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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, November 11, 1890, Image 5

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CHADWICK NON EST.
THE DAMRON CASE PROCEEDS
WITHOUT HIM.
Deputy Sheriff Brady Fails to Find the
Missing Witness-No New Develop
ments—The Prosecution Closes.
Nothing very startling was evolved
from the examination of witnesses in the
Damron case yesterday. During the
morning session but little was done.
The deputy district attorney said that
Deputy Sheriff Brady had gone to Arrow
head springs, where it was believed that
Chadwick was rusticating, and he was
in hopes that he would be able to pro
duce this absconding witness in court in
the afternoon. He was disappointed in
his expectation, neither Brady nor Chad
*j,wick materializing.
In the afternoon M. N. Avery was
called to the stand. He identified the
Perry note and said he had discounted
it for Damron.
G. A. Hough, the expert, recalled, was
subjected to a severe cross-examination
respecting a number of tests submitted
to him to determine whether they were
in Damron's handwriting or not. Wit
ness thought that some of the test writ
ing was either not the work of defend
ant's pen or else he had attempted to
disguise his handwriting. Mr. Hough's
testimony, which is damaging to Dam
ron, was not broken by the cross-exam
ination. .
Frank B. Fanning, deputy county
clerk, was alsu recalled, and swore that
from his knowledge of Damron's writing
he was satisfied that the signatures, E.
T. Wright and Hervey Lindley, were the
work of the defendant. He had been
familiar with his writing for four or five
years, and had seen him sign his name
scores of times, besides seeing him write
other things. Being shown the tests,
submitted to expert Hough, witness re
plied that none were in Damron's ordin
ary writing.
Judge Shaw was also cross-examined
by S. M. White on similar topics, aud
the prosecution then closed. The case
will be resumed this morning.
A LAST RESORT.
An Inquest Necessary to Secure a Cer-
tificate of Death.
Coroner Weldon held an inquest yes
terday upon the body of Mrs. Maggie
Eilenstein, a native of Ireland, 43 years
of age, who died at her husband's resi
dence, No. 148 Winston street, from
natural causes.
From the testimony taken at the
official inquiry into the cause of her
death, it was learned that Mrs. Eilen
stein had been suffering from a trouble
peculiar to women for some time past,
and had been treated by a number of
physicians. Until Friday evening last
Dr. H. Nadeau had been in attendance
upon the sick woman, but he was in
formed on Saturday that the patient
was under treatment by Dr. Zobala, and
according to the rules of professional
etiquette, he withdrew from the case.
Consequently, when the patient died
on Sunday evening. Dr. Zobala, who had
only been in charge of the case twenty
four hours, refused to issue a certificate,
ami De. Nadeau, when appealed to, also
refused on the ground that the woman'
was no longer his patient when she ex
pired. Hence in order to obtain a cer
tificate at all, it was necessary to call
upon the coroner, who, of course, could
not issue one until the case had been in
vestigated. The jury on learning these
facts, returned a verdict of death from
natural causes.
STUART STEALS.
A Letter Carrier Arrested for Pilfering
in the Office.
At 5 o'clockon Sunday afternoon United
States Deputy Marshal Tarble arrested
at the central postoffice, Broadway, a
young letter carrier named W. F. Stuart,
and locked him up in the county jail.
Stuart, who is only 20 years of age, has
been a carrier for the last three years.
For some time past some one has been
pilfering small amounts of money out of
money drawers. In order to detect the
culprit several coins were marked on
Sunday and placed in a till. In the
afternoon they had disappeared. Deputy
Postmaster Shoulders asked that every
one in the office should empty his pock
ets, and he, himself, gave the example.
Stuart, who did not know that the ab
stracted money was marked, made no
difficulty in turning his pockets inside
out. His assurance left hiia immed
iately when $3.10 of the marked money
were pointed out to him.
Commissioner Van Dyke set his bail
at $500, which the defendant will have no
trouble in procuring, as his parents are
highly respectable people, who reside on
Boyle Heights.
