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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, December 10, 1890, Image 3

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WHY NOT?
A CHANCE TO SECURE THE SAND
WICH ISLANDS TRADE.
A Proposition Worthy the Attention of
Merchants and the Chamber of Com
merce—The Trade Possibilities.
Why not make Los Angeles the South
ern California center for the trade of the
Sandwich Islands and Mexico?
It can be arranged in forty-eight hours
if Los Angeles merchants care to aid in
and profit by such an enterprise.
A reliable firm, Messrs. Livingstone &
Clark, heretofore of San Diego, have for
some time been conducting steamer
lines from San Diego to Honolulu, and to
the ports on the Mexican coast. These
enterprises they are forced to abandon
so far as San Diego is concerned, be
cause of the commercial torpidity of
that town, and the consequent im
possibility of getting business
there. The men comprising this
firm are of the best standing,
and will appear before the Lob Angeles
merchants under the auspices of the
board of trade of this city. They desire
to form a stock company here for the
purpose of prosecuting the lines of trade
specified, particularly that with Hono
lulu. They intend to make this city the
place of business of the proposed steamer
line, and to make Redondo, or one of the
city's harbors, the terminal of the line.
They have prepared a prospectus, from
which the following excerpts are made,
which will be found of interest as in
dicative of the great trade which it is
possible to build up between this city
and the islands of the west.
The name of the company is to be the
California and Pacific Navigation com
pany. It is''proposed to purchase a
steamer of two thousand tons
capacity, and with a speed of thir
teen knots an hour. The capital stock
estimated to be necessary is $125,000.
Of this $36,000, it is agreed, will be sub
scribed by the "combination" sugar fac
tories at Honolulu, and $10,000 will be
taken by Livingstone and Clark, leav
ing the remainder to be taken by the
citizens of the port at which the com
pany is organized.
The cost of operating the steamer for
one year, for twelve trips, including the
feeding of nassengers, is placed at $103,
--600.
The receipts for twelve trips are esti
mated as follows:
OUT-BOI'ND.
300 tons per month, Ililo, contracted
at $5 ÜB.OOO
400 tons per month Honolulu, contract
ed at *3 14,400
•200 tons b rlcy from San Hiego, con
tracted at $4 9,600
□00 tons hay from San Diego, contract
ed at $S 10,200
100 tons merchandise from San Diego,
contracted at $1 4,800
20 passengers out at $50 12,000
178,000
IN-BOUND.
400 tous sugar per month, I.ohania,
contracted at $5 * 24,000
500 tons sugar per month, Honolulu,
estimated ats3.so 21,000
500 tous sugar per mouth, Hilo, esti
mated at $ I 24,000
3000 bunches lianauas per month,
at $50 12,000
$ 81,000
Total, with out bound $159,000
Less operating expenses, as above 103,000
$ 55,400
The Hawaiiangovernmenthasgranted
a subsidy for the year of 1801 to such a
steamship line of $12,000.
The coming crop of sugar on the is
lands is estimated at 135,000 tons, which
is an increase of 15,000 tons over the
crop of last year. The banana and mis
cellaneous trade could be relied on, it is
thought, to largely inciease the traffic.
The islands consume largely of arti
cles produced in Southern California.
Their imports last year were 8000 tons
of barley, 200 tons of wheat, 5000 tons of
hay, 500 tons of corn, 3500 tons of flour,
25.000 sacks of potatoes, 5000 sacks of
onions, 4000 boxes of raisins, 8000 boxes
of apples, 200 tons diied fish, 1,500,000
brick, 14,000 barrels of lime, 37,000 feet
of iron pipe, 70,000 pounds fencing wire,
3500 tons of fertilizer, etc.
It is believed that the establishment
of this line of steamers will secure for
Southern California in the first year one
million dollars worth of business, which
can be steadily increased. It is also
thought that the entire trade of the dis
trict of Hilo, which, last year, imported
over $225,000 worth of American goods,
can be by it controlled hy Southern Cal
ifornia merchants.
All in all, the scheme is one which
deserves the attention of merchants, and
should be examined by the chamber of
commerce.
THE FARMERS' ALLIANCE
Establishes a Selling and Purchasing
Depot, with R. Sherer in Charge.
