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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, September 24, 1890, Image 5

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ANOTHER RAILROAD.
A COMPANY TO TAKE THE LOS AN
GELES AND PACITIC.
It will Be Kxtended Through the City-
James Campbell's Deal at Rattlesnake
Island—The Terminal Company to
Push Construction.
Los Angeles has ail the symptoms of
an extraordinary time of commercial
activity. Large and bona fide enter
prises are springing into existence every
day, faster than be chronicled.
The last on the list is the regeneration
of the moribund Los Angeles and Pacific
railway, which before the flood of two
years ago, used to carry passengers to
Santa Monica.
Mr. S. W. Luitwieler, one of the
largest stockholders in the company,
stated to a Hbbald reporter yesterday,
that the Westinghouse Electrical com
pany had about concluded the negotia
tions preliminary to taking the road,
and transforming it into an electric rail
way, with a system extending several
miles into this city.
This enterprise is entiiely distinct
from Captain A. W. Barrett's plan of an
electric railway recently described in the
Herald, and will involve the invest
ment of a very large amount of money
in this city and tributary territory.
The Terminal Company.
The last obstacle in the way of the
Terminal Railway company was re
moved lately.
That canny Scot, Admiral James
Campbell, of the Bollina harbor com
pany, in the days of the boom, saw that
Rattlesnake Island was a desirable strat
egic point, from a railroad man's point
of view, and he at once proceeded
to secure it for that purpose. When the
Terminal road people came and wanted
to buy the island from tlie Dominguez
estate, Admiral Campbell was found to
have a large sized live claim and it had
to be adjusted. This the estate has done,
and on Monday, Mr. Campbell's corpo
ration, the Long Beach and San Pedro
railway company, was turned over to
the Terminal company, and General
Manager Burnett of the latter elected
president of the former, together with a
directorate consisting of T.B.Burnett,
W. VVincup and Dan McFarland.
This leaves the company a clear road
and tlie work of construction will be
rapidly pushed. The pile driver will
commence work this morning, and the
contracts for the grading ou the east
side will be let on Thursday.
THE POND CLUB.
An Executive Campaign Committee
Appointed.
At a meeting of tlie members of tlie
Pond club, at their rooms, Tuesday
evening, September 23rd. 1890, the fol
lowing gentlemen were appointed as an
executive committee to take charge of
and direct the affairs of the Pond club
during the coming campaign:
Thos. B. Brown, Frank Sabici , H. T.
Gordon, J. H. Mitchell, D. A. F, Darl
ing, Louis Roeder, Prof. A. Wilhartitz,
Wm. H. Juenger, C. F. A. Last, Carlos
Cruz, Col. J. O'Bryan, J. W. AVinston,
Geo. J. Denis, Max Lowenthal, John
Webber, J. Whithorn, Dr. Lindenfeld,
Chas. Forman, John Bryson, sr., T. J.
Gallagher, A. McNally, Hugh J. Smith,
M. Hopkins, Mike Curran. W. H.
Workman, E. C. Bosbyshell, Isaac Nor
ton, D. Neuhart, Larkin Snodgrass,
John T. Jones, S. White, Thomas J.
Cuddy
Thos. J. Gallager, secretary pro tern.
A PECULIAR CASE.
Can a Minor be Made a Party to a Debt
Not Contracted by Her?
A case which was sometime ago trfed
before Justice Marshal, sitting in the
township justice's court, and in which a
decision was given for plaintiff, default
of defendants having been entered, is to
be reopened on Oct. 2. John Lowe on
July 8 obtained a judgment against John
Lee", C. A. Lee and Eva Lee for $85.45,
rents due on a house on San Pedro street.
John Lee was away in the state of Wash
ington, C. A. Lee was dead and the only
remaining defendant was a young girl, a
minor who was unable to make contracts
and should not have been made a party
to the suit. She had a piano left her by
a deceased sister, and that was seized.
Police Sergeant Morton had himself ap
pointed guardian ad litem of the minor
in order to see that she was not despoiled
of her property and it is at his instance
that Justice Savage yesterday reopened
the case.
UNITARIANS.
The Return of the Delegates to the Pa
cific Conference.
Mr. Thomas G. Barnard, who. in com
pany with Mrs. Dr. Fay and Mrs. C. M.
Severance, were delegates to the Pacific
Unitarian conference at San Francisco,
have just returned. They met and had
the pleasure of hearing all the best tal
ent of the denomination,as well as Rabbi
Voorsanger, of San Francisco, wbo read
a very able paper on the ideas and prin
ciples of the Reformed Jews as compared
with the orthodox church of that people.
