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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, November 29, 1890, Image 4

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DAILY HERALD.
FCBLISIIKD '
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.
Joseph D. LYNCH. James J. Ayers.
AVERS & LYNCH, - - PUBLISHERS.
I Entered st the postoffiee et Los Angeles as
second class matter. ]
DELIVERED BY CARRIERS
At »Oc Per Week, or Bt>c Per Month-
TERMS BY MAIL, INCLUDING POSTAGE:
Daily Herald, one year *f'S9
Daily Herald, six months j-j-o
Daily Herald, three months 2£>
Weekly Herald, one year 2.00
Weekly Herald, six months 1,00
Weekly Herald, three months OO
Illustrated Hebald, per copy IS
Offlce ol Publication, 223-225 West Second
street. Telephone 156.
Notice to Mail Subscribers.
The papers ol all delinquent mail subscribers
to the I.os Angeles Daily Herald will be
promptly discontinued hereafter. No papers
will be sent to subscribers by mail unless the
same have been paid for in advance. This rulo
la Inflexible. AVERS & LYNCH.
The "Daily Herald"
May be found in San Francisco at the Palace
hotel news-stand; in Chicago at the Postofflce
news-stand, 103 East Adams street; in Denver
at Bmlth Si Sous' news-stand, Fifteenth and
Lawrence streets.
SATURDAY, NOVKMBKK 29, 1890.
PARNELL PLAYING A LOSING PART.
It is inconceivable that a man of Par
nell'? political astuteness should want
to retain the leadership of the Irish
party in the face of the positive opposi
tion of the English Liberal party, and
the evident desire on the part of his own
colleagues that he may be able to see
the necessity of his retirement. His
sullen attitude seems to indicate a self
ishness we had not before suspected in
Parnell. Xo man can rise above pub
lic sentiment, and it is especially unfor
tunate that one who has it in his power
to help or injure a great national cause
should for a moment place his own per
sonality or feelings in the balance
against that cause. A man of large,
broad and comprehensive principles
would certainly not do so, and
wo have heretofore given Parnell
credit for those principles. He has
tjertainly been a great leader, and has
exhibited a force of character in his
championship of the rights of Ireland
which give him the highest claims upon
the gratitude of his countrymen. Yet
he dwarfs himself and tarnishes his
record when he fails to appreciate the
fact that his dogged persistence en
dangers the great cause for which he
haa worked so long and so splendidly.
For, alter all, where is the credit to him
if after performing a magnificent work
for his country he deliberately spoils it
and renders it nugatory by an act of su
preme selfishness?
If others than himself were to blame
for the situation in which he finds he
ia placed, there might be some reason
for his sullen attitude. But his party
has been loyal to him in every emer
gency; it has followed him with a har
mony and a fidelity such as has never
been witnessed bcfure in Irish leader
ship; and even now it clings to the
shadow of a hope that he may unseal
his lips and give liis friends
some explanation of his conduct that
will enable them to face the moral
world wito a decent line of defense.
This last relief, however, his colleagues
can hardly hope for. Whatever the mo
tive for his silence, and whatever of a
condonatory character may lie behind
it, it is now too late to change the set
tled conviction of the public. He is un
fortunate if he is impeccant, but as the
world goes his silence is looked upon as
a confession.
But if Parnell stood ready to resist
any demand from his own immediate
followers to withdraw, how can he ex
pect to maintain his hold upon his own
party, if he persists to refuse to do so in
the face of the attitude of Gladstone and
the English Liberal party? If he should
do so, it will be manifest to the whole
world that he considers himself before
hig country—and when once he falls
from public esteem as a patriot, not only
his usefulness but his well-earned fame
will be gone. Look at his attitude from
any point of view, and it ia not cal
culated to raise him in public esteem ;
and however set he may be in his
purpose to hoid his place at the head of
the Irish home rulers, he will ulti
niately'be compelled to retire. He has
now a chance to do so gracefully; in a
few days he will be forced to go, with
the further humiliation that hia reputa
tion for patriotism will go with him.
The temper of the noble English
allies of home rule cannot be mistaken—
they will not co-operate with the Irish
party if Parnell retains ita leadership.
