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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, November 17, 1890, Image 4

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DAILY HERALD.
PUBLISHED
SEVEN DAVB A WEEK.
Joseph D. Lynch. James J. Arias.
AVERS & LYNCH, - - PUBLISHERS.
| Entered at trie postofiice at Los Angeles as
second-class matter.]
DEIJVERED BY CARRIERS
At SOc Per Week, or 800 Per Month-
TERMS BY MAIL, INCLCDISO POSTAGE:
Daily Herald, one year 18.00
Daily Herald, six mouths 4.25
Daily Herald, three months 2.2^
Weekly Herald, one year 2.00
Weekly Herald, six months 1.00
Weekly Herald, three months 60
Illustrated Herald, per copy 15
Office ol Publication, 223-225 West Second
street. Telephone 150.
Notice to Mall Subscribers.
The papers of all delinquent mail subscribers
to the Los Angeles Daily Herald will be
promptly discontinued herealter. No papers
will be sent to subscribers by mail unless the
same have been paid for in advance. This rule
Is inflexible. AVERS & LYNCH.
The "Dally Herald"
May be found in San Francisco at the Palace
hotel news-stand; in Chicago at the Postofflce
news-stand, 103 East Adams street; in Denver
at Smith Si .Sons' news-stand, Fifteenth end
Lawrence streets.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1800.
THE WEATHER PROBLEM.
The papers in San Francisco are do
ing a good deal of figuring as to the
probability of a dry season. The situa
tion with them is getting to be a little
serious; for it is not often .that the end
of November comes in the northern and
central pirts of the state, failing to de
velop two or three good rains, that the
season does not prove deficient in inois
ture to produce a crop. The anxiety
about this matter in the north has re
sulted in raising the price of barley and
other feed. This is not the
only influence that has increased
the price of these commodities.
The stock of barley in the state is not
more than comfortably sufficient for
the needs of the state, even if a crop for
next year were assured. This most im
portant fact naturally produces a pretty
stiff market. Feed barley is now worth
$1.55 in San Francisco, and it is worth
fully as much here. Each week of con
tinued drouth in the state must
result in creating a higher price
for feed of all sorts. Here hay is up to
$17 per ton, retail price, and if the
month passes without rain, it will prob
ably, go to $20 wholesale.
In our local columns we have tried to
allay any anxiety that may have devel
oped as to a dry year south of Tehach
epi pass. In a period of twenty years
there has been only about one fail
ure of crops by reason of deficient
rainfall, and that was not by any means
a total failure. In fact, deficient crops
have been the result oftenerof too much
rain than of too little. At this moment,
no doubt the failure of the fall rains in
Oregon, Washington and Northern Cal
ifornia' indicates the working of a gen
eral,law, : applicable to the entire Pa
cific coast, but that ia all can be
said at this time. We are only
at the beginning of the season, and local
causes often produce good rains here
when the general laws fail to bring
any precipitation in the northern por
tion of the state. A glance at the facts
set forth in the article referred to before
will show that a failure of rain up to the
end of November with us in Southern
California is a fact of little or no sig
nificance. Even should there be no
rain up to the end of December, still
the chances would be altogether in
favor of plenty of rain after that date.
For a long series of years we have had
abundance of rain every year. The re
sult is that the ground is full of moist
ure, the streams are running a good
volume, and the mountains are storing
an almost inexhaustible Eupply of
the precious fluid. Under these
circumstances, our moist lands will pro
duce crops without any rainfall, our
vegetable lands will produce big crops,
and a very moderate rainfall will in
sure crops even on the dryest mesas.
Two inches of rain in the four months
from January first, would be ample for
all purposes.
The fact is Southern California is the
most certain section of the country as
to rainfall. Our dispatches inform us
this morning that one-half of the state
of Nebraska is now undergoing a famine
because of a failure of the rains
last summer, and the legislature
of that state is asked to ap
propriate $100,000 to keep the people
from starvation. This is something ab
solutely unknown in Southern California,
where the crops never fail. It is to be
hoped that our rains may hold off until
quite late. If they do not come until near
the end of the year it is no misfortune,
but rather the opposite. If the total
precipitation for the season should not
surpass a dozen inches, that, too, will be
a positive benefit to all interests.