DELBASTY PUNISHED.
The Wages of Sin is Imprisonment in
the County Jail.
Jean Delbasty, whom a jury, upon his
second trial, some weeks since found
guilty of notorious and open adultery
with a woman named Villemer, was yes
terday brought up for sentence in de
partment six. Judge Shaw imposed a
fine of $300 and six months in the
county jail upon the luckless sausage
maker, who will now be able to place
his culinary talent at the disposal of
Jailor Darcy in the kitchen of the prison.
It is the intention of Mrs. Delbasty now
to apply for letters of guardianship for
her 11-year-old boy, and to commence
divorce proceedings against her unfaith
ful spouse.
THE REPUBLICANS.
The Dates Set for Their Caucuses,
Primaries and Convention.
The Republican city central commit
tee held a meeting last evening and de
cided to hold the caucuses for the com
ing city election in each precinct at 7:30
Highest of all in Leavening Power.—TJ. S. Gov't Report, Aug. 17, 1889.
PriVfaJ Baking
l\ Powder
ABSOLUTELY PURE
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD: TUESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 11, 1890.
on Tuesday evening the 18th, the pri
maries for the afternoon of Thursday
the 20th, between the hours of 2 and 7,
and the city convention at 9 a. m. on
Monday the 24th inst. The apportion
ment is one delegate for every precinct,
and one for every 25 votes cast for Mark
ham.
EDUCATIONAL MATTERS.
The Proceedings at the Meeting Last
Night.
The board of education met in regular
session last night at the city hall. Presi
dent A. E. Pomeroy in the chair, and
Messrs. Ellis, Frew, Gosper, Mcintosh,
Morris and Whaling present.
After the usual preliminaries had been
disposed of, a communication was re
ceived from the Los Angeles Lighting
company, estimating the cost of heating
the rooms of the new high school at
$733.30 or $647.80, according to the size
of stove, and the same was referred to
the building committee.
A petition signed by J. Vandam etal.,
asking that a kindergarten school Jbe
established in the Grown Hills school
district, was referred to the teachers'
committee.
A communication from the Baker Iron
works, relative to the heating and ven
tilation of the new school rooms, was
read, and referred to the building com
mittee.
Superintendent Friesner presented
his report for the month of October,
showing an enrollment of 7287 pupils,
of whom 3073 were girls, and 3014 boys.
The report of the teachers' commit
tee recommending the appointment of
Mrs. Brodbeck as teacher at the Scott
tract school, and Miss Hobbs, at the
Seventh-street school, was adopted.
The finance committee not being
ready to make its report, a recess of ten
minutes W'is taken to allow of the com
pletion of its labors. On reconvening
at the end of that time, a number o( de
mands, amounting in the aggregate to
(581,84, were approved in accordance
with the recommendations of the com
mittee.
The following bids for the heating and
ventilating oi the new high school
building, according to the plans of Pres
ton & Son: Baker Iron works, $77.50
and $4070; H. P. Cregorv & Co., $5157;
$2092.50; $4408, and $1400.90; all were
referred to the building committee.
A number of bills, amounting to
$4889.81, which had not been endorsed
by Superintendent ot" Buildings Much
more, were taken up separately and
were approved, subject to the approval
oi that official. On motion of Mr. Mc
intosh, of the building committee, all
bills in connection with the Bloom and
Seventh streets schools were withheld
for a week.
Tho report of the janitors' committee,
recommending the appointment of Miss
Kosa Garcia at Grafton-street school,
Jacob Colish at Stanton-avenue school,
and Mrs. Hastings at Chestnut-street
school, was adopted and the appoint
ments made.
After disposing of several matters of
minor importance, the board adjourned
until next Monday evening.
It seems, however, that the adjourn
ment was only temporary, for Mr.