The Farmers* Alliance movement is
certainly growing in this section, and
judging from present indications, is
bound to be a power, which if properly
controlled, will do a world of good. In
this county there are at present up
wards of a dozen sub-Alliances,-having
a membership in round figures upwards
of one thoußand, and scarcely a week
passes but some new Alliance is re
ported. The organization has finally
got into good working condition, and is
bending all its energies to the commer
cial side of the "agriculturaldepression"
bug-a-boo that "bobs up serenely" at
every election. At its ast meeting it ap
pointed R. Sherer of Compton, as its
business representative, with full power
to buy and sell farm produce and farm
supplies.
The main feature of the Alliance
movement in commercial matters is to
find new markets for Southern California
farm productions, and so far as practica
ble, sell direct to the eastern buyers,
thereby saving to the producers the mar
gins of"the middlemen. By shipping in
car-load lots the Alliance also expects
some concessions from the transporta
tion companies. Implements, seeds and
general farm supplies will be bought by
the business representative of the Alli
ances at different points in large lots,
and furnished to the farmers at cost.
The county Alliance meets in secret
session on the first Saturday of each
month in the chamber of commerce
rooms, this city.
PALMA'S VENDETTA.
He Shot at Donato Simply Out of Re
taliation.
Luis Palma, the Italian peddler who
shot at a young grocer nanjed Cyrus
Doinito, last Saturday morning, and who
was captured on Monday at Azusa, was
taken before Justice Owens yesterday
lor arraignment upon the charge of as
sault with intent to commit murder.
His examination was set for Tuesday
t, and as his victim was
al condition, he was re
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD: WEDNESDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 10, 1890.
manded to jail, bail beiog required in
tbe Burn of $10,000.
Palma claims that young Donato
struck him in the face, and that he shot
in self defense. He does not evince any
regret, but rather appears to look at the
affair as simply an act of retaliation,
perfectly justifiable.
MR. ANSON HERE.
A Distinguished English Gentleman
Pays Los Angeles a Visit—Check
ered California Experiences.
Mr. F. Anson, the brother of the gen
tleman who is the prospective editor of
the London Times, is paying Los Angeles
a visit for the second time. Since he
was here before Mr. Anson has had
some lively experiences, and the San
Francisco press has been full of his ex
ploits. The Chronicle and Examiner
have both been interested in h ; s move
ments. The former journal loads off as
follows:
"I've been in this blawsted town ten
days and been robbed three times."
The speaker was Frederic A. Anson of
London, tourist and gentleman. He sat
in the dining-room of a down-town
hotel last evening quietly dissecting
a Russian river capon and drinking a
bottle of California claret.
Mr. Anson arrived here on November
21st from Los Angeles. He proceeded
to enjoy himself, and after being robbed
one night last week in Chinatown, and
having his pockets picked on Kearney
street on Sunday, one would suppose
Mr. Anson would know the highways
and byways of San Francisco pretty
well. Nevertheless on Tuesday evening
he asked the hotel clerk for $500, being
the balance of his funds in the hotel
safe, and sallied forth again to see the
town. Mr. Anson invariably directs his
steps toward North beach in" seeing the
sights. On Tuesday evening he prompt
ly proceeded to investigate the Barbary
coast section of the city. When Mr.
Anson returned to his hotel, rather the
worse for wear, he brought with him a
strong odor of Barbary coast. His $500,
with his gold-headed cane and his mass
ive gold watch and chain, he had left
behind. Two enterprising Barbary
coasters had slid oft with the swag.
Mr. Anson cones of a distinguished
line of ancestry. His sister and his
aunt are ladies of high social standing
in England. Mr. Anson, who registers
from London, is a graduate of Oxford
college. He is the celebrated long leg
of the Lord's Cricket club, the crack
cricket organization of England. He
has been a member of the club for six
teen years, and is looked upon as one of
the leading amateur athletes of London.
At Oxford he was a distinguished figure
at football games.
Mr. Anson left England with the
avowed determination of coming to
America, embarking in business and
growing up with the country. Being an
adept in the insurance business he has
been quietly seeking an opening in that
line of financial trade in San Francisco.
During his brief sojourn here he has
figured as a protege of James V. Cole
man, who it is said met the young Eng
lishman while at Baden Baden last win
ter. Mr. Anson is a tourist of tourists.
