OCR Interpretation


The Washington bee. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1884-1922, August 14, 1886, Image 1

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84025891/1886-08-14/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

JU-.
r--
't '-
- h -
i i '
-rrr-
'?
flfcK-?
J?-
rmmmmmkk
ii fi
Terms. $2i00 Per year.
5 cents per copy.
WASHTN-QTON, D. O., SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 1886.
JO. ii.
U
; 4213
a.
m r. )Jk. . vr i i " ; W . k.. i
r i h'Hi mm m w m t . vm.
-
NEVER SUCH BARGAINS
IN"
Men's Boys' and Children's Clothing
ks sir now offered at tlie Gre?t Ssnuple Men,I5o5s'
and Children's Clothing Opening at 924 7tli St., W.W.
Bet. 1 St. and Massachusetts Avenue.
Over oue thousand Men's Boy's and Children's Suits and Overcoats
el the best goods. Many of them will be sold at less than the cost of the
mjods, say nothing about the making and the trimmings. Actual bar
.in seldom come. A sample Suit worth $20 can be bought for $12.
overcoats very low, and Children and Boy's Suits at little over half
l.iico. Children's Overcoats at less than you would have to pay for the
making. These goods are mostly in single Suits, only one of a kind,
uid are made of the best English, French and American goods. Prince
I bert Coats sold for $lo now g, Suits that sold for $12 to $20 at less
than two-thirds of the cost. There are no better goods made, many of
tin-in superior to the best ordered work. Men's Suits start at $5 and go
uii to SIC ; Boys' suits $5 to $10 ; Children's Suits $2.50 to $6, and Over
coats for Men,' Boys' and Children from $2. 50 up. You can secure the
uU bargains of your life in any of these goods you can get fitted in. We
have a lot of Children's Suits 54 in all the price of them was $6.50, $7,
s. jy.iaml 10 ages, 4 to 8. Just think of it. You can have your choice
dt this lot for $3.90. Little Overcoats for half price. Men's Pants 75c,
i . .i..-ii, 2 up to $6, We have a lot of Prince Albert Coats, Black Cloth
loi hhtI.v sold for $18, $20, $22 your choice to day for $12.
It would beimpossible to enumerate the thousands of good things in
rlotlimg for Men, Boys' and Children. Come and see for yourself
sit the jireat sale of sample Suits at 924 7th St. N. W., bet. I Stand
ilas. Ave. Look for the signs. Sample Suits and all styles of men's
Wnsand Children's Clothing. Sale commences TUESDAY MORN
JN(i at 10 o'clock.
JOHN 3B JEJL-L.TiS Sc 1 X,
Si37 PENK AVENUE, WASHINGTON, D. C.
EXTENSIVE DEALERS IN
o
?
MUSIC
AND MUSICAL MERCHANDISE OF EVERY DESCRIPTION
Sole agents for the Weber Bchriiig, Vose, Guild, Mason and Hamlin
Fn'hr Bros.
PIANOS!
MASON AND HAMLIN, SMITH AMERICAN. GEO. WOODS
PACKARD, CHASE
O H G- Jk. IS S! '
82.50 DOUBLE STITCHED SHOES. $1.50
MADE OF
CALF-SKIN BROAD BOTTOM.
$1-50 mmm use mtoiess mm, elegtrig.
FLEXIBLE &;
4.00
HAND SEWED GALTEES for Ladies and Gentlemen.
I-ow ua,vter SSlioes, IN GREAT VARIETY".
Y
O TJ
Id
2 Tfch St., HEILBRUNS Old Stand.
fc
THE GIRL I LEFT BEHIND ME."
COPYRIGHTED IB71
iw! Haydock. hich is not only the Leading
'H.ivnnii-ihlc Pctu'. 1" THE LEADING BUGGY OF AMJSKICA. Has
Li?s?,?JLB-?-GGir' Wlla the Haydock Safety King Bolt and Fifth Wheel.
Mio is insecure riding over any other.
f This picture itt be farniibcd on ft luge cM, printed in cleg strle, to Mjonc who irill crce to Ihne It.)
- :Tr4 t. a. s-rDOCE:, o
invwe IrIcc LUt CoT Mura 8nd Twelfth StsM CLXCIXX1TI, O.
AbEETS WAKTED 'WHEEE WE HAVE KONEl U0 IF7EBTMEHT B0 PE0PITABLE,
aBS!
mimES&m
O
BT
N G- 'S.
Look for the'old lady in Window
OUR WASHINGTON COLORED
SOCIETY.
THE EFFECT OF MATTHEWS AP
POINTMENT. MR. MC. FAELAND
AND KING DAVID KALAKAUA.
