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The Denver star. [volume] (Denver, Colo.) 1913-1963, April 15, 1916, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84025887/1916-04-15/ed-1/seq-3/

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IF IT IS IN THE HAIR
LINE, SEE ME
MRS. WM. G. CAMPBELL
2835 STOUT ST.
1 PHONI MAIN (I*l
Treating the Scalp for all
Diseases, such as Dandruff,
< Eczema, Tetter and Itch.
, GUARANTEED TO CURE
Sole Agent for All Remedies of the
Johnson M’f 2 Co., Boston, Mass.
PRICES REASONABLE
Phone Main 4239
Joe 1 . Hirahara I p rt) p S .
Joe Y. Tani 1
TOGO
Dry Cleaning and
*“ Hand Laundry
Call and Set Ds ~•<* .w**
Dr. Crump. Residence Phone
Champa 1538.1,
Office Phone Main 8298
' DR. J. w. GRUMP
PHYSICIAN AND|
‘.SURGEON J I
102 S 2tMtlStr««e
Hours—9 to 12 p.
m.. 9 P- m -
Five Points
Hardware Co. r
and Tinshop
Everything in Hardware, Paints.
Oik and Glass at right pnces
Also Furnace work. Gutting and
all k-~f« of Tin and Sheet Metal
~‘wotk at Reasonable prices _
tM* Walton It
Mom Champa MM.
PW- Mai. C. W. BRIDGES
94*7 Pr#p -
Trunks Moved on Sunday
at Regular Price
<st«r ★ Fuel. Feed
and Express
HARD AND SOFT COAL
HAY AND GRAJf
FURNITURE MOVING
Stand, 27th and Welton Sta
Office, 6iq 27th St.
Phone York 9068
Help tha.Bllno
0. Marshall & Son
Destera in
CORN BROOMS
All kinds) of |Corn Brooms
and Barn Brooms
2541 Clarkson St. Denver
WM. HILL
BAGGAGE AND EXPRESS
CALUCD FON ANO DELIVERED
Stand at Elite Drug Company
Phone Main 2701
Residence 2228 Downing St.
Phone Blue 274
if ANY OP OUR SUBSCRIBER*
PAIL TO GET THMIR PAPER*
PLEASE PHONE THIS OPTION,
CHAMPA MM. OR SIND POSTAI4
CARD.
ASKS LIBERAL SUPPORT
FOR TRAINING SCHOOL
Juogs Pritchard Says Institution at
Durham, N. C., Has Msrit.
in a letter to the New York Tribune
recently United States Circuit Court
Judge J. C. Pritchard of the Fourth
district at Richmond. Va.. expresses his
approval of the wotk being done by the
National Traiuing school, Durham.
N. C. Judge Pritchard says:
“I desire through the columns of your
paper to call attention to the work of
the National Training school at Dur
ham, N. C.. for the Negro. This school
Is farreachlug In its influence. It is
endeavoring to give to the Negro high
(deals and develop character. Its aim
primarily is to direct the emotional
tendencies of the race into practical
channels and make It a means of uplift.
“To this end It is training leaders In
industrial, literary, social and religious
walks and sending out these men and
women so trained to reach others. To
my mind no school is founded upon
truer lines or Ls destined to do a great
er work and especially with such a
small expenditure of money.
“General Julian S. Carr, commander
of the Confederate Veterans of North
Carolina and one of the largest hosiery
mill owners in the south, says of this
work: *1 know when a school ls worthy.
This one ls. It is founded upon right
lines. I am glad to accept the chair
maushlp of the new board of trustees
of this Institution for the Negroes, and.
although 1 am resigning from board
of institutions having to do with my
own race, I want to help the Negro
and believe that this school furnishes
to me the best means.’
“Dr. Charles IJ. Park hurst and Colo
nel Theodore Roosevelt havenlso heart
ily indorsed this work. The immediate
need of this school is $1,500 monthly
with which to meet current expenses.
$50,000 for buildings and $15,000 for
beat and water.
“The Negro ls here with us. He must
be lifted up and properly trained. This
can be done best by well trained lead
era of his own race who are sent out
to meet the masses. I have faith In
this school and Its president I would
be very glad Indeed if gifts for the edu
cation and training of the Negro could
largely go to supply tbe pressing needs
and equipment of the National Train
tng school, Durham, N. C.. of which Dr.
James E. Shepard is president.
“Additional Information aud facta In
regard to this important work can be
had from him. I believe that no gift
will be more worthily bestowed.
“J. C. PRITCHARD,
“Judge United States Circuit Court.
Fourth District, Richmond. Va."
GENERAL EDUCATION BOARD
BROADENS SCOPE OF WORK
Rural Fur CelorW Raw lauth
Rawivt Gantraua Aid.
Education adapted to the real nerd*
of the colored (>eople of the south of
the kind to make them better citizen*
received a great impetus in 1015, ac
cording to the sixth installment of the
annual report of the general education
Itoard, supported by the Rockefeller
foundation, made public the last week
In March at New York.