The delegates were disappointed in
not meeting the Rev. J. 8. Thomson,
pastor-elect of the Church of the Unity,
Dr. Fay's successor. From letters re
ceived from Mr. Thomson, he states that
it was impossible to arrange his affairs
in Sommerville to attend the conference,
but will leave Boston Sept.- 24 for Los
Angeles, which place he will reach in
time to fulfill his promise to begin his
pastoral services to that church the lirst
Sunday in October.
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS.
The Court House Contractor Urged to
Hurry Up.
Supervisor Martin made a motion yes
terday morning, at the meeting of the
board, which was unanimously adopted.
It was that the new court house con
tractor, 0. E. Brady, increase to the full
est extent the working force of each de
Highest of all in Leavening Power.—TJ. S. Gov't Report, Aug. 17, 1889.
Powder
ABSOLUTELY PURE
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD: WEDNESDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 24, 1890.
partment of workers on the building,
and put on at least twenty shinglers to
work on the roof; also that he push tlie
work of completion as rapidly as possi
ble, without losing sight of the fact that
the security of the building must not be
endangered.
The Redondo school district special
tax matter was ordered continued until
October. A warrant for $200 was ordered
in favor of A. B. Whitney, county tax
collector, to pay for 20,000 postal cards
to be used in notifying tax payers of the
amount of taxes due by them to the
county for this fiscal year. The plans
and specifications of Mr. Ledbetter for
the new Garvanza bridge were accepted,
on motion of Supervisor Hubbard, but
he soon withdrew his motion and sub
stituted another to the effect, that all
bids be rejected and that the county re
advertise for them, the bids to beopened
October ti. The contractor, under this
motion, is to furnish all material except
lumber. The motion was adopted.
On motion of Supervisor Davis, M. 11.
Ledbetter was directed to put in top
streets and lateral braces in the Pico
and Sanford bridges.
IN THE COURTS.
A Few Notes Gathered in the Halls of
Justice.
Somebody will oblige the officers of
Judge Van Dyke's court by taking away
a pair of infantile knee-breeches and a
pair of baby shoes that have laid there
for more than a week.
Judge Wade and a jury were engaged
all day yesterday Hearing evidence in
the suit of the city against Mrs. Clem
ents to recover a strip of land on Figue
roa street, and $22,000 damages. The
case will go to the jury today.
Tlie $50,000 damage suit of Mr. and
Mrs. Coenen against the Los An
geles Cable Car company is slowly
progressing before Judge Clark and a
jury in department two. It will take at
least two days more before it can be
handed to the jury for a verdict.
John Kaus was fined $20 yesterday by
Justice Savage for having licked an old
man named Eldridge. The defendant
wanted to appeal the case at lirst, but
thought better of it afterwards and paid
his fine.
Louis Wilson of Sweden and Edmund
Brunts of Germany were admitted to
citizenship by Judge Shaw.
On the ground of extreme cruelty-
Judge Van Dyke yesterday declared the
bonds of matrimony dissolved between
Mary Norman and her husband. The
latter, who was the deiendant, allowed
the case to go by default.
In department one yesterday Juan
Jose Reyes pleaded not guilty to the in
formation charging him with having
stolen 10 head of cattle from the Laguna
ranch, and Grant Van Dyke made a
similar plea to an information charging
him with the commission of a crime
against nature. The causes of both de
fendants were placed on the trial calen
dar.
A jury yesterday in department five
gave a verdict against Celestin Save, in
favor of Jean Lahorgue, for $180.55 and
costs. It was an appeal case from Jus
tice King in the city justice court, and
was an action for the delivery of one mare
and colt belonging to plaintiff. The
lower court had found for plaintiff in
the sum of $130,
ST. JOHN'S CHURCH.
The Corner-Stone Ceremonies Which
Occurred Yesterday.
The corner stone of the St. John's
Episcopal church was laid yesterday af
ternoon at 4 o'clock, at the corner of
Adams and Figueroa. The clergy, in
in their vestments, preceded by the
vestry of the parish, approached the
ground in procession. The Rev. Dr.
Easter, of Glendale, opened the service.
He was followed by Rev. Mr. Kienzle, of
East Los Angeles, and Rev. Mr. Ott
mann, of Pasadena.
Rector H. O. Judd read a list of the
articles deposited in the stone, after
which, in tlie absence of the Rev. Mr.