"WHAT THE PEOPLE SAID. THE
NEGRO KING SEEKS WHITE COM
PANY. There is no doubt but what the
appointment of Mr. Matthews will
turn the heads of some of the socie
ty dudes. But as he well knows
who his friends are he will be very
careful with whom he associates.
At this time there are quite a num
ber of society fops wiio will at
tempt to court his good will. It is
this class of which Mr. Matthews
has complained as being instrumen-
tal in defeating his confirmation. 4,K wortn-, lil3 oration abound
It is understood that he will ap- 'ed lu w,t eloquence and cogency.
ap
point men in his office who
are friendly disposed towards him
self and the administration. The
social circle will tender the distin
guished Albany politician several
receptions as a token of their ap
preciation. Mr. Matthews, besb
friend in this city has been Mr.
Alexander Powell, who has worked
assiduously for ,his confirmation.
The most important event in odr
society was the invitation sent "to
KING DAVID KALAKATJA
by Mr. Sidney Mc.Farlaud. Tljis1
gentleman has played a conspici-
ous part "socially and politically
The Negro kiug having paid a vis
it to this city several years ago,ad
the colored people desiring to shoV"
their appreciation for him thought
it best to tender him a banquet.
The most arristocratic as tjiey
styled themselves were somewhat
slow . in giving the proposed ban
quet. Mr. Sidney McParlaudi'' -as
we said, who is now, and was th,eu
highly respected for his liberality,
sent an iuvitation to the kiuglhvit
ing him to meet the representative
colored citizen at his residence on
the tolWini?:r6Dlv t,JeKins wroH
His majesty King Kalakaua re
grets that other engagements will
prevent his acceptance of the po
lite iuvitatiou of Mr. Sidney Mc.
Farland.
The Arlington, Monday Dec, 14 '8i.
The so called society fops
thought it was rediculous that Mr.
Mc.Earlaud should invite the King
to dine wnth him. The gossip
mongers had it in their mouths
for months. And mauy of those who
condemned Mr. Mc.Farlaud then
have fallen below, while others
died ignominious deaths and soci
ally disgraced themselves. One
year prior to this occurence Mr.
Mc.Farlaud gave a reception to ex
Gov. Pinchback and invited sever
al colored" citizens to meet him
among whom were Hon. John M.
Langston, Collector Cook and oth
ers. Some saw fit to criticise Mr.
Mc.Farland for this act ot grati
tude. No man has endeavored to hon
or his people more than Mr. Mc.
Farland ; no man has a higher ap
preciation of his people, and friends
than this citizen. The colored so
ciety of this city is not like it use
to be. In years gone by it was
reputation and character, now it is
color and money with the ignorent.
If the former is not a sufficient
guarautee to carry oue through
life, it will virtually die out. Those
who have endeavored to win the
favor oi the new Recorder ot Deeds
have charged him with discrimina
tion. We understand from Mr.
Powell that Mr. Matthews is not
guilty ot what he has been charged-
with.
.4
HON. B. K. BRUCE AT
GREENSBURG.
EMANCIPATION CELEBRATION AN 0V
ERWHELMING .SUCCESS. GREENS
BURG DOES HONOR TO HER DIS
TINGUISHED SABLE GUESTS.
NEGRO ELOQUENCE.
Apropos an invitation and much
eolat, we attended the Emancipa
tion celebration at Gn-ensburg,
Ind., last Tuesday, the 3d inst It
is the county seat of D c tur
c mnty, one ot the richest counies
in thefcstue. It has a population
of ab ut 6,000, one hundred of
whom are Americans of African
descent. Many atti actions h d"
beeu heraldtd to enhau e he suc
cess, aud'en liven the spirit of the
occasion. The drawing card, how
ever, was the announcement that
Hon. B. K. Bruce of Mississippi,
would be the orator of the day.
Aside from many local attractions,
excursion trains came from adja
cent towns and cities, and the ca
pacity of the city va3 tested. The
procession formed on the public
square and moved through the
principal streets, headed by the
Greens burg Cornet Band. At 12
m. it reached the fair grounds
where the exercises of the day
were opened. Invocation by Rev.
D. A. Graham ofGreencasile, was
followed by an intermission for
dinner. At 2 p. m. Hon. B. K.
Bruce of Miss., delivered the ora
tion of the day. He 13 a remarka
ble man remarkable for his suc
cess, his intelligence and his ster-
i . -i --- .
For nearly two hours he enter
tained the v.ist assembly by his
pleasing mein and the melloiiuen
ey of his diction. He is a fine
specimen of the possibilities of the
American N?gro. Born a slave
.in Virginia, he obtained a good
education by his own unaided ef
forts, acquired wealth, was elected
to the United States Senate where
he served his country six years.
