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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, September 01, 1890, Image 4

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DAILY HERALD.
PUBLISHED
•EVEN DAYS A WEEK.
johpe D. Lynch. James J. Ayers.
AVERS & LYNCH. - PUBLISHERS.
(Entered at the postoffice at Los Angeles as
second-class matter. |
DELIVERED BY CARRIERS
AM Mfl. Per Week, or 80c. Per Month.
TERMS BY MAIL, INCLUDING POSTAGEI
Daily Herald, one year ?8.00
Daily Hebald, six months 4.25
Daily Hebald, three months 2.25
Weekly Herald, one year 2.00
Weekly Herald, six months 1.00
Weekly Herald, three months 60
Illustrated Hebald, per copy 15
Notice to Mail Subscribers,
file papers oi all delinquent mail subscribers
to the Los Angeles Daily Hbrald will bo
promptly discontinued hereafter. No papers
will be sent to subscribers by mail unless the
same have been paid lor in advance. This rule
to inflexible. AVERS & LYNCH.
The "Dally Herald"
May be found in San Francisco at the Palace
hotel news-stand; in Chicago at the Postoffice
HM Hand, 103 East Adams street; in Denver
at Smith A Sons' news-stand, Fifteenth and
Lawrence streets.
Office of Publication, 223-225 West Second
■treat. Telephone 156.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1890.
The Herald in the Country.
Persons leaving the city for the sum
mer may have The Herald sent by mail
to any postoffice address by leaving orders
at the office. Those at the seaside can
have their papers delivered by special
horse carrier, thus receiving it much
earlier than if ordered through the mail.
Leave your orders and addresses with
the local agents:
B. W. Saunders, Santa Monica.
N. O. Anderson, San Pedro.
E. J. Pratt, Long Beach.
S. B. Hall, Redondo Beach.
Hunt & Hargitt, Avalon, Cata
lina Island.
The star of Senator W. W. Bowers has
declined from its high estate, and his
chances in the Republican Convention
at Ventura are small indeed. Never
theless Bowers, although he cannot be
the King, may be the King-maker—or
that small representation of that idea
involved in naming the representative
in Congress from the Sixth District.
The Democratic clubs of Los Angeles
have combined to ask the Board of
Supervisors to properly district the
county, so that the intent of the law,
which calls for not more than two hun
dred voters to the precinct, shall be car
ried out. The Supervisors, we under
standjWill take up the matter on Tuesday.
This quite reasonable request should be
complied with. There has been at least
one instance in the history of Los
Angeles county where the will of the
people was defeated through inad
equacy of polling places.
The idea steadily grows that with a
good locefl ticket the Democracy will
win in Los Angeles cbuntv. To enable
them to do this, however, the advice of
the leading Democratic clubs of this city
should be taken, that the elections ought
to be called under the state law. The
county central committee will probably
adopt this suggestion. To make it effec
tual, however, the penal provisions of
the law should be embodied in the call.
Only on the idea thai we shall have hon
est election s can a Democratic victory
be relied upon. A mere party name
counts for little in these local contests.
The indications are multiplying that
a transcontinental railway is behind the
movements of which the Messrs. Hobart
and Burnett are the figure heads, and that
railway building on a considerable scale
will be noted here very shortly. The
Hon. Jeff Chandler, who is heavily
interested in these movements, will be
here in a few days, and we shall then
doubtless hear more of the new project.
We observe that Mr. Chandler has been
talking some excellent Democracy to
the people of the state of Washington, a
speech of his delivered at Tacoma being
brimful of point and instruction on the
issues of the day.
We give place elsewhere to some sug
gestions from Mr. Wm. A. Ryan advis
ing a Democratic organization in Los
Angeles patterned upon that of San
Francisco. To all of which we pray,
"Good Lord deliver us." The Golden
Gate has a right to its perfect machin
ery. The Herald begs to file a caveatj
to any infringement of the lovely San
Francisco patent. The Democrats of the
metropolis invented it and it would be
cruel to trench upon their rights. We
will add that the people of Los Angeles
are not yet prepared for that kind of a
"machine," and we doubt if they ever
will be. The very essence of Democracy
is that local initiative which we do not
believe the Democrats of Los Angeles
will ever surrender.
The Herald has received the report
of the Historical Society of Southern
California for 1890. It is a neat brochure,
and is full of interesting matter.
Amongst other things it contains a con
tinuation of Mr. Albert F. Kercheval's
paper on St. Vedalia (a new and poetic
designation for the Australian lady bug)
and several contributions from Professor
vJ. M. Guinn and others. The pamphlet
Will well repay a perusal. That the
society is an active one is shown by the
report of the committee on publication,
which states that, during the past year,
eighteen papers were read before it and
that five hundred pamphlets were pub
lished and circulated. One of the
marked features of the publication is an
article, by Rev. Jose' Adam, on "The
History of the Catholic Church in Los
Angeles." '
In a few days the Illustrated Los
Angbi.es Hebald will be issued and it
will be for sale over the counters of this
office. It is a remarkably complete
srjrk and will be an admirable publica
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD; MONDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 1, 1890.
cation to send east. In artistic merit it
will equal any of the more pretentious
illustrated periodicals of the country,
distancing many of them, in fact, and its
letter press is exceptionally fine in style
and valuable as to matter. It is no exag
geration to say that the illustrations will
surpass in merit the ordinary run of the
cuts in Harper's Monthly ami the ( 'entury,
Los Angeles is just upon the point of
emerging from the depression that has
prevailed in some sections of this
country for twoyearspast, the interest of
eastern people is again being aroused
concerning us, and all that we need now
is a little judicious advertising. The
Illustrated Elsrald this year as
always will be extensively circulated,
and its distribution will bring millions
into the county.
