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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, September 30, 1890, Image 4

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DAILY HERALD.
t PUBLISHED
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.
JOSEPH D. LYHCH. JAMKS J. AYKRS.
AVERS & LYNCH, -- PUBLISHERS.
(Entered at the postoffice at Los Angeles as
second-class matter.l
DELIVERED BY CARRIERS
At SOc Per Week, or 80c Per Month-
TERMS BY MAIL, INCLUDING POSTAGE:
Daily Herald, one year $3.00
Daily Herald, six months 4.25
Daily Herald, three months 2.25
Weekly Herald, one year 2.00
Weekly Herald, six months 1.00
Weekly Herald, three months CO
Illustrated Herald, per copy 15
Notice to Mall Subscribers.
The papers of all delinquent mail subscribers
to the Los Angeles Daily Hkrald will be
promptly discontinued hereafter. No papers
will be sent to subscribers by mail unless the
same have been paid for in advance. This rule
is inflexible, AVERS & LYNCH.
The "Daily Herald"
Hay be found in San Francisco at the Palace
hotel news-stand; in Chicago at the Postoffice
news-stand, 103 East Adams street: in Denver
at Smith & Sons' news-stand, Fifteenth and
Lawrence streets.
Office^of Publication, 223-225 West Second
street. Telephone 150.
Democratic State Ticket.
(Election, Tuesday, November 4,1890.)
FOR GOVERNOR,
IDWARD B. POND, San Francisco.
vnv i , VT-GOVKRNOR.
R. F. DEL VALLE Los Angeles.
FOR SECRETARY OF STATE,
W.C. HENDRICKS Incumbent
FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL,
WALKER A. GRAVES San Francisco.
FOR SURVEYOR GENERAL,
B.C. HOONE Humboldt.
FOR STATE COMPTROLLER,
JOHN P. DUNN Incumbent.
FOR TREASURER,
ADAM HEROLD Incumbent,
FOR CHIEF JUSTICE,
JOHN A. STANLEY Alameda.
FOR ASSOCIATE JUSTICES,
GEORGE 11. SMITH Los Angeles,
JAMES V. COFFEY San Francisco.
P. J. HATCH, (short term) San Jose.
CLERK OF SUPREME COURT,
J. D. SPENCER Incumbent.
SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION,
H. CLAY HALL. San Mateo.
District Nominations.
FOR CONGRESSMAN FROM SIXTH DISTRICT.
W.J.CURTIS San Bernardino
RAILROAD COMMISSIONER—THIRD DISTRICT,
LEONARD ARCHER Sanla Clara.
BOARD OF EQUALIZATION—FOURTH DISTRICT.
JOHN T. GAFFEY Los Angeles.
TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 30. 1890.
It was given out, when the propri
etors of the Belt Electric line first pre
sented their street railroad scheme to
our people, that the cars should carry
their own motive power with them on
the electric storage principle. It is now
stated that they will use poles for wires.
The people will not take kindly to the
planting of poles in our streets for this
purpose. We have already had some
experience in that way, and it lias not
been pleasant.
Thk dissatisfaction of old and respect- j
able Republicans at the way in which ]
the primaries were fraudulently car- ]
ried last Saturday in several of the
wards, finds indignant expression in
another column of the Hkrald. Their
own papers are silent against them.
They are told by them to leave the party
if they don't like the methods they com
plain of, and they look to us to afford
them a vehicle through which to make
their protests public. The Jojos have
raised a hornet's nest. The old line Re- !
publicans, who are justly outraged at the !
barefaced primary frauds, are not men
to submit tamely to this kind of treat- 1
ment. They will make themselves
heard, for they will have friends in the
convention whose sympathies are with
them. Jojoism is a style of politics that
will not long be tolerated in this latitude
by any party.
The Democratic party has now its op
portunity to elect the entire county
ticket next November. It will be im
possible for the Republican convention
to make up a ticket that will be satis
factory to its party. The Jojos have car
ried the primaries and will follow their
victory up by combining upon a slate
ticket composed of some of the scaliest
representatives of the ring. Every Dem
ocrat is called upon to take an active in
terest in the primaries of his party.
The best element must turn out and
vote. As the primaries will be held
under the Porter law, the ballot box
can be protected against repeaters and
other fraudulent voters. A few prompt
arrests of these gentry, if they attempt
the Jojo game, will cool their ardor and
leave the polls to the honest voters. We
want representative Democrats in the
convention. We can get these if our
people do their duty. And if we get
these, we will nominate a ticket that
Will go through with flying colors. Hun
dreds of disgusted Republicans are
ready to vote for a first-class Democratic
ticket.