While in the senate he was ap
pointed temporary chairman of
the senate or, vice president of the
United States. President Garfield
appointed him Register of the
Treasury, which place he held four
years uuder Arthur's administra
tion. As an orate r and lecturer
he ranks amou the best. Space
forbids our giving a review ot his
speech, Indianapolis World.
tuTbits!
M.r. Grevy has gone to his sum
mer place at Mont Sons Vaudrey.
:vu Ai uivht and hlr in
the morninp-.
As we go to press we learn that
no trace of General Boulanger's
bullet has yet been found. The
next question is Did he shoot?
All this talk about the inscrip
tion on the gravestone of Josh
Billings is nonsense. What if it
is going to be simply "Josh Bil
lings?" There's no use in putting
on it that he was a horse thief
unless there is uudeniable proof at
hand.
An elevator is being constructed
at Pittsburg 850 feet m one min
ute. It will be popular with cred
itors. The Maoris of New Zealand are
reduced to 42,000, and will soon
become distinct. We don't fancy
they will like it very well, but they
can try it if they are so inclined.
a
Ernest Iugersoll, the writer, is
going to lecture this winter on
"The Battle for Life." It is sup
posed to be descriptive of what
occurred just after he offered a
contribution to a magazine mana
ger. if: if:
Out of 27,061 public school
children in Buffalo, only 7.195 are
of American parentage. The rest
were born of Buffalo parents.
A Philadelphia physician blunt
ly asserts that much of the so-called
malaria is pure laziness Then
some of our base ball players
ought to doctor for malaria.
An animal called a Blind Tiger
is causing some excitement in At
lanta.' Someone das been giving
away too many "three cheers"
down there.
Seventy. five girls will study
Greek at Harvard next fall, unless
a cataclysm of some other foreign
er steps in to prevent such a ca
tastrophe. All the mermaids along the
American oasts s;em to have
gone out of the business. There's
one old mermaid up the Hudson,
however, who is keeping his eyes
open for 1888.
BOSTON FROM THE COLOR
SIDE.
Oae could be greatly surprised
on going to Boston for the first
time after hearing so much about
this great city, not only because
of the streets, houses and the gen
eral municipal arrangements, but
because of the manners and cus
toms of the people as well. Espe
cially is this true of the traveller
that has lived in the south or in
some city, say Washington for in
stance, for the Bostouians are ac
customed to call Washiugtouians
"you Southerners."
The first thing that attracts a
stranger in any city is the houses
and streets, and the impression
whether favorable or unfavorable
depends upon the general charac
ter aud condition of both. With
out doubt Boston has some fine
houses and a few fine streets but
not euough to make it a beautiful
city. I doubt very much whether
the city has ever beeu surveyed,
certainly it has never been proper
ly surveyed, since the streets are
crooked and houses built angularly
and tbey lack that symmetry and
parallel which make places easy of
access and quickly found. In fact
the general idea one forms is that
the paths the early settlers made in
going hither and thither have been
wideued and growu iuto streets
with of course short cuts and open
ings so as to prevent one from be
iuj? entirely hemmed m. There
are however a few thoroughfares
which are only fit to be called
streets and avenues ; and there is
not a single oue of then that comes
any where near beiug as beautiful
aucl commodious as our own Pen
sylvaiiia Avenue. Of course where
ever there are systems of tenements
some of which contain twenty fam
ilies, the houses can never pre
sent that neatness of aspect as is
characteristic of small homes where
the tenant is lord and master of
his own domain. It stands to rea-
wfef-b4ifeitA,,paMcA,n&.Lxif2x&g
or owning the same premises they
do not take the interest aud care
in tne tiuiness anu neaitu oi tne
apartments as one person whose
sole care is to beautify and make
agreeable aud pleasant his little
homestead. But like other cities
Boston has her mansions.
This mauuer of living is prim
arily the origin of boarding houses
and restaurants. So long indeed
has this system been established
that now eating houses are as in
dispensable as the favorible diet,
beans. uTell me what a nation
eats and I will tell you their rela
tive greatuessr" says a writer. But
if Bostons mental calibre depended
upon its beau diet sad would be
her hours of slumber. I do not
condemn boarding houses but tbey
are iujurious to family and domes
tic relations.
Boston socially is but a flimsy
pretext. Every man thiuks himself
better than his neighbor and it fol
lows "every woman too," What
ever of social vestige remains is
found in sects and clans. There is
no general feeling prevailing among
the inhabitants founded either up
on color, title or rauk. Dress how
ever is au absolute requirement and
seems to be the ticket of admission
to all circles. It is strange that
southerners however much they find
cause for criticisiug the methods
aud condemning the cold hearted
uess of his fellow glide, easily into
the prevailing manners and readi
ly fall victims. It takes two
weeks iu Boston to Lejome a dude.
