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The Washington bee. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1884-1922, July 17, 1886, Image 1

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Terms. $2.00 Per year.
VOL. V.
never" such
-IN-
Men's Boys9 sum! Children's ilofhiag
Is are now offered at the Great Sample ofi ilc,lSius'
aUd a iiiicU'est's Clothing Opening at 924 Yth St., IV. IV. .
Bet. I St. and Massachusetts Avenue.
r. n tiimiRfliiri Men's Bov's and Children's Suits and Overcoats
of the best goods. Many of them wil,l be sold at less than the cost of the
coods say nothing aboutthemaldug and the trimmings. Actual bar-
JUI. V"V uiivrv.Mvv
..,;c ortlrlnm
Overcoats very low, and Children and
rome. A Sara )ie ouii vvyn,ii ou ran uc uuugui iui ?x.
Drice Children's Overcoats at less tuau you wouiu ua 10 pi. ior tue
marine These goods are mostly in single Suits, only one of a kind,
inVare made of the best English, French aud American goods. Prince
Mbert Coats sold for $15 now ( Suits that sold for $12 to $20 at less
than two-thirds of the cost. There are no better goods made, many of
thPin mmerior to the best ordered work. Men's Suits start at $5 and go
an to $10 Boys' suits $5 to $10 ; Children's Suits $2.50 to $6, and Over
coats for Men, Bovs' and Children from $2. 50 up. You can secure the
best bargains of your life in any of these goods you can get fitted in. We
have a lot of Children s suits o m an tue price oi uueiu was $u.uu, o ,
i 9 and $10, ages, 4 to S. Just think of it. You can have your choice
Vtlris lot for $3.00. Little Overcoats for half price. Men's Pauts 75c,
$1 1 50 &2 up to $6, We have a lot of Prince Albert Coats, Black Cloth
L'mm-Iv sold for $18, $20, $22 your choice to day for $12.
t WOUlQ DGimpOSSlUie UJ euuiJioiaLU uuu niuuaauue vi. kwu tuuiyo in
Clothing for Men, Boys' and Children. Come and see for yourself
t the great sale of sample Suits at 924 7th St. N. W., bet. I St. and
Mass Ave. Look for the sigus. Sample Suits aud all styles of men's
Bov's and "Children's Clothing. Sale commences TUESDAY MORN
ING at 10 o'clock.
i in
tl 4- --. .i .-- wiir-t fs
JOHN F. EULiTS Ac C Km
937 PEKN. AVENUE, AVASHINGTOAT, D. C.
EXTENSIVE DEALEBS Jf
o
-mp
MUSIC
AND MUSICAL MERCHANDISE OF EVERY. DESCRIPTION
Sole agents for the Weber Bebring, Vose, Guild, Mason and Hamlin
Bekr Bros.
I? I Jk. IS O S!
MASON AND HAMLIN, SMITH AMERICAN. GEO. WOODS
PACKARD, CHASE
ORGAN S!
$2.50 DOUBLE STITCHED SHOES. $1.50.
MADE OF
CALF-SKIN BROAD B01 TOM.
$1-50 GMFBUTTQN UGE &G0SGRESS GAITERS, ELECTRIC,
FIJEIXIIIBIJE Sc SOFT
In 'I I H f "-"'" wu .. jaw u-aiAJiivo xkjl uauiuo aim VJCUUeilieil.
k.
4
i M AYH fil?lVT?.n r Aimrno 4V t..-..h., .....i -a...ji
NJ - V-' V
Lof Qusxrler Slioes, US" GREAT VARIETY
Y O U N G 'S.
"2 7fch St., HEILBRUys QUI Stand. Look Jor the old lady in Wimlo.w
THE GIRL I LEFT BEHIND ME."
Copyrighted
llluc....-,. ... - -
1877 1U ...-. -5&- -i . .
r.J nenseoiauggF made jay T. T. Haydoct. which is not only the Leading
'Havdn v ? ?f U but THE LEADING BUGGY OF AMEKICA. Hal
M A vnofcK J2F.Bolt. ?nd Pifth Wheel- Ask you denier for the T. T.
