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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, December 09, 1890, Image 3

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THE COUNCIL.
A FULL REPORT OF YESTERDAY'S
PROCEEDINGS.
Reports Received From Various City Of
ficers—A Discussion on Insurance Mat
ters—A Lively Meeting.
The city council met in regular session
at 10 o'clock yesterday morning, Presi
dent Frankenfield in the chair and all
the members present.
After disposing of the usual prelimi
naries, a number of reports from various
city officers were taken up.
That of the tax and license collector
for the week ending on the sth inst.
showed the collection of $4447.22, mak
ing a total of $357,326 for the six fiscal
months last past.
That of the city clerk showed the
issuance of 2224 licenses turned over to
the auditor during the month, valued at
$15,11)9; of these 164, valued at $450,
were turned back uncollected. These
latter were turned over to the chief of
police, and $143 worth were returned
collected and $307 uncollected.
That of the city assessor for the past
year shows the total valuation of the
personal property of the city to be
$1,240,554, of which $13,040.50 was col
lected.
The city engineer presented an ordi
nance of intention to change and estab
lish the grade of Vale street, from Col
lege to Bernard street. The ordinance
The bridge committee presented a re
port recommending the construction of
a bridge across the Arroyo Seco at Wal
.nut street, and that the bid of the Eddy
Steel Wire Cable Bridge company for
$4583 be accepted for the erection of
the said bridge, and that the street
superintendent be instructed to im
mediately construct approaches to the
Pasadena-avenue bridge.
The report was signed by Messrs.
McLain and Van l)us,en, the third mem
ber of the committee, Mr. Summerland,
presenting, over his signature, as a
minority report, a recommendation to
the effect that a contract to construct a
wooden bridge, at a cost of $4247, be
awarded to M. H. Ledbetter.
Mr. Steadman, representing the Wire
Bridge company, addressed the council
on behalf of awarding the contract to his
company. He stated that his was a
home company, having its principal of
fice in Los Angeles, and that it had
constructed bridges all over the state,
which had had the effect of breaking up
a monopoly of bridge building in this
state. He had constructed a wire bridge
in this county which had some defects,
and upon which thirteen improvements
had since been made. He was willing
to submit his constructed bridge to a
test, and declared it would be perfect in
every particular. He presented a peti
tion "with names that his bridge be built.
Mr. Van Dusen moved then the
adoption of the majority report, while
Mr. Summerland insisted that the mi
nority report should be adopted, as the
city engineer had not recommended the
building of a wire rope bridge.
Mr. Steadman here interposed with a
remark to the effect that that official
had not as yet even seen the plans.
Deputy City Engineer Ed Lownes said
that in any event his superior officer
would refuse to recommend the con
struction of such a bridge.
Mr. Wirsching then moved as a substi
tute for the original motion that the
matter be referred to the city engineer,
but Mr. Van Dusen vigorously opposed
this motion, and Major Bonsall wanted
the matter left to a committee of the
whole. Finally, however, after a breezy
debate Mr. Wirsching's motion pre
vailed by a vote of 5 to 4, and the matter
was referred to the city engineer.
The second clause of the report was
adopted without debate.
The report of the board of public
works was then taken up. It recom
mended the passage of the ordinance
providing for the grading and graveling
of Teed street, in spite of the mayor's
objections thereto, it being the opinion
of the board that the mayor had not
personally inspected the ground.
When the motion to adopt the report
was put, Mr. Van Dusen said as the
council had been fighting the mayor
ever since it had been in existence, he
would suggest that precedent be ig
nored, and that his veto be sustained.
President Frankenfield begged to cor
rect the gentleman from the First. The
fight did not come from the council, but
from the other direction.
After a brief debate upon the ques
tion, the motion was carried by a vote
of 5 to 4.
The report of the finance committee
recommended the reduction of the
amount of monthly license paid by the
Los Angeles District Telegraph company
from $15 to $5. Mr. Hamilton stated
that the committee was satisfied that
the company could not afford to pay tlie
said amount of license. The report was
.adopted.
The report further recommended that
the following policies of insurance be
placed upon the old city hall in lieu of
the insurance policies which expired
during the month of November, to-wit:
Hartford Insnrance company $2000,
same $2000, Caledonian Insurance com
pany $1000, American Insurance com
pany $1000, State Investment Insurance
company, $2000, Continental lusurance
company $2000; total $10,000.