Whaling after some time discovered the
other members in a room, busy over a
lot of letters. He entered the room, but
was told that the session was simply a
convening of the teachers' committee,
and that it was private. He protested
that, as a member of the board, he had
a right to be present, but they insisted
that he should go, and on his refusing,
tho mysterious documents were put
back in the members' pockets and they
all dispersed.
AMUSEMENTS.
Magnificent Band Concert in the Rideau
Rink Last Evening.
Liberati's famous band, fresh from its
great success at the recent Minneapolis
exposition, played at the Rideau rink
last evening. Nearly every number on
the programme was heartily encored
and met with a generous response. The
range of composers interpreted last even
ing was a wide one, including, as it did,
Mendelssohn,Wagner,Meyerbeer,Weber,
Gounod and List/..
The concert opened with a inarch com
posed by Mgnor Liberati himself; this
was followed by the overture from Men
delssohn's Atlialia. Weber's Imitation
a la Valse was performed by the lull baud
with greateffect.—[Ottawa Daily Review,
Canada, Tuesday, July 1, '90.
Signor Liberati and his band will open
at the Los Angeles theater next Thurs
day night.
Next week Clara Morris will follow.
The friends of Mr. Joseph Schurtz, of
the Palace, have tendered him a grand
benefit concert tomorrow, particulars oi
which may be found under the amuse
ment head in the advertising columns of
the Hbrald.
CITIZENS' BANK.
A New Financial Institution in Los
Angeles.
The latest financial development in Los
Angeles is the organization ot the Citi
zens' bank, with a capital of 1200,000.
The officers are T. S. 0. Lowe, presi
dent; T. W. Btotherton, vice-president,
and F. D. Hall, assistant cashier. The
directors, besides the president and vice
president, are H. L. Wi.liai'.is, L. VV.
Blinn and C. F. Cronin. Tbe offices are
ou the corner of Spring and Third
streets, where, in addition to a general
banking business, this new institution
has safe-deposit boxes in fire and bur
glar-proof safes. The standing of the
new bank will be sure to draw it custom.
How to Get Kid of Sideache.
Who has not suffered from sidoache? We all
had it when we ran races at school—we have it
when we overwork ourselves at any age. it
comes on, as everybody knows, suddenly 11 y
using one of ali.co< k's Porous Ft, a STIRS it
goes away nearly as quick. F. Hoessner, of No.
55(> West Fifty-eighth street. New York, says:
'•It is with pleasure I write these lines in
tastiniony to the {powers of Ali.cock's Por
ous Plasters. I have been somewhat annoyed
with serious paint in my side, for which several
medicines have been prescribed, but to no
avail, and through the advice of a friend 1 tried
two allvook'h Porous Pla! ; trrs, and the re
lief they have given me is both satisfactory
aad To any one annoyed with
pains these plasters are a certain remedy."
Manloca, for puddings, at Jevne's,
TELEGRAPHIC.
PERILS OF WHALING.
Six Men Lost by One Ship and Four by
Another.
San Francisco, Nov. 10.—The loss
of six men from the whaler Charles W.
Morgan, which arrived Saturday from
the Okhotsk sea, has just been made
public. The men left the vessel in a
small boat September Ist, in pursuit of
a whale. The whale was successfully
harpooned and started off at a rapid
rate, towing after him the boat which
contained the second mate, H. A. Mar
tin and five seamen. Another boat had
been launched, but the party failed to
catch up with the lirst one, and a fog
setting in, they returned to the vessel.
Nothing was ever found of the boat con
taining the second mate and five men,
and it is believed the whale smashed
the boat, killing the occupants. The
whaler Norwhal, from Fox island, re
ports six men washed from her decks
during a gale, but two of them were for
tunately thrown back alive by the re
turn wave.
IHE MESSEXOEKS SLEPT.
A Double Express Bobbery Accom-
plished by One Man.
Augusta, (ia., Nov. 10.—Two night
trains on the Georgia railroad, one leav
ing Atlanta for Augusta at 11:30 p. in.,
and the other leaving Augusta for At
lanta at about the same hour, were rob
bed last night near the same point.