LlfeWSSSW01' Wlth lIl? Haouk Safel Ktoff Bolt and Fifth WheeL
j'ie is insecure riding over any other.
CTU, picture will be famished on & lcc crd, printed in elegant style, to anvonc -who ill aSree to frame it)
aptWo rlrh,c LigtV Cor. Plum and Twelfth S!s., CIXCDTXATI, O.
AUEJTS 7ASTED T7HEEE T7E HAVE ffOHE! SO INVESTMENT B0 PE0FITABLE.
ii 1 1 rr .THrrrrt
MBHH1BMC 1 1 f 1 1 M l'M 1 1
VMBHSi' lEIIkC lijaMqilll 1 B.H.I I MNiBKZBa
bargains
5
"
-i-l.l
Boy's Suits at little over half-
lv 4 li Atinmili' aP vaaI flit An i
o
ft 1TA "
.t.iu rr 1 1 ir-tiene
IC it tt i I 111 I I'MWHHBEI
S3
..,.
WASHINGTON, D. p.,
OUR WEEKLY REVIEW.
C0L0KED JOURNALISM. TKE DOUG
LASS AND TUE ERA. NEWSPAPER
SHARKS. COLORED NEWSPAPERS
IGNORED BY ItEPUBLICANS.J THE
COMMONER. nOW SOME 01' TEE
PAPERS LIVE. PROGRESS OP NE
GRO JOURNALISM, &C.
The colored editors whoae pa
pers have been reviewed by us
should not feel chagrined, because
wo are endeavoring to deal with
them fairly and judiciously. The
fact that colored journalism in this
country is a success, is well demon
strated. But to say that the are
up to the standard of newspapers,
published in this age, is what we
do not conceede, nor will any1 fair
minded man who has a knowledge
of journalism. Fortune of the
PKEEMAN
aud Pulies, of the Globo
1
come
nearer to real journalism tluiw'the
majority of the colored press. :The
superiority of these papers, in sub.
ject matter and make up, mkes
them leaders of the colored press.
They nave shown this much, (i. e.)
if the colored people would support
them, that they are able to discuss
the issues ot the day. In our last
weeks review, relative to the
?
NATIONAL ERA
we should have said that the Doug
lass Brothers, liquidated an indebt
edness of$3S5l), and that tkere
was no disguising the fact, they
were true friends of the race.
the coxsriKAcr
to overthrow the Era was caused
by jealousy, as we have heretofore
stated. And we have it from reli
able sources, that Mr. Robert
Thorn pkiiK, was the only honora
ble mau in the transaction, .or
a member of the defunct bank
ring. While Mr. Tliompkius.lias
been severely criticised, bvtiuiinr
associated with the bauk ring, he
was the only mau to honor his ob
ligations. This gentleman is a
fine and smooth writer. He has
ability equal to any young man in
the race. The consolidation of the
Era and Citizen was a destruction
to the former. The Citizen only
brought fifty subscribers to the
firm. The Citizen's attack on the
celebrated Lotus club, which was
dispised by the people, tended to
increase its circulation, prior to
the consolidation. We shall speake
more fuTly concerning- the Lotus
club, before we shall conclude this
review. The
REPUBLICAN PARTY
which aided to Emancipate the
Negro, did not do much toward
supporting colored newspapers.
The Era was the only paper ot any
prominence that received support
from the republican executive com
mittee, while other journals edited
by white men were well compensa
ted. Had the Era lived, it would
have been the recognized aud the
most reliable race paper edited by
Negroes. Mr. Douglass knew the
value and importance of the press
when he established
THE NORTH STAR,
subsequently Fred. Douglass' pa
per. He knew with the press he
could reach millions. Mr. Doug
lass has been charged with ingrati
tude towards the race, which is a
charge not well ibundrd. There is
not a more liberal and kind hearted
man in the race than this sage of
xVnacostia, and the abuse that lie
ets, very oiten comes from per
sons who have endeavored to bleed
him. If one eighth of our moneved
negroes were as liberal toward "the
press as Mr. Douglass, our journals
could live. In this connection we
must not fail to mention the liber
ality of
E? HEGISTF.Il 1JRUCE.