To provide supervising industrial
teachers in colored schools the board
has added $15,000 to the Anna T.
Jeanes foundation, which produces an
annual Income of $39,500, employed
under the direction of Dr. James H.
Dillard. State and county sui>erlntend
enta are taking Increased interest In
making the education of the colored
child practical.
Mr. Jackson Davis, who since 1011
has been the state supervisor of rural
schools in Virginia, has been made
general field agent in charge of Negro
educatlou. Better schoolhouses, better
teachers. Improved sanitation and a
care for cooking and entertainment
have lieen gained In the past year.
The southern states are all working
toward a new goal, an adequately or
ganised, financial, administered, su
pcrvlscd and mnnned educational sys
tem. In Tennessee a long stride has
been taken toward freeing education
from politics, and an Alntiaraa statute
completely reconstructs the county
board of education. The board has
appropriated $3,000 to Mississippi to
Initiate a model organization In a sin
gle county.
In eleven states the board baa sup
ported rural school agents, professors
of secondary education and agents for
Negro education. Eight new high
schools were started In Florida In the
year, eleven In Virginia, four county
high schools In Alabama ami eight
new high schools In West Virginia.
In Arkansas thirty-two two-year
schools, six three-year schools and one
new four-year school were opened.
Kentucky opened new high school
buildings costing $495,000: Mississippi.
$410,000; Alabama, $303,750, and Ten
nessee. $154,000.
Convention of Country Lifo Clubs.
President It. S. Wilkinson of the
State Agricultural and Mechanical col
lege at Orangeburg. S. C.. has splen
dldly arranged for the entertainment
of delegates and visitors to the con
vent lon of collegiate country life clubs
Itcfng held at the college, Orangeburg,
for three day* beginning on Friday.
April 7. The convention has the ap :
pmval of the Xutlonal Collegiate Conn
try Life Clubs of America, of which
Dr. Kenyon I* Butterfield, president
of Amherst college, and Dr. Aretaa W
Nolan or the University of Illinois are
the leading officials. Educators and
students from the various schools In
South Carolina ure attending the ecu
vent lon In large numbers.
READY TO DEFEND
NATION’S HONOR
Oswald Garrison Villard’s Plea
For Colored Soldiers.
PRAISEO BY GENERAL BURT.
House Military Affair* Committee Re
quested to Provide For Two Artillery
Regiments In Present Plans For En
larging Regular Army—Record of
Ninth and Tenth Cavalry Cited.
Washington.—Tbe following letter re
cently sent to the chairman of the house
und Semite committees on military af
fairs and others voices the demand of
10.000,000 native born. English speak
ing American citizens for the right to
serve their country at this crisis of its
existence. These citizens ask for the
right to enlist in our army, while the
Tenth cavalry is tearing the brunt in
Mexico.
The letter says: At the suggestion
of Mr. Oswald Garrison Villard, treas
urer of the National Association For
the Advancement of Colored People,
this appeal is presented asking for
your support of the request that two
regiments of artillery and two of in
fan try of those ainuit to be created be
designated as oftpn f*»r the enlistment
of colored soldier>
The adjutant gencinl has stated that
he doubted if 175.<"Kj0 regulars could
be recruited in the United States
There is no difficulty In recruiting col
ored regiments. Yet while officers are
tearing their hair to get white recruits
the sign is up. “No colored man want
ed.” Does It not seem a ridiculous pro
gram of prejmredness which deliberate
ly excludes the l*est material we’ve
got?
That is no Idle boast. When the Fif
ty-fourth Massachusetts stormed Fort
Wagner in 18*tt it established for all
time the tact thut the colored soldier
could light and tight well. The history
of the Ninth and Tenth cavalry in the
Indian tights l*etween ISGS and 1890
piled up the evidence of their courage
and loyalty. There have been notably
fewer desertions from the colored regi
ments tbnn from the white. The Ninth
cavalry once astonished the army by
reporting not a single desertion In
twelve mouths, an unheard of and un
dreamed of record.
W. A. Jones. M. D. H. 1 M. Brown
President Treasurer
A. A. WALLER. Mana K er HARRY COWELL
Notary Public Mer, 5 Pts. Branch
The Colored American Loan
AzjjnSr and Realty Company
Phone Champa 455 1027 21st St.
With Branch at Office 2735 Welton St.
Phone Main 1924
We pay rent for two offices that capacity of the race,
we have equipped, just to serve and We write Fire, Health and Accl
represent you. Then you owe it to dent, and Endowment Insurance. We
the race and yourself to give YOUR handle City Improved and Unim
business to YOUR representative. We proved. Garden Tracts and Farrr
stand for the race. Curbstone agents Property. Remember, Negro business
mean nothing to the uplift or business for the Negro.