Most Angelefios will remember the
great energy used by Mr. C. White
Mortimer, the British vice consul in Los
Angeles, in denouncing the investments
of Englishmen in Antelope valley. Col.
J. Drew Gay and Mr. Elliott had pur
chased some 50.000 acres in that section
at $1 an acre, which was subsequently
reinforced by the purchase of 13,000
acres additional at the same price.
Some of this land, subdivided, and un
der plans of colonization when C.White
Mortimer raised his assinine bray in the
English press, was resold to English
colonists for $2 or *3 an acre, pending
the London Telegraph's experiment of
making paper out of the yucca palm, a
species of cactus that grows out on the
Mojave plains. While Mr. Mortimer, for
a consideration, had much to say in
commendation of the Rose place, which
was then loaded down with the red
and white scale, he had nothing but
senseless vituperation to extend to the
intelligent plans of the Messrs. Gay and
Elliott, who figured as the representa
tives of the greatest evening paper on
earth, the London Telegraph. The
Herald pointed out the inconsistency
of this financial fakir, who reported
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD: MONDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 17, 1890.
most rosily for propositions that in
volved "dead horse," and who never had
a word to say in favor of propositions in
which the British investor could have
made, in two or three years, from two to
twenty-five thousand per cent. During
the past week Mr. Elliott sold on ac
count of the Lawson estate—both the
proprietor of the London Evening Tele
graph and Col. Gay are dead —seven
thousand acres of the original purchase
in Antelope valley to the Rock Creek
Irrigation company for $25 an acre, the
original purchase price being $1 an acre.
Probably few English investors would
look for a larger return for capital in
vested for a very short time than is in
volved in these figures. They mean
that on the surface of the globe there is
no such opportunity for the profitable
investment of money as exists to
day in lais Angeles county.
AS IT LOOKS TO US.
There are few people who have lived
in Southern California for a long time
who are not aware of the fact that rob
bery and perjury are incidents of daily
life here in as full a measure as led the
framers of the Mosaic law to say to the
Israelites struggling toward Mt. Pisgah
and the Promised Land, "Thou shalt
not steal," and, "Thou shalt not bear
false witness against thy neighbor." In
our local columns we give a resume of
the Edelman warrant robberies. There
is no man in Los Angeles county,
who is a cubit high in stature,
and who knows enough to go in out
of the rain, who does not know that the
county has been robbed, and robbed
shamelessly, in every detail of these mat
ters which are now on trial. There has
been something indescribably infamous
in every detail of these swindling opera
tions against the county. Our accom
plished fellow-citizen, the Hon. "-tephen
M. White, if he were district attorney,
would send every one of the forgers to
the penitentiary. Yet he will get up as
the attorney of these people and strain
every nerve to have them acquit
ted, and judging by the past, he
will succeed. Why should these Edel
mans be allowed to rob the community ?
Why should the Republican party be
permitted to escape the consequences of
its great outrages on common honesty
and partisan responsibility ? And echo
will answer, "Why?" There is too
much of this disgusting travesty of law,
and too much successful boodling, to
please the people of Los Angeles county.
The results which follow upon such a
scheme are not unexpected. An ar
raigned forger gets up in his place in a
felon's dock; and, instead of hiding his
guilty head, and asking the mercy of
his wronged fellow citizens, he turns
his tainted tongue against a press which
has been all too merciful towards him;
and is permitted, after arraigning his
betters, with no forgery uncanceled—a
forgery which must have been com
mitted by somebody, and which was
probably committed by the fellow that
got the money —to walk into the light of
heaven a free man. Very likely
there was no forgery in the
Damron case. Very likely the
$2200, which was drawn from the county
treasury by the Edelman forgeries,
ought to have been lost to the taxpayers
of Los Angeles county in any event.