Hon. B. K. Bruce, has given lib
eral support to uewspapers edited
by Negroes. And those that he
has help the most are the lirst to
abuse him. This is ingratit.ude.
Mr. Bruce doesn't miud lair criti
cism, but, personal attacks are not
appreciated by any man. A circum
stance occures "to us, dining the
press convention in '80 held in this
city. Mr. Sim kins, formerly editor
of i he Arkansas Mansion wanted
Mr. Bruce, to identify him. so that
could cash a draft or a note,
we dou't know which. Mr. Bruce,
not knowing the Mr. Simkins, de
clined. On the editors return home.
he wrote an abusive notice against
Mr. liruce. Such journalism is a
disgrace to the colored press. An
other journalist called on Mr. Doug-
SATURDAY, JULY 17, 1886.
lass for the loan of 8800 without an
eudorsor, which was also declined.
This journalist hasn't had much
use for Mr. Douglass since. AYe
could mention several instances of
3Segro correspondence, attempting
to fleece reputable people and on
failing, have black-mailed them.
The most indiguant men are the
MEMBERS OF CONGRESS.
They complain daily of alleged
Negro correspondents, claiming to
represent papers, having beat them
out of money. The most uotorious
of these correspondents is the indi
vidual who claim to represent a
paper in Baltimore, New York and
Cleveland Ohio. But Mr. Pulies,
some time ago, immediately dis
claimed the connection of this indi
vidual with his paper. A more
notorious rascal, doesn't, exist than
this penitentiary bird. He is knowu
in this city by thieves and beats.
This is .the way a majority of these
Negro correspondents live. The
CCODIOjN'ER,
is the next journal that played a
couspicious part in the field of jour
nalism. Its editor was Rev. Geo.
W.Williams, the colored historian.
The entrance of this paper into the
field of journalism was met with
universal favor. Subscriptions
&c. had been collected and paid
for in advance, but, like all other
papers, it died in its eight week,
which was one week before Mr.
Williams, received an appointment
in the Post Office, at the request of
General Grant, and it was thought
by many that that was all the gen
tleman wanted. He did not hold
the position long. This paper was
well edited aud had Mr. Williams
been sincere in his new enterprise,
it would have beeu a success.
THE PLA1NDEALER
was the next in order to be estab
lished. This was founded by Dr.
King and A. W. Harris. It was a
well edited paper, but, the treach-1
cry or certain negroes killed it.
In. its war on John Defrees, the
late Public Printer, certainly show
ed the power of the Negro press.
There were certain men connected
with the paper who played Judus
and gave many secrets away which
crippled the paper somewhat and
forced the removal of Dr. King nnd
tne appoiutment ot A. W. A. De
Leon, a West Indian. DeLeon was
a brilliant writer and his editorials
commanded respect by the leading
journals in the country. His con
servative policy caused many of the
republican attaches of the paper
to leave. DeLeon who did not own
one cents worth of thePlaindealers'
type, when he was invited to join
the company, but when he left he
carried the whole business with
him to New Hamshire, where his
course ended as an editor. He is
now in Hayti.'
In our next we shall state how
the Lotus club was killed, who
were in it and where they are and
the power of Douglass'" Press.
A LOOK AHEAD.
puop. w. b. jounson's address at
ASBIMY PARK. N. J. SOUND AD
VICE OF A YOUNG DIVINE.
Prof. W. ti. Johnson, of this
city', at the annual meeting of the
American Baptist Home Mission
Society held at Ashury Park, K".