THE PLUMED KNIGHT TO THE FORE.
Tlie politician oi the present day is
much given to chasing butterflies. Even
a man of the great experience of Mr.
James G. Blame is not exempt from this
weakness. We all remember how we
were assured that the Pan American
Congress was to result in the end of all
wars between the Republics of tb<>
American continent, north, central and
south, the empire of Brazil included.
Everything like a difference of opinion
was to be settled hereafter by arbitra
tion. Sweet peace, with white wings,
was to brood over all American lands.
Pa'ans of praise went up all over the
Union at this triumph of the statesman
ship of the great chief of the Jingoes.
Scarcely, however, had the Congress
adjourned, than war broke out like a
rash all over Central America, and the
distant empire of Brazil was rocked from
center to circumference even during the
sessions of the Congress. The stories of
blood and thunder that have reached
us from Guatemala and other
Central American countries have been
enough to discourage all believers in
peace and arbitration. The very spirit
of Donnybrook Fair appears to have
taken possession of our southern neigh
bors since the adjournment of the Pan-
American Congress, and it has been only
needed to see a head to hit or a throat
to cut in countries to the south of us.
Not a whit daunted by the failure of the
peace part of the programme, the
Plumed Knight now assures us that we
are to have reciprocity in trade with the
Spanish-American Republics, and that
all we have to do to accomplish this
desideratum is to withhold free sugar until
the people of the Southern Republics
consent to buy more of our products.
All this is, of course, very pretty, and it
is just as practicable as the universal
peace programme, and it will have just
as substantial results. One good, how
ever, is likely to flow from the agitation
set on foot by the man from Maine, and
that is the defeat or material curtail
ment of the McKinley tariff bill. With
that measure defeated or modified, and
the Lodge Federal Election bill knocked
out—and to both measures the Plumed
Knight is irreconcilably opposed—the
American people can well afford to in
dulge a few vagaries of statesmanship,
out of compliment to Mr. Blame.
The expectation that we can materially
increase our trade with the Central
and South American states is, of course,
highly fallacious as long as an ex
travagant tariff upon imports enables
American manufacturers to get rich by
spoliating the consumer of the United
States. Whatever roseate pictures Mr.
Blame may draw of the possibilities of
commerce with our neighbors of the
South, that never amount
to one-third of the domestic consump
tion. Under a high tariff prices would
accordingly be adjusted to fleece the
larger class of consumers—that, is to
say, our fellow countrymen. And as
< long as that policy prevails the Brazil
ian* the member of the Argentine
confederation, and the other South
j and Central American countries, will
buy where they can buy the cheapest;
and that will be, in the future as in
the past, from English, French and
German merchants.
Of course, there is one way in which
we might build up a trade with Central
and South America, and that would be
by selling to those countries at a cheaper
rate than to our own. But the Ameri
can people would scarcely submit long
to such discrimination. It was once
done under a Republican war tariff with
salt. The Onondaga Salt Company, of
New York, under the high tariff on salt,
manufactured so much of that staple
that it had to seek a market in Canada
for its surplus. When it was found that
the Onondaga Company were selling salt
in Canada for one-half the amount they
charged the people of New York under
a high tariff, a howl was raised that re
sulted in an inquiry which showed that
this model company—the archetype of
the modern trust—was making dividends
of one hundred and fifty per cent, a year
on its capital stock. Public indignation
was so great that the tariff on salt was
immediately lowered to something like
reasonable limits.
In his Waterville speech Mr. Blame
said that there is no such thing as a
war tariff. To some extent this is true.
He says that the tariff of 188;> left very
little of that tariff. He might have
added that the war tariff itself was
essentially modified in 1805, after the
war had ended, and that those modifica
tions were in the direction of higher
duties. Very many of the articles in
the McKinley bill are considerably
higher than the duties in the war tariff,
and many of those in the existing tariff
are in excess of those imposed prior to
the post-war tariff of 1805. In this
instance we see that the Plumed Knight,
with his customary tricky logic, begged
the question, and juggled with the in
telligence of him hearers, a thing that no
man knows better how to do than he.
Educational.
Experienced resident governess desires en
gagement; country preferred. Teaches English,
Latin, modern languages and high class music.
Address 10, Herald Office. au3o-3t
Potomac Lining Parlors.
Finest meal in the city, 25 cents. Elegant
service. 217, S. Broadway, 4th floor. Tale
•levator. MRS/N. COOK, Proprietress.
A SEASIDE TRAGEDY.
A WIFE AT LONG BEACH FORCED TO
SEE HER HUSBAND DROWN.
