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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, November 14, 1890, Image 6

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HOME COMING.
Back after Journeying leagues of guileful sea,
Back from long tarriance among: climes remote.
I did not guess what heats of amity
Lay hidden among the hearts of these my frtenda
Absence has clothed me with a purple state.
Crowned me aud sceptered me a transient king
With those T lore and those I had dreamed till now
Not bah* so rich in lore's warm royalties;
While clear through every greeting, equable
As breezes through a grove of sister trees.
One bland familiar human impulse floats!
Different, Indeed, the welcome had I fared
Back from that vaporous voyage we all must make
Sooner or later to the unknowable!
How then the faces leaned toward mine would
flash
With query, amazement, awe! How faith would
clutch
Hy hand victoriously How science, then.
Eager for larger lore, would clasp my knees 1
And, ah, how chill negation's eyes of Ice
Would blaze upon me their supreme surprise'
- Edgar Fawcet t in Youth's Companion.
AKENTUCKY "WARNING."
Late one afternoon in September I
•reached the cabin of John Hungerford,
in a cove of the Kentucky mountains.
The family consisted of father, mother
and three small children, and there were
many comforts about the place. Hun
gerford was an industrious, hard work
ing man, and one of unusual intelligence
for a mountaineer, and the wife and
children were far above the average.
They extended a right royal welcome,
and we had been visiting away for two
hours when a woman rode up on a mule.
The beast was badly blown and wet with
perspiration, and th« woman must have
come with important news. Now was
deyeloped a trait peculiar to all the
southern mountaineers. They are game
to a man—and woman. They are the
coolest people in the face of danger one
ever saw.
"Howdy, John?" queried the woman
as she drew rein at the door, and as Mrs.
Hungerford appeared she added, "And
howdy, Mary?"
Both answered that they were well.
and John inquired:
"How are all you'uns, Sarah?"
"All able to dig. thankee, John."
"Corn an' taters turnin' out well?"
"Reckon they be, what littlo we've
got, bnt barks and roots pays better.
Chilling any this fall, Mary?"
"Not a bit, Sarah."
"Haven't heard from them'uns, I
reckon?" queried Hungerford after a
long pause, during which the woman
tried to size me up.
"Mebbe. Who may he'un be?"
"Stranger from the no'th. - '
"Sartin?"
'Tin shore."
"Will he back with ye—stand to your
back in case of trouble?"
"Haven't mentioned, but I reckon."
"Well, then, they'uns is coming np to
■aight to put on the hickory."
•'Hul Who said it?"
"Heard it at the corners. It's shore.
■Bassett is gwine to lead 'em. Are ye pre
pared, Jim?"
"Reckon."
"And Mary?"
"She'un is prepared."
"Well, then, that's all I've got to say.
Hope you'll hurt they'uns till they'll be
have themselves. Good-by, John—good
by, Mary."
She waa off with that. I had a dim
suspicion of what was meant, but the
coolness of tho trio puzzled me. When
she v. as out of sight I asked:
"Isit trouble?"
'<Btranger," replied Hungerford, as be
pulled a twig off a bush and bit at it,
'Tve been warned away!"
"How—why?"
"Took sides with the Oldhams against
the Bassetts, and the Bassetts have
warned me to leave."
"And as you have refused to go they
are coming to take you out and switch
you?"
"Exactly—if they kin!"
"And aro they coming to-night?"
"I reckon."
"And you?"
"I shel be ready."
We sat in silence for a moment. 1
looked up at Mrs. Hungerford, but she
was sewing away and trotting her foot
as placidly as if danger was at the other
end of the world. The children soon
began a game of tag, and the husband
softly whistled as he switched the twig
over the ground.
"Great heavens! but you take it cool
ly," I exclaimed as I noted everything.
"Stranger," answered Hungerford as
•he turned to me, "I need somebody to
back with me to-night. This ain't your
fuss. You don't know the Oldhams
from the Bassetts. 'Deed you may have
stayed with an Oldham last night You
don't want to mix in, and yet"
"I don't want to kill or be killed, but
can't I help you some other way?"
"You kin. He'un is all right. Mary.
I knew he'un was."
".Glad on't," 6he briefly replied, not
"oven looking up from her knitting.
Hungerford took the whole matter as
coolly as if it was an ordinary business
transaction. There was only one way
by which his cabin could be approached.