J., May 30th, delivered the iol
lowiug address Paf. Johnson is
the third divine of color who has
ever addressed this s iciety. The
address was well received and
the culm and eloquent manner of
his delivery were met with he trty
applause. Prof. Johnson said:
We btand to day upon an emi
nence that oxerl'oks more than
fcivo decades, spent in efforts
to ameliorate the condition
of seven million immortal
souls; by opening befre
their hitherto dark and cheerless
lives, possibilities of development
into a perfect and symmetrical
manhood anu womanhood. The
retrospect presents to us a picture
of moral degradation a logical se
qnenee of slavery: menial gloom,
unpenetrated by the faintest ray
of intellectual light; souls, (out of
which should flow the holiest and
best forces of Pfe) belittled in ca
pacity; warped in sentiment and
lowered in instinct, until the dis
tinction between moial right and
wrong had nearly become extinct.
Absolutely sunk m the lowest
depths of -a poverty, which educed
th m to libjcts of chnaaty and
s'0)d, as twj imnieffiiablu Wnpr
'in their way to speedy "advauo
raent, in all those qualities that
make the useful citizen, with ev
ery influence of church, state and
social life, opposed to their pro
gress in and enjoyment of the
blessings of liberty, and like some
evil genius, forever haunting them
with the idea, that their future
must be one of subserviency to
the "superior race."
Hated and oppressed, by the
combined wisdom, wealth and
statesmanship of a mighty confed
eracy; watched and criticised their
mistakes strongly magnified by
those who fain, would write de
struction upon the emancipation;
they were expected to lise from
this condition. The idea of giv
mr to the ntwly enfranchised a
sound practical education was con
sidered at the dawn of freedom,
an eay solution, of what as an un
solved problem, threatened the
perpetuity of republican institu
tions. Within a year from the
firing on Sumter, the benevolent
andfarsighted northern frieudshad
established schools, from Wash
ington to the G-u'f of Mexico,
which became centres of lip;ht,
penetrating th darkness aud
scattering the blessings of an en
lightened manhood lar and wide
The history of the world, cannot
produce a more affecting spectacle
than the growth of this mighty
Christian philanthropy, vhieh be
ginning amid the din of battle,
has steadily marched on through
every opposing influence, and
lifted a race troni weakuess to
trength, from poverty to wealth,
from moral and intellectual non
entity to place and power among
the nations of the earth, b'rom
the awful depths out of which we
have emerged, to the promised
la-d of perfect race develjpment
wo aroskcd-tu'luuky -and lrjr--all-
the rapid and healthful process
of the p-iaf; by an unwaveriug faith
in that Divinity that shapes our
ends, forec at the future
The prospect shows 'improve
ment religiously. The emotional
as opposed to the rational element
in the Negroes' religion is fast be
coming a thing of the past. The
pew is loud, continuous and uni
versal m its demand for an educa
ted pulpit one that unites to
deep piety a mind well trained;
that makes Christ the centre of all
its preaching; that shirks no re
sponsibility; th st aims to awaken
in the people, holy aspirations and
untiring zeal, to the end, that the
kingd ms of this world may be
come the kingdoms of our Lord
and his Christ. Denominational-
ly our progress is, partly, seen in
the organization of the 800,000
Baptists of the south, for the pros
ecution of Mission work in Africa
We have raised 1 0,000, sent out
six missionaries, all of whom have
beeu trained in "Home Mission
schools," planted schools aud mis
sion stations in Africa, and awak
ened an interest in the work in
this country, both in the ministry
aud laity, that is simply un paral
lelled. We regard the African
Mission work as pre-eminently
ours, since it develops in us that
spirit of self help, without which
nations nor individuals can rise to
worth and ppwer. There is a
growing tendency among the
chnivhes of the south to assume
the conduct and support of their
own educational institution3, but
the more conservative and far
sighted leaders, see in this, a pres
ent imposibility, though all believe
the lorces are gathering them
selves, that will in time uot ony
conduct and support, but build
and endow colleges nd universi
ties all over the southland.