President Frankenfield moved that
this portion of the report lie upon the
table, stating that it was poor financial
policy to keep on paying money for in
surance. He wanted the policies aa
they run out to be thrown aside and
the city assume its own insurance. The
city could lose a schoolhouse every year
and yet save money.
Mr. Shafer sided with the views of the
president on the matter and said it
would be the testimony of any insur
ance man that only 25 per cent of the
money paid for insurance ever comes
back to the party insured. He didn't
have any of his own property insured
and he found it profitable to himself not
to insure.
Mr. Bonsall said insurance companies
operated upon a .general average of a
class, and made their money in that
way. He thought the city hall and
police station should be insured, because
there were not buildings enough owned
by the city to justify the city in carrying
its own insurance upon them. He
didn't know how it would be with the
school houses.
President Frankenfield said that there
were people moving about the police
station every moment of the twenty
four hours, and that if a fire would start
there it could be extinguished by a
bucket of water.
The motion to lay 'on the table was
then put and lost.
I'resident V runkenfield then rose and
■aid that though he did not like to chal
lenge the vote of any of hia colleagues,
be had been credibly informed that
there was at loust one member of the
TIIE LOS ANGELES HERALD; TUESDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 9, 1890.
council who had an indirect interest in
the insurance of the city's property. He
understood there was one, but believed
that there were two members who had
such interests.
Mr. Summerland in reply said he was
perhaps one of the men indicated by
the gentleman from the Fourth. He
was an insurance agent, but he had no
interest in any of the city's policies, and
he insisted on his vote.
Mr. Van Dusen said he also was an in
surance agent and had several city poli
cies. He would waive his vote.
The president continued to suggest
that no insurance man ought to vote on
the question, when Mr. Summerland
said that Mr. Frankenfield had ques
tioned his vote. He did not say any
thing about that gentleman he
voted on the bank business, nor did he
object to his voting on the opening of
Broadway.
At this juncture the outspoken mem
ber from the Eighth was called to order
by a sharp rap from the chairman's
gavel in the hands of Mr. Wirsching,
and the motion to adopt was then put,
resulting in a vote of 5 to 3. The tem
porary chairman decided, at the sugges
tion of Mr. Frankenfield, that the mo
tion was lost, as it was on a question in
volving the expenditure of money, and
therefore required six votes.
A lively scene ensued, and the city
attorney was called up to give his
opinion as to the correctness of the
chairman's ruling. He was inclined to
the belief that no expenditure of money
was involved in the question at issue,
and that five votes were sufficient to
carry the motion ; whereupon President
Frankenfield took issue with thatofficial
and the question was argued at some
length. Finally, however, the matter
was dropped, as the chairman refused to
rescind iiia i"tiling.
The report of the city attorney was
then taken up and read, as follows:
I have prepared and herewith present
as per your instructions, ordinances
allowing the tax collector three deputies
during the month of December, and re
pealing the ordinance in regard to
weights and measures. Ordinance
passed.
In regard to the petition of Joseph
Cook and others, complaining that the
base ball grounds on Temple street is a
nuisance, and asking that it be licensed
or prohibited, I report ihat there has
been a great many complaints made to
me in regard to the same matter. It is
within the power of the council to
license base ball playing or prohibit the
same within the city limits. Filed.
In regard to the request of the com
missioners for opening and widening
streets, that their expenses to the
amount of $123.75 incurred in the mat
ter of widening Chavez street be allowed
them, I am of the opinion that their
reasonable expenses should be so al
lowed. This question will arise in a
number of other streets, the proceedings
to widen or extend which have been in
stituted by tlie council and afterward
discontinued, and I think greater care
should be exercised before ordering pro
ceedings for the opening or widening of
streets, as it has now got to be quite a
serious matter, and there is hardly a
week but what I am ordered to draw one
or more ordinances for that purpose, and
hardly a week but that some proceeding
is discontinued. I think that streets
should only be widened or opened where
I there is an" urgent necessity, and which
: would be fully determined by the council
before ordering the work done. I think
the council should at once investigate all
thedilferent proceedings already ordered,
and if there is any probability that any
of them will be discontinued, to do it
now before any further cost or expense
is incurred. Adopted.