When Mr. Gladstone felt constrained to
take a positive attitude on the issue
every one may be assured that it is a
very grave one. The Liberals, under
the leadership of the "grand old man,"
were to all outward appearances, going
on to certain victory. All the indica
tions furnished by the elections up till
the Parnell scandal, pointed that way.
As the case stands now, if Salisbury
were to dissolve parliament, the Tories
could scarcely fail to achieve an un
precedented triumph. The temporary
retirement of Parnell from a leadership
in which he could no longer hope to be
effective would seem to be called for on
every patriotic consideration. The fate
of one man or of a score of men counts
but a trifle in the scale as against the
interests of a whole people.
THE LAST OF HIS RACE.
The recent death of William 111,
king of Holland, in his seventy-third
year, may prove the first link in an in
teresting chain of political events in
Europe.
The historical family of Orange has
most probably with his demise closed
ita career as a reigning dynasty.
Founded in the sixteenth century by
William, the Silent, whose heroic efforts
for the liberation of the Netherlands
from the tyranny of Spain and France
terminated abruptly in his assassination
THE LOS ANfIELES HERALD: SATURDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 29, 1890
in 1584, the houee of Orange has ruled
Holland throughout some of the most
brilliant achievements, both at home
and abroad, to which any nation can
lay claim.
The late king had been twice mar
ried. Two sons of the first union died
without heirs. His second wife, to
whom he was wedded in 1870, was Prin
cess Emma, of Waldeck-Pyrmont, a sis
ter of the Duchess of Albany (wife oi
Prince Arthur of England). The heir to
the throne is Princess Wilhelmlna, a
child of ten years, during whose minor
ity Queen Emma will act as regent.
Judging by the republican trend oi
thought and feeling on the continent,
however, it is extremely problematic
that this child will ever wear her
father's crown. Long before she comes
of age the United States of Europe may
have become an accomplished fact. But,
in the nearer foreground, the sleepless
jealousy between France aud Germany
may precipitate awkward complications
in connection with Luxemburg, of
which the late king was grand duke,
j The Salic law, precluding a woman
from inheriting regal power, causes Hol
land's child-queen to lose this annex to
her patrimonial inheritance, Duke
Adolf of Nassau, a member of another
branch of the family of Orange—ac
cording to this remnant of the rule of
the Franks—becoming its possessor.
The duke is a German subject, Nassau
having been incorporated by Germany
in her grand territorial sweep of 1800.
The tiny, triangular-shaped princi
pality, only thirty-two miles broad by
fifty long, with a population of a little
more than 200,000, lies wedged in be
tween Belgium and Rhenish Prussia,
touching France on the southwest. It
forms a point of great strategetieal im
portance, particularly in case of a re
newal of hostilities between France and
Germany.
In 1807, Napoleon 111 created a furor
in European political circles by arousing
suspicions of a contemplated absorption
oi Luxemburg and Belgium. An inter
national meeting, held in London in
; consequence, resulted in a treaty by
I which the little state was declared neu
! tral and placed in the guaranteed pos
session of the house of Orange-Nassau.
Bismarck, who was hardly willing to
precipitate the Franco-Prussian struggle
at that time, renounced the right of gar
risoning the missive fortress in the
southern part of the duchy, which,
somewhat later, was demolished.
The natural inference is that France
would regard with extreme disfavor
Germany acquiring a position of such
consequence on her northern frontier.
Germany, in her desire for extended
commercial seaboard, is openly credited
with a hankering for rounding off
her coast line by the acquisition of
Holland. And France, in turn, is not
devoid of ambition in this section of
Europe also. The annexation of Bel
gium she believes to be 'part of her
natural destiny. To either party the
acquisition of Luxemburg would greatly
facilitate the aims of the one and retard
those of the other.
Upon some such pivot may turn that
disturbance of the balance of power in
Europe, which, in all likelihood, will
add a very stirring chapter to modern
history.
THE DUTY OF THE DEMOCRACY.