Morally we are improving. This
element of progress is necessarily
slow; its opposition is mighty and
deeprooled; it must eliminate the
evil habits of generations. Iso one
who knows the southern Negro aud
compares the low moral status in
which freedom found him, with
his present m ;rality can deny that
his progress has been stupendous.
Go to his home aud there you will
hud a pure mual atmosphere,
supplemented by that taste and re
finement which is an outgrowth
of right living. Go to the schools,
look into the bright intelligent
faces of the pupils, and see the
marks of refinement, in dress and
f Kf
5 cents per copy.
no. r.
decorum, which are the conse
quences of proper home -training.
Mankind is imitative, the Negro
is pre-eminently so. Throw him
iu a healthy moral atmosphere
and he will imbibe its salutary in
fluence and reproduce it in his
home. Since emancipation under
the most dispiriting-circumstances
the Eegro has made rapid and un
parallelled improvement in morals;
aud if this state has been attained'
against countless and multiform
adversities, to what moral heights
may he not ascend iu the next
twenty years, with the refining
aud elevating influences of the
church, the home, and the schools
as agencies in promoting this great
end. E lucationally his progress
is amazing. For this he is largely
indebted to the continued beuevo
lenee of northern philanthropist.
Already we have men in all tie
professions (where "caste" has not
closed her iron gates against them)
and the success attendant upon
their ettort-j argues well for the
race. But when we consider their
rapid numerical increase and the
vastueas of thefL II for missionary
and educational effort, we are con
fronted with the problem, how to
meet this growing illiteracy and
gather the material into our -schools
and churches to be utilized
for God and humanity.
The society's schoolplan ted all over
the south have indeed been a rich
blessing not only 'to the southland
but the whole countrv. God haa
signally blessed the work of the
past and now leads the denomina
tion iuto wider fields of usefulness.
Is there not a significant call to
the great Baptist family, by the
increasing numbers ot southern
Negroes; by the success of the
past and the posaihaitioo o.
The future, to enlargen its
plans?. Jf the Negro population
is to double itself every twenty
years, in the next half century
how shall the ignorant millions
be supplied with teachers and
preachers? In the hundreds of
intelligent teachers and able
preachers; qualified doctors and
shrewd lawyers, farsighted jour
nalists, energetic business men
and legislators of recognized abiK
ity, scattered all over the south.
The society may see the . fruits of
over 20 years labor and the efforts
put forth now, to lift -the -Negro
to higher plains of thought and
action can only become visible
when the great tide of illiteracy
rushes upon us in the years to
come. God has given to northern
Baptists a work in the south, that
he has not committed to any other
denomiuatiou. He has made that
land productive of Baptist princi
ples, and thee is no spot in this
republic capable of yielding such
glorious returns.. Shall weuotgo
in and possess the land?
The southern Negro now needs
a thorough education of the hand
as well as the heart and head. To
give mental development only, to
a race whose needs are so impera
tive and varied; to send out an
army of intellectual giants and in
dustrial dwarfs, is a mistake.
Prof. Gilliam savs "The Negr in
1900 will number 14,000,000."
Now with numerical increase
come new responsibilities. Wbat
must be done for theje millions?
We answer, gather them into our
schools, place the intellectual
torch iu their hands and if they
care not for the '-professions," let
them find their way to. industrial
fame, bv its light. We are m the
midst of grand opportunities to do
the American Negro incalculable
good. A thousand evils stand
around to thrust their deformities
upon him aud subject htm to a
thralldom more demoralizing and
far-reaching than that from which
he has just been imancipated.'The
Lord of the harvest Invites the
laborer by placing betore him these
white fields, ripe with possibilities.
Shall we hesitate? Duty 'calls for
immediate and determined action.
The great Biptist denomination
must: let no man take its crowD;
it must rallv its forces and in solid
phalanx meet the common enemy
that threatens to destroy the
home; impede the progress, of the
church audbubvert the order, of the
state.
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