A recess was then had until 2
1 o'clock p. m.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
On reconvening at 2 o'clock the mat
ter of the opening and widening of Wall
street was taken up. Mr. Brown said
that the matter had been continued at
his request, from time to time, for some
months past, and he wished to have it
disposed of at as early a date as possible,
but as he did not know exactly what
the property owners wanted at the pres
ent time, he asked that action on the
matter be again postponed for a week,
and that the protestants be notified to
appear before the council at 2 o'clock p.
m. on Monday next.
The following final ordinances were
passed, the rules with regard to printing
having first been suspended to allow of
their passage : Providing for the paving
of Walters street, from Upper Main and
New High streets, with porphyry; for
the sidewalking of First street, from Al
ameda to Center streets, with asphalt;
for the gravelling of Centennial street
from Temple street to Bellevue avenue,
and from Court circle to Temple street;
for the grading and gravelling of fan
Pedro street, from Fifth to Sixth streets.
Mr. Summerland moved that the city
attorney take immediate steps to abolish
the Chinese pool games now running in
this city ; but 'after some discussion of
the question the matter was referred to
the board of police commissioners, City
Attorney McFarland arguing that the
Chinese were as much entitled to run
pool games as white men, and if they
allowed gambling in their places it was
the duty of the police to arrest them for
violating the state laws.
Mr. Wirsching moved that the city
engineer be instructed to make surveys
and plans for a bridge over and across
the Arroyo de las Posas on State, but
the matter was referred to the bridge
committee.
An ordinance providing for the open
ing and widening of Santee street, from
the De Celis Vineyard tract to East Pico
street, and lixing the limits of the dis
trict to be assessed to pay the cost and
expenses of the same, was read; but
there being a misunderstanding as to the
district of assessment, the matter was
referred back to the board of public
works.
On motion of Mr. Brown, tlie vote by
which the lecommendation of the board
of public works to the effect that the
ordinance providing for the grading of
Teed street be passed over the mayor's
veto had been adopted,was reconsidered,
and after some discussion the matter
was referred back to the board of public
works.
On motion of Mr. Hamilton, the vote
by which the bill of J. F. Adams for
$41.50, due for services as a special offi
cer in August last, was referred to the
board of police commissioners, was re
considered. Mr. Collins, of the police
board, then addressed the council at
some length in explanation of the mat
ter, and on motion of Mr. Van Damn the
bili was approved.
After disposing of several unimportant
matters, the council then adjourned.
Tlie Secret of Success.
K. W. Ellis & Co., druggists, believe that the
secret of success is perseverance. Therefore
they.persist in keeping the finest line of per
fumeries, toilet arcicles, cosmetics, drugs and
chemicals on the market, They especially in
vite all persons who have palpitation, shoit
breath, weak or hungry spells, pain in side or
shoulder, oppression, nightmare, dry cough,
smothering, dropsy or heart disease to try Dr.
Miles' unequaled New Heart Cure before it is
too late." It has the largest sale of any similar
remedy. Fine book of testimonials free. Dr.
Miles' Restorative Nervine is unsurpassed for
sleeplessness, headache, fits, etc., and It con
tains no opiates.
PALMA CAPTURED.
He Tells the Story of the Shooting of
Donato.
Louis Palma, the man who shot and
dangerously wounded Cyrus Donato last
Saturday, was captured yesterday at
Azusa by Constable T. H. Hudson. The
prisoner was seen yesterday afternoon
by a Herai.ii reporter, and in broken
English gave his version of the affair as
follows: "The baker refused to leave
bread as usual on Saturday morning.
My wife asked him why, and he replied
that the groceryman had instructed
him not to supply them any more. I
got up and inquired what the matter
was. He asked me to give up all the
tickets left and he would give me money
for them. 1 then put on my clothes,
kissed my baby and went to the grocery
store. Donato was sweeping out the
store. I asked him why he told the
baker not to leave me any bread.
He denied that he had done so, when I
offered to bet him $20 that he had au
thorized the baker not to leave any
bread at my place. *I put the money on
the counter, but Donato refused to bet.
We had a few words when Donato
pulled off his coat and struck me across
the face. I stepped back and then shot
Donato. That is the straight story of
the shooting."
Donato is reported to be in a preca
rious condition. Palma also states that
Donato attempted to cinch him in the
matter of bread supply. The baker sup
plied him bread at 3" cents a loaf, and
the scheme was to make him pay Scents
to the grocer.