We are not of those who think it a
man's duty to supp6rt any name on his
party ticket, irrespective of the question
of merit or demerit. In local affairs
particularly it is the highest duty of the
citizen to discriminate, and not only not
to vote for men positively objectionable,
but, on the contrary, to vote directly
against those of notorious unfitness for
the place. But common aa it is for a
man to suffer for the company he is in,
it ia not always just that he should. It
ia proverbial that politics makes strange
bedfellows.
Next Monday it will be the duty of
the citizens of this municipality to vote
for city officers. The government of the
city for the past two years has been no
toriously bad. It lias been our cher
ished hope that we would be
able to redeem the city from misrule
at the approaching election. It is still
our hope that thia may be at least par
tially done. It is always a misfortune to
have any party exercise uncontrolled
sway in any government. A divided
responsibility ia almost universally
found to be the best.
We most earnestly commend to the
Democratic voters of this city a number
of names on our ticket that stand for the
highest types of manhood in this com
munity. It is most desirable that the
council, the board of education and the
library trustees be as largely Demo
cratic as possible. It will be for the
best interests of the city to have
it so, and fortunately there are
names on the ticket for all these
offices that are worthy of the
earnest support of all good men.
The councilmanic ticket is particularly
strong. Not to mention them all, Daniel
Innes in the Second ward, V. Ponet in
the Fourth, John Osborne in the Fifth,
J. T. Bearden in the Sixth, and D. M.
McUarry in the Seventh, are among the
best known and most thoroughly trusted
men in tho city, They are thoroughly
identified with the city's interests, and
their worst enemies cannot find one
word to say to their discredit.
The list oi names up for library trus
tees is an equally Strong one. Again,
not to multiply instances, it will be
only necessary to take the first
and last in the list, E. H.
Owen and J. 1). Bicknell. If the city
were picked two more suitable names
could not be selected.
For the general offices there are M. F.
Stiles for clerk, I. 11. Polk for treasurer,
A. McNally for superintendent of streets
and J. H. Dockweiler for engineer,
all men who may claim the fealty of
every member of their party, and the
careful consideration of all good citizens
of all parties. They are possessed of all
Jeffersonian tests for fitness to hold of
fice. They are capable, honest and
sober. No voters can by any possibility
make any mistake in giving their suf
frage and their earnest support to these
men. They are worthy.
It is the duty of the party to up
hold every man of them, and it will be
better for the city if they are put in
trust. Without going into any pro
gramme of disparagement as to their
opponents, we do not hesitate to say
that our men are by far the best. Let
them have their full party vote, and
whenever there is a Republican in
doubt as to tho fitness of the opposing
candidate on liis own ticket, we say
confidently, hesitate no Linger, but give
your vote and your aid to these men oi
ours. They will not disappoint you.
It is a critical period in the history of
our party in this city. Let no mistake
be made. We can sutler defeat with
less injury than we can achieve succef-s
in the election of improper men to office ;
but do not let any such counsel result in
any injury to any thoroughly good man
on our ticket. Give him more earnest
j and hearty support because of the cxi
! gencies of the occasion.
Aftbb a characteristic exhibition of
moral cowardice, the local Democracy
nominated their municipal ticket on
Wed nesday.
The above is from the Express of last
evening. In another article our neigh
bor says, speaking of the Democratic
ticket:
The whole thing is so rank that our
esteemed Democratic contemporary, the
Herald, is so tilled with unspeakable
indignation and disgust that it has thus
far refrained from mentioning editorially
the fact that a ticket has bee . launched,
although two days have elapsed since
the auspicious event.
Why the Express should speak of the
"eharaeteristiccowardice" of the Democ
racy is not apparent, but let that go. Out
neighbor seems to admire moral courage,
and wo shall be glad at some future time
to see it practice as it preaches. We
have often set it an example of this ster
ling quality, and shall be glad to see it
emulate this good example when some
member of its own party, especially
some rascally office-holder, is charged
with crime.
Thebr is every indication of great i
activity in the Terminal railway project.