He has hunted elephants in Siam,
chased ostriches in Africa, killed bears
in Russia, and wears on his silver watch
box a relic of the tusk of a huge boar
killed in Greece.
t After spending a week in New York
city Mr. Anson found himself short of
funds, as his remittances from London
were unavoidably delayed. At his hotel
he had a mountain of luggage and a
wine and restaurant bill of equal size.
He expected to make the overland jump
to Los Angeles, aud had money enough
to make the trip, but not sufficient to j
pay his hotel bill. I
"That is all right, Mr. Anson," said
the accommodating New York boniface,
"we will send your baggage to Los An
geles by express, and you can remit us
from there." When Mr. Anson arrived
in Los Angeles he was followed by an
other car full of luggage, "C. O. D.
$400," which amount included his New
York hotel bill. Luckily, at this crit
ical moment in his career, Mr. Anson
received a draft of $2500 from his aunt
.in England. With this he planted him
self firmly on his feet again, settled his
bills in Los Angeles and came to San
Francisco. Here he has been spending
money with a lavish hand. His last
$500, however, fell as a legacy to the
pirates of the Barbary coast. Fastid
ious as to dress, and wearing a different
suit of swell clothing of English make
at every meal, Mr. Anson has cut a fig
ure at his hotel, and has caused a bevy
of waiters to hover about his chair like
green-bottle flies around a paddock. Mr.
Anson is nothing if notoriginal, and
caused a scene at the Bella Union thea
ter the other night, when his applause
stopped the performance and caused a
panic in the dressing rooms.
The Examiner treats Mr. Anson with
a little more levity, as appears in the
subjoined. In its sub-head the Mon
arch has much to say about Mr. Anson's
mud-turtle ranch, and declares that he
has decided not to invest in Southern
California real estate, but will buy the
Golden Gate park for a private race
track. Tbe sub-head is rounded up by
the remark, "Much business ahead."
The following is the Examiner's article
in full:
John GalTey did not return to Los An
geles yesterday. He is still here, and
so is his friend, Frederick Anson, Es
quire, of London. The two friends
leave for Mr. Gaffey's domain in Ari
zona Sunday, where Mr. Anson, of Lon
don, intends to invest in a freak.
Mr. Anson, of London, is interested
in everything that is extraordinary.
Among tbe rest he cares for himself and
looks after his personal appearance with
pronounced difficulty.
His wardrobe caused the North Beach
cars to turn a dark yellow yesterday, and
the mud outside of the gore formed by
Geary and Market streets became so dry
that it was parched, and blew in
through the swinging doors.
Here are tlie clothes of Mr. Anson as
they would trfure in an inquest.
Item : A scarlet waistcoat, made by
Hill, and trimmed with purple chenille.
Item: A tweed coat, made by Small
page, marked with square black and
white checks that simply shrieked as
they turned out of Kearny into Market
street.
Item: Trousers to match the coat,
made by Jones, in Sackville street, Lon
don, and warranted to travel on their
shape for five years from date.
Item: Patent leather boots, with yel
low uppers to match, from Peel, in Pic
cadilly.
Item: A blue shirt, with a
pink necktie, all from Beale tfelnmau, in
Bond street.
COLONEL KINNEY FLED TO THE UILLS.
And this is a sample of the wardrobe
which Mr. Anson has forsaken in the
Westminster hotel, Los Angeles. It
seems that just three weeks ago he
arrived in the hoped-for capital of the
sunny south, with letters of introduc
tion from Colonel Lorillard of New
York to Colonel Abbott Kinney of
Sierra Madre villa.
The minute that Colonel Kinney
heard there was a letter of introduction
stalking abroad, he hitched up his ex
press wagon and drove with the intens
ity of Jehu toward the hills.
However, Percy Griffiths happened to
be doing the honors of the town just
then, and he gathered in Mr. Anson.
Then came the Gaffey episode. Mr.
Griffith introduced Frederick Anson to
John Gaffey in pure good faith. Griffith
has lived in Piccadilly himself, and
knows what real society ought to be.
But John Gaffey is a critical, suspicious
creature who "loves to ask questions.
John Gaffey took a fancy to the stranger's
make-up right away. He wasn't used
to New York, and the costume fascinated
him.
Frederick Anson, of London, had a
lovely time in Los Angeles that night.
He was introduced to everybody, includ
ing Mr. Crowley, of railroad celobrity.
He played billiards with Griffiths and
drank a variety of brands with Mr.