It seems that the announcement, that
Markham's hand had become so inflam
ed from constant shaking with voters
that he would have to forego this mode
of carrying his magnetism to the elec
tors, was not altogether correct. It is
true that when he reached Martinez,
after the ordeal he had gone through at
Vallejo, his dexter "bunch of fives" had
become alarmingly swollen, and his
friends were fearful that his canvass
would come to premature termination.
Bat Dan. Burns, ever fertihf
in resources, got a bottle of
Pond's extract, and a liberal appli
cation of this wonderful lotion so far
reduced the inflammation that when
Markham reached Benicia he was able
to shake hands with all the employes
in the great tannery there. It is be
lieved that the tanbark also helped him
ont, for when he reached Woodland
that same evening, he went bravely
through one of the most trying hand
shaking ordeals he had ever yet en
countered. Now that he has discovered
the virtues of Pond's extract he will
probably be equal to a hand-shake
with every man north of Sacramento.
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD: TUESDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 30, 1890.
RAILROADING A RAILROAD FRANCHISE
THROUGH.
The indecent haste with which the
city council has railroaded the Belt Elec
tric franchise through, gives rise to the
most serious doubts as to the entire in
tegrity of that scheme. Certainly a fran
chise which proposes to practically grid
iron the city, to run cars over nearly
every important street, and to encircle
the city with rails, is one which should
only be granted, if granted at all, after
the most careful deliberation.
One week ago the newspapers were
tirat apprised of the character and ex
tent of the franchise to be asked for.
The scheme was carefully kept away
from the public till the very last mo
ment. How long the members of the
council were familiar with it before it
reached the public we cannot say; but
from the precipitous alacrity with which
they granted it we presume they each
and all had had it thoroughly explained
to them in all its details some time ago.
Had that not been the case it is hardly
to be believed that they would have been
prepared, on so short a notice, to grant
so important a franchise for fifty years.
There are many suspicious circumstan
ces surrounding this lightning scheme
put through with lightning rapidity, not
the least of which is the deft manner
in which the people were led to believe
that this new electric railroad did not
involve the planting of poles in our
streets, but that it would be operated on
the storage plan. Now it turns out
that it is the old thing, and that a for
est of poles will be put up in all the
streets through which it is to pass.
Had this been known last week, there
would have been a storm of opposition
raised against the granting of the fran
chise.
There are other considerations which
should have induced the council to legis
late upon this franchise with the utmost
deliberation. Among these is the ques
tion whether it is altogether just to in
jure the property of the cable car com
pany by bringing a new road into com
petition with it after it has expended
several million dollars in giving us one
of the best, if not the best, cable car sys
tems in the United States. This com
pany have acted in perfect good faith
with our city. They have carried out
all their engagements, and have operated
their lines, if not at a loss, certainly
without profit. It is neither just nor
generous on our part to make their ef
forts to build up a fairly profitable busi
ness more remotely possible than ever.
But we hoid that this belt franchise
has been put through with shameful
and indecent haste, when it should have
been subjected to the utmost delibera
tion and the widest discussion before it
was placed upon its passage. This is a
case for Mayor Hazard to seriously pon
der before he places his signature to the
ordinance granting the franchise.
WEALTH THAT IS OURS AND NOT OURS.
Tlie oil wells near Newhall are now
yielding finely. We learn that the out
put is about four hundred barrels a day.
Last week a twenty-live barrel well was
struck near the Gelcich claim, and new
plants are being put up at various places
where oil has been tapped. It is among
the things that cannot be accounted for,
that these wells, so rich in oils and giv
ing so continuons and increasing an out
flow, are of little or no value commer
cially to this city. The crude oils are
all carried five hundred miles away to
be refined, when refineries might just as
well be established here within thirty
miles of the wells. Is it because our
people lack the enterprise to draw this
great industry to our city, or is it be
cause tlie oil territory has nearly all
fallen into the hands of a monopoly that
has no interest whatever in this part of
the state excepting to carry away its
natural wealth? It should not be a very
great or expensive undertaking to run a
pipe line to this city, and thus secure to
our people the benefit of the large em
ployment which the refining of the
crude oil would give us. It is a very un
fair as well as unnatural diversion of the
benefits which should properly accrue to
our locality, this building up of indus
tries five hundred miles away out of a
crude material furnished by nature at
our very doors. Perhaps the owners of
these extensive wells would find it to
their ultimate advantage to try to culti
vate friendly relations wit h the people of
this neighborhood. If. however, they
only care to strip our territory of its nat
ural wealth and make it beneficial to re
mote localities, a feeling may be aroused
here that will not be to their permanent
advantage. They may, of course, say:
"What are you going to do about it?"