Only the express car was entered. One
messenger lost a very small amount,
but the other one is "said to have lost
$12,000.
The robber was alone. He boarded
the north-bound train and robbed the
car while the messenger was asleep;
stepped on the other train at the meet
ing point, and finding the other messen
ger conveniently asleep, robbed his safe
also. The robber had a key to open the
car doors. No clue.
Stranded Business Finns.
Chicago, Nov. 10.—The old established
notion firm of Schweitzer & Beer went
into the hands of the receiver today,
with assets of $,'50,000, aud liabilities of
over Since the recent death of
one of the partners, Carl Beer,
it is said that the business has been run
at a loss. Charges are made also that
Beer misappropriated the firm's funds,
and the courts are asked to apply his
real estate and life insurance in settle-
I ment.
Boston, Nov. 10.—Wadleigh A Little
field, well known in the Hour trade, have
failed. Their liabilities are supposed to
be heavy.
Nashville Knees.
Nashville,Tenn., Nov. 10.—Half-mile
—Major Hughes won, Clark second,
Silvor Light third; time, 51.
Six furlongs—Jubilee won, Little
Crite second, Lida L. third; time,
1 :K%.
Five and a half furlongs—Malacca
won, Sullross seevnd,Frank Shaw third ;
time, 1
Six and a half furlongs—Vexation
won, Lucy P. second, Red Cap third;
time, 1:23.
Five-eighths of a mile—Jack of Dia
monds won.JHaramboure second, Mark
S. third ; time 1:04.
Dempsey und Fitzslminons.
Portland, Ore., Nov. 10. —Articles of
agreement for a fight between Jack
Dempsey and Bob Fitzsimmons, the.
Australian, before the New Orleans Ath
letic club, for a purse of T I2,OQ|O, were
received here today and were signed by,
Dempsey. The men are to weigh not to,
exceed 154 pounds. The fight will take
place January 14th. Dempsey will leave
tor the sound tomorrow, and on the
28th of this month will start for NeW
Orleans.
Powderly Speaks in Denver.
Denver, Nov. 10.—The general assem
bly of Knights of Labor met this after
noon. There are already in the city 300
delegates, and 100 more are expected to
arrive tomorrow morning. Tonight
Powderly delivered an address at the
colisseum on the subject of The Labor
Situation of the Day, before one of the
largest ami most enthusiastic audiences
assembled here for some time.
The Canal Flourishing.
San Juan, Nov. 10 —The Nicaragnan
I minister of public works has advised the
'< general agent of the Maritime Canal
i company that the company has more
I than fulfilled its obligations as to ex
penditures on the work, under the
I requirements of the concession. The
! government has sent congratulations to
| the company on the satisfactory condi
j tion of the work.
New York Horse Show.
New Yokk, Nov. 10.—The sixth an
nual show of horses opened this fore
noon at Madison Square garden. The
crowds in attendance found everything
'on a much grander scale than ever be
fore. The entries number 1100, and in
clude every class, from the magnificent
Pereherons to Shetland ponies.
Stabbed for Five Cents.
Seattle, Wash., Nov. 10.—Julius
Stroscaen, a laborer, was stabbed in the
left side with a pair of scissors today,
by Joseph Simpson, It! years of age.
The boy claimed that Stroscaen stole
five cents from him, and that he did the
stabbing in self-defense. Stroscaen is
in a precarious condition.
The Duchess' Debts.
New Yoke, Nov. 10. —The sheriff re
turned unsatisfied executions in three
judgments aggregating over $600,008,
obtained against the Duchess of Marl
borough, last week. The duchess has
no property here, and the income from
the estate of her late husband cannot
be levied upon.
World's Fair Bonds.
Chicago, Nov. 10.—The city council
tonight prepared an ordinance for the
issuance of $5,000,000 World's far,'bonds,
voted Tuesday, by the people of Chicago.
