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The bee. (Washington, D.C.) 1882-1884, April 07, 1883, Image 1

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THE
'Jf"r?rrr t2LJ2l
4
m c C STEWART, Business Manager axd Publishes.
Home Rule, Industry, Justice, Equality and Recognition according to Merit.
W. 0. CHASE, Editor a-d PnorcuET car.
VOL. I.
WASHINGTON, D. C. SATURDAY, APRIL 7, 1883.
NO. 35.
ill IO-Is
w $ jt
BEE
Attention,
GRAND SPRING OPENING !
Fill
FATTDI
EA
STE
OF
AT
ECEETG-'S
S14 seventh:
R
Owing to additional improvements our Regular
Spring Opening will! be postponed for a few days,
and will be duly announced when it takes place.
Meanwhile we shall offer a special sale of Easter.
Tie
Moot
Deo l
Wagon on
IS MANUFACTURED BY
RACINE,
iutly earned the reputation of malting "Best Wagon ox Wheels.'
'v i far-lures have abolished the warrany, but Agents jnay, on their own
' msibilitv. give the following warranty with each wagon, if so agreed :
WL HEREBY WARRANT the FISH BROS. WAGON, No to be well made in
f i particular and of good material, and that the strength of the same is sufficient for
. work with fair nsnge. Should any breakage occur within one j-ear from this date by
cou of defective material or workmanship, repairs for the samo will be furnished at
I .are of sale, free of charge, or the price of Baid repairs, as por agent's price list will be
I aid m cash by the purchaser producing a sample of the broken or defective parts as evidence.
Knowing wc can suit you, we solicit patronage from every section of the United States.
Paid for Trices and Terms, and for a copy of the "Racine Agriculturist," to
FISH BROS. & CO., Racine Wis.
WE WILL SELL DALLY AT
hrend's Baltimore Store,
eventh St,, N. W
M.ff SPRING GOODS at auction.
Via Gocds. D.n't forgot the Dame
. BEHEEND, 908 7th St., N. W.
Fits, Epilepsy,
OR
FALEJNG SICKNESS.
p Mnnently curedNo Humbugby one
A :ih-s usage of Dr. Goulard's Celebrated
1 'ill Mi Fit Powders. To convince suffe
'' " fn it those powders will do all we claim
1 ,T "i- m we will send them by mail, post
Hid, o frpp Trial Box. As Dr. Goulard is
or.!-, Physician that has ever made this i
' ,rap a special study, end as to ourknowl
r Vv ii m sands have been permanently cured
'in ue of these Powders, we will guar-mt-
u permanent cure in every case or re-
' on all money expended. All sufferers
J' 1 give these Powders an early trial,and
f.T mced of their curative powers.
l "i'V. for large Box. 3.00, or 3 Boxes for
NO-OP geQt yy maii to any part of the
1 nit J States or Canada on receipt of price,
f r '". . xj-ress C. 0. D. Address.
ASTL & BOBBINS,
300 Fulton St., Brooklyn, . Y
"W. X-I. Harrover3
MArrAcrniiEri or
STOVES. RANGES AND FURNACES,
Ail 4ealer in Table Cutllerv, Tinware, Houro
1-iwii:G.ocl8, etc., 313 Seventh Street,
r "Wfst and Pennsylvania Avenue,
Waehington, D.C.
D. W. LEWIS,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
practices in all the courts of the District o
v wnbia and the state of Virginia.
f -Eions and claims against theTJ. S. Gov
, 'r-'i't a specialty. Room 15 May Build
- j " . , th i E sts., city. f cb24-li
levi ft?ScCabe, Caterer.
leals Served Ont,
Ta"ble iJoai-d..
922 i ith Street, N. W.
Ladies !
ts m 80BTS.
PLAY
H
ZFLCOE,
street, ISJ". "W.
WIS.,
Now is the time for great larairs in
and number.
DENTAL CARD.
I TAKE pleasure in announcing to my friend
and former patrons that I have removed
my Dental Office from corner of 7th and I
Streets to more convenient quarters at
1209 Pennsylvania Ave.,
where I may be found daily (except Sunday)
from 9 a. m. to 5.80 p. m.