Little Gem Poultry Yard
All Eggs for Setting, Silver Campines, doz. $3 to $5
“ Rhode Island Reds “ $2 to $4
Mrs. Ida Williamson
2946 STOUT STREET jD INVER, COLORADO
Phone Main 7705
JNu.N. NORTON C. A. HOLLY H. HARDY
Director Bus. Mgr. JLeader
The Queen City Band
Music Furnished For All Occasions
PHONE SOUTH DENVER. COLO.
I Dayton Bicycles
5 Year $30.00 TO
Guarantee yyfSfcg) 550.00
The best Colored people In tlis city recommend ua
L. A. MAEDEL, 1754 California Street
Liwb Mawcrm, Girin Hat, Phnbiaf Cmili, Hardware sad Paat,
Kitcbaa Uteaaib. Mre bayiag caaaa sad mi aa
Their service during the Spanish war
and since has shown our colored troops
to be Infinitely better fitted for service
in our tropical dependencies than white
troops. Company Lof the Forty-ninth
volunteers, composed wholly of colored
men and commanded by Captain E. L.
Baker, a colored veteran, who had
served for seventeen years in the Ninth
and Tenth cavalry, made a record
which no white company remotely ap
proached. This company had on its
rolls during a period of twelve months
100 men who were fit for duty at all
times and never lost a day on account
of sickness.
More extraordinary still Is the fact
that during the same period not one of
these men ever went before a court
martial, surely a striking illustration
of what can be done by colored officers
Such traits enabled General A. S. Burt
in relinquishing command of the Twen
ty-flfth infantry on April 17, 1902, to
quote the inspector general of the army
aa saying. "The Twenty-fifth Infantry
Is the best regiment I have seen in the
Philippines." it was noticeable, too.
that neither the officers nor the men of
any colored regiment figured In the
coarges and countercharges which
arose cut of the use of the “water cure*'
in the Islands.
Since 1870 there have been four col
ored regiments in our regular estab
lishment. two of cavalry and two of
infantry, but there has never been a
colored artillery organization in the
regular service. When ten regiments
and several units of artillery were add
ed in low the colored citizens of Amer
ica were deeply offended that Secre
tary Ib—t failed to recommend the es
tablishment of any colored regiment.
Now thiit the question of recruiting
the lint: -mil guard is before congress
again the National Association For
the Ad -an -cment of Colored People
urges that tin* right of these lO.tJOO.
000 citizen* t • participate to the full in
every phase of our national life be
recogni *-d by designating two of the
artiller> .-gimenus and two of infantry
of tb<>-- . • •lit t*» la* created by con
gress ii' M-en tu enlistment to colored
Amerl !,* If hyphenated citizenship
is u weakness of Hie body politic, why
insist t i t PMKMM)OO men and women
piust r*i vfr»»-Americans unto the
fourth nd tilth generation?
Ssgregat.on In Texas Cities Illegal.
The tight on laws which discriminate
agatiis' the colored people continues in
varion- *e<-t i* >iis of the country. The
latter p.irt of March the Texas state
Buprcui- eouri in the case of Frank A.
Spence verso* W II Fenchler, on ap
peal f: in 111 1 ‘aso county, held that
the clt:••' of Texas have no authority
»o estii ii'h districts of segregation
Phona Main SOSI
PROF. W. M. MACKEY
■SPECIAL. MAGNETIC HEALER.
Cures all pain by Hand Massages, Headaches and Neu
ral; land Toathtche a specialty, stops it in 15 minutes
2o;t ST UT ST., Always at 2230 LARIMER ST.
C. H. SHIRLEY, Pres. . J. C. HAMPSON. V.-P
R. KAMSTETTER, Sec. and Tress
The Atlas Drug Co.
Incorporated
Leader* in Prescription*
Store No. 1 Store No. 2
2701 WELTON ST. 26th AND WELTON
5 Points Cafe
All Kinds of Chop Suey and Noodles
Hot Chili Served
SHORT ORDERS AT ALL HOURS
2712 Welton St. Phone Main 4730
Terms Cash Lowest Prices
R. E. Norris
The Original Colored Coal Man
Lump Coal per Ton $3-75
Lafayette Lump Coal $3.95
Monarch Lump : ; $4.50
Wood, 3 Sacks for 25 cents • 25
Lump or Nut Coal 5 Sacks for $l.OO
Express and Freight
PHONC MAIN 3190 1024 23rd tt.
Can You Beat It
MONEY TO LOAN
Chattels
We Loan Lot* of Money to Anybody, $lO, $l5, $2O, $2
$3O, $4O, $5O, $65, $75, $lOO or more on your fu>
uture, pianos, sewing machines, ranges, tcaans. cattle, dairies
'arm implements, store fixtures, income lands, lots, or asp
hing else of value, all left in you possession; very wertt
orivate and quick; __ ~ " plenty clerks and
iuto go any place.
2945 Larimer Street
Phone Mata 10&3 Office Hours lOeato^ae.

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