JESSIE'S SUIT.
Some Letters from Dennis Are Read and
the Case Continued.
The $50,000 damage suit of Miss Jessie
Marshall against Jacob Taylor of Del
Mar was continued yesterday before
Judge McKinley. Miss Jessie Marshall,
the complainant, finished her story. She
read in all thirty-six letters, which were
signed by Dennis O'Brien, a young man
who is alleged to have acted for the de
fendant, Jacob Taylor.
In these epistles the writer urged Miss
Marshall to prosecute her suit, and he
would assist her financially. He told
how he was about to be divorced from
his wife, and was arranging to get all of
his property out of his hands, so as to
avoid paying alimony. He frequently
expressed affection for Miss Marshall,
and intimated that the people of River
side, Del Mar and other towns in that
section were fully satisfied Taylor
was the father of the child and that their
opinion of him was not of the highest
order.
The court adjourned at noon out of
respect to the memory of 11. M.
Mitchell, until this morning, when Miss
Marshall will be cross-examined.
Ccmeer of the Nose.
In 18TB a sore appeared on ray nose, ana
grew rapidly. As my father had cancer,'
and my husband died of it, I became alarm
ed, and consulted my physician. His treat
ment did no good, ana the sore grew larger
and worse in every way,until I had conclude
ed that I was to die from its effects. I was
persuaded to take S. H. S., and a few bottles
cured me. This was after all the doctors and
other medicines had failed. I have had no
return ot the cancer.
MRS. M. T. MABEN.
Woodbury, Hall County, Texas.
Treatise on Cancer mailed free.
SWIFT SPECIFIC CO., Atlanta, Qa.
AMUSEMENTS.
NEW LOS ANGELES THEATRE.
H. 0. Wyatt, Lessee and Manager.
Tuesday Evening, December !)th, 1890
: GRAND BENEFIT CONCERT! j
For the St Paul's Hospital building fund,
under the musical direction of
MR. J. H. BRENNER.
SOLOISTS.
Mrs.R. M. Lancaster, pianist, of San Bernardino.
Mrs. Modini-Wood.
Miss June Reed, violinist, Pasadena.
Mis. J. 8. Owens.
Mrs. E. L. Swaine.
Sig. Modini-Wood
Dr. J. W. Jauch.
Arend's orchestra and a host of volunteers.
See programmes. 12-»-'2t
|>OTOMAC BLOCK,
A Broadway, near Second street.
Saturday, Dec. 13th, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.,
:THE i
j DOLL'S WEDDING. \
A life-like representation of Dollies marriage
ceremony. The bride and groom in full dress,
clergyman in canonical!, pages, guests, etc., all
iv appropriate costumes, forming one of the
most unique anil beau li fill groups of elaborately
dressed dolls ever seen in this city
Do not miss the opportunity of seeing this
exquisite tableau, which js given by the Young
Ladies of Immanuel Fresbvterian Church in
connection with their sale ol
DOLLS, DOLL CLOTHING, APRONS AND
FANCY ARTICLES
for the holidays.
Cakes and refreshments will be served
throughout the day and evening. 12-8-td
ILLINOIS HALL,
Broadway and Sixth St.
SOCIAL AND ENTERTAINMENT
BY
THE ILLINOIS ASSOCIATION,
Tuesday Evening, December 9th.
Grand Musical Programme.
Elocution, Dramatic Specialties, etc.
Citizens and strangers equally welcome.
PALACE RESTAURANT AND SALOON,
Corner First and Spring Streets.
The Most Magnificent and Popular
Resort in the City.
FKEE CONCERTS!
BT THB
CELEBRATED PHILHARMONIC SOLOISTS
Every Night from 8 to 12.
JOSEPH BCHURTZ. PROPRIETOR. -
JeB-tf
TIVOLI THEATRE.
12, 14 and 10 Court strcot.
STRICTLY FAMILY RESORT.
ADMISSION, - - - - 15c., 25c. and 35c.
EVERY EVENING.
MATINEE SUNDAY.
NEW ATTRACTIONS WEEKLY.
1 10-24-0 m
for hi} opinio? of fr?e <§R&t4©>.
A PopP foR INFANTS MAS No
Johnson Locke Mercantile Co.
Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast.
CHILDS, SILENT & CO., Southern California Agents.