But there are a great many people who
will not think so; and who will think,
in addition, that with six superior courts
in full play in Los Angeles county there
ought to be a little law, to say nothing
of justice.
Mk. Blame, Bince the late election, is
certainly a much more important factor
in the Republican party than he was
six months ago. He was taken into the
cabinet on sufferance, aud he has been
little more than a cipher in it Until the
past few days. He has been out of
sympathy with the party on
nearly every great issue, and
has openly fought with his people,
on some of the most pronounced fea
tures of their policy. His ideas were
sneered at and their author was snub
bed for propounding them. He is now
master of the situation, and will rise in
influence in the party again until he be
comes its most commanding figure once
more. Will he be the party's leader
and standard bearer in 1892? Hardly,
but possible.
There is no reason in the world why
a square Democratic ticket should not
sweep the city of Los Angeles. Demo
crats always give that degree of reform
which is embodied in honesty and good
government. The voter knows that in
a Democrat he has a guardian of society ;
and that in most of the Republicans he
haj a boodler enemy. With either Hon.
Thomas B. Brown or Dr. Joseph Kurtz
for mayor the Democracy would have a
walk-over.
The mature advice of the Herald to
the Democracy is, "stand by your
guns." There is enough reform in the
party of Jackson and Jefferson to start
half a dozen callow parties in existence.
This thing of originating a party every
other day has become tedious ; but, nev
ertheless, the ordinary records seem-to
make the boy asleep in the rushes some
thing that stirs the heart of the cast
iron martinet,
NOT CAPTURED.
The Murderer of Mrs. Farmer Still at
Large.
Major George E. Gard, United States
marshal, returned yesterday from his
search for the Indian who murdered
Mrs. Farmer at Mint cafion, near Acton,
on Friday last. The murderer is being
closely pursued and will probably be
captured.
The Indian is described as follows : A
Chimahuaia Indian from Fort Tejon, 25
years old, 5 feet 8 inches in height, me
dium build, face smooth, not full nor
exactly thin ( complexion medium light
for an Indian, cheek bones not very
prominent, wears dark-colored sack coat
and vest, buttons on vest of different
colors, pants mixed grey, badly frayed
at the\ bottom and much worn
on inside nearly to the knee, .
black slouch hat, sharp pointed laced
clioes, about number 9, with three nails
on outside of the sole of the left shoe.
He is well acquainted with the coun
try near Calico; speaks good English ;
carries a 44-calibre Ballard rifle.
Coroner Weldon returned yesterday af»
ter having held an inquest on the body
of Mrs. Farmer. The verdict of the jury
was that she came to her death from the
hands of some unknown person.
TELEGRAPHIC.
STARVING BUGEATERS.
Funds Required to Relieve Distress in
Western Nebraska.
Lincoln, Neb., Nov. 16.—At a mass
meeting held today, presided over by
Governor Thayer, steps were taken for
the immediate relief of the destitute
in the western part of the state, and a
substantial fund was raised. It is de
signed to tide over all pressing wants by
individual subscriptions until the meet
ing of the legislature. A commission,
appointed by the governor, reported
twelve counties included in tlie drouth
stricken district. An appropriation of
$100,000 will be required to Drevent
actual suffering.
DESTITUTE IRISH.
Great Suffering- Reported in the Sklb
bereen District.
Dublin, Nov. 10, —Colonel Turner has
just returned from a visit to the district
of Skibbereen. which Baltour was pre
vented by illness from visiting on his
recent tour. He gives a gloomy report
of the condition of the district. Thei
inhabitants, he says, aie for the most
part in a state of abject poverty, es
pecially in Schull, where the greatest
destitution pievails.
No Reprisal League Formed.
Rome, Nov. 10.— The Riformi gives a
formal denial to the statement that
Crispi and Caprivi, at their recent inter
view, arranged for the formation of an
international league in opposition to the
new United States tariff.
Dr. Koch's Remedy.