Crowley. When a game of poker was
proposed, from which John Gaffey ex
cused himself, but asked to provide a
substitute in Mr. Brick Brady, of the
sheriff's office. The object was to show
Mr. Anson how to play poker, so as to
deceive the natives of San Francisco.
"It's as easy as mud!" exclaimed
Gaffey. "I'll leave you with my friends
and they'll show you thirty-nine ways
of beating the 'Frisco game."
Mr. Gaffey left for the north next
morning, and never heard a word of the
terrible catastrophe that ensued.
A CATASTROPHE ENSUED.
How it was done no one understands,
especially Mr. Anson.
Eight trunks, three hat-boxes, adress- i
suit case, a walking-stick case, a boot j
caße, two shirt-cases and a gun-box were
attached on various strange reasons by I
the sheriff's office next day.
Mr. Anson threatened to send a letter ;
to the London Times proclaiming, the
Westminster hotel. His new-found
friends rushed to his rescue, and with
them Brick Brady of the sheriff's office,
who was more friendly than he had
been the night before. Mr. Anson in
troduced his case to the latter and exe
cuted a document by which Mr. Brick
Brady should be custodian of his re
claimed effects.
The day after Los Angeles citizens
were horitied to see Brick Brady, Colo
nel Hotchkiss the lawyer, George Flint,
Ned Miles and a few others attired in
new clothes.
Colonel Hotchkiss wore a quiet affair,
built by Poole, in Nile green.
George Flint had on white corduroys.
Ned Miles wore a crushed-strawberry
waistcoat, and with mauve trousers con
structed by a Jermyn-street tailor.
Brick Brady sported an ulster that
possessed the iridescent hues which only
a true "gent" could afford.
Mr. AnHon arrived at the Palace hotel
Wednesday night, and llined with the
Casserly boys. He explained the awful
disaster in Los Angeles as follows.
"Me luggage is in Los Angeles, you
know, but they'll have it arranged to
morrow. If they don't, why, Senator
John Gaffey will have the persons who
keep the hotel there.thrown into prison.
Senator Gaffey has a large turtle farm in
Arizona, and he has invited me to accom
pany him there Saturday night. He
owns the only prize coyote in the terri
tory, he tells me, and he has offered him
to me, with a testimonial and warranted
pedigree, for £1000. From all I hear of
the animal's speed I call thatconfounded
cheap—doncherknow 1"
The Secret of Success.
R. W. Ellis & Co., druggists, believe that the
secret of success is perseverance. Therefore
they persist in keeping the finest line of per
fumeries, toilet nrcicles, cosmetics, drugs and
cheii ieals on the market, They especially in
vite all persons who have palpitation, short
breath, weak or hungry spells, pain in side or
should r, oppression, nightmare, dry cough,
smothering, arot-sy or heart disease to try Dr.
Miles' unequaled New Heart Cure before it is
too late. It has the largest sale of any similar
remedy. Fine book of testimonials tree. Hr.
Miles' Restorative Nervine is unsurpassed for
sleeplessness, headache, fits, etc., and it con
tains no opiates.
CAIN- I
j ONE POUND
•EE2f A Day.
J A GAIN OF A POUND A DAY IN THE [
j CASE OF A MAN WHO HAS BECOME "ALL j
5 RUN DOWN," AND HAS BEGUN TO TAKE 5
j THAT REMARKABLE FLESH PRODUCER, j
jSCOTT'SI
i Emulsion
j OF PURE COO LIVER OIL WITH |
! Hypophosphites of Lime & Soda {
)IS NOTHING UNUSUAL. THIS FEAT 5
j HAS BEEN PERFORMED OVER AND OVER {
j again. Palatable as milk. En- J
< doused by Physicians. Sold by all 3
J Druggists. Avoid substitutions and i
\ imitations. I
AMUSKMKNTS. ~~
■pOTOMAC BLOCK,
L BROADWAY, NEAR SECOND STREET.
Saturday, Dec. 13th, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.,
:THE :
j DOLL'S WEDDING, j
A life-like representation of Dollies marriage
ceremony. The bride and groom in full dress,
clergyman in eanonieuls, pages, guests, etc., all
in appropriate costumes, forming one of the
most uuique and beautiful groups of elaborately
dressed dolls ever seen in this city
Do not miss the opportunity of seeing this
exquisite tableau, which is given by the Yo.ng
Ladies of Immanuel Presbyterian Church in
connection with their sale of
DOLLS, DOLL CLOTHING, APRONS AND
FANCY ARTICLES
for the holidays.