Mr. John Downs, of Rivers'de, the Victim
of the Ocean—Narrow Escape of Other
Bathers—Mrs. Downs th 9
Dreadful Scene.
tin Saturday afternoon Mr. John
Downs of Riverside was drowned at
Long Beach under peculiarly distressing
circumstances. He was bathing in the
surf with a young lady friend, and
thoughtlessly waded out with the reced
ing tide until both he and his compan
ion found themselves being carried out
beyond their depths. They at once
attempted to retrace their stops, but
owing to the strong current which was
then running and the heavy breakeis
which were rolling in at the time, they
did not make much progress. After
lighting the waves for some minutes, a
large breaker struck them, and to his
horror. Mr. Downs relaxed
his hold upon her, as the seething water
closed over them, and when she came to
the surface, he had disappeared com
pletely.
The young lady struggled gamely
towards the shore, and managed to at
tract the attention of a young man
named Buck minster, who was bathing
some distance away. lie at once went
out to her rescue, and attempted to
bring her in, but finding his efforts to
tight against the current to be unavail
ing, he kept the young lady afloat and
ceased to waste his strength. By signs
and shouts the attention of some fisher
men on the beach was attracted, and
they at once put out in a boat and res
cued the couple from their perilous situ
ation. Both were almost completely
exhausted, but were speedily restored on
their return to shore. The boat was
then launched again, and, after a short
search, Downs' body was recovered.
Coroner Weldon was notified and held an
inquest, which resulted in a verdict of
accidental drowning.
Mrs. Downs, who had recently re
covered from a severe illness, was on
a visit to Long Beach for the benefit of
her health, and was rapidly regaining
her strength under the soothing in
fluence of the balmy sea-breeze, wit
nessed the sad accident from a buggy, in
which she was driving along the beach,
but was unable to render any assistance
to her drowning husband or his com
panion. The horror of her situation, as
her husband disappeared before her
eyes in the whirling waters, cannot be
fully realized, much less described. The
sad blow completely prostrated her, and
owing to the feeble condition of her
health, grave fears are entertained as
to the result pf the tragedy.
OLD SLEUTH VESTRESS
Receives a Warning from a Really
Truly Detective.
During the recent fire on Fifth street
a youth named John Dempsey, who occu
pied one of the burnt out rooms, lost the
sum of $105, which was in his trunk.
This money was subsequently found
by a boy, who placed it in
the hands of a friend named Hans
Cook for safe keeping, with the under
standing that when Dempsey offered a
suitable reward foi his lost savings, the
money should be handed over to him
and that the reward should be divided
equally among them. The smart boy
who devised this scheme confided it to
some of his juvenile friends, and the re
sult was that it soon became public
property. Among others who learned
of it was J. L. Vestress, a barber, whose
ambition soars to the dizzy heights
attained by "Old Sleuth," "Hawk
shawe," and other kindred lights, who
shine to such advantage in dime detec
tive stories. This amateur Vidocq at
once proceeded to turn his knowledge to
his own advantage by callingupon Cook
and representing himeslf to be a detec
tive, demanding the money. The boy
from whom Cook had received it, having
borrowed $15 of it, the balance $120 was
turned over to Vestress, who in turn
gave it to Dempsey.
A few days ago Vestress again called
upon Cook, at the residence of his uncle
(j. P. Wolfrung, at 442 Ducoinmon
street, and threatened the whole family
with all sorts of dire punishments, un
less the fifteen dollars balance was im
mediately forthcoming. Mrs. Wolfrung,
an old lady, fainted away at the blood
curdling threats of the detective, and a
terrible scene ensued. Finally the
Wolfrung family called at the
police station and interviewed
Detective Wallin on the sub
ject. After hearing the old man's
story the officer read the riot act to Mr.
Vestress; and in future it is more than
likely that a detective, in calling at the
Wolfrung residence, will have to pro
duce his authority for so doing or re
ceive a warmer welcome than he bar
gains for.
He Commands the Respect of All.
The Democratic party, in nominating
E. B. Pond of San Francisco for gov
ernor, has probably put at the head of
its ticket its stiongest man. There is
this assurance given by the nomination
of gentlemen named that the campaign
contest between the leaders will be one
of cleanliness. In fact we can
not conceive of any reason
why it should not be conducted upon
the same line, so far as all candidates
are concerned. That the contest will be
one calculated to call into play the best
energies of the two great political organ
izations, there can be no manner of
doubt. We shall have a warm and
energetic, but, we believe, a manly
campaign.
With the nomination of Mr. Pond the
Democracy has every reason to be satis
fied ; its representative body at San Jose
was certainly moved by wisdom and
dominated by sound sense in making
the selection it did. Personally, Mr.
Pond commands the respect of all who
know him, and should he be selected
the people can be assured, so far as past
career can guarantee a future one, that
they will have an upright executive and
an able one.—[Sacramento Record-
Union, Aug. 21, 1890.
The Perfect Physician.