Berlin, Nov. 10.—There are 1500 for
eign doctors already here for a supply of
Dr. Koch's lymph, which is temporarily
exhausted. Koch suggested that the
remedy be called "paratoloid" in pre
scriptions.
A Misplaced Switch.
Huntington, lud., Nov. 10.—A bad
freight wreck was caused on the Chicago
and Erie near here last night, presum
ably by a misplaced switch. The en
gineer, fireman and a brakeman were
fatally injured.
A 540.800 Fire.
Pittsburg, Nov. 16. —The business
portion of the village of Luthersburg,
Clearfield county, was destroyed by fire
yesterday, entailing a loss of $40,000.
Long Live Liberty.
Madrid, Nov. 16. —Ex-PremierSagasta
returned today. Sixty thousand liberals
escorted him home, cheering and shout
ing: "Long live liberty."
The Muskroot for Cholera.
The Russian government has sent sev
eral physicians to Asia Minor to make
experiments in the treatment of cholera
with ferula 6umbul, or muskroot, a
plant which grows in Turkestan and
which possesses certain anti-spasmodic
properties. It formerly enjoyed quite a
reputation in Germany and Russia as a
remedy for cholera, but has fallen out
of use in- recent times. Even its name ia
now unknown to most practitioners in
those countries, although the plant is
still regarded popularly as an efficient
diarrhoea medicine.—Chicago News.
Queen Natalie a Physical Wreck.
Queen Natalie's, of Servia, troubles
have told terribly upon her. In two
years she has aged twenty. It is said
that she suffers from want of 'sleep and
has recourse to opiates. Her beauty is
gone and with it her youth, and the
wreck of her former self is all that is
left to tell the tale of her life. She is the
personification of a political riddle, in
the solving of which a nation is rendered
wretched, a queen outraged and a moth
er disconsolate.—New York Telegram.
Worth Their Weight in Pound Notes.
Many parents are apt to consider their
daughters worth their weight in gold,
but a Scotch gentleman estimated his
two daughters' value at even a higher
rate than this, bequeathing to each her
weight in £1 notes. The elder seems to
have been slimmer than her sister, for
she got only £51,200, while the younger
received £55,344.
At Long Branch even the West End
ers go in the surf barefooted. It should
be said to the credit of these sensible
girls that they take a bath and return to
the pavilion without a moment's run
ning or sanding on the beach. More,
than that, they wear long suits that reach
from ear to wrist and from chin to knee.
The Best iv the World.
Senator Henry C. Nelson, of New York, says
"On the 27th of February, 1883,1 was taken
with a violent pain in the region of the kid
neys I suffered such agony that I could hardly
stand up. A» soon as possible I applied two
Allcock's Porous Plasters, one over each
kidney, and laid down. In an hour, to my sur
prise and delight, the pain had vanished and I
was well. I wore the plasters for a day or two
as a precaution, and then removed "them I
have been using Allcock's Porous Plasters
in my mmiiy for the last ten years, and have
always L.und them the quickest and best ex
ternal remedy for colds, strains and rheumatic
affectio'is From ray experience I believe they
are the best plasters in the world."
Eccalyfta, sing of table waters.
There will be a mass-meeting at Haz
ard's pavilion to-night, at 7:30, of the
friends of the Sunday closing of saloons.
There will be good speakers and good
music— [Advt.j
No High Prices
At Joe Pohelra's, The Tailor. Eight cases of
the very latest styles in suitings and trouser
ings just received. All our work made by
first class workmen in Los Angeles. 141 and
143 S. Spring street.
Serviceable and Stylish Suits
Made to order at Gordon Bros.'. 118 South
Spring street. Our prices cannot be lowered or
our goods excelled.
EI'CALYPTA for brain workers.
Frank X. Engler.
Piano regulator and tuner, 11!) 9. Olive St.
Drink Eucaltpta, ye thirsty thousands.
HEATH & MILLIGAN Prepared Paint at
Bcriver St Quinn, 146 8. Main street.