To such as do not already know me I wii
onlv eav, that having practiced DENTISTRl
for OVER THIRTY YEARS, I can promiat-firat-claeB
work; making the insertion or ARTI
FICIAL TEETH. a specialty. I can insure a
good fitting set of teeth in every case, whilt
mv charges will be moderate.
In thanking m7 frieudd for their liberal pa
tronage up to date, I hope that the samo wil
bo continued in the future, promising, a.
heretofere, to do my best to pleaae all wb
may favor me with a call.
HE VOICE OF A MECHANICAL EXPERT.
-r ,-.- ti n MuTin 1RR2.
v Abmiv-i"-t " - .
After carefnllyeminiiScwinBMjchinca of Tiinons
patterns, I decided I upon tho 9OEEt1"nf finfl it au
it was reDrescnted to be. My fnmily re eo rnnca
pieced tthatxro recommend it to our De.Bhbor8
Ld friend. Who are ouMly gg0RTH,
Model and Mechanical Dran6btman.
aS'&S&ffQUmK1"- wdl bother kindB of
fintdu. JMSfcSSSSwi andHBtreet.
SSSffiKcSS Fuliishing and Hat Store bext
door.
E. M. Hewitt & John 1 Moss,
Attorneys at Law.
-r.. :-: oil io f.nnris of tho District
! Collection of claims before, the departments
and debts of every description, vim, -
Louisiana avenue, rooms 1 and jg
floor.
HOUSE AND WALL PAINTING,
GRAINING, &C.
Stewart & Belt.
Orders left at the office of The Pee
will be promptly attended -to. Ill" 1
Street, N. W. Ap7-lm.
DIS
LLINERY
Whees.
In Clear or Cloudy Weather,
Wonderful Effects by the
Wo -were the first to introduce it in this city. Also the originators of low prices.
Elegant Cabinet Photographs $3.00 por Dozen. Cards 1.00 per Dozen. ProolTs shown
and Satisfaction Guaranteed to all.
The Finest Skylight and Most Spacious Rooms
South of PhiaideSphia.
Hours for Sittings from S .A.. M. to G I. M.
925 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE, NEAR 10TH STREET.
Special Rates made to Clubs of 5, 10 and 20.
THE ULYilKIIE LOMOOI MISFIT STORi
912 F Street, Opposite Masonic Temple,
ARE NOW OFFERING SPECIAL BARGAINS IN CLOTHING FOR SPRING
AND SUMMER WEAR.
-:o:-
READ THE FOLLOWING PRICES.
Men's "Working Suits 5, regular price $10; Men's All Wool Suits $7.50; regu
lar price $12; elegant English Melton Suits, in ten. different patterns $10,
regular price 18; fine Black and Blue All Wool Cheviot Suits $8.50, regular
price $14; imported English "Worsted Suits $15, actual value $25; Men's "Work
ing Pants $1, regular price $2; All "Wool Custom-Made Pants $2.50, regular
price $4; Boy's Suits, from 12 to 16 years of age $4, regular price $7.50.
X. B. Remember we have no connection with any other establishment in
the city.
New Store ! New Goods ! ! Hew Prices ! ! I
DO NOT FORGET PLACE AND NUMBER,
912 F Street, Opposite Masonic Templc.tlio only Original London Misllt Store."
JOHN F. ELLIS & CO.
ESTABLISHED 155
937 Pennsylvania Avenue, Near Tenth Street
!PI.AISrOS JNT ORGANS
For Sale at Reasonable Prices, on Easy Terms
ToniBg," Repairing and Moving promptly att&nded to. Cornets, Violins, Fiutes
Guitars, and everything in the mnsio line for
CASH OR OJX INSTALMENTS.
JOmST F1. ELLIS & CO.,
937 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE.
Reel-Eye
The Eeliable
OF
WM. HAHN & CO.
Desire to impress upon the minds of those in search of
Good Shoes at Low Prices. That
Reliable is our motto.
Reliable our dealings.
Reliable the materials used in the manufacture of our goods, and
Reliable the statement that "we can give our customers more for their money
than can be found anywhere else.