Mr. Richard Kerrens writes that his as
sociates and himself will be out here
early in February to look over the
ground. Meanwhile, seventy thousand
tons of steel rails and a proportionate
quantity of ties will be sent to Los An- j
geles forthwith. This will be enough to j
rail and tie seventy miles of road. Mr. :
Burnett, the Los Angeles managerof the
company, is about to start for the cast J
to further the objects of the enterprise j
and expedite the arrangements looking j
toward active construction.
"A GROWL."
Mb. Editor: Although my taxes are small,
f«t they are as burdensome to me as if I paid j
much more. Aud as a tax-payer, I feel that 1 ■
have a right to criticise those extravagances j
that are factors iv the creation of high taxes. I 1
have iv my mind tho county hospital. No
■Doner does Ihe impecunious citizen beeonio
broken down and debilitated, than he rushes off
to the hospital. Even persistent dyspepsia and
j constipation aro getting to be excuses for admis
sion. Hence, allow mo spice to enter my feeble
! protest against further continuance of this per
nicious practice. It costs the county many
hard dollars for the treatment of every onetjf
these unfortunates, and It is high time that they
should know that they can save the county that
expense, and themselves those distressing ail
ments, by tho judicious use ot a few bottles of j
Joy's Vegetable Sarsaparilla,— a remedy that
within my observation is a sovereign cure for
those too common disorders. If they won't take \
it they ought to be compelled to by some law
that would meet the ease. Under the circum
stances a full hospital is inexcusable, — hence
this growl. CITIZEN. )
I
The Colored Man in Polities.
The Colored Workingmen'a Republi
can club met at tbe hall last night. Mr.
R. Murphy, chairman, called the meet
ing to order, after which the object of
the meeting was stated by the secretary.
8. Oliver. Rousing speeches were made
by A. McNally, Ed Gibson, A. Ramish,
E. B. Brawn, S. Oliver, Wm. McKinney
and others. The meeting then ad
journed to meet tomorrow night, and
all candidates are invited to be present.
Seieneo Overcomes Deafness.
Just now the medical world is engaged in dis
cussing the new device for deafness called
Sound Disc. No invention of late has attracted
so much interest among the medical profession.
Its perfection, which is now an established fact,
has resulted in the overthrow of many pet
theories of there being no relief for a vast num
ber of eases.
This ingenious discovery was made by H. A.
Wales, of Bridgeport, Conn., nnd coming as it
does with the approval of some of the leading
aurists of the world, it can hardly fail to prove
of great value to both the profesi-ion and the
afflicted.
Drifted Snow Flour.
Rightly named, at Seymour & Johnson Cos.
Democratic City Ticket.
FOR MAYOR R. A. 1.1 NO
For City Clerk M. F. STILES
For City Assessor A. RAMISH
For City Auditor FRANK A. MAURICIO
For City Treasurer I H. FOLK
For City Attorney J. MARION BROOKS
For Superintendent of Streets ...A. McNALLY
For City Engineer J. H. DOCKWEILER
For City Tax C. lleetor W. V. HEATHMAN
For Trustee of tlie Public Library—
E. H. OWENS.
H. J. HANCHETTE.
J. B. DUNLAP.
ANTHONY BCHWAMM.
J I>. BICKNELL.
For Member of the Council-
First Ward F. M. NICKELL
Second Ward DANIEL INNES
Tliird Ward CHARLES GABBEN
Fourth Ward V PONET
Fifth Ward JOHN OSBORNE
Sixth Ward J. T. BEARDEN
Seventh W rd D M. McIiARRY
Eiehih Ward..' GEO. LE MEBMAGER
Ninth Ward ~ F.COBB
For kfember of Board of Education—
First Ward J. E. FRICK
Second Ward H. 0. MARSH
Third Ward E. VVINEBURGII
Fourtli Ward CHARLES LANTZ
Fifth Ward. A. '"RAWFORD
Sixth Ward J. j. HOUX
Seventh Ward W. F. NORDHOLT
Eighth Ward J. T. GAFFEY
Ninth Ward C, M.RICHARDSON
L. FRIEL.
Surveyor and Civil Engineer,
"Room 8, Maxwell Block, I.os Angeles.
Having in my possession the private notes of
ihe nirveys made by Major Henry Hancock, I
am prepared to re locate Ranch Boundaries.