And we confess thifcis a hard as well as
a brutal question to answer.
A writ of mandamus was served upon
the board of supervisors yesterday to
compel that body to act upon a petition
from cultivators in Azusa, demanding
the formation of an irrigation district
in that locality under the Wright law.
The writ was referred to the law rimi of
Houghton, Silent cc Campbell. Is it not
strange that a matter of this kind
should be referred to a private law firm,
instead of the district attorney, the of
ficial law officer of the board? It is
perhaps true that the district attorney
does not carry enough guns to handle a
case of this importance, and that the
board did not feel justified in entrusting
it to that officer. The comment on this
is that the Republican party is respon
sible for placing in office this official
who is thus discredited by the board of
supervisors, also a Republican body.
Of course the tax-payers will be called
upon to pay the firm of Houghton,
Silent & Campbell a fat fee for their ser
vices; but if the people will elect Repub
lican inefficients to office, they must ex
pect to pay for the luxury.
The Jojo party is badly split up since
the"boys" got away with the primaries.
A slate ticket has been prepared, and
the chances are nickels to dollars that it
will go through as slick as goose grease
next Saturday. As the people are not
in the mood to elect the old gang or
their proteges, the Jojos will, in all
probability, get left.
AMUSEMENTS.
Miss Maude Granger at the Grand.
Opera House.
Miss Maude Granger made her first
appearance in Los Angeles at the Grand
last night in a very emotional melo
drama, scene laid in Kngland, by
Kichard Davey and Lucy Cooper, called
Inherited. The name refers to the afflic
tion of insanity which runs through sev
eral generations of the heroine's family
nnd includes herself. The leading role
is about all there is in the play worth
noticing, and its chief element is the
emotional. Helen Carruthers going
mad twice, escaping from a mad housein
names once, and wandering back to her
own home to find her child very ill, and
her husband just then at church
getting married to her dearest
friend. Besides this she makes
the mistake of supposing her child to be
dying and poisons herself in the last act,
and dies, surrounded by the husband,
his second wife, his father and her own
child.
There is a bit of side play in the piece
between a very impossible American
youth and a very pretty English girl.
The remarkable prettiness of Miss Car
rie Elbert, who takes the part of Fay
Merwin, really relieves the nothingness
of her own role, and the stupidity of her
lovers to some degree.
Miss Granger is an experienced and
painstaking actress, but she is rather
mature in all respects to be playing
in the roles of a young woman
just getting married. She does not fit
such casts at all. She played the part
well and made much of the situations
in it. She has the rare merit of not
tearing the passions to tatters. She
does not overdo her work.
A large audience was present, which
enjoyed the play greatly.
It is on for tonight, which closes the
short season, and tomorrow night Mr.
Dixey will once more present his inim
itable Adonis before a Los Angeles audi
ence.
The Circus.
The town is on the gui vive forold John
Robinson's big circus. This show will
appear here for one day, giving a mati
nee and evening performance. This will
be on Thursday. At 10 a. m. of that
day the great street parade will take
place. The show will be at the foot of
Fifth street, near the the Arcade depot,
and the parade will be formed there.
It will march up Fifth to Main, to the
Plaza, back to Spring, down Spring to
Eighth, to Broadway, to Second, to San
Pedro and back, to place of starting.
A GOOD MAN.
But He Must Go Under That Snow
Drift.
H. A. Unruh of Arcadia lias, at the
request of many residents in the seventy
sixth district, announced himself as a
candidate for the Republican nomina
tion as member of the assembly. Mr.
I'd rub is a very popular man and deser
vedly so. He has done good work for
Southern California in many ways and
has great numbers of friends who will
sympathize with him in the knowledge
that though he will probably win the
nomination he seeks, it will only be to
meet the fate of being under the big
snowdrift which in November will cover
up so many of his party associates.
"It is a fact," that Hood's Sarsaparilla does
cure scrofula, salt rheum and other diseases or
afl'ections arising from Impure state or low con
dition of the blood, overcomes that tired feel
ing, creates a good appetite, and gives strength
to every part of the system. Try it.
Interesting.