It was arranged that I should secrete
myself in the cowshed on the one hand,
and his wife in the smoke house on the
other, and at the proper moment this
' flank fire would have its effect
Hungerford waa to hold the house, and
k he was the only one who was lo shoot to
■ kill. As he said it wasn't my fuss, but
ft wasn't human nature to leave him to
'-fight a mob alone. When all had been
arranged we went into supper, and after
the meal a double barreled shotgun was
got down and loaded for the wife. The
husband had his army musket, which he
loaded with buckshot, and I had my re
volver as a weapon. As we finished our
preparations and sat down on the door
step the wife carelessly inquired of her
husband:
"Gwine to shoot to kill, John?"
"Beckon I orter," he replied.
4 'And me?"
"That's according. Mebbe yonll have
to."
"And the stranger?"
"Oh, he'll fire high."
"Pap, can't I shoot?" asked the eldest,
a girl of 10.
"Shet, Tilly!"
The children went off into a corner
and rejoiced that there was going to be
"a font," but by and by grew sleepy
and went off to bed. Up to 10 o'clock
we talked of everything but the coming
event. At that hour Hungerford said:
"Reckon it's time. They'll be here
by it"
The wife tied a shawl over her head,
picked up and examined the gun and
walked off to ber station with never a
.word. I went over to the shed, took the
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD: FRIDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER J4, IBdo.
place picked out for me and five minutes
later all was darkness and silence. It
was just about 11 that 1 heard the low
hum of voices and the footfalls of men.
and ten minutes later four or five of the
gang of twenty came directly up to the
shed and leaned against it as they in
spected the house.
"AU sound asleep," whispered one.
• "We are dead shore of him," added a
second.
"There's to be no let np, boys!" cau
tioned a third.
"We must switch him till he gives in.
We've had enough fooling."
"What of the wife?" whispered the
first.
"Blast her! She's as bad as he isl
Let's give her a taste of the gad, too!"
"Agreed!"
One of them went away to call up tho
crowd, and in a few minutes all were
assembled. Then I gleaned from their
whispers that John Hungerford was to
be whipped to death, and that his wife
was to receive less merciful treatment
They even planned to fire the house, and
wipe out the whole family root and
branch. At a signal all advanced, and
five or cix men jumped against the door.
It was barred. Then a voice called:
"Open, John Hungerford! We've
come for ye, and we are bound to
have ye!"
The words were answered by a shot
from the house, and then the shotgun
roared from the smoke house. 1 ele
vated the muzzle of my revolver and
fired six shots over the confused and flying
crowd and next moment all who could
get savay were gone. Hungerford came
out with a lantern, and by its light we
saw two dead men and three wounded.
The wife had also shot to kill. One of
the wounded was past speaking. The
other two, who were strangers to the
family and belonged in a distant village,
begged for mercy and promised all sorts
of reformation in the future.
In the morning, as I was ready to go
on, there were three dead outside the
door and the two wounded were groan
ing with pain. The nearest doctor was
five miles away, and 1 was to stop and
leave word for him. As I left the house
Mrs. Hungerford said:
"Thankee," stranger, and we won't for
git it."
And the husband said:
"It wasn't your fuss, of course, but
what a shame to have wasted all them
bullets!
"Good-by, and God bless yel"—M.
Quad in Detroit Free Press.
Accommodating.
Visiting southerners—at least those
from Texas—are not at all pleased with
the rush of northern railroads, if we may
believe Maj. Martin, of that state. They
are used to a very different sort of do
ings. By way of illustration the major
tells this story:
I remember that a woman one evening
asked the conductor of a train in my
state to stay at a certain place all night.
She wanted to spend the- night with
some friends, she said, and if he didn't
oblige her she should have to wait twen
ty-four hours for a train.
The conductor said he hated to be dis
obliging to a lady, but he didn't like to
delay the other passengers. Finally he
agreed to talk it over with them, and
we decided that if her friends would
give us lodging and breakfast we
wouldn't mind an extra day spent on
the way.
The train waited half an hour while
she got off and consulted with her
friends, and just as we were about to
leave the place she came and told us
that they had agreed to the terms. The
fires in the engine were banked, and the
train left on the track. Next morn J ng,
after a comfortable night spent in the
farm house, we left the place twelve
hours late. Talk about accommodating
railroads!— New York Tribune.
How Severe Colds are Broken Up In
Montana.
From the Virginia City (Mout.) Madisonian.