Boston has the best system of pub
lie schools iu the country. In spite
of the many advantages claimed
by them few of either sex ever reach
college. The young men climb as
high as the latin school and gravi
tate to the level of a waiter. Nine
ty percent of the young men hold
ing important position aud of
those who are in colleges are south
ern born and bred. It is true that
public facilities are greater than
they are in the south. A man can
be admitted in a public place as a
man, and his color is no
disgrace.
badge of
But after all Boston is no place
for colored men. There too can
be seen the thin partition of prnja
dice. No clerks, no cash boys and
girls, no sale; women are in large es
tablishments. Indeed the head of
a large firm once said that he will
never employ a colored person. So
Boston is not what it is said to be.
WlSiTED i IFlYActive ftnd intelligent, to
nun I bU UU I represent In her ownlocallty
an old Ann- References required. Permanent position,
ad good salary. QAY & fiBOS., li Barclay fc. &Y.
i
VIRGINIA POLITICS.
THE PROBABILITY OP A COLORED
CONGRESSMAN. THE REPUBLICAN
CONVENTION AND CANDIDATES.
Hampton, Va., Aug-. 12th, '86
On the first of September the
Republicans of the Second Con
gressional District will hold their
nominating convention in the city
of Norfolk. It is expected to be one
second only to a National conven
tion in point of interest. The necfis.
sity of nominating a colored man
has been thorougly canvassed by
leading colored politicians and the
journals published in the interest
of colored people in Virginia.
Among those spoken of most
favorably at the out set were,
Hon. R. M. Smith, of Hampton-,
S. B. Harris of Williamsburg, E. G-.
L. Page of Norfolk and as it is cir
culated arouud Mr. G. L.
Pryor of Hampton, who is now
holding a federal position in Wash
ington, will be out in the Virginia
Critic in a few days for the nomi
nation. Mr. A. W. E. Bassett has
with drawn trom the contest.
The convention will be com
posed of three fourths color
ed delegates, who will nodoubt give
each his just deserts. In the opin
ion of the best judges of personal
merit and political qualifications,
Messrs, C. P. Carigan, of Ports
mouth, James A. Fields, Esq., of
Hampton, and Kev. J. M.Dawson,
of Williamsburg, stand head and
shoulders above any of the first
gentleman mentioned, all being
colored.
Some of the white aspirants are
EIon. L:bby, M. O Mayor, Lamp of
Norfolk, and ex Postmaster Bou
deu and Col. H. Clay. Mr. Cari
gan will be the colored man's
choice. Mayor Limb will be the
choice of the Norfolk king. Col.
Clay the laboring man's choice and
in part of the Knights being very
strong aud be being a shrewd wire
quite iitely in spite" tne autxrom
Mahone is trying and will try to
have Mr. Libby's nomination sure
as usual.
Mr. Bouden is the choice of the
old time republican element. This
gentlemau has been ignored in
former conventions by the carpet
bager and the Eeadjuster element,
but the failures of the latter in the
last gubernational contest adds
greatly to Boudens chances for
success.
Dr. P. L. Barber, D. L. L., of
Norfolk and his charming bride are
paying a visit to their friends, stop
ping with &on. R. M. Smith.
DEMOCRATIC TRIUMPH.
NEGRO REPUBLICANS VOTE THE DEMO
CRATIC TICKET. REPUBLICAN BOSS
ES MUST CHANGE.
The election held last Thursday
was one of great importance and a
little interest was shown on the
part of tlfe colored people, and es
pecially the white Republicans as
far as the Republican ticket was
concerned, and the result wastan
overwhelming majority for he
Democrats.
This election was an unprece
dented one, as the colored men
walked and rode in hack loads to
the polls, voted and worked like
beavers for the success of the Dem
ocratic ticket with an alarming
vim. The action on the part of
the colored men can easily beac
counted for. The white Republi
cans have no good reason to pre
sent for their luke-warmness at the
polls. The colored men are not
going to be handicapped by c 'boss
es'' and political leaders. Mem
phis Watchman.
BARNES' COLORED KEWS
PAPEB AGENCY.
1107, I St., & 802 Sherman Ave.,
N. W., Washington, D. C.
Ail the co!ored newspapers for
sale an 1 o.i fil subscriptions and
adverts pieuts received. Find
your lost relatives and friends
through tni3 agency. General
agency for the Negro liteiary and
musicjl productions.
Communications by mail prompt
ly attended to.
George B. Barnes, Agent.
1. 31, tf.
'
''I
ti
.-'
H
xi
ft
m
ftiti
nrtiam.MUtwr.)TfMiftVwfEW'tJlJ?:?SB;SS
fc'l 1

xml | txt