Bugbee, he addressed the assemblage
upon the history and prospects of the
parish. Dean Frew then formally laid
the corner stone and concluded the ser
vice. Music was furnished by the choir
of St. John's church. Tlie attendance
was large. The new church will be of
Gothic structure, capable of seating
100 people, and is so placed as to ad
mit of enlargement at an early date.
The vestry of St. John's consists of T.B.
brown, M. S. Severance, H. R. Hatha
way, S. V. Landt, L. Thorn, S. E. Lucas,
T. A. Eisen and H. F. Leonard. The
address of Rector Judd was a very able
and fitting one.
Cure of Wrenched Spine.
How many men given to heavy labor go
through life with a kind of a hitch in the back
bone, caused by wrenching al tome period in
their younger days. Let all men take heed from
the following letter:
C. R. Bentley, Lyndonvilie, Orleans county,
N. V., writes:
"Some years ago, while loading sheep on a
railroad, I badly wrenched my back. I was
confined to my bed for four weeks.being partial
ly paralyzed. As I could get no relief, I put on
my spine three ALLCOCK'S PLASTERS, from tbe
small of my back up between my shoulders.
From that day I began to get better, suffering
less pain all the time. I put fresh plasters on
every ten days, and iv a month I was well and
attending to my business.
Hit on the Back of the Neck.
Lottie Taylor, a colored girl, yester
day caused tbe arrest of Wiliiain Taylor,
a mulatto, on the charge of battery.
Taylor claims that Lottie is not his
wife. She resides at the New England
house and he rooms at the New Orleans
house. On Monday thesejtwo Taylors,
who although not married, were very
close friends at one time, fell out and
the male Taylor hit the female Taylor
in a violent manner on the face and in
the back of her neck. William will be
tried by Justice Savage on Saturday.
For Chicago.
The car of exhibits for the Chicago
display will be loaded Thursday morn
ing. Persons donating exhibits for this
occasion will please send them to the
chamber of commerce today and to
morrow.
STILL A MYSTERY.
THE CAUSE OF THE TAYLOR
SHOOTING UNKNOWN.
Editor Dyer Held In Ten Thousand Dol
lars Bail—His Attorney Says He will
Be Cleared at Onco—Taylor in a Dan
gerous Condition.
Many different theories were advanced
yesterday for the shooting of James
Taylor by Frank Dyer, editor of tbe East
Side Citizen. The majority of them
were conjectures, however, based on
what had been published about the
affair in the morning papers. The prin
cipals refused to discuss the matter. A
score or more of the residents of the
East Side called to see Dyer at the city
prison. There was no less than a dozen
people present in Justice Austin's court
when the shooter was arraigned. Dr. K.
D. Wise made a statement in regard to
the injuries of James Taylor; in the
opinion of the doctor it was a toss up
whether he would live or die. The con
dition of Taylor was very critical indeed,
in his opinion. Tbe examination was
then set for Thursday, Judge Austin fix
ing the bail at $10,000. Mrs. Dyer was
in attendance and walked with her hus
band to tbe county jail.
F. R. Willis, who is acting as counsel
for the defendant, remarked to the Her
ald representative : "The jury will ac
quit Dyer without leaving their seats."
The reporter requested Mr. Willis to
give out some of the information he pos
sesses for the benefit of the public who
have been kept busy guessing the cause.
The legal gentleman was non-commital,
however. Last night Frank Dyer was
visited by several of the reporters, but
he could not be induced to make a state
ment. "My lawyer," said he, "has re
quested me not to discuss the matter.
Sometimes I feel like putting myself on
record, but there is no use in having a
lawyer unless one is guided by his in
structions."
The story that Taylor wrote Mrs. Dyer
a threatening letter is the one that is
generally believed by those who are in
the best position to know. Taylor re
fuses to say a word in the case, merely
stating that he supposes that Dyer
knows why he did the shooting and that
people can ask him.
"DICK" CHUTE.
He is Surprised to Hear of Fitzgerald's
Candidacy.
Mr. "Dick" Chute, as astute a Repub
lican politician as ever wanted to wear
the shoes of the defunct Boss "Bill"
Higgins, is in the city. He is not here
on politics. Not at all, as the Herald
reporter very correctly surmised,who last
evening saw him the center of a crowd
four deep of big and little politicians in
the Nadeau lobby. Mr. Chute said to a
Hkkai.o reporter, who waited an hour
and a quarter until the conversation
was ended:
■'Down here on politics? Not at all.
Simply for pleasure. What do I think,
why a Republican success to be sure.