Drink Euc alytta for all stomach troubles.
Bakery.
Kbinger's bakery and ice cream and dining
parlors, cor. Third and 8. Spring sts.
Every family should use Eucai.yita .
Yes, It Is.
That man dresses well, and his straight cut
tack was bought of Mullen, Bluett & Co. Get
one like it for SlB, S2O, *25.
Eucalyfta is sparkling, refreshing and
pleasant.
The Illustrated Annual Herald.
The most acceptable present you can
send to eastern friends is the Illus
trated Annual Herald. There are
forty-eight large pages of fresh and re
liable information about Southern Cali
fornia, including statistical matter of
the greatest value, relating to the cli
mate, crops, population, etc. There are
fifty tine illustrations of local scenes, the
birdseye view of the city of lajb Angeles
being alone worth the cost of the publi
cation. No gift would be more appreci
ated in the east than a copy of the An
nual Herald. It may be obtained of
newsdealers, or at the Herald business
office. Price 15 cents per copy.
When purchasing teas or coffees, do
not look for a chromo ora six cent pickle
dish to go with it, but go to H. Jevne's
grocery house, wbere pure teas and cof
fees at proper values can always be had,
136 and 138 north Spring street.
Cannot Be Excelled.
Mullen, Bluett & Co. have on hand the largest
vml best assortment of cutaway suits in South
ern California. They have on their counters
today forty lines of frock suits from $15 to $35.
It will pay you to look them over.
Drink EucalvptaJor headache, sour stomach.
F. Adam, Pioneer Tailor.
Call on him at 213 N. Spring street (up stairs)
for the best tits and lowest prices in the city.
Adam does his work at home, on short notice,
and always suits his patrons.
Erc.vi.YPTA stimulates, but does not intoxi-
cate.
Overstocked.
Gordan Bros., 118 S. Spring street, the place
for bargains iv domestic and Imported woolens.
Call and be convinced.
Manioca, for puddings, at Jevne's,
AMUSEMENTS.
NEW LOS ANGELES THEATRE.
H. C. Wvatt, Lessee and Maneger.
Monday and Tuesday, Nov. 17 and 18.
GREAT SUCCESS.
: LIBS ATI'S i
UNRIVALED MILITARY BAND
Of New York City.
50 SELECTED ARTISTS 50
Including an array of Peerless Soloists and
Famous Vocalists.
The finest Band that has ever visited the Pacific
Coast. Sig. A. Libkati, the greatest Corjiet
Soloist in the world, at every concert.
Popular prices Seats on sale at Box Office
on and after Wednesday Nov. 12lh, at 10a.m.
ILLINOIS HALL,
Broadway andSixtii St.
SOCIAL AND ENTERTAINMENT
BY
THE ILLINOIS ASSOCIATION,
Tuesday Evening, November 18th.
Vocal and Instrumental Music, and Dramatic
Readings by
MRS. BATTLE JOHNSON,
The noted Elocutionist from the East.
Everybody welcome.
9-28-tf
TIVOLI THEATRE.
12, 14 and 10 Court street.
STRICTLY FAMILY RESORT.
ADMISSION, - - - - 15c, 25c. and 35c.
EVERY EVENING.
MATINEE SUNDAY.
.NEW ATTRACTIONS WEEKLY.
10-24-6 m
r EIECfION"
_l >' *' ...,©H
Closing Saloons ob Sunday.
Tuesday, Nov. 18, 1890.
VOTING PLACES.
FIRST WARD.
Precinct A—Moore's store, Downey avenue,
between Truman and Hellman sts.
Precinct B—Arnold & Swing's real esta'e of
fice, Downey avenue, between Chestnut and
Truman sts.
SECOND WARD.
Precinct A—Southeast corner Temple and Bel
mont avenue.
Precinct B—Northwest cor. Temple St. and
Broadway.
THIRD WARD.
Precinct A—Old City Hall.
Precinct B—Chick's stable, Fifth It. between
Spring and Broadway.