The physician should be a strong and
healthy man, a master of his profession,
of course, and a gentleman ; the last
word implying gentle manners and a
line sense of honor. His approach to
the sick chamber should be like "foot
steps upon wool," and his presence
therein a benediction. Strong in his
knowledge, firm, but gentle even
to womanliness in his touch,
magnetic in his sympathies,
discreet of speech, sincere in
counsel, he would always inspire not
only the relatives but the patient with
confidence and gratitude. If the case
were not serious the loss of prospective
fees would not prevent his mingling his
sincere pleasure with that of the rela
tives: if it were past hope his sympathy
would make the terrible affliction
easier to bear. Would itbe impertinent
to ask how many American members of
a noble profession satisfy these require
ments? The medical
in America abounds with com
petent and honorable men satisfy-
I ing some of them. Some have the
knowledge and experience without the
more graceful qualities. Others have
the social accomplishments without the
scientific acquirements. It is better to
have honesty and ability united even
with a degree of rudeness, than to have
all the social graces in the world with
out the necessary skill. A doctor may
Ibe a bear in manners, yet, if he keeps
| death from the door, his attentions can
| not only be tolerated, but gracefully
I accepted.—[Contemporary Review.
"Punch" to The Czar.
Punch of the 9th of August has a car-
I toon by Tenniel which has done more
jto excite British sympathy for the Rus
I sian Jews and British dislike of the Czar
than nil the lurid epithets and furious
denunciation of Swinburne's over
strained verse published in the current
number of the Fortnightly Review
Punch represents the Ghost of the Pfaa"
raohs warning the Czar against
i drawing the sword of per
j secutiun. It is entitled, "From
the Nile to Neva." A stanza
I from the companion verses explains the
I purpose of the drawing:
O Muscovite, blind in your wrath, with your
heel on the Israelite's neck,
And your hand on that baleful old blade, Per
secution, 'twere wisdom to reck
The Pharaoh's calm warning. Beware! Lo,the
Pyramid! pierce the gray bloom
Of a desert that is but a waste', by a river that is
hut a tomb,
Yet the Hebrew abides and is strong. Amene
man is gone to the ghosts,
He the Prince oi the ('optic police who so har
ried the Israelite hosts.
When their lives with hard bondage were bitter.
And now bitter bondage you'd try. ,
Proscription, and exile, and stern deprivation,
Beware, sire I Pat by
That blade In its blood-rustfd scabbard. The
Pharaohs, the Caesars have found
That it wounds him who wield* it; and you,
though your victim there, prone on'the
ground,
Look helpless and hopeless, you also shall find
Persecution a bane
Which shell lead to a Bed Sea of blood to o'er
whelm selfish Tyranny's train.
Mai lline; Discovery.
The discovery by the inhabitants of a local
ity hitherto unvislted by that pestilent scourge
of lever and ague, that it exists In their very
midst, Is decidedly startling. Such discoveries
are made at every season, in every part of the
Union. Suosequently, when it is ascertained,
as it invariably is at such times, through the
valuable experience of some one who has been
benefitted aud cured, that Hosteller's Stomach
Bitters is a thoroughly efficacious eradieator
of the malarial poison, and a means of fortify
ing the system against it, a feeling of more se
curity and tranquility reigns throughout
the neighborhood. ' Besides the febrile
forms of malarial disease, dumb
ague and ague cake are removed
by the potent acttoa of the Bitters, to which
science also gives its sanction as a remedy for
rheumatism, dyspepsia, constipation, liver
complaint, debility, kidney troubles, and all
diseases impairing the organs of digestion and
assimilation, uu26-3t
You Are Invited.
The citizens of the 7th ward and vicinity,
and all who are interested, are invited to at
tend a mass meeting to be held at Kearney's
hall, on east 7th street, September slh, 1890,
at 7:!!0 o'clock p. m., to protest against that
pan'if the city being made a dumping ground
for the city's filth.ana garbage; ami to ask the
city council to declare the iniquitous contract
with ]). F. Donegan forfeited.
AMUSEMENTS.
HAZARD'S PAVILION.
Frank W. Conant, Manager.
Monday, Sept. 1, 2 and 3,
McCABE & YOUNG'S
OPERATIC MINSTRELS
35 ARTISTS 35
New Songs. New Jokes. New Ideas.
every act a FKATUBJt.
Don't fail to see McCabe & Young's beautiful
FLOWER GARDEN FIRST PART.
Watch our
GRAND STREET PARADE.
Popular prices 25 and 50 cents.
Seats now on sale at R. S. Stoneman's Music
store, 106 north Spring st. au26-td
PALACE RESTAURANT AND SALOON,
Corner First and Spring Streets.
The Most Magnificent and Popular
Resort in the City.
♦,'♦
FREE CONCERTSI
* • • • *
BY THR
CELEBRATED PHILHARMONIC SOLOISTS
Every Night from 8 to 12.
JOSEPH SCHURTZ, PROPRIETOR.
jeS-lm
RED RICE.
RED RICE'S, LOS ANGELES, SUNDAY,
August 31st. It may seem eccentric, but
Red Rice has always found it pays the best to
tell the exact truth, and nothing but the truth,
in an advertisement; so that when we tell our
readers, that we are obliged, by reason of obli
galions maturing, to have money quick, we
mean what we say. We are carrying a tremen
dous stock of goods, such as was never before
gathered together here. There is most every
thing wanted by mankind, from the finest
marble top walnut set, all new, to a bit of
second-hand hose. We have some beautiful
goods that were never set up outside of the fac
lory, until set up in our stores. Some sweet
parlor suites. We have chain, bedsteuds, shef
foniers, ward robes, folding beds, sideboards,
upholstered furniture, bedding, kitchen safes,
tables, chairs, stands, ull and everything new,
and somewhat used. Know that we can sell
you a pretty antique, or ash, hotel commode
bed room set for $10. A nice mahogony bed
room set, complete, for $14. A good painted
set for $10. This will be the greatest furniture
sale in the history of this city. Get prices, get
prices, get prices at once. We shall pull the
goods in from our storage warehouse, and the
other stores as fast as space is vacant in our
Main Street P,azar,l43 to 145 South Main Street.