They will be 4 per cent, payable thirty
years after tho date of issue. The ordi
nance has been referred to the finance
committee.
Chinese Damage Suits.
San Francisco, Nov. 10.— Twenty
suits demanding damages to tho amount
of $200,000, were filed by the Chinese
today against Supervisor Bingham for
damages resulting from the enforcement
of tlje ordinance designating the loca
tion in which Chinese should live.
Richest Ore In the South.
Raleigh, N. C, Nov. 10.—The super
intendent of the Silver valley mine, in
David county, reports the richest de
posits of ore ever found in the south ; a
large vein of carbonate of lead, carrying
70 to 100 ounces of silver and 30 per
cent of lead to the ton of ore.
Lack of Evidence.
Ban Kiivncibco, Nov. 10.—Captain
Cook, of the whaler Johnand Winthrop,
who was arrested for cruelty to members
of his crow, was today discharged by the
United States commissioner for lack of
evidence.
DECISION REVERSED.
Justice Field Overrules the Judgment
In a I.ii|nor Case.
Washington, Nov. 10. —The supreme
court of the United States, through Jus
tice Field, today, rendered an opinion
reversing the judgment in the court for
the northern district of California, dis
charging Henry Christensen from the
custody of Chief of Police Crow
ley, of San Francisco. This is a
liquor case, Christensen having
been arrested for retailing liquor
without license, which the police com
missioners of San Francisco, under the
discretion invested in them, refused. The
court holds that the commissioners have
arbitrary discretion to grant or refuse
liquor licenses, and that such ordinance
does not infringe on any privilege or
right of the applicant for a license. The
decision of the lower court is therefore
reversed.
Anxiety for a Steamer.
Quebec, Nov. 10.—Considerable anxi
ety is felt heie regarding the safety of
the steamer Vancouver, which sailed
from Liverpool for Montreal October
30th.
Isaac Blmnme Dead.
San Francisco, Nov. 10.—Isaac Blux
ome, a pioneer of 1849, and secretary of
the famous vigilance committee of 1850,
died here yesterday.
Dr. Byers Dead.
Columbus, 0., Nov. 10.—Dr. A.J. By
ers, secretary of the state board of char
ities, Bince 1887, died tonight.
WITH THE WITS.
The man who is always picking up a
quarrel rarely complains of v short crop.
—St. Joseph News.
Proud Mamma—"Look, uncle John,
isn't baby the perfect imageof his papa?
Uncle John —Yes, yes, my dear, but
nevermind. He may outgrow it as he
gets older.—[Journal of Education.
"I couldn't help getting mad. Now I
appeal to you, if you were I, wouldn't
yon be angry?" "I don't know as I
would be angry; but if I were you I
should be inexpressibly sad."—[Boston
Transcript.
The summer girl may have her day,
But the one that lead! them all
Is the autumn girl, the ilrst of whom
Was Eve, that famous fad.
[Philadelphia Times.
One Matron : No ; I do not allow my
husband to address me by my Christian
name. Another matron: I shouldn't
mind that at all. It is the unchristian
names he breaks out with every once in
a while that I object to.—[lndianapolis
Journal.
A Word for tiie Dude.
I ant B»cd to say a word in defense
of ths tlnAu. The primal meaning of the
wc*d wm Intended to convey the idea of
■ forctflem, rapid, useless nonentity, of
less acoouafc In the world than foam, and
aa superfluous as a second handle to a
teacup. But more and mere the word is
becoming estranged from its original
import. It is getting to bo quite the
thing to revile a s'oung man for wearing
clean linen and maintaining a courteous
demeanor. The very fact that he is a
gentleman both in apparel and conduct
is enough to let loose all the dogs of ridi
cule upon him.
Ride in any street car, full of tobacco
spitting, mannerless boors, and see how
the sneer goes round if there appears in
their midst a gentleman who wears
gloves, is exceedingly polite and refrains
from the everlasting expectoration! If
he is faultlessly attired the last straw is
added to forbearance, and he is stigma
tized as a "dude." A pretty pass we
have come to when all the pleasant at
tributes of courtesy, consideration,
cleanliness and civility are at a discount
in public places, and only the riotous,
rough and elbowing, pushing, inconsid
erate boors are held high in pppular esti
mation.