When we lind a medicine we know to
possess genuine merit, we consider it a
duty, and we take pleasure in telling
the public what it is. Such a medicine
we found Chamberlain's Cough Remedy,
last winter, when la grippe was prevail
ing. We are satisfied that we warded
off several attacks that weie threaten
ing by the use of this syrup, and we
have since relieved, in a few hours,
severe colds, and in the course of two or
three days, entirely broken them up by
its use, as we have several of our friends
to whom we have recommended it. It
is all that it is represented to be by the
manufacturers. If you have a cough
and want to stop it, Chamberlain's
Cough Remedy will do the work. For
sale by C. F. Heinzeman, 222 N. Main
street; John A. Off, Fourth and Spring,
and all leading druggists.
When purchasing teas or coffees, do
not look for a chrouio or a six cent pickle
dish to go with it, but go to H. Jevne's
grocery house, where pure teas and cof
fees at proper values can always be bad,
136 and 138 north Spring street.
I Have Moved
To 301? 8. Spring street. WALL PAPER AND
DECORATIONS. A. A. ADAMS.
Minnots. Stilton, Swiss, Edam, Cream and
Roqueford cheese, at Seymour & Johnson Co.
Tents and wagon umbrellas at Foy's saddlery
bouse. 315 N. Los Angeles street
Granula, the great health food, for sale by all
grocers. k
Try "Pride of the Family" soan.
T. WIESENDANGER,
50 BRYSON-BONK BR AKK BLOCK.
(ELEVATOR.)
The cheapest residence in Los Angeles, Mnin
street, 10 rooniß, two stories, only 13,250.
The cheapest improved fruit ranch, 25 acres
aud water, only |3,500.
House 7 rooms, barn, windmill nnd tank; lot
by 176, on Eighteenth street, 14000.
A big, big bargain for 13250; new, modern
two-story house. 10 rooms, Main street, near
Twenty-ninth.
T. WIESENDANGER.
50 Bryson-Bonebrake Block (elevator).
10-22- lm
WANTED,
Musicians for Military Band
AT
PACIFIC BRANCH N. H. D. V. S.
Veterans of the Army and Navy will have the
preference in every case.
No attention will be paid to any application
which does not sate oompexut&tion per monlh
expected and name of instrument.
Members of the band will be furnished with
bosrd and lodgings at the Home, and they wlil
be subject! o the same rules and regulations as
regular members of the Home. Address
COL. C TREICHEL, Governor.
, Soldiers' Home P. 0.,
\ Los Angeles County, Cal. 11-2eod~t
Inherited Scrofula.
Swift's Specific (S. S. B.) onred my little
boy of hereditary scrofula, which broke out
all over his face. For a year he had suffered,
and I had given up all hopes of his recovery,
when at length I decided to use S. S. S. Af
ter using a few bottles he was entirely cured.
Not a symptom now remains of the disease!
This was three years ago.
MRS. T. L. MATHERS, Mathersville, Miss.
In the early part of last year I had a vio
lent attack of rheumatism, from which I
was confined to my bed for over three months
and at times was unable to turn myself in
bed, or even raise the cover. A nurse had to
be in constant attendance day and night. I
was so feeble that what little nourishment I
took had to be given me with a spoon. Af
ter calling in the best local physicians, and
trying all other medicines without receiving
any benefit, I was Induced by friends to try
Swift's Specific (8. S. S.) I discontinued all
other medicines, and took a course of S. S. S.
thirteen small bottles, which affected a com
plete and permanent cure.
L. C. BASSET, El Dorado, Kansas.
Treatise on Blood and Skin Diseases mail
•dfree. SWIFT SPECIFIC CO. Atlanta.Ga.
MERCHANT TAILORS.
JOE POHEIM,
THE TAILOR,
Has just received an immense stock of Fall and
Winter Woolens and is making Suits to order at
40 percent less-thau any other Tailor ou the
Pacific Coast.
Elegant English Serge and Cheviot
Suits, to order, from 835 to 835
Fine Dress English Worsted
Suits, to order, from 830 to 840
(Cost elsewhere from $55 to ?75)
F!n« Erencli Beaver and Pique
Suits, to order, from 855 to Sir,
(Cost elsewhere $60.00 to 190.00).
French Cassimore
Suits, to order, from 830 to 845
Overcoats, fine Silk Linings,
from 825 to 840
And other garments in proportion. Perfect fit
nnd best of workmanship guaranteed or no sale.