Besides furniture ad infinitum you must know
we have stoves, both new and used, in great
variety. We have upwards of 300 stoves in our
stores and warehouse. We will sell you a pretty
new cook stove for $10, Gasoline stoves at $3 to
$8, etc. In carpets we are in good supply. In
tinware, crockery, agateware, hardware, tools,
etc., we have enough to lit up a good sized
store; all must go at a jump-down price. For
whatsoever you may want, we earnestly ask you
to interview the boys at Red Rice's Bazar, 143
and 145 South Main Street; they will endeavor
to please you. We also have a great quantity
of second-hand goods on sale at the warehouse
422 and 424 South Main Street and 420 and 428
South Spring Street. Every salesman has been
instructed to put down prices at every store of
Red Rice's. This special sale is made to get
money quick, and will last only during Septem
ber, for by the end of that month we must either
go down, or get the money
RED RICE'S.
ELECTION NOTICE^
SCHOOL TAX.
XTOTTCE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO THE QUAL
ay itled electors of the City of San Pedro Soli 00l
District, County of Las Angeles, State of Cali
fornia, that an election will be held on the 23rd
day of September, A, D. 1890, at whicn will be
submitted ihe question of voting a tax to liqui
date present indebtedness of City of San P.dro
School District, to furnish supplies, keep school
building in repair, and to maintain school dur
ing present year.
It will be necessary to raise for this purpose
the sum of $1,500.
The polls will be open at Fifth Street School
House from 6 o'clock a. m. to 7 o'clock p. m.
The Judges appointed to conduct the election
are: •
W 11. Menhennet, John. C. Mahar,
C. J. Lamore, lAa Pearce,
B. P. Wilhite, James H. Dodson,
Judges. District School Trustees
9-1,8,15,22,
rTVHE SIBTERB OF THE HOLY NAMES]
A a branch of the convent of Our Lady of the
Sacred Heart, Oakland, have opened a boarding
school at Ramona, Cal.; the location cannot be
surpassed in beauty and salubrity; the course of
instruction is of the highest grade. For terms
apply to the LADY SUPERIORESS. The classes
will be resumed Sept. Ist, 1890. 125-1 lm
FIVE CENTS A LINE.
Situations obtained, help secured, houses
/ented, property of all kinds bought and sold,
and money loaned by advertising in these
columns.
Everybody Heads Them.
WANTED—MISCELLANEOUS.
W ANTKD—ONE BOILER 25 to 35, ONE
VV inch iron, S to, lii horse power. Apply
to 5.->5 BANNING ST. au3l-d-w-lmo
TIT ANTED—BUGGY, PH.ETON OR Sl' It HEY
VV in exchange for diamonds, cold watches
or jewelry, Room 15,124% S. Spring st. PAC
IFIC LOAN CO. au3-ll
A* t antkd-I'l<;t7ires to frame, cheap-
VV est place at M'KNS'S. 250 S. Main St.
au2l-lf
TIT ANT ED — TO BUY SECOND-HAND
VV wagons and carnages. 128 BAN PEDRO
jcti-3m*
WANTED—HELP.
WANTED— ALL NEEDING HELP FREE—
employment or any information, address
K. NITTINGKR'S BUREAU; established 1SSO;
'818% 8. Spring street, Los Angeles, Calif. Tele
phone 113. mlo-12m
wanted—female help.
.'
Must have over 1 year's experience in dry
goods store and not out of the business over 2
months, otherwise don't npplv. Also experi
enced dry goods man. WIN'KBURGHS, 309
-311 S. Spring street. au3l-2t
ANTED—GIRL FOR GENERAL HOUSE
work, Apply at 631 S, Spring street.
an2o-tf
WANTED—MALE HELP.
AITANTED-5,000 ABLE BODIED MEN-FOR
VV Bering sea. Call at THE CHICAGO, 150
North Main st. nul-lm
WANTED—SITUATIONS.
\\TANTED— SITUATION BY YOUNG WOMAN
VV Is an experienced cook and willing to do
general housework. Call at MOFFITT HOUSE,
25 Davis street, Room 3. au3l-2t
TITANTED — A SITUATION ON A FRUIT
VV ranch or private place to do general work.
Address G. NO. 340 BUENA VISTA ST.
au3o 3t
FOR SALE.
T7*OR SALE CHEAP, 150 GOOD SOUND
A 1 puncheons in first class condition. Apply
to W. 11. WORKMAN, 357 Boyle avenue.
an 29-lmo
TJtOR SALE—A FINE NEW UPRIGHT PIANO
JT never been used. $225.00.
tf PACIFIC LOAN CO., 124>.jS Spring st.
I*OR SALE—DIRT CHEAP, A LIGHT-RUN
-1 ning Babcock buggy, nearly new. Apply
to JOHN C. BELL, 224 S. Los Angeles st
jylO-tf
FOR SALE—City Property.