Cakes and refreshments will be served
throughout the day nnd evening. 13-8-td
TLLINOIS HALL,
X Broadway akd Sixth St.
SOCIAL AND ENTERTAINMENT
BY
THE ILLINOIS ASSOCIATION,
Tuesday Evening, December 9th.
Grand Musical Programme.
Elocution, Dramatic Specialties, etc.
Citizens and strangers equally welcome.
TIVOLI THEATRE.
12, 14 and Hi Court street.
STRICTLY FAMILY RESORT.
ADMISSION, - - - - 15c„ 25c. and 350.
EVERY EVENING.
MATINEE SUNDAY.
NEW ATTRACTIONS WEEKLY.
10-24-8 m
Cancer of the Nose.
In 1875 a sore appeared on mv nose, anu
grew rapidly. As my father had cancer, 1
and my husband died of it, I became alarm
ed, ana consulted my physician. His treat
ment did no good, and tne sore grew larger
and worse in every way,until I hadconclud*
ed that I was to .die from its effects. I waa
persuaded to take S. 8. S., and a few bottles
cured mc. This was after all tbe doctors and
other medicines had failed. I have had no
return of the cancer.
MRS. M. T. MABEN.
Woodbury, Hall County, Texas.
Treatise on Cancer mailed free.
SWIFT SPECIFIC CO., Atlanta, G».
AMUSEMENTS.
MEW 1,03 ANGELES THEATRE,
•L" H. C. Wyatt, Manager.
FOUR NIG 8.
Beginning Thursday, December 11th.
No Saturday Matinee.
KING FUN!
FRANK DANIELS
• AND HIS
BIG COMEDY COMPANY!
Including Miss Bessie Lanson,
Presenting
"LITTLE PUCK!"
Jutt broke tbe record of the California Theater,
playing to the largest buxiues9 ever known
in Sau Francisco at regular prices.
Seats now on sale. 12-3tf
gECOND ANNUAL EXHIBITION
OP THE
LO3 ANGELES COUNTY
POULTRY ASSOCIATION
Will be held In the Dr. Zahn Block, 431, 433
and 435 S. Spring st., Los Angeles. CaL,
DECEMBER 9th, 10th, 11th nnd 12th.
This will be the finest Exhibition of Poultry
and Pet Stock ever held in California, and will
be tho attraction of the season. Do not fail to
attend.
Admission, 25c. Tickets for sale at the book
stores and news-stands, and by members of the
Association. Doors open all day and in the
evening. 12-3-10t
ILLINOIS HALL,
J- Broadway and Sixth Street.
Great Star Course—Second Night.
SWEDISH QUARTETTE I
The most artistic musical combination before
the Ameiican public.
The land which gave us Jenny Lind and
Christine Nilsson has also produced this won
derful quartette of male singers. Their un
paralleled success in all the great cities of
Europe and the Eastern States is a sufficient
guarantee that this will undoubtedly be one of
the chief attractions of the year in Los Angeles.
Their singing is characterized by an elegance
and vivacity which charm all audiences. In
addition to their Swedish sones the Quartette
renders a number of English selections, which
enable them to give a most pleasing and varied
programme.
Tlie Quartette will be assisted by Miss Lura
Baiden, the talented dramatic and humorous
reciter, and by Miss Vina J. Skoog, tbe popular
accompanist.
Weduesday evening, December 10. Course
ticket, ten nights. ?3.50. Single admission, 50c.
Reserved seats, 75c. 12-7-3t
OECOND TERM OF
HENRY J. KRAMER'S
SCHOOL FOR DANCING!
Academy, 313 and 315 V;,' S. Main St.
Class for beginners, ladles and gentlemen,
Monday and Thursday evenings, from 8 to 10
p. in., commencing Monday, Dec. 29, 1890.
Class for advanced pupils, Tuesday evenings
only, from 8 to 10 p. m., commencing Tuesday
evening. Dec. 30, 1890.
Class forladbs, misses and masters, Saturday
afternoons only, from 3:30 to 5:30 p. m.
Juvenile claßa, 1:30 to 3:30 p. m.