Spring goods now arriving, Ladies' Hook and Laced Shoes 2.00, and fine
Kid and Goat Button $1.00 up;' Gents' fine Button and Laced Shoes $2:00;
Children's Heeled and Spring Laced and Button Shoes, 75 cents, Infants
Shoes 25 cents up.
WM. HAHN & CO., 816 7th street, and 1922, Pa. Ave. N. W.
Sign Red Slipper.
Julius Baumgarten,
SEAL ENGRAVER AND DIE SINKER.
Seals for all Secret
Societies made to
order at the
shortest notice.
DESIGNS AtSJL J2.S5T1MA1J1.S IXJRNISHED,
fob24-ly 1222 TVFFA. ATE., WASHINGTON, D. C.
Instantaneous Process
Jllife"Bel1
Shoe House.
Jewels and Reg;ilia
for all Secret
Societies. For G.
TJ. O.-of . O. F. a
Specialty. .
tax D08S' SAILS.
Cftnlneft Carlesltlei ChAraiiBfly ChAXftc
torized'
No. 1. A Virginian said to his
wife the other day that he would
like to have some rabbits. A pointer
dog overheard the remark and start
ed out. In a little while he return
ed, bringing a rabbit he had caught,
and laid it at his master's feet.
This operation was repeated until the
sagacious animal had brought in four
rabbits. The next day the dog was
ordered to go for more rabbits and
did so, catching three.
No. 2. The Louisville Courier
Journal saya a boy by the name of
Sharp was crossing North Elkhorn
on the ice near Georgetown when he
broke through and was unable to
get out. His dog, a large St. Ber
nard, attempted to rescue him, but
failing vent up on the bank and
set up such a continued howling
that some workmen in an adjoining
field were attracted to the spot.
They procured a long pole and
helped the boy out, although he was
In almost a senseless stupor.
No. 3. A valuable hound attempt
ed to run the gauntlet of the swing
ing doors in the Bradford, Pa., oil
exchange, which resulted in the lyss
of three inches of the end of his
;ail. Being a great favorite among
the members they nearly all gathered
around the dog and paid no atten
tion to business. By the time tho
doctor got the wound dressed a few
bulls, who remained at their posts,
had the price up two cents and suc
ceeded in unloading before the others
had realized the situation.
No. 4. Last "Monday evening,
3ays a Georgia paper, a stranger
came into a saloon in Montague and
called for a drink, which was handed
him. He raised the glass to his lips,
when a large dog took him by the
collar and tried to pull him out of the
door. A crowd collected around and
attempted to take the dog off, sup
posing it would hurt him, but the
stranger said: "Let him alone he is
my dog. I have been on a spree at
Bowlie, and th dog pulled me out of
the saloon there and made me sober
up." The stranger left without his
drink accompanied by his faithful
dog.
No. 5. Lovers of superstition, ac
cording to the Chicago Herald, are
revelling in a singular thing which
happened at Quincy during the ill
ness of the late Samuel Medill, the
journalist. When he went there to
the house of his father-in-law, Mr.
Tohn B. Carson, the family took to a
country house a considerable dis
tance from the town a little dog of
Mrs. Medill's, thinking that its bark
ing might disturb the invalid. The
dog was only once brought back and
then in a buggy and only for a few
short hours, but on the day of Mr.
Medill's death, the family in Quincy
were astonished to hear the dog howl
ing in front of their door. The door
was opened and the dog rushed pell
mell into the parlor and scampered
up stairs to the sick-room, bolted in
through the door and sprang upon
the bed. The dying man fondled the
dog, but when the family attempted
to remove the brute it entrenched
Itself underneath the bed, from
whence it was taken with great diffi
culty by the coachman. Mr. Medill
died that night.