W E R F FRO NI 235&237
* — " *—' *— -— W■>l 7 WEST FIRST STREET,
DEALER IN
Furr|iture etnci Ceirpets.
Also tbe latest styles In New Carpets, and all kinds ot Linoleums, Oilcloths, Portieres, Lace
Curtains, Shades and Curtain fixtures, Antique and Sixteenth Century Goods. All goods
guaranteed and sold as represented. Moderate prices and courteous treatment.
W* GOODS SOLD FOR CASH ON l_Y. ~M~
AMUSEMENTS.
NEW LOS ANGELES THEATRE,
11. C. Wyatt, Manager.
FOUR NIGHTS,
Beginning Thursday, December 11th.
No Saturday Matinee.
KING FUN!
: FRANK DANIELS
■ AND HIS
BIG COMEDY COMPANY!
Including Miss Bessie Unison,
Presenting
"LITTLE PUCK!"
Just broke tbe record of the California Theater,
playing to the largest business ever known
in San Francisco at regular prices.
Seats now on sale. 12-3tf
OECOND ANNUAL EXHIBITION
OF THE
LO3 ANGELES COUNTY
POULTRY ASSOCIATION
Will be held in the Dr. Zahn Block, 431,433
and 435 S. Spring st, Los Angeles. Cal.,
DECEMBER 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th.
This will be the finest Exhibition of Poultry
and Pet Stock ever held in California, nnd wild
be the attraction of the season. Do not fail to
attend.
Admission, 25c. Tickets for sale at the book
stores and news-stands, and by members of tbe
Association. Doors open all day and in the
evening. 12-3-10t
ILLINOIS HALL,
Broadway and Sixth Street.
Great Star Course—Second Night.
SWEDISH QUARTETTE!
Tlie most artistic musical combination before
the American public
The land which gave us Jenny Lind and
Christine Nilsson has also produced this won
derful quartette of male singers. Their un
paralleled success In all the great cities of
Europe and the Eastern States is a sufficient
guarantee that this will undoubtedly be one of
the chief attractions of the year In Los Angeles.
Their singing is characterized by an elegance
and vivacity which charm all audiences. In
addition to their Swedish soniis the Quartette
renders a number of English selections, which
enable them to give a most pleasing and varied
programme.
The yuartette will be assisted by Miss Lura
Barden, the talented dramatic and humorous
reciter, and by Mils Vina J. Skoog, the popular
accompanist.
Wednesday evening, December 10. Course
ticket, ten nights. $3.50. Single admission, 50c.
Reserved seats, 75c. 12-7-3t
TERM OF
HENRY J. KRAMER'S
SCHOOL FOR DANCINGI
Academy, 313 and S. Main st.
Class for beginners, ladies and gentlemen,
Monday and Thursday evenings, from 8 to 10
p. m., commencing Monday, Dec. 29, 1890.
Class for advanced pupils, Tuesday evenings
only, from 8 to 10 p. ra., commencing Tuesday
evening, Dec. 30, 1890.
Class for ladies, misses and mastcs, Saturday
afternoons only, from 3:30 to 5:30 p. m.
Juvenile class. 1:30 to 3:30 p. m.
Terms—One quarter, 20 lessons, $10; one-half
quarter, 10 lessons, $ti.
All the latest fashionable round and square
dances will be taught in the above classes.
Satisfactory references required from all ap
plicants, send for circular. Office hours, 3to
sp. ra. Hall to rent.
12-7-lm HENRY J. KKAME? , Instructor.
rpURNVEREIN HALL.
j MISS ADELE AUS DER OHE! j
The Greatest Living Pianist in the World,
Who has just made such a tremendous furore
in San Francisco after her phenomenal success
iv Europe and America, is coining to Los An
geles with our old Los Angeles friend,
MR. F. W. LUDOVICI,
And will give Two Concerts in Turnverein
Hall on
WEDNESDAY EVENING, DEC. 10, 1890,
SATURDAY EVENING, DEC. 13, 1890.
Tickets for sale at George S. MaryKold's Broad
way music store, Potomac block. Price, $1.00,
including reserved seats. 12-5-7t
CALIFORNIA DIME MUSEUM
AND THEATER,
North Main street, near First.