Rules of seli-measuremeut and samples of cloth
sent free to any address, or application to
JOE POHEIM, The Tailor,
141 and 143' S. Spring Street,
LOS ANGELES.
_ A PANTfe*
JjL TO ORDER.
ifm\ $3.50
'.■ fiii'cM? TO ORDER
Iff $15.00
«' arr and upward.
11 GABEL'S,
_& tl . 308 STOCKTON ST
Branch.424 KEARNY St
345 NORTH MAIN ST
ST. ELMO HOTEL.
we fr--u
HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS.
ILLICH'S
RESTAURANT.
Everything New and First-Class.
146 and 147 N. Main Street.
ap29-tf JERRY ILLICH, Proprietor.
Hr
PRICES TO SUIT THE TIMES.
No. 6 Bertha (a 5-hole) Ranr-e % 9.00
No. 7 Bertha (a 5-hole Range 10.00
No. 8 Bertha (a 5-hole) Range 13.00
I am overstocked with Gasoline Stoves and am
selling them at
$4 Less Than Eastern Prices.
EVERY STOVE GUARANTEED!
A fine line of Dry Air Refrigerators at very low
prices. A full line of Medallion Ranges.
Stoves sold on the Installment plan at ■
F. E. BROWNE'S
ml2-tf 136 S. Main St., opp. Mott Market
MISS M. I JORDAN,
318 S. SPRING STREET,
Millinery Importer
And dealer in all the latest Novelties of
LADIES' HEADWEAR. Special atten
tion given to MANICURING and
SHAMPOOING. Also agent for MfSS
BEACH'S CURLING FLUlD—celebrated
for its lasiing qualities. 10-18-lm
—■ ll
STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING.
Office of the Crystal Springs )
Land and Wateii Company,>
Los Angeles, October 13, 1890. >
Notice is hereby g yen that the annual meet
ing of the stockholders of the above company
will be held on Monday, the 17th day of No
vember, A. D. 1890, at 3:30 o'clock p.m.. at
the office of the company, on the northwest cor
ner of Marchessault and Alameda streets, Los
Angeles city, forthe purpose of electing di
rectors for the year ensuing.
S. H. MOTT, Secretary.
City papers please copy 10-14-td
L I'M X Ell YARD
Kerekhoff-Cuzner
MILL AND LUMBER CO.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Main Office: LOS ANGELES. Wholesale Yard
at SAN PEDRO.
Branch Yards—Pomona, Pasadena, Lamanda,
Azusa, Burbank. Planing Mills—Los Angeles
and Pomona. Caraoes furnished to order.
J. M. Griffith, President.
H. G. Stevenson, Vice-Pres. and Treat
T. E. Nichols, Secy. E. L. Chandler, Supt
J. M. GRIFFITH COMPANY,
Lumber Dealers
And Manufacturers of
DOCKS, WINDOWS, BLINDS, STAIRS,
Mill work of every description.
934 N. Alameda Street, Los Angeles.
lul tf
PERRY, MOTT &. GO'S
LUMBER YARDS
AND PLANING MILLS,
No. 78 Commercial Street. jul tf
J~A~HKNItERSON, WM.'F. MARSHALL,
President. Secretary.
J. R. SMURR,
Vice President and Treasurer.
SOUTHERN "CALIFORNIA
LUMBER CO.
350 East First Street.
9-19-Sm Los Angeles, California.
DENTISTS.
Removed to 208 N. Main St. opposite Temple
Block, Rooms 1, 2, 8, 4, 5 and 6.
FILLINGS.
Gold filling *2.00 to JlO.OO
Gold alloy filling 1.50 to 5.00
White fillings for front teeth 1.00 to 2,00
Silver or amalgam filling 1.00
CROWN AND BRIDGE WORK.
Gold and porcelain crowns ? 5.00 to 110.00
Teeth with no plate 10.00 to 15.00
ARTIFICIAL TEETH.
Gold plates, best grade 180.00 to f 40.00
Silver plates, best grade $20.00 to 30.00
Rubber plates, best grade 10.00
Rubber plates, 2d grade 8.00
Rubber plates, 3d grade 6.00
EXTRACTING TEETH.
With vitalized air or gas *. $1.00
With cocaine applied to gums 1.00
Regular extracting 50
Regulating aud treating teeth and gums and
all other operations known to dentistry at
lowest prices All work guaranteed. Office
hours from Ba. in. to 5:30 p. m. Sundays 10 to
12 a. m.