No. 6. The other day some Wis
consin people were astonished to see
their dog come into the house with a
piece of paper tied to his tail. They
paid no further attention to it, ex
cept to laugh at his comical appear
ance, until he began going around to
different members of the family,
always tail first, and sticking it at
them. This ludicrous action at last
made them see there was writing on
the paper, which proved to be as
follows: "My legs are broken. Please
help me." They carefully examined
his legs, but found them all right,
when somebody recognized the writ
ing of a woman who lived half a
mile away. They went to her house
and found her helpless from a fall
which broke her legs. She could not
stir nor attract anybody's attention,
and she might have starved or frozen
to death,-but luckily the dog came
in, and crawling to a table she man
aged to write the note and fasten it
to his tail.
Won't Eat Weeds.
A very nobby swell from the city
was passing a few days in the country,
and made himself generally obnoxious
by his highfalutin manners. One
morning he wanted to go out into a
field where a number of cattle were
standing areund, but before he started
he said to the lady of the house:
"Aw, madam, can I gaw out into
thfctpahstuah?"
"Yes, in course you can; them
cattle won't eat weeds n Drummer.
GtkUwi of ihe VasU
lit. John B, XleHasto, is hla now
ly published work, a "History of the
Poopio of tho United States from th
Revolution to tho Civil War," says thai
"A Philadelphia gentleman of the lasi
century, If he were a gentleman oi
fashion or means, wore a three-cornered
cocked hat heavily laced. His hair
was done up in a cue, and its natural
shade concealed by a profusion of pow
der. His coat was light-colored, with
diminutive cape, marvellously long
back, and silver buttons engraved with
the letters of his name. His small
clothes came scarcely to his knees : his
long stockings were striped, his shoes
pointed and adorned with huge-buckles;
his vest had flap pockets, his cuffs
were loaded with lead. When he bow
ed to the damsels that passed him, he
took half the sidewalk as he flourished
his cane and scraped his foot." The
historian proceeds to convince us that
the dress of the lady, as she gravely re
turned his salutation and curtesied
nearly to the earth, would seem no less
strange to us. "Those were the days
of gorgeous brocades and taffetas lux
uriantly displayed over cumbrous
hoops, which, flattened before and be
hind, stood out for two feet on each
side ; of tower-built hats, adorned with
tall feathers ; of calash and muskmelon
bonnets, of high wooden heels fanci
fully cut, of gowns without fronts, of
fine satin petticoats, and of implanted
teeth." It appears that in 1784 this
curious custom of transferring teeth
from one woman's jaw to another's
had been lately introduced in Philadel
phia. In an advertisement yet extant,
ono La Mayeur announces to his fair
but presumably mature patrons that
his business is to transplant teeth, and
that he has within the six months just
preceding successfully transplanted
123 ; and he asuires those having front
teeth for sale that he will give two
guineas for every sound one brought
to him.
In the city of Philadelphia the drear
iness of winter evenings was relieved
by assemblies and plays. "The assem
blies were of fortnightly occurrence
and very select. The price of a season
t.iPkfit TV-IS thrPft pon3 fifteen. oKil
lings." Married women and refined
men of the world seem to have enjoyed
complete ascendancy, for "it was
thought highly improper that diverse
ments of this kind should be attended
by young men under twenty or by
young women under eighteen. Eight
een was then for women the marriage
able age. Nor did such damsels as
found admittance reap any benefit from
beauty, from wit, or from the posses
sion of any of those charms now so
highly prized. The plainest and fair
est were treated alike. For partners
were chosen by lot, and remained
partners throughout the evening.
They danced, walked, and flirted with
no one else, and when the dancing was
over partook together of rusks and tea."
On the following evening the young
man went to sup with the parents of
the young woman who had fallen to
his lot at the assembly, an event which
was made the occasion of a great dis
play of plate, of china, and of cere
mony. The Drinks of all Nations.
"Drinks of All Nations" was the
subject of one of President Cotten'a
lectures before the Trenor Hall tern-
perance meeting in New York. "Brit
ons," he said, "spend annually 140,-!
000,000 in drink, an average of $19
each. This does not include the sum
paid for imported Prench wines. I
have learned that America is now ex
porting large quantities of whisky to,
England. If. so, God help England.