Terms—One quarter, 20 lessons, $10: one-half
quarter, 10 lessons, $6.
All the latest fashionable round and square
dances will be taught in the above classes.
Satisfactory references required from all ap
plicants. Send for circular. Office hoars, 3 to
sp. m. Hall to rent.
127-lm HENRY J. KRAMER, Instructor.
rpURNVEREIN HALL.
i MISS ADELE AUS DER OHE! j
The Greatest Living Pianist in the World,
Who has just made such a tremendous furore
iv San Francisco after her phenomenal success
in Europe and America, is coining to Los An
geles with our old Los Angeles friend,
MP.. F. W. LUDOVICI,
And will give Two Concerts iv Turnverein
Hall on
WEDNESDAY EVENING, DEC. 10, 1890,
SATURDAY EVENING, DEC. 13, 1890.
Tickets for sale at George S. Marygold's Broad
way music store, Potomac block. Price, tl .00,
. including reserved Beats. 12-5-7t
CALIFORNIA DIME MUSEUM "
AND THEATER,
North Main streot, near First.
Doyle & Knifeen Managers
CARD TO THE PUBLIC-After a prolonged
absence we have returned to Los Angeles, and
will resume the management of the above bona
fide "Family Resort " Our former patrons can
rest assured that it will be conducted in such a
rasnner as to warrant the term. Respectfully
soliciting the consideration of our former
pations, we remain, the public's obedient
servants, DOYLE & KNIFFEN,
Charles A. Doyle, Manager.
GRAND OPENING SATURDAY, DEC. 6th.
Everything New In Museum and Theater.
For full particulars, see descriptive bills, pro
grammes, etc.
Doors open from 1 to 10. Performances
hourly.
Admission—loc Reserved seats 10c extra.
JJAZARD'S PAVILION,
Fifth street, near Olive.
OLYMPIAN RINK!
A first-class place of moral and popular amuse
ment, where good order and decorum are rig
idly enforced. Ladies are required to obtain an
approval card before skating.
Ten thousand feet new maple floor; 1000
pair pin roller and ball bearing skates. Grand
opening fete nights, Thursday, Fiiday and
Saturday, December 4th, sth and 6th. Ex
hibitions of laney, fast, trick, acrobatic and
comic skating and bicycling will be given.
Change of programme nightly. Admission free
to the galleries. Stating, 25c. Saturday fore
noons, 10 to 12. children.-grand complimentary
matinee; admission free, skating 10c. Special
department for new beginners 11-27 Im
PALACE RESTAURANT AND BALOON,
Corner First and Spring Streets.
The Most Magnificent and Popular
Resort In the Oity.
FREE CONCIK T8 I
BY THE
CELEBRATED PHILHARMONIC SOLOISTS
Every Night from 8 to 12.
JOSEPH BCHURTZ, PROPRIETOR.
JeS-tf
j LUMBKR UKi)
Kerekhoff-Cuzner
MILL AND LUMBER CO.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Main Office: LOS ANGELES. Wholesale Yard
at SAN PEDRO.
j 'Branch Yards—Pomona, Pasadena, Lamanda,
Azusa, Burbank. Planing Mills—Los Angeles
and Pomona. Cargoes furnished to order.
J. M. Griffith, President.
H. G. Stevenson, Vlce-Pres. and Trea«.
T. E. Nichols, Secy. E. L Chandler, Supt
J. M. GRIFFITH COMPANY,
Lumber Dealers
And Manufacturers of
DOCKS, WINDOWS, BLINDS, STAIRS,
Mill work of every description.
934 N. Alameda Street, Los Angeles.
lul tf
PERRY, MOTT &. GO'S
LUMBER YARDB
AND PLANING MILLS,
No. 76 Commercial Street. jul tf
J. A. HENDERSON, WM. F. MARSHALL,
President. Secretary.
J. R. SMURR,
Vice President and Treasurer.
SOUTHERN ~CALIFORNIA
LUMBER CO.
|3So East First Street.
9-19-5 m l.os Angeles, California.
raTTTIAM w - Oonglw! fthoea art
VAUI lUn vrnrvnntpd, aud every pal'
ha. Ills name and price stamped r~i botlor.i.
$3 SHOE GENTLEMEN.
Fine Calf and Laced Waterproof Grafu.
The excellence and wearing qualities of thin shoe
mnnot be better shown than