THE AMERICAN CASUALTY INSURANCE
AND SECURITY COMPANY OF BALTIMORE
CITY, with a capital of ONE MILLION DOL
LARS ($1,000,000) and a cash surplus of ONE
HALF MILLION DOLLARS ($500,000), has
been licensed to transact business in this state
by the Insurance Department. This company,
organized by prominent business men active in
the management of LARGE INSURANCE IN
TERESTS throughout the country, having
stockholders and directors comprising some of
the WEALTHIEST AND MOST INFLUENTIAL
MERCHANTS AND BANKERS OF BALTI
MORE AND NEW YORK, is provided with a
charter sufficiently broad to enable it to occupy
a position SECOND TO NONE AMONG INSUR
ANCE ORGANIZATIONS OF THE WORLD.
Theeompafiy will do a GENERAL ACCIDENT
BUSINESS, not confined to the limitations of
what is generally known as accident insurance,
but will introduce original and attractive fea
tures which cannot fail to commend themselves
to the intelligent insuring public. Employers,
particularly, will be interested in the plan of
insuring against all liability on account of th»
personal injury or death of employes, resulting
from any and every accident, happening to
them while in active service; or this insurance
mity be effected when the employer is NOT LI
ABLE, and may also include his liability to
ward the public in case of accident. Another
distinct feature is protection to steam users
throughout the country against all property
losses caused by accidents to, or by boilers,
engines, elevators, steam pipes, automatic
sprinklers, or other specified machinery. In
connection with this subject, it is well to men
tion the few exigencies which may have arisen
and may again occur, to demonstrate the value
of the protection offered by this company:
Your mill is blown to atoms by an explosion,
the cause of which remains forever a mystery,
and you not only suffer a physical loss caused
thereby, but may be liable also for personal in
juries. Your engines break down, causing loss
and damage to property, and YOU ARE LI
ABLE.
Your elevator falls and is dashed to pieces,
causing loss to property, with probable and se
rious loss of life and injury to persons, and YOU
ARE LIABLE.
Your boilers — old, new, patent, or safety
boilers—explode, causing terrible damage to
your own and surrounding property, perhaps
injuring and killing several persons, and YOU
ARE LIABLE.
Your truckman runs over some one in the
street, possibly a child, causing fatal injuries,
and YOU ARE LIABLE for heavy damages.
Continued rains swell the streams and rivers,
dams give way, aud in an incredible small
space of time your fortune may be swept to de
struction. Your property may be damaged or
entirely destroyed by earthquakes, cyclones,
floods, wind-storms and tornadoes.
With the advance of civilization many at
tempts are made to chain the nowerfti! electric
fluid to serve us heat, power and light; but
these attempts are not always successful, and
theftcrrible danger is always present and often
causes terrible injury or death und great dam
age to property.
To all the different cases mentioned, where
injury und loss occur, the principle of insurance
is applicable, the, liability of the few unfortun
ates being assumed by the many who do not
suffer.
THE AMERICAN CASUALTY INSURANCE
AND SECURITY COMPANY is orgunized to
meet the present advanced ideas, the widening
field and the growing demand for insurance
that will furnish, under one contract, feuturcs
which hitherto have only been given under
several contracts, and, also, Including features
never before offered by any company.
No doctrine of insurance Is more fully es
tablished than the proposition that the larger
the capital, thejwider the Held, the greater num
ber of risks, and the more extended the terri
tory over which a company extends its opera
tions, themore secure will be the guarantee
that itcan meet its obligations promptly and
obtain substantial success. Altogether the new
company has entered upon an attractive field
of operatfons. and the high financial standing
of the Board of Directors in Baltimore and New
York, added to the experience and enterprise
of its officers and agents, furnishes reasonable
assurance of its prosperity.
AMUSEMENTS.
GRAND OPERA HOUSE.
McLain <Si Lehman, Managers.
TONIGHT,
Engagement of
MAUDE GRANGER.
In Richard Davey and Lucy Hooper's Play
"INHERITED."
(La Hkritu;e D'Hf.i.knr)
As originally produced at the Theatre de
L'Application, Paris, Madison Square Thea
tre. New York.
NOTE—By special arrangement there will be
no advance in prices during Miss Grunger's en
gagement.
RAND OPERA HOUSE
V.T McLain &l Lkiiman, Managers.
Four nights and Saturday Matinee only,
beginning
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER Ist, 1890,
Event of the Season.
Special engagement of America's fuvorite
Comedian, Mr. Henry E.
;: : DIXKY : : I
And his big company of merry players, under
the direction of Barclay H. Warburton.
Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday Matinee,
: -:- ADONIS. -:- ;
The greatest successof thecentury. Over 3,000
performances.
Friday and Saturday nights,
Mr. Dixey.s latest and greatest success, a
kaleidi scope entertainment, iv two acts and
eight tableaux, entitled,
-:- SEVEN AGES. -;-
A humorous elaboration of Shakspeare's sub
lime soliloquy, by Messrs. Gill &
Dixey. Most complete
scenic production ever seen on the
Pacific slope! Company of fifty-five players.
New Costumes. Brilliant Music.
Seats and boxes on sale Thursday, Sept. 25th,
at 10 a. m. Telephone 511.
JJA/.ARD'S PAVILION.
Halt! Who Goes There?
Two Nights only, Saturday and Sunday,
Oct. 4 and S,
Colonel Grover's
A MM MM EEE RRR II CCC A
AA MMMM X R It II 0 C AA
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AAA M M M E R R II 0 0 AAA ...
A A M M M EEK R R II CCC A A ...
Consisting of the original
MRADY WAR VIEWS.
Taken during the war of the Rebellion, by
Brady, tint famous war photographer, and sold
to the United States government for
$25,000.00.
Notice—Col. J. Holmes Grover, lateU. S. A.
and Ex-United States Consul to Italy, has the
sole and exclu-ive privilege of re-producing
these famous war relics, and will exhibit at Los
Angeles for the combined benefit of the relief
fund of the L. A. Posts of the G. A. R. and the
L. A. Woman's Relief Corps.
Ktr~~\± k any member of the G. A. R or w. R.C.
for a ticket. Previous to opening of box office,
a ? 7 o'clock on Saturday evening, Oct. 4th. no
tickets can be had excepting through the mem
bers of the following posts and corps:
Stanton Post E. K. Alexander, P. 0,
Logan •• Myron F. Tarble, "
Bartlett " N. Sherman, "
Gelcic li " C. I. Mclntyre, "
Gen. Crook Post M. Wood, "
Stanton Corps Mrs. Abbic E. Johnson,Pres.
Logan " Mrs. Kirkbride, "
Bartlett " Mrs. Biles, '•
Gelcich '• Mrs. Spencer, "
Gen.Crook " Mrs. Lena Brady, "
125 SCENES will be shown each evening, cover
ing 900 Square Feet Each I Program
changed nightly.
Saturday evening, Oct. 4,
From Fall of Sumter to Battle of Gettys
burg.
Sunday evening. Oct 5,
From Siege of Vicksburg to Surrender of
l.cc.
ONE PRICE TO EVERYBODY, 25 cents.
HAZARD'S PAVILION,
2 Nights, Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 4 and 5.
5-28-7t
JgASE BALL.
Opening of the New Grounds of Los Angeles
Base Bull Association, Temple st. cor. -of Cen
tennial aye.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER Ist.
TUFTS-LYONS ARMS CO.
MONROVIA.
Game called at 2 p. m. sharp
Temple st. cars to grounds in 3 minutes from
Spring st. 9-30-ld
CH'HOOL FOR DANCING.
O
Academy at 313 and 315' i South Main
street. Class for ladies und gentlemen Monday
and Thursday evenings from 8 to 10 p. m.,
commencing Monday evening, October 6, 1890,
Class for advanced pupils Tuesduy evenings
only, from H to 10 p. m., commencing Tuesday
evening, October 7th. Classes for ludies,
misses and masters, Saturday afternoons only,
from 3:30 to 5:30 p. m., commencing Saturday
Oct. 11th. Juvenile class, ages, 4 to 7 years, Sat
urdays only, 1:30 to 3:30 p. m , commencing
October 11th. Send for circular.
A satisfactory reference required from all
strangers.
HENRY J. KRAMER,
Instructor.
PALACE RESTAURANT AND SALOON,
Corner First and Spring Streets.
The Most Magnificent and Popular
Resort in the City.
FREE CONCERTS!
* *
BY THE
CELEBRATED PHILHARMONIC SOLOISTS
Every Night from 8 to 12.
JOSEPH SCHURTZ. PROPRIETOR.
jeS-lm
ILLINOIS HALL,
Broadway and Sixth St.
Social and Entertainment by the Illinois As
sociation every Tuesday evening. Vocal and
Instrumental Music, Elocution, Specialties and
Social Intercourse.
Citizens and Strangers equally welcome.
Free Reading Room open daily. 9-28-tf
rrVflH AURORA,
-1 N. E. Cor. N. Main & Arcadia Sts.