Cleanliness is not incompatible with
mankind, neither is it necessary to chew
tobacco, go unshaven and unkempt to
prove yourself a son of Mars or a descend
ant of Thor. Brawn of muscle and
brawn of brain nro enviable possessions,
bnt they need the setting of innate good
breeding and wholesome personal ap
pearance to make them effective, just as
the finest picture that ever was painted
is greatly enhanced in value by a setting
and a frame.—Chicago Herald.
The Smile ami tho Laugh.
"The chief characteristic that I notice
in my friends after a long separation
from them," remarked a gentleman re
cently, "is that they laugh less than
they used to."
"Do you not consider that encour
aging?" asked a lady present. "Is it not
a sign of increased sense that people
grow more serious as they grow older:''
"I—l hadn't thought of that," said the
first speaker hesitatingly. "I simply
thought that they had grown sadder."
" 'Sadder' and 'wiser' have not been
wedded for nothing in time honored
proverb," laughed the lady.
"I had thought of my aged contem
poraries hertofore as only to be pitied.
I shall think of them after tins as also
to be congratulated," admitted her
friend.
Probably there is nothing more absurd
in a small way than tho spectacle pre
sented to the disinterested looker on by
your smiling man as he appears in pub
lie, walking up the aisle of a church or
riding in a car. However sweet and
amiable the spirit signified by his peren
nial simper the simplicity of mind ar
gued by such a "wearing of one's heart
upon on's sleeve" is too patent to be
agreeable. The habitual smiler or
laugher, whatever else he may be, can
never bo a man of deep thought nor of
any other depth, unless, perhaps, a hypo
critical Shakespearean villain. —Chris-
tian Union.
The Illustrated Annual Herald.
The most acceptable present you can
send to eastern friends is the Illus
trated Annual Hbbald. There are
forty-eight large pages of fresh and re
liable information about Southern Cali
fornia, including statistical matter of
the greatest value, relating to the cli
mate, crops, population, etc. There are
fifty fine illustrations of local scenes, the
birdseye view of the city of Los Angeles
being alone worth the cost of the publi
cation. No gift would be more appreci
ated in the east than a copy of the An
nual HBBALD. It may be obtained of
newsdealers or at the 'Heuald business
office. Price 15 cents per copy.
The Menlo.
This elegnnt house has changed hands; been
entirely re-furnished; rooms sunny; location
central; prices reasonable; everything first
class; for families or single gentlemen. Every
thing superintended by the proprietress, Mas.
H. H. Heath.
EAGLESON * CO.
lliili ft'
146 North Spring St. -
MEN'S
Furnishing Goods,.
i
NEW
FALL W. WINTER j
GOODS.
NOW ON HAND THE ]
Largest, Best, Most Fashion
able, and by far the
CHEAPEST STOCK
Ever Shown in this City
OF 1
WOOL AND MERINO
UNDERWEAR! 1
HOSIERY, i
GLOVES.
NECKWEAR,
NEGLIGEE SHIRTS,
WHITE SHIRTS,
ETC., ETC.
a
t
Buy direct from the manufac-1 j
turer and save the wholesaler's \
profit. j
I We are the only nouse on the
1 coast who manufactures and J
imports all our own goods.
EAGLESON & CO.
11-8-2 m
ASSESSOR. j
— ;
Announces himself as a candidate for <
I
CITY ASSESSOR,
Suhject to the action of the Democratic City i
Convention.
AUDITOR. j
| j "~ ,
Candidate for
CITY AUDITOR,
j Subject to the decision of the Democratic City
| Convention.
JP RED. W. I'OTTS,
Candidate for
CITY AUDITOR, 1
Subject to the Democratic City Convention.
SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS.
j£ B. millerT" j " .
Candidate for
STREET SUTEUINTENDENT,
Subject to decision of Republican City Con
vention.
A NTIIONY MoKALLY,
Candidate for
SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS,
Subject to the decision of the Democratic City-
Convention.
FOR THE COUNCIL.
gAMUELRE ICS
Is a candidate lor the
COUNCIL IN THE NINTH WARD,
Subject to the decision of the Republican Con
vention.
jpUANn* E. ADAMS, SR.,
Announces himsell as a caudidate for
COUNCILMAN IN SECOND WARD,
Subject to the action of the Democratic City
Convention.
PRICES TO SUIT THE TIMES.
No. 6 Bertha (a 5-hole; Ranee % 9.00
No. 7 Bertha (a .".-hole RaDce 10.00
No. S Bertha (a 5-hole) Range i:t.oo
I am overstocked with Gasoline Stoves and am
selling them at
$4 Less Than Eastern Prices.
EVERY STOVE GUARANTEED!
A fine line of Pry Air Refrigeratorsat very low
prices. A full line of Medallion Ranges.
Stoves sold on the installment plan atl
F. E. BROWNE'S
iul2 tf 130 S. Main St., opp. Mott Market.
STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING.
Office op the Crystal Springs )
Land and Water Company,>
Los Anokl.es, October IS, WM. 5
Notice Is hereby g> yen that the annual meet
ing of the stockholders of the above company
will l>e held on Monday, the 17th day of No
vember, A. D. 1800, at 3:30 o'clock p.m., at
the office of the company, on the northwest cor
ner of Marchessault and Alameda streets, Los
Angeles city, for the purpose of electing di
rectors for the year ensuing.
8. H. MOTT, Secretary.
City papers please copy 10-14-td
5
MMM
Rhoades & Reed
Auctionecrsand Commission Merchants,
Sales Koom, Cor. Broadway und 3d Sts.
Bex. 0. Rhoades and H. H. Matlock,
Auctioneers.
LIVE STOCK
AT AUCTION.
Horses, Mares, Colts, Cows and Heifers,
from the famous Rodeo de los Aquas
Rancho, Hammel & Denker.
Proprietors.
RHOADES & REED
WILL HELL
On Tuesday, November 11,1890,
AT 10 O'CLOCK, A. M.,
Cor. Ninth and Main streets, Los Angeles,
A fine lot o£ Stock from the above Rancho,
comprising
Draft and Work Horses, Brood Mares
and Colts; also Graded Holstein
and Shorthorn Milch Cows
and Heifers,
Fresh and first-class milkers in every parti cnlar
We call the particular attention of stockmen*
ranchmen and breeders to this important sale
of graded stock, which must be sold on account
of the subdivision of tbe rancho into 1 o acre
tracts, and the stock must be closed out.
Sale positive and without reserve.
BEN. 0. RHOADES,
Auctioned,
AMUSEMENTS.
NEW LOS ANGELES THEATRE.
H. C. Wyatt, Lessee and Manager.
Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday,
November 13th, 14th, 15th and lßth.
Saturday Matinee.
I LIBR ATI'S i
UNRIVALED MILITARY BAND
Of New York City.
50 SELECTED ARTISTS 50
Including an array of Peerless Soloists and
Famous Vocalists.
The finest Band that has ever visited the Pacific
Coast. Sig. A. Librati, the greatest Cornet
Soloist in the world, at every concert.
Popular prices Seats on sale at Box Office
on and after Wednesday, Nov. 12th, at 10 a. m.
JJAZARD'S PAVILION,
Fifth street, near Olive.
TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY AND
FRIDAY,
November 11,12,13 and 14,1890.
THE FIRST
j FLORAL EXHIBITION;
OF THE
Southern California Floral Society .
In the membership of the society are repre
sented the leading and practical gardeners of
the six southern counties. This assures the
most gorgeous display of flowers and orna
mental plants and trees ever held in Southern
California, while the premium list-aggregating;
?1100 in cash—is calculated to bring out the
very best the country affords.