In Russia, the common people drink'
enormous quantities of strong beer.;
The nobility consume a great amount
of brandy. The government has re-'
cently appointed a commissioner to de-j
vise a scheme of national reformation.,
But one dram shop is to be allowed ini
each village, and where two towns are
in close proximity one shop must doj
for both. At present, 8,000,000 gal-j
Ions of wine and brandy are annually
consumed in Russia. Hollander
drink gin and beer. Germans use
beer and wine as beverages. In 1878.
official reports show that there were,
11,800 breweries in the German speak
ing countries, turning out 846,000,000
imperial gallons of beer. In Copen
hagen the authorities have decided to
reduce the 1,350 beer shops to eight.
No pretty barmaids are to be allowed
to serve liquor, and the drunken man
must be carried home in a cab at the
expense of the last man who sold him
beer. The Turks are the only temper
ate race of all civilized nations. No
good Mohammedan touches distilled or
malt liquors."
on
In the Khoyra district, India, which
comprises a considerable portion of the
Sunderbunds, more than fifty people
timber cutting and collecting in the
jungle were killed by tigers during
fh lost nffinial rnar
AMUSEMENTS.
Holiday Concert
-AND
XHIBITIDN
THE GLEE CLUB
OF THE
tUnsljingtcm $a&eimnjvs)
WILL GIVE THEIU
FIRST PUBLIC CONCERT
AT
LINCOLN HALL,
JIOXDAT EVESIXG, APRIL 1C, 188,
EMANCIPATION DAY,
ASSISTED Bl
Madame Agnes Smallwood.
Miss Blanche Washington,
Mr. R. W. Thompkins,
Mr. J. Wm. Cole,
Mr. John T. Dayton,
A. J. Hall, of Chicago
and others.
PROF. TH1ERBACH, Pianist.,
Glee Club of Thirty Voices.
This concert being made up entirely
of our Home Talent, and the manage
ment being at less expense than whum
strangers are brought from a long dis
tance, it has been decided to put thei
tickets at popular prices.
General Admission, 25 cents. Re
served seats, 15 cents extra, or two)
reserved seats for -5 cents extra.
This merely nominal charge for that
'privilege of reservinga seat just wheroi
you would like to have it, is only suffi
cient to cover the additional cost and
trouble of extra tickets, ushers, &c.,
and must undoubtedly meet the hearty
approval of all. Reserved seats may
be purchased at Metoorotfo 2.xuiv
Store, or General Tickets exchanged! foe
reserved seats on payment of the;
difference.
Sale commencing Monday morning,
April 2, 1583.
Fine vocalists, fine selections, wor
thy object, home talent, popular prices,
and holiday must draw.
CAPT. C. A. FLEETWOOD,
Manager., ,. -
Complimentary Testimonial!
By Distinguished Citizens of
Washington to
.
Miss Henrietta V. Davis
Pupil of Miss Marguerite E. Saxton,
who will appear in a series of
Dramatic Secit&ls,
Assisted by Miss Blanch Washington;
the talented Musician,
Introduction by Hon. Frederick
Douglass,
AT
Marines Hall,
Wednesday Evening, April 25, 1883;
Admission, 50 Cents.
Miss Henrietta Y. Davis will make
her debut before a talented Wash
ington audience in dramatic art. Her
tutoress Miss Marguerite E. Saxton is
well known as an elocutionist of extra
ordinary ability and she has undoubt
edly trained Mis3 Davis to a high
standard in the profession in whichshe
has mastered.
The Emancipation Celebrations
WILL TAKE PLACE
Monday, April !6? 1883.
The Procession will form in front .
of the City Hall at 11 o'clock.
Col. Perry H. Carson, Cnief Marshall
Exercises at the First Congrega
tional Church, corner 10th
and G Sts., N. W.
IN THE EVENING AT 7.30 P. M.
Hon. Frederick DotiglasK Orator of
the Evening.
Rev. R. S. Laws and Col. Ingersolll
will also speak.
j37"Mnaic by the Coronet Band..J3
Col. M. M. Holland, Master of Cere
monies. W. Calvin Chase, Secretary
of the Committee on Speakers.
Admission fee will be 10 cents to pay
current expenses. The exercises will!
bo under the auspices of the committee!
of arrangement.
JOHN W. FREEMAN,
Chairman.

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