Precinct C—Drug store, northeast cor. Sixth
and Pearl.
FOURTH WARD.
Precinct A—Alderson A Kincaid stables, Pearl
near Pico.
Prec net B—Engine house, Ninth street.
FIFTH WARD,
Precinct A—Washington Garden stables.
SIXTH WARD.
Precinct A—Ladies' free reading room, nenr
Washington Garden.
SEVENTH WARD.
Precinct A—Northwest cor. Wall and Fifth sts.
Precinct B—Northeast cor. Daviesand Rose sts.
EIGHTH WARD.
Precinct A—San Fernando St., opp. S. P. R. R.
depot.
Precinct B—Hook and Ladder House, Aliso st.
NINTH WARD.
Precinct A—Northcraf t's warehouse, cor. An
derson & Aliso.
Precinct B—Engine house, Virginia avenue
near Boyle.
Polls open at sunrise and close fit 5 p. m. Vote!
Vote early, and vote fir Sunday saloon closing.
11 17-2t
J. C. CUNNINGHAM,
Manufacturer of and Dealer in
Tronks and Bags
132 S. MAIN ST., Opp. Mott Market.
Telephone No. 818.
Repairing promptly attended to. Old trunk
taken in exchange. Orders called for an
delivered to a 11 parts of the city. au2o-3m
Naud's Warehouse.
GRAIN, WOOL.,
—AMD-
General Merchandise Warehouse.
ADVANCES MADE ON WOOL. ml2-ti
C. F. HEINZEMAN,
Druggist & Chemist
No. N. Main St., I,oi Angeles, Cal.
Prescription* carefully compounded day and
night. mil-U
CLOSING OUT
CLOAKS!
AT
25 PER CENT. BELOW COST.
We are going out of this line entirely and are offering Ladies', Misses' and Children's
Cloaks at RUINOUS PRICES. We invite ladies to examine our goods and get our prices
before purchasing elsewhere. Take advantage of this sale, as WE ARE POSITIVELY RE
TIRING FROM THIS BRANCH OF BUSINEfeB.
CLOAKS AT ANY PRICK.
jfe CITY OF PARIS,
NO BOOM!
BUT THERE IS A
TREMENDOUS UNDER CURRENT
THAT IS
Sweeping Everything
BEFORE IT TOWARDS
ALESSANDROI
1000 ACRES
Have been sold since the day of the selection, October 15th.
Most everybody was there on that day; aud it was truly an
eye-opener to those who saw that MAGNIFICENT
TRACT OF LAND for the first time and realized the
GREAT INDUCEMENT the
BearYalley & Alessandro Development Co
ARE OFFERING TO SETTLERS.
NO TIME TO WASTE
IF YOU WISH TO SECURE A
HOME IN ALESSANDRO
$80 per Acre is the Price Today,
And only 250 acres at this price, then
250 ACRES AT" $85.00,
It will cost $100 before many days.
DO NOT WAIT, BUY NOW!
Not an acre on the entire tract that would not be cheap to
day at $150. One man said in our office, who has 40 acres,
that he would not sell an acre for less than $200. That is
the way the'people feel who know what they are talking
about. Real estate at 50 cents on the dollar is the thing to
put your money in. Call at the office of the company and
look at the map.
Bear Valley & Development Co.,
A. P. KITCHING, Gen. Manager. Redlands, Cal.
BARTLETT'S
JEWELRY« MIC ill
Has Removed to
129 N. SPRING 81
NEXT DOOR TO PEOPLES' STORE
NOTICE.
All persons are herebj warned not to shoot
or trespass in any way inside the fences or
upon the lake at Nigger slough, upon penally
arrest.
1028 I4t O. B. DOCAZAU
PIONEER TRUCK CO.,
(Successors to McLain & Lehman,)
pbofbietors of thm ''
Pioneer Truck & Transfer Co.
Piauo and Safe Moving a Specialty.
Telephone 137 3 Market St. Los Angeles Cal
tel-tf

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