Township and Section lines. 11-2:i-3in
Please send Dr. Chamlee address of persons with
Cancer
liiO S. Spring st. Xo knife'or pain. Book free.
gtJacobsOil
cures w
(pacKAclp.
™? «" ACHES
Promptly —
AMUSEMENTS.
-VJKW I.MS ANOELES theatre,
il H- C. WYATT, Lessee and Manager.
Last Two Night* and Saturday
Matinee.
Mr. Al. Barman, manager of the Baldwin
Theater, San Francisco, presents
THE GREAT
OLA It A MOBRISI
Under the management of Edwin H. Price.
"An actress who compels admiration."—[Ex
aminer.
"A genuinely artistic representation."—
[Chronicle
"Miss Morris give a perfect study "—|Call.
"A woman of unquestionable genius."—
'Report.
••she has a very enviable reputation."—[Alta.
"Clara Morris has no superior."—[Bulletin.
"Her acting caused a wild tumult of ap
plause, "—[Post.
Friday RENEE DE MORAY
Saturday Matinee CAMILLE.
Saturday Night RENEE DE MORAY
Prices—2sc, 50c, 75e, Jl and f1.50.
Sale of seats begins Tnursda*', November 20th,
at 10 a. in. 11-1!)
/-SRAND OPERA. HOUSE.
VT McLain & Lehmak, Managers.
HERRMANN'S
MAGNIFICENT
TR A NS-ATi. ANTIQUES.
M A TIN E X TODAY:
LAST
PER FORM ANCE TONIO BT.
jp RAND OPERA HOUSE,
\JT McLain & Lbiiman, Managers.
BEGINNING MONDAY EVENING.
G A 3
U METEOR O
8 FLASH II
OF N
MERRIMENT!
W T
I A magnificent company of
J' HE.VI- comedians,
l i Controlled by Prof. Herrmann ; *>
I : and Oeorgc W. Lederer, pre- j ™
A ■ tenting the entirely new • r
g MUSICAL SATIRE! y
. D U ii II
IT IJ 4 4 II
V V 44 4 II
U U A A t "II
UU 444 * 11
Seats now on sale. Telephone 511.
TTAZARtFS PAVILION,
Fifth street, near Olive.
OIYIf P i AN RINK!
A first-class place of moral and popular amuse
; ment, where good order and decorum are rig
Idly enforced. Ladies are required to obtain an
approval card before skating.
Ten thousand feet new maple floor; 1000
pair pin roller and ball bearing skates Grand
opening fete nights, Thursday, Fiidnv and
Saturday. December ith, sth and tlth Ex
hibitions of tanoy, fast, trick, acrobatic and
comic skaliug and bicycling will be given.
Change of programme nightly. Admission free
to the galleries. Sating, 25c. Saturday fore
noons, 10 to 12,chlldren'sgrand complimentary
matinee; admission free, skating 10c. Special
department for new beginners. 11-27 lm
V"EW LOS ANGELES THEATER
A.l H. C. Wyatt, Lessee and Manager.
One week, commencing
MONDAY DECEMBER 1
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday.
PROF. GENTRY'S
EQUINES AND CANINES!
50—Humanely Educated Ponies and Dogs—so
Two hours of solid enjoyment never to be
forgotten.
We have positively 50 of the grandest per
forming ponies and dogs in the world. Stand
ing challenge of $10,000 will be given any per
son or persons that will produce their equal.
See our Grand Parade.
Prices—Adults, 25c, 50c, 76c, 11.00.
Children, half-price. 11-27
- .
illinois hall, * *
Broadway aud sixth htkekt.
Next Friday Night, November ",Bth, opens
the great
STAR LECTURE AND CONCERT COURSE
At the Illinois Hall. The opening lecture is by
the most widely known and eloquent man on
tbe American platform. Of him says President
McCash: "He has as much power or eloquence
as Parke-, and vastly more acquaintance with
philosophy than the mystic Emerson. He
lightens and thunders, throwing a vivid light
on a topic by an expression or c mparison, or
striking a presumptuous error as by a bolt from
heaven,"
Season tickets at Merrill & Cook's bank store,
N. Spring st. Reserve seals on 6ale Monday,
1) o'clock.
