Miners’ union and forty in
tin* Brick. Tilt* and Terra Cotta Work
ers* alliance The Springfield Fed
eration of Labor included Negro mem
bers In local unions of miners, barbers.
taoJca friers and cement workers.
TRUNKS EXPRESS MOVING
THE LITTLE COTTAGE COAL CO.
Phone Main 8314 R. E. NORRIS Quick Service
Soft Lump $4.50 Per Ton
Coal, Lump per Ton, . $6.00. $6.50. $7.00
5 Sacks of Nut, . , uo
5 Sacks of Lignite Soft Lump, 1.00
4 Sacks of Hard Lump, . , 00
WOOD, per Sack, . . , IO
1117 22nd Street, Between Arapahoe and Lawrence
THE LEADER
r
We are now pleased to announce to
the public that we are located at our
new homo, 2108 Larimer street, in
quarters more commodious and con
venient. We have an especially fine
line of hair goods and toilet acces
sories. Hair dressing according to
the latest modes. A call is all we
ask, as we are sure we can please
you.
HALLOWELL AND JOHNSON
Mrs. Viola Johnson, Prop.
J. R. Hallowell, Manager
Artists Electrical Massage
/ Bolden Bros. Barber Shop
RUFUS ECLDEN, Manager
ouick;service
926 NINETEENTH tSTREET DENVER, COLO.
* Near’CurtisJ Phene Main 4052
/
MONEY TO LOAN
Chattels
One Month’s Interest
Free
We loan lots of money to anybody, like $lO. $l5. $2O
$25, '*'4o, SSC. $65, $75, sqo, Sroo or more, on your fur
niture. pianos, sewing machines, ranges, teams, cattle, dairies
farm implements, store fixtures, income lands, lots, or any
thing rise of raluc, all left in you possession; vtry secret,
private and quick; in one hour all done; plenty clerks and
auto go any place.
2945 Larimer Street
| Phone Main 1083 Office Hours 10 a. m. to 3 p. m*
/
C. H. SHIRLEY, Pres ). C. HAM PSON.JY. -P.
; PAUL J. SHIRLEY, Sec. and Treas.
The Atlas Drug Co.
Incorporated
Leaders in Prescriptions
StorefNo. 1 StorejNo. 2
».*>■ WELTON ST. 26th AND WELTON

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