17A0R SALE—NICE HOME ON WASHINGTON
' street near Figueroa, very cheap. BUR
BANK, BAKER & O DEA, 114 S. Broadway.
au2l-tf
IfOR SALE—GREAT - :BARGAIN; COTTAGE
JP of 5 rooms and kitchen; hard finished;
garden, stable, etc.; 3 minutes from cable; part
cash. BURBANK, BAKER & ODEA, 114
Broadway. tf
IfOR SALE—NEW 9-ROOM HOUSE AND
1 hath, large lot, cement walks, tine neighbor
hood, near corner Washington and Figueroa
sts.; only .$l,OOO. BURBANK, BAKER & ODEA
114 S. Broadway. jy'Jf.-tf
FOR SALE—Country Property.
If OR SALE—OS-ACRE RANCH, NINE MILES
1 from court house; grain, alfalfa and fruit
land; all improved; price $ 100 per acre, or 50
acres at $80 per acre. R. C. CARLTON, Ful
ton block. jy2s-3m
IfOR SALE — PRODUCES AN INCOME.
About 200 acres, };j mile south of Norwalk
railroad station. An overflowing and everflow
ing artesian well. Best corn and alfalfa land.
Good for apples, peaches, pears, cherries, grapes,
plums, oranges, lemons, etc. All well fenced.
Must be sold to pay debt. Will be sold to
gether or in parcels. W. G. COWAN, adminis
trator, Rialto. Cal. Inquire of H. E. ROWLAND,
on the place, or EDWIN BAXTER, attorney, 7
i and 8 Jones block, lx>s Angeles. aul3-lm
SALE—A PARTY WHO WANTS A
piece of ground to improve and make a liv
ing on, can I uy 10 or 20 acres 10 miles from
Los Angeles and half a mile from railroad, on
his own terms; this is excellent soil and is
well adapted for deciduous or small fruits, or
chicken ranch; cash no object; a good oppor
tunity for the right man. Address P. O. box
660, Los Angeles. al-lm*
FOR SALE—LIVE STOCK.
FOR SALE—2O HEAD OF FRESH MILCH
cows; graded Jerseys, Durham and Ashyres;
all gentle lor family use. 235 8. Los Angeles
.st. C.E.CROWLEY. au!9-2W
IWR SA LE^-Pul > S~KEt"kieVKR AND WATER
Spaniel, graded. 201 N. Mathews street,
Boyle Heights. aulli-lm
FOR RENT—ROOMS.
IfOR RENT-39 ROOMS AT 139 BROADWAY.
1 E. B. MILLAR. auBo-7t
1J»OR RENT—UNFURNTSB ED Rf )OMB, NOR
-1 TON HOUSE, corner of 7ln and Hill, %
block from market and postollice. Rent reason
able. au27-lmo
for rent—houses.
at 213 south Hill st. No children. aul3.tf
IT'OR RENT—HOUSE OF 8 ROOMS, NO. 511
" Temple street, for $20; 3 houses on Castelar
street,one of 5 and one of 7 rooms, $10 each; all
in good condition. Apply to ROOM 5, Dueom
mun block. S. ('. HUBBELL. jy3l-tf
PERSONAL 7,
PERSONAL - A GENTLEMAN OF SOME
1 property wishes to meet a lady willing to
lift mortgage and take advertiser and property
as security. ARTHUR K. PRESTON'S, Hail
Diego, Cal. au3l-5t
'•T7*CONOMIC" PRICES—SUGAR, 20 LBS.
JUd brown or 16 lbs. white, |1; 4 lbs rice.sago
or tapioca, 25c.; 13 lbs. white beans 25c.; starch,
4 packages, 25c; germea, 20c.; silver cream, 15c;
10 lbs. cornmeal, 15c; pickles, 10c. a qt.; good
black or Japan tea, 35c; sack flour, 80c;
Fresno flour, $1.10; 10 cans salmon, $1; 9 cans
oysters, 51; can roast beef, 20c; potted tongue
or ham, 10c; 4 cans sardines, 25c; 6 lbs.
raisins, 25c; 40 bars soap, $I; bacon, 12Uc;
hams, lH'Ac; pork, 10c. ECONOMIC STORES,
509-511 S. Spring st. Telephone 975. m 5 tf
DIVORCE LAW A SPECIALTY; ADVICE
free. W. W. HOLCOMB, attorney-ut-law,
office, old Wilson block, 126 W. First St., rooms
10 and 11. ma29-tf
ERSONAL — INTERESTING TO EVERY -
body How to make and save money. Head
the class.) ed advertisements in the Heralij
daily. A few cents spent in an advertisement
may make thousands of dollars for you. You
may procure a situation; sell your bouse and
lot; rent your vacant property; buy a paying
business or sell to advantage; loan your idle
money or borrow cheaper than from agents,
and in a thousand different ways use these col
umns to advantage. On this page advertise
ments are only FIVE CENTS A LINE A DAY.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
171RN EST RIM AN. EXPERT EXAM IN lilt OF
XU land titles, 20 years in the business. Sat
isfaction guaranteed. Charges lih.ral. Call at
Room 9, Redick Block, No. 238 West Ist street.
Los Angeles, Cal. nu23-lmo
JIV F. MOREHOUSE, CARPENTER AND JOB
j bet, buys and sells second-hand goods of all
descriptions; keeps constantly on hand ladders
of all kinds. Masons' hods, daubers, etc., 616
S. Spring street.
NOTICE— THE LOS ANGELES CITY WATER
Compuny will strictly enforce the follow
ing rule: The hours for sprinkling are between
6 and 8 o'clock a. m., and 6 and S o'clock p. m.
For a violation of the above regulation the
wator will be shut off', and a fine of $2 will be
charged before water will be turned on again.
a it 17-ly
LOST AND FOUND.
LosT-£fbo rewaTuTT-or
white Gordon setter, name Booth, tag 169—
leave same at 1616 San Fernando street. No
questions asked. 9-1-t
LOST— BROWN MULE WITH HALTER. RE
ward paid for return to S. POWELL, South
ern California Music Co. au3o-7t
OST—$5 00 REWARD. STRAYED AUGUST
J 26, 1890, a large bay horse. Please call or
address F.SMALL, 1826" New Main street.
au2B-7t
TO EXCHANGE. ~
THE RIMAN REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE
Company has clear Eastern property to
trade for Incumbered houses and lots in Los
Angeles. We assume indebtedness. Room 9,
Redick Block, Los Angeles, Cal. au23-lmo
EDUCATIONAL.
VOICE CULTURE AND SINGING TAUGHT
by Oscar N. Klepper. Apply at BART
LETT S MUSIC STORE. aul3-lm
THE fall term of Miss Marsh's School, a
Bearding and Day School for Young La-,
dies and Girls, at 121T".5. Hill St., and 1220 S.
Olive St., will begin Wednesday, September 10. .
an 1 2d in
rpRINITY SCHOOL, 1534 MISSION ST., PRE-
X pares young men and boys for university
college and business. Kail session opens Mod
day, August 4, IS9O Address, Dr. E. B.
SPALDING, rector, San Francisco. aull llmos
THE OCCIDENTAL UNIVERSITY OPENS
Sept. 17,1S!)0; now courses of study added;.
building improved, better equipment than ever
before. Address Prof. J.M.McPHKRRON, station
B, Los Angeles, Cal. au7-lm
LOS ANGELES BUSINESS COLLEGE AND
English Training School,new number, 144
S. Main St. Experienced teachers; complete
courses of study. E. R. SCHRODER, I N.
INSKKEP, F. W. KELSEY, Proprietors. a22lf
WR. STOLL, VOCAL INSTRUCTOR.
• with German Conservatory of Music,
123 Fifth St., cor. Broadway. je29-tS
SHORTHAND, TYPEWRITING, TELEGRA
phy. LONG LEY INSTITUTE, 126 W. First
St., the only school in the city in which these
arts are taught by competent gentlemen, skilled
in their profession. Terms moderate. ELIAS
LONGLEY, 30 years a reporter, W. H. WAGNER,
stenographer and telegrapher. ju l-6m
ACADEMY OF IMMACULATE HEART, PICO
Heights—The scholastic year comprises
two sessions of five months each. Tho first
session commences on the Ist of Sept. and
tho second on the Ist of Feb. Pupils are re
ceived at any time. For particulars apply on
the premises. jul 5m
OC'HOOL OF CIVIL, MINING, MECHANICAL,
O Engineering, Surveying, Architecture,
Drawing, Assaying. A. VAN DER NAILLKN,
723 Market St., San Francisco. mlO-tf
OT. VINCENT'S COLLEGE,
iO -GRAND AVENUE.—
A BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR
BOYS AND YOUNG MEN.
Course, Classical and Commercial
Fall term will begin on Monday, Sept. Ist.
Address REV. A. J. MEYER, C. M. Pres.
au 10-lm
\I7OODBURY'S BUSINESS COLLEGE
VI —AND—
SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING
INSTITUTE,
159 South Spring Street, Los Angeles, Cal
SESSIONS DAY AND EVENING.
For particulars, call at office or address
m2O-tf F. C. WOODBURY, Principal.
MEETINGS.
SAFETY COUNCIL, NO. 604, AMERICAN
Legion of Honor.—Meets the second and
fourth Fridays of each month at Caledonia hall,
119% 8. Spring st. Visiting and resident com
panions invited to attend. A. H. MILLER,
Commander. JOHN SPIERS, Secretary.
ORRIS - VINEYARD LODGE, I. oTg. T.,
No. 120.—Meets every Monday night. Hall
cor. Laurel and Main sts.
NIGHTS TEMPLAR, CUiUR DE LION
Commander}-, No. 9, K. T. — Holds its
stated conclaves In the asylum, in MasonichaU,
cor. of Spring and First sts., on tho third Thurs
day of each month, at 7:30 p. m.
T\7"ELCOME LODGE, K. OF 11., NO. 3342.—
ii Meets Tuesday evenings, at room 45, Cali
fornia Bank building.
GOOD WILL COUNCIL, NO. 629, AMERICAN
Legion of Honor, meets on second and
fourth Wednesdays of each month at the Y. M. I.
hall, 17 North Main st.
LOSI OS ANGELES LEGION. NO. 6. SELECT
J Knights, A. O. U. W.—Meets every Monday
evening, in Campbell's hall, cor. Downey aye
and Truman St., East Los Angeles.
T OS ANGELES CHAPTER, R. A. M.—STATED
±J convocations on the second Monday of each
month, at 7:40 p. m., at Masonic hall, Spring
St., bet. First and Second.
I7VRATERNITY LODGE, NO. 79, K. OF P.—
Meets on second and fourth Wednesday
evenings in each mouth at Pythian Castle, 24
S. Spring st.
X OS ANGELES LODGE, NO. 2i)2ST~K\I)F
X-A H.—Regular meetings are held every Wed
nesday evening, at 75 N. Spring It.
C"< EI.CICH WOMAN'S RELIEF CORPS, NO
~X 22.—Meets first and third Fridays of each
month, at 2 p. m., in Campbell's hall", East Los
Angeles.
RANGE BRANCH COMM ANDERY, NO
306, U. O. G. C—Meets every Friday even
ing, in new Odd Fellows' hall, llaydeu block,
East Los Angeles.
AUNTLET LODGE, NO. 129, K. OF P.—
Meets on Monday evening, in Pythian
Castle, No. 24 S. Spring st.
LIVE LODGE, NO. 26, K. OF P.—MEETS
every Thursday evening in Pythian Castle,
24 S. Spring, just below First st.
FINANCIAL.
MONEY TO LOAN ON LONG OR SHORT
time, in large or small amounts, single or
partial payment plan. ATLAS ENDOWMENT
ASSOCIATION, Room 53, Bryson-Bonebrake
Block. au3l-3t
MONEY LOANED ON IMPROVED CITY
and country property, bonds and stocks.
Any amount, low rates. Bonds bought. JNO.
A. PIRTLE, 138 s. Spring street. au3l-3mo
MAIN-STREET SAVINGS BANK AND TRUST
Company, 426 S. Main st. Money to loan
at (i] 4 per cent on business property. jel-tf
WANTED— LOAN OF $7,000 — to $9,000 ON
six parcels improved property, worth $27,
-000—4 in city, 2 in country. Reasonable in
terest but no commission. Apply to S. B. GOR
DON, Attorney, Bryson-Bonebrake building.
au2B-thur-sat-sun-tue-4t
I PACIFIC LOAN COMPANY—LOANS MONEY
in any amounts on all kinds of personal
property and collateral security, on pianos
without removal, diamonds, jewelry, sealskins,
bicycles, horses, carriages, libraries or any prop
erty oi value; also on furniture, merchandise,
etc., in warehouses; partial payments received,
money without delaj-; private offices for con
sultation; will call if desired; W. K. DeGROOT,
Manager, rooms 14 and 15, No. 124U South
Spring st. m3O
51,500,000~
I 7 TO LOAN AT R. G. LUNT'S
LOAN AND INSURANCE AGENCY.
Cor.First & Broadway, Redick block, Los Angeles
Agent for tne
GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY,
of San Francisco. jul-3m
fij.2s TO $25,000.
qp Long and short term loans a specialty.
Buy notes and mortgages.
CRAWFORD & McCREERY, Room 11, over
Los Angeles Bank, corner First and Spring.
au27
MONEY TO LOAN ON MORTGAGE-MOR
TIMER & HARRIS, attoriieys-at-law, 79
Temple block. a22-tf
T OS ANGELES LOAN CO. WILL LOAN
±J money on pianos, without removal,
diamonds, jewelry, carriages, horses and any
thing of value; private rooms for consultation;
all business confidential; money withoutdelay.
ROOMS 8 AND 9, Wilson block, cor. First arid
Spring sts. W. D. Eckstein, manager. m29-tf
AIONEY LOANED ON REAL ESTATE, DIA
JTJt monds, watches, jewelry, pianos, seal
skins, live stock, carriages, bicycles, and all
kinds of personal and collateral security. LEE
BROS., 402 S. Spring, mlB-tf
ftl ftflfl OAA T0 LOAN AT 9 PER CENT.
C'I.UUU.UUU gross to 12 percent, gross, on
w Lu^w^ ropt \ rt , y_LoB Angeles city or acreage.
lILLLMAN, ALLEN & CHALFaN'T, Perrltt
building. 127 W. Third st. mioilm
MONEY TO LOAN AT CURRENT RATES
on good risks only. M. F. ODEA, 114
Broadway. ml3-tf
fl|> KAA AAA TO LOAN UPON IMPROVED
iIpiWU.UW city and country property; low
est rates; loans made with dispatch. Address
the Northern Counties Investment Trust, Ltd.,
FRED. J. SMITH. Agent. Pomona. Cal.
' MINING.
PACIFIC COAST MINING BUREAU—GOOD
mining properties bought and sold. Min
ing prospects and mines bonded, and capital
furnished for development of those that can be
shown to have merit. NOLAN A SMITH, office
132 North Spiingstreet, Los Angele», Cal.
au24 (imp
STORAGE.
Downeyave. and San Fernando st. Rates
reasonable. Tel. 385. C RAPHAEL & CO.
jy3-6m
• BUSINESS CHANCES.
WANTED— $7,000, LONG TIME, BEST OF
security, lowest rate of interest. Address
NO. 129 S. SPRING ST., Room 6. au-27-71

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