Judge Fitzgerald? Yes, I know him.
No! You don't mean it! He a candi
date for United States senator! Why I
saw him today and he didn't tell me so.
People up north didn't know it.
We all think up there that
if the legislature is Republican
that Mr. Stanford will be elected. He
is the only candidate we know of. Other
Republicans of note have declined to
run against him. Fitzgerald is a very
smart man, but we have not heard of
him as acandidate. Steve White? Yes,
he is very able ; but no one can tell how
his campaign will take. I am only down
here for pleasure, and, — here in Stan
ford's interests? No sir. Yes,ofcourße
lam a friend of his, but I am not a
manager."
AN ANARCHIST TOY.
Has Anyone Lost a Large Dynamite
Bomb?
A dynamite bomb was found yesterday
by a lady on Spring street, near the
American restaurant. The attention of
Officer Chase was drawn to the peculiar
looking object. Several began to ex
plore the mysteries of the inside of the
discovery.. Enough inflammable mate
rial was encountered to demonstrate that
it was no fake bomb. It was eventually
turned over to a druggist for investiga
tion, and he reported at police head
quarters that it was a genuine dynamite
bomb.
SANTA MONICA.
Some Interesting Seaside News Notes
and Gossip.
Polo this afternoon, and a good time
anticipated.
A. J. Pinkstone of San Francisco
visited the sea-side yesterday.
Mr. and Mrs. C. Woods and family of
Pasadena have returned to their home.
A barbecue will be given at the cafion
today, commencing at noon, followed by
a dance.
Mr. and Mrs. R. Hopf have returned
home after a very pleasant week's vaca
tion at San Diego.
J. R. Scheckels showed today, prior to
sending to the chamber of commerce,
some fine specimens of corn grown on
his ranch in the cafion.
A. H. Heimer, one of the most popu
lar young men of Santa Monica, has
taken a position on the Santa Fe and
gone to the Needles to commence work.
Charlie Kimball and Jack Heny spent
Tuesday with Kimball's celebrated
dogs Jenny and Joe, hunting at Ballona,
and came home with the finest bag of
game of the season ; indeed, it has never
been equaled, I believe, before. The
spoils of the day's sport amounted to 26
dozen and 5 reed birds, 0 dozen and 3
curlew, and 18 snipe.
Mr. J. A. Pritchard showed your cor
respondent a magnificent specimen of
the sugar beet which was grown on the
Jones and Baker ranch, which proved
conclusively, that they would grow here
in splendid proportions. All those here
tofore analyzed showed from 1(1 to 20
per cent of sachariue qualities.! The beet
in question was 13 inches in diameter
and weighed 20 pounds, and was grown
without irrigation.
A meeting of the board of trade has
been called for tonight at the town hall
to pass suitable resolutions of respect in
memory of the late president, Mr, tiaddy,
who was one of the most indefatigable
workers in the interests of Santa Monica.
There will also come up for consideration
of the board various matters of moment
which should have the earnest thought
and collaboration of every citizen of the
community.
Father Hawe, who has not been strong
for some time, lirs taken a much needed
vacation. No member of the community
has worked more untiringly or faithfully
than the reverend gentleman, who has
cheerfully. Father Farley is filling
the place acceptably during his absence.
The following prizes which were drawn
at the last fair remain for the lucky
ones to claim them : Heifer, No. 14<i;
saddle and bridle, No. 58; watch, No. 78;
clock, No. 202;
Tlie board of trustees held their regu
lar meeting Monday evening, President
Carillo in the chair. In the matter of
grading Fifth street between Arizona
and Nevada avenue, tbe declaration of
intention was ordered to be published
and a twenty foot sidewalk was estab
lished, Dr. Elliott's appeal being dis
missed. Mr. Abbot Kinney addressed the
i board upon tbe matter of closing the
alley in tbe rear of the Casino. The
matter was referred to the street com
mittee.
COVINA.
News Notes From a Prosperous Lo
cality.
Correspondence of the Herald.
Harry C. Roberts is picking his
grapes on the forty-acre vineyard near
Covina. His yield of Berger is very
heavy, probably ten tons to the acre.
Price received $14 per ton. It is re
ported that G. W. Taylor will clear ten
thousand dollars this season, from his
fruit drying business.
Nearly all the first-class orange trees
for the season of '91 are sold or engaged
at prices ranging from 75 cents to $1.
All the available prune trees but a few
thousand are also sold, at prices rang
ing from 25 to 35 cents apiece. Such
I a demand for trees of all sorts was never
known before.