*
ILLINOIS HALL,
BIIOAErWAY ANDSIXTH Sr.
SOCIAL AND ENTERTAINMENT
BY *
THE ILLINOIS ASSOCIATION,
Tuesday Evening, December 2d.
Grand Musical Programme by Mi's. Catching
nnd Pupils.
Also Recitat*ons by Miss Cora Fov, and "The
Campaign Hat," by Hon. W. A. Ryan.
Citizens and strangers equally welcome.
OIMMON AUDITORIUM.
GRAND CONCERT.
First appearance in Los Angeles oi
MISS GRACE A. MILTIMORE,
The favorite Soprano, assisted by Mr William
Piutti, pianist; Mr. Hurley E. Hamilton, viol
inist; and Mrs. James Ogllvte, accompanist
Wednesday Evknino, December 3d.
Admission, 50 oents. 11-27-Ht
PALACE RESTAURANT AND SALOON,
Corner First and Spring Streets.
The Most Magnificent and Popular
Resort in the City.
FREE CONCEBTSI
BY THE
CELEBRATED PHILHARMONIC SOLOISTS
Every Night from 8 to 12.
JOSEPH BCHURTZ. PROPRIETOR.
je9-tf
TIVOLI THEATRE.
12, 14 and 10 Court street.
STRICTLY FAMILY RESORT.
ADMISSION, - - - - 15c , 25c. and 30*.
EVERY EVENING.
MATINEE SUNDAY.
NEW ATTRACTIONS WEEKLY.
10 246 m
CLOSING OUT
CLOAKS!
AT
25 PER CENT. BELOW COST.
We are going out of this line entirely nnd nre offering Ladies , Misses' nnd Children's
Cloaks at RUINOUS PRICKS. Wo invite ladies to' examine our goods and get our prices
before purchasing elsewhere. Take advantage of this sale, as WE ARE POSITIVELY RE
TIRING FROM THIS BRANCH OF BUSINESS.
CLOAKS AT ANY PRICE.
OF PARIS.
The Train Is Moving!
If you do not get on you will certainly get left.
THE $50.00 STATION 13 PASSED!
The Conductor is now crying
ALL ABOARD
FOR ALESSANDRO!
$85.00 IS THE NEXT STATION!
| The 250 acres advertised last week at $80 per acre are all
sold, and only
250 Acres to be Sold at $85 per Aem.
That will not last many days. The people ai-e aroused and
begin to realize that land in Alessandro at any
thing less than $150 or $200 per acre
Is Less Than Half Its Value.
Our Office is the busiest place iv town. If you want to
meet your friends, call and see them; you will find
them looking over the list of purchasers aud
making their selections from the many
elegant 10-aore lots yet unsold;
and the interest in
ALESSANDRO!
Is not by any means confined to this immediate
vicinity. The
Bear Valley <& Alessandro Development Ca
Is known from Maine to California. The eyes of the people
of the East are turned towards the setting sun for an easier
life and better returns for their labor.
ALESSANDRO FILLS THE BILL
As before remarked, you can save $5 or $10 per acre by
getting on the train today. Respectfully,
Bear Valley & Alessandro Development Co.,
REDLANDS, CAL..
A. P. KITCHING, Gen. Manager.
P. B.—Since writing the above, two telegrams have been received, one for
10 acres and one for 40 acres, at $S5 per acre.
BARTLETT'S
JEWELRY» MUSIC HOUSE
Has Removed to
129 N. SPRING ST.
NEXT DOOR XO PEOPLES' STORE
Are you looking for a place to get ornamental, nursery or greenhouse stock, that is grown to give
satisfaction and sold on its merits, with 100 cents for every dollar, try the
RAVENSWOOD NURSERIES
C. G Prop , Pasadena aye., Highland Park, 1 mile from city limits. P. O. address, Gar
vanza. Take Santa Fe R. R. to Central aye., or Cross B. K. lo Banta Fe crossing
11-o-tl

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