Through W. S. Lyons, state forester, the State
Forestry Commission will make a unique and
original display of
FOREST AND ORNAMENTAL TREES,
including a large variety of eucalypti, all prop
erly labeled
E". D. Sturtevant, the celebrated grower of
Rare Water Lilies, will make an elaborate
display of many varieties of thfs favorite flower.
Musfc every evening during the exhibition
by Ahrend's Orchestra.
ADMISSION:
Single tickets, 25c.; t> admissions, SI; child
ren under 12 years of age, 15 cents. Tickets fo
lie had of Central Park Floral Store, 251 South
Main; The Rural Californian, 218 N. Main st:
Germain Fruit Co., 338 N. Main St., Edwards
Si MeKnight, 114 West First st. and Ball Si Car
ter, 117 West First St.
Reduced rates from all points in Southern
California will be furnished by the railroads,
good from November 10 to 16. Plants and
flowers in pots and packages for the exhibition
carried free Olive street ears will pass the
pavilion during the exhibition. 11-2-10t
gPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT.
A GRAND
TESTIMONIAL BENEFIT! !
Will be tendered to
MR. JOS. SCHURTZ,
By the citizens of Los Angeles, at the Palaco
Saloon, corner First aud Spring, Wednesday
evening, November 12th, on which occasion
Meines' Celebrated band will render a choic
programme of music. As this will be the eve
of the musical season, all are cordially invit
Admission free. 11-11-2
ILLINOIS HALL,
Broadway and Sixth Si
SOCIAL AND ENTERTAINMENT
BY
THE ILLINOIS ASSOCIATION.
Tuesday Evening, November 11th.
Vocal aud Instrumental Music, and Dramatle
Readings by
MRS. FRANK MORGAN,
The noted Elocutionist from tbe East.
Everybody welcome.
9-28-tf
PALACE RESTAURANT AND SALOON,
Corner First and Spring Streets.
Tho Most Magnificent and Popular
Resort in the City.
* •*
FREE CONCERTS!
* *
BY THB
CELEBRATED PHILHARMONIC SOLStISTS
Every Night from 8 to 12.
JOSEPH SCHURTZ. PROPRIETOR.
jcS-tf
TIVOLI THEATRE.
12, 14 and U! Court street.
STRICTLY FAMILY RESORT.
ADMISSION, - - - - 15e, 25c. and 35c.
EVERY EVENING.
MATINEE SUNDAY.
NEW ATTRACTIONS WEEKLY.
10-24-6 m
HOMEOI'ATHISTS.
O sTsALISBURY, M~ P., HOMCEOPATHIBT.
Office, rooms 11 and 12, L. A. Banic build
ing, cor. First and Spring sta. Residence, 648
S. Pearl st. Office hours, 11 a. mto3 p. m. Tel
ephone Nos.: Office, 597; residence, 577.
m24-tf
■p\RS. BEACH 4 BOYNTON. OFFICE, 37 N.
\J Spring st., Los Angeles, Cal. Office "noun,
810 12 m., 1 to 4 and 6toB p. m. Dr. Boyn
ton's residence, 735 Olive St. ml9tf
ISAAC lOLLOWS, M.IIT HOMEOPATHIST
Office hours, 11 to 12 a. m., 2tosp. m.
Office, Nos. 2 and 5 Odd Fellows' building, Loa
Angeles, Cal. Residence, 508 South Main st,
m9-tf
SPECIALISTS.
BELLEVUE "IY7NG-?N HOSPITAL is" NOW
open, under the management of Mrs. Dr. J.
H. Smith. Patients can have their choice ol
physicians, and the best of care is given. Mid
wifery a specialty. 145 Bellevne aye. m2Btf
PLUMBERS.
tor. Telephone 799. Jobbing promptly at -
I tended to. 309 Broadway, near 3d St. 10 15-lni

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