Doyle <5t Kniffen Managers
CARD TO THE PUBLIC—After a prolonged
absence we have returned to Los Angeles, and
will resume the management of the above bona
fide "Family Resort." Our former patrons can
rest assured that it will be conducted in such a
manner as to warrant the term. Respectfully
soliciting the consideration of our former
potions, we remain, the public's obedient
servants, DOYLE & KNIFFEN,
Charles A. Doyle, Manager.
GRAND OPENING SATURDAY, DEC. 6th.
Everything New in Museum and Theater.
For full particulars, ses descriptive bills, pro
grammes, etc.
Doors open from 1 to 10. Performances
hourly.
Admission—loc Reserved seats 10c extra.
JJAZARD'S PAVILION,
Fifth street, near Olive.
OLYMFIAN RINK!
A first-class place of moral and popular amuse
ment, where good order and decorum arc rig
idly enforced. Ladies are required to obtain an
approval card before skating.
Ten thousand feet new maple floor; 1000
pair pin roller and ball bearing skates. Grand
opening fete nights, Thursday, Friday and
Saturday, December 4th, sth und titb. Ex
hibitions of tancy, fast, trick, acrobatic and
comic skating and bicycling will be given.
Change of programme nightly. Admission free
to the galleries. 8-ating, 25c. Saturday fore
noons, 10 to 12,children'sgranil complimentary
matinee; admission free, skating 10c. Special
' department for new beginners. 11-27 lm
LUMBER YARD
Kerekhoff-Cuzner
MILL AND LUMBER CO,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Main Office: LOS ANGELES. Wholesale Yard
at SAN PEDRO.
I {Branch Yards—Pomona, Pasadena, Lamanda,
Azusa, Burbank. Planing Mills—Los Angeles
and Pomona. Cargoes furnished to order.
J. M. Griffith, President.
H. G. Stevenson, Vice-Pres. and Tree*.
T. E. Nichols, Secy. E. L. Chandler, Snpt
J. M. GRIFFITH COMPANY,
Lumber Dealers
And Manufacturers of
DOORS, WINDOWS, BLINDS, STAIRS,
Mill work of every description.
034 N. Alameda Street, Los Angeles.
jul tf
PERRY, MOT T St. GO'S
LUMBER YARDS
AND PLANING MILLS,
No. 76 Commercial Street. jul tf
J. A. HENDERSON, WM. F. MARSHALL,
President. Secretary.
J. R. BMURR,
Vice President and Treasurer.
SOUTHERN "CALIFORNIA
LUMBER CO.
1350 East First Street.
9-19-sra Los Angeles, California.
f ATfiPTAHI w> Oongln* Shorn art
VIIU IIUH warranted, and every pail
has his name and price stamped ~~i bottom.
$3 SHOE GENTLEMEN.
Fine Calf and Laced Waterproof Grain.
The excellence and wearing qualities of this shoe
cannot be better shown than by the strong endorse
ments of Its thousands of constant wearers.
f(B.OO Genuine Hand-sewed, an elegant and
9 stylish dress Shoe which commends Itself.
%m.OO Hand-sewed Welt. A flne calf shoe
•» unequalled for style anil durability.
SQ.SO Goodyear Welt Is the standard dress
O Shoe, at a popular price.
SO.SO Policeman's Shoe Is especially adapted
O Jor railroad men, farmers, etc.
All made In Congress. Button and Lace.
$3 & $2 SHOES la f o°,P.s,
hare been most favorably received since Introduced
and the recent Improvements make them raperioi
to any shoes sold at these prlcea.
Ask your Dealer, and If he cannot supply you seat'
direct to factory enclosing advertised price, crt
postal tor order blanks.
W. L. DOUGLAS, Brockton, 'Mass
MASSACHUSETS
Boot # Shoe House,
Sole Agents for Los Angeles,
fel-5m 120 WEST FIRST ST.
Holiday Photos. Christmas Presents.
Only $3.50 -2 Only $3.50
Everybody desiring Photographs for Holiday
Presents should remember that Dewey is mak
ing his elegant and finest finished $7.00 Cabinets
for $3 50 per dozen. "Nothing finer in the
State." Large photos for framing at Very low
prices. Family groups, babies and children's
photos a specialty. Developing, printing and
finishing for amateurs. Old pictures copied
and enlarged. Come early and avoid the rush
DEWEY'S AItT PARLORS,
11-27-3 m 147 8. Main street.