ELEGANTLY FITTED. POPULAR RESORT.
CONCERTS
Every Saturday by a superb orchestra.
Finest of wines, liquors and cigars.
9-23 FRED SAUMER, Prop.
NATATORIUM.
242 Broadway,
SWIMMING RACES.
For boys, 15 years and under.atthe Natatorlum,
Wednesday afternoon at 2:30. Prizes for
Ist, 2d and 3d places. Races for umateur cham
pionship to take ulace Thursday evening, Oc
tober 10, 1890. " 9-28-lm
A. K. NUDSON,
Practical -:- Well-Borer.
Wells bored on short notice. Best work for
the least money. Address.
A. K. NUDSON,
STATION H.
Or, apply to J. F. HOLBROOK, manufacturer
of well pipe, 310 Rtquena st. L. A. 9-30-lm
Fall and Winter-1890
yy DRESS GOODS
ff| |{ ON SALE NOW.
The Choicest Novelties in
Fancy and Plain Dress Goods
For Fall and Winter wear ever shown in the city, at prices lower than the
lowest.
CITY OF PARIS,
203 to 209 North Spring Street.
BARTLETT'S
JEWELRY»II HOUSE
Has Removed to
129 N. SPRING 81
NEXT DOOR TO PEOPLES' STORE
ASPHALT *
SIDEWALKS-PAVEMENTS
POINTERS to property owners :
Look into the merits and price of Asphalt before signing petitions for other
material.
ASPHALT has stood the test of use for years without failure in this city.
CEMENT emphatically has not.
ASPHALT is laid on its merits by the undersigned, who have honor and reputa
tion at stake.
ASPHALT SIDEWALKS of ours never have protests against their inspection.
PRICE PER FOOT, 11 to 14 cents per square foot, according to thickness re
quired.
CALL AT OUR OFFICE for further particulars or write us, and we will call or.
you.
Asphalt Paving Compaoj,
000 N. MAIN ST., LOS ANGELES.
J. J. SCHALI.ERT, President. T. W- BROTHERTON, Vice-Pres. J. H. BURKS, Secy 'real
Cor. 3d ant Bpring.
-)iCITIZENS' ICE CO. je
CAPITA L, — — $100,000.
DIRECTORS: J. J. Schallert, T. S. C. Lowe, Geo. R. Shatto, W. L. Packard, T. W. Bro:
This company will soon be fully equipped to furnish the citizens of Los A i
geles solid ice, manufactured from water, free from all impurities. The ice fnr
nished by this company will be absolutely pure, so much so that druggists will use
it instead of the distilled water of commerce.
The Citizens' Company was formed to relieve the impositions of a nn . ( ii
and they fully intend to do it, and will furnisli ice at the lowest rates. Do not
contract with any other company. - 0-18-tf
tW SOUTH FIELD WELLINGTON Jgs
~);SELECTED LUMPff-
WHOLESALE J KBTAH,
The Best Domestic Coal in the Market.
Oak, Pine and Juniper wood sawed and split to Order
HANCOCK BANNING,
Importer of S. F. Wellington and Foreign Steam Coal,
YARD, S3B N. Main St. Telephone 1047. m29-4m OFFICE, 130 W. Second St. Telephone SO
S. a BUTTERFIELD,
315 S. Spring Street. TEMPLE BLOCK GALLERY
CABIN ETS, $3 PER DOZEN.
THE CHICAGO EXHIBIT.
Persons having articles that they wish
to place in the exhibit rooms in Chicago
will please notify the undersigned, de
scribing the articles and stating what
space they will occupy.
D. Freeman.
Chairman.
Los Angeles. 9-13-d&w-lm
UNITED STATES STABLE,
• PETER CLOS, Proprietor.
Horses, Carriages and Saddle Horses To Let
All Kinds of Horses Bought and Sold.
Horses Boarded by the Day, Week or Month
Telephone 255.
No. 952 Flower street, Los Angeles, Cal
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PIONEER "TRUCK CO.,
(Successors to McLain & Lehman,)
I'KOI'RI KTOKH OF THK
Pioneer Truck & Transfer Co.
Piano and Safe Moving a Bpecialty.
Telephone 137. 3 Market St. Los Angeles Cal.
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J. C. CUNNINGHAM,
Manufacturer of and Dealer In
Trunks and Traveling
132 S. MAIN ST., Opp. Mott Market.
Telephone No.- 818.
Repairing promptly attended to. Old trunks'
taken in exchange. Orders called for and
delivered to all parts of the city. au2o-3m j

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