RAMONA!
The Gem of the San Gabriel Valley.
Only Three Miies from City Limits of Los
Angeles.
Property of San Gabriel Wine Co.,
Original owners.
LOCATED AT SHORE'S STATION,
On line of S. P. R. R. and San Gabriel Valley
Rapid Transit R. R.,
From 10 to 15 minutes to the Plaza, Los An
geles City.
CHEAPEST SUBURBAN TOWN LOTS,
VILLA SITES, or
ACREAGE PROPERTY.
POPULAR TERMS.
PUREST SPRING WATEH 1
Inexhaustible quantities guaranteed.
Apply at Office of
SAN GABRIEL WINE CO.,
Ramona, Los Angeles County, Cal;,
10-26tf Or to M. D. WILLIAMS, Ramona.
THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA BLUE
Gravel Mining Company—Location of mines.
Placerito Creek, Los Angeles County, State of
Calif omia.
Location of principal place of bnsiness, 120
South Spring street, in the city of Los Angeles,
in the State of California.
Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of
the Directors, held on the 22d day of October,
1890, an a-sessment (No. 2) of 20 cents per
share was levied on the capital stock of the
corporation, payable on or before She 25th day
of November. 181)0, at its principal place of
business, No. 12t> Soutli Spring street, in the
city of Los Angeles, in the County of Los An
geles, State of California, to Gay W. Brown, the
secretary of said corporation. Any stock on
which this assessment shall remain unpaid, on
the 25th day of November, 1890, will be delin
quent, and advertised forsale at public auction,
and unless payment is made before, will be sold
on Monday, the 15th day of December, 1890, at
10 o'clock a.m., to pay the delinquent assess
ment, together with costs of advertising and
expense of sale.
GAY W. BROWN,
Secretary of the Southern California BlueGrnrel
Mining Company.
Office, 12(5 South Spring street. Los Angeles,
California. 10-24t011-25
STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING.
Office of the )
Los Angeles City Water Company,>
Los Anueles, October 13, 1890. >
Notice is hereby given that the annual meet
ing of the 8toe» holders of the above company
will be held on Mo- day, the 17th day of No
vember, A. D. 1390, at 3:30 o'clock p m., at
the office of the company, on tne northwest
corner of Marchessault and Alameda streets,
Lob Angeles City, for the purpote of electing
Urußtees for the year ensul' g.
S. H. MOTT, Secretary.
City papers please copy. 10-14-td
THE LOS ANGKLKS HERALD.
THE
DAILY AND WEEKLY
"HERALD"
Established Twenty Tears Ago.
Published Under the Same Management Without Change
of Policy Ever Since.
It Always Has Led Eyery Other Journal
IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA AND WILL DO SO.
The Herald has just donned a bright, stylish "dress" of
new types, which in metropolitan appearance, clearness
of impression and facility to read,|puts it far ahead of
all competitors.
The Herald has done more and is doing more to make
known and to develop the manifold resources of this
section, than all other agencies combined. It is the
exponent of the development of the "Semi-Tropics."
The Herald gets all the "Associated Press" telegraphic
news from all parts of the world. To be informed in
the events of the day, people resident in Los Angeles,
must read the Herald.
The Herald gives a carefully and conservatively prepared
resume of all the local news of the day. It is written
up crisply, tersely, pointedly and without unnecessary
prolixity.
To know what is doing in local material enterprises, you
must read the Herald. These lines of news are the
Herald's* special province, and no competitor comes
near it in accuracy therein.
The Herald is by far the best edited paper on the Coast.
It treats all important questions, local, State, national,
international with vigor, intelligence, clearness and
fairness.
The Herald is a clean family paper, avoiding all un
cleanly sensations, but giving all the news of the day.
For a Clean, Faiily Paper Take the Herald
FOR THE J MATERIAL INTERESTS OF THE
COUNTRY TAKE THE HERALD
FOR FULL LOCAL NEWS
OF ALL SORTS TAKE THE HERALD.
For Careful and Able Editorials on All the Happenings,
of the Day Take the Herald.
Tl LOS ANGELES IMP,
THE CLEANEST, ABLEST, MOST COMPLETE AND
SATISFACTORY JOURNAL IN
SOUTH CALIFORNIA

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