WILKE'S
DELICACY STORE
203 N. MAIN STREET,
TEMPLE BLOCK.
All kinds Cold Meats and Salads.
Foreign and Domestic Cheese, Etc.
SMOKED BEEP AND TONGUE.
lunch"i?oom.
11-14-3 m
JOHN WIKLAND, FREDERICKS
BURG, UNITED STATES and
CHICAGO BREWERIES.
EXTRA PALE PILSENER, STANDARD, ER
LANGER and CULMBACIIER BEERS of aigh
repute. Also brew the best PORTER and ALE
JACOB ADLOFF,
General Agent, Los Angeles.
Telephone, 408. P. O. Box 1231, Station C.
Corner New North Main, Mission and Chavez
sts., opposite Naud, Weyse & Co.'s warehouse.
11-1-tim
3
ILLICH'S
RESTAURANT.
Everything New and First-Class.
145 and 147 N. Main Street,
ap29-tf JERRY ILLICH, Proprietor.
OPTICIANS AND JKWm.KKS.
THIS II NOT" OUR WAY.
This'is OUR WAY of Fitting^Glasses.
The importance of perfect-fitting glasses is
self-evident to every intelligent reader. Ill
fitting glasses cause discomfort, injuries, partial
or totalloss of sight. Beware of the ignorant
jewelers; they are frauds posing as opticians.
We guarantee you a thorough, reliable and
perfect scientific fit at lowest prices. Eyes
tested free. Call and see.
S. G. MARSHUTZ, Scientific Optician,
114 8. Spring st ,between First and Second.
We carry also a full stock of artificial eyes.
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| 2_
RAMONA!
The Gem of the San Gabriel Valley
Only Three Miies from City Limits of Los
Angeles.
Property of San Gabriel Wine Co.,
Original owners.
LOCATED AT SHORB'S STATION,
On line of 8. P. R. R. and San Gabriel Valley
Rapid Transit R. R.,
From 10 to 15 minutes to the Plaza, Los An
geles City.
CHEAPEST SUBURBAN TOWN LOTS,
VILLA SITES, or
ACREAGE PROPERTY.
POPULAR TERMS.
PUI{EST SPRING WAXES
Inexhaustible quantities guaranteed.
Apply at Office of
SAN GABRIEL WINE CO.,
Ramona, Los Angeles County, Ca..
10-26 if Or to M D. WILLIAMS, Ramona.
TN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
Jt County of Lob Angeles. State of California
In the matter of the estate of George Wilshire,
deceased.
Notice is hereby given that Thursday, the 11 Hi
day of December, IS9O, at 10 o'clock a. m. of
said day, at the court room of said Superior
Court. Department Two thereof, corner Frank
lin and New High streets, in the city of Los
Anreles. county of Los Angeles, ana state of
California, has been appointed a« the time and
place for hearing the application of eeorc I
Wilshire and Alexander McDonald. pra\
ing that a document now on file In ia, ! d
court, purporting to be a copy of the last wlli vi.d
testament of the said deceased, and the probi.i.,'
thereof in the sister state of Ohio, duly
authenticated, be allowed and recorded in this
court, and that letters testamentary on -d
will be issued to said George P. Wilshire and
Alexander McDonald, at which time and plate
all persons interested therein may appear and
contest the same.
J. M. MEREDITH, Clerk.
By M. J. ASHMORE, Deputy.
Dated November 28,1890. 11-30-12t
NOTICE OP CONSOLIDATION.
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN—NOTICE IS
hereby given, that the Los Angeles and Glen
dale Railway Company; the Los Angeles, Pasa
dena and Glendale Railway Company, and the
Los Angeles Terminal Railway Company, have
consolidated and amalgamated all their capital
stock, debts, property, assets and franchises in
the manner required by law, into a new com
pany called "Los Angeles Terminal Railway
Company." and that such consolidation will go
Into effect in one month after the fir3t insertion
of this notice in this paper.
Bated November 27th, 1890
T. B. BURNETT,President, ( LosAngelesit Glen-
WM. WINCUP, Secretary, (dale Railway Co
B. F. HOBART, President,! Los Angeles. Pasa
> dena & Glendale
T. B. BURNETT,Secretary,) Railway Co.
B. F. HOBART, President, | Los Angeles Ter-
T. B. BURNETT,Secretary,( mlnal Railway Co.
1 11-29 30t

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