The ants are bothering young trees
in orchard. Few have been killed
outright, but many have been dam
aged. So far as known, the Florida
sour root has not been affected in the
above manner. The sour tree at home
in the Florida hammocks is said to be
entirely free from gum disease (called
foot-rot by some) and all consequent
ailments. It is reported by some that
the ant punctures the tree and causes
the gum to ooze out.
SHOT HIMSELF

But he Claims That it Was Done
Accidentally.
A telephone message reached the
police headquarters late yesterday after
noon, to the effect that a man on Seventh
street, a few rods back of West Lake
park, had shot himself. A young man
i named Doyle was found there bleeding
j from a bullet wound. It looked clearly
I like a case of suicide, as the man's shirt
was powder burnt.
Dr. Wing attended the young man and
found that the ball struck the sixth rib
and lodged below the shoulder blade.
The doctor does not think the wound is
| necessarily fatal. Doyle said that he
I had shot himself accidentally. He also
j stated that his parents lived in County
Kerry, Ireland, and that he came to
California from Columbus, Ohio, about
a month ago. After staying in San Jose
a fortnight he came to Los Angeles and
put up at the Grand Central hotel.
Fearing that he might die, Doyle gave
Manning the address of Luke Crawney
of Columbus, who is a friend of his.
The Annuals Have Come.
A large consignment of the Annual
Illustrated Hbbald has arrived. Parties
desiring it can be supplied in quantities
to suit at the HKKALD business office.
Send it to your eastern friends. It will
be more valued than a letter. Its wide
circulation will materially benefit this
section. There are forty-eight pages of
information about Southern California,
and fifty fine illustrations.
OBITUARY.
There are times when, amidst the Imstle and
confusion of our daily avocations, in the weary
march along the pathway of life, we are sud
denly called upon to pause by the wayside and
mingle our tears for the death of one whose
kind words, pleasant smile and rippling laugh
ter have cheered us on our journey.
The little village of Ballona has been encir
cled in gloom for the past few days over the
de.ith of one of the fairest and most beloved of
our (laughters, Miss Rebecca Sanford, who died
at her home at that place on the 10th instant,
after a short illness.
Miss Sanford had grown to young woman
hood and received her education in our midil—
having received a teacher's certificate at the
last teachers' examination in this city; she was
immediately engaged for the next school year
by the trustees of the Ballona school, who bad
known her since her childhood, and had confi
dence in her ability. But the all-wise "Giver of
every good and perfect gift" found her worthy
of a higher and grander certificate, and just as
she was.about to enter the threshold of her new
duties, summoned her from earthly scenes to a
higher calling in the realms above.
Besides her intellectual attainments, Ruby
possessed a sweet and sunny disposition, which
made her the center of a large circle of warm
friends both at her home and in this city. Her
modest and amiable manners, sincerity in
friendship, and kindness of heart endeared her
to all who knew her.
Little children rejoiced at her coming, while
oftimes tlie sick and needy had occasion to
bless her ministering hands.
Ruby will be sadly missed in many a home,
where her presence was always welcomed as a
gleam of sunshine. Words are too weak to
contain our loss, or to picture so sublime a
character.
Sleep, dearest Ruby, sleep,
In the cold and silent tomb,
While thee onr hearts in memory keep
Yet in sorrow and in gloom.
But when tears and griefs shall flee away,
And tbe brightness of the mornings come,
Then with thee in blissful pel feet day
Abide forever, sweet, sweet home.
A Friend.
Pure Blood
Is absolutely necessary in order to have perfect
health. Hood's Sarsaparilla is the great blood
purifier, quickly conquering scrofula, salt rheum,
and aU other insidious enemies which attack the
blood and undermine the health. It also builds
np the whole system, cures dyspepsia and sick
headache, and overcomes that tired feeling.
Scrofula Sores.
" My adopted boy, aged 14 years, suffered terri
bly from scrofula sores on his leg, which spread
till they at one time formed one great sore from
the caM of his leg up to his thigh, partially cov
ered with scab, and discharging matter contin
ually. The muscles became contracted so that his
leg was drawn up and he could hardly walk. We
tried everything we could hear of, without suc
cess, until we began giving him Hood's Sar
saparilla. In just a month, after he had taken
two-thirds of a bottle, the sores entirely healed,
fail leg Is perfectly straight, and he
Can Walk as Well as Ever.
Hood's Sarsaparilla Is the best medicine I ever
saw for scrofulous humor. It has done its work
more than satisfactorily." William Sandkm,
Rockdale, Milam County, Texas.
Hood's Sarsaparilla
Bold by dragghrti. tl; «ix for t5. Prepared only
by C.L HOOD A CO., Apothecaries, Lowell, Mas*
I OO Doses One Dollar
THK COULTER DRY GOODS HOIBE.
FASHION NOTES. -
Never in tlie history of this house has so much thought, time and expense
been so willingly given to the purchase of Fall Goods as there has been this sea
ion. Two buyers sought the market this fall, and have given their un
divided attention to the purchases. We can truly say no labor nor pains has been
spared in accomplishing our one object, and that was to give tbe ladies of this
community an equal chance with their sisters on the Atlantic coast, of having the
pick and choice of the Novelties in Dry Goods. We didn't rush in the market and
buy any and everything and pay large prices, but simply worked and used our
brains in selections. If you buy too early you don't get the choicest novelties and
you pay too much. Don't, ladies, be in a hurry to buy for you will surely repent
it your leisure, unless you have visited our house. We are sure to please you with
style, quality and price. This is no idle talk; but you can't afford to purchase
anything until you visit us. Our Novelties are select in style and texture; our
prices are lower than ever. For two reasons we claim this : First, it is onr aim
to handle a larger quantity than ever; second, we have bought our goods as low as
L-ash would purchase, and we had the market apd cash to command only the low
est prices from the importer.
Rough stuffs in mixed, plain and plaids have the preference in everything in
woolen goods. Plushes, especially, are to be used in a variety of forms in trim
ming; Astrachans are affected in many ways for trimming; Velvets, embroidered
are used for Gigot sleeves, black grounds with colored figures have the preference.
Plain Velvets and Velveteens are used extensively; Fringes and hand-made
Silk Trimmings, with and without cut beads, are very popular, and tbe best styles
are scarce. AYe are showing a large line in Scotch, English, and French Plaids, in
Serges and Plain Cloths. Broadcloths are more popular than ever for Tailor Made
Costumes. In plain goods, Henriettas, Serges and Whipcords have sway for light
materials, while for rough effects Cheviots Homespun and Aldine Suitings have
come to the front for street dresses. English Corduroys are the rage for traveling
and carriage dresses, and are effected by the bon ton classes. Cloakings are shown
in rough effects. Now a few words about Black Goods, as in the Colored Goods,
rough effects, such as Homespuns, Cheviots and Camels hair are the correct.
For Black Goods in smooth effects we are showing Broadcloths, English Cloths,
Serges, Whipcords, Broad Wales, Plaids, Stripes, Rip Reversible Cords, Henriettas,
Raystines, Biarritz and Sebastopol.
We have many new things in Silk and Woolen Goods to mention, but our
space forbids. Come and see these handsome goods, and don't buy until you have
visited our elegant stock. Remember, quality superb, quantity largest, prices
lowest. Respectfully,
THE COULTER DRY GOODS HOUSE,
201 to 205 South Spring Street, corner 2d Street.
Polls Now Open!
DO NOT GET LEFT.
FOR $75 PER ACRE.
You can, today, buy the BEST ORANGE LAND of the
Bear Valley & Alessandro DevelopmentCo
That ever lay out of doors. The best people from the north, south, east and west
are among the purchasers of this land. You will find your friends
and acquaintances all there. Send for a list of
purchasers if you want to see
their names.
THE SALES HAVE BEEN LARGE.
Our agents are sending in orders every day to swell the list.
«] Alessandro is Going to k a City. t»
With churches, schools, hotels and a railroad running across the entire tract,
within the year, connecting with the Southern Pacific.
Ghxtlkmkx—The time is short j the day is near at hand; October 15th will
soon be here. GOOD ORANGE LAND, with a never failing suuplv of water from
Bear Valley, at
$75 PER ACRE,
will probably never be seen on tlie market again in our day. Make no mistake.
Just think a moment, yod, who are looking forward to a home of your own. $760
in four equal payments of $157.50 each will today buy 10 acres, that in 5 years time
will give you an income that will support yourself aiid family the balance of your
life. Parties holding options will make their selections Octobei 15, after that
The Price Will Jump.
_
Let us hear from you before it is too late. Full particulars and circulars sent to
all interested. Apply in person or by mail to
Tlie Bear Valley and Alessandro Development Co.
REDLANDS, CAL.
Ammon P. Kitching, Gen'l Manager
N. B.—A first class carriage road will be completed by October 16, from Red
lands, making the distance only an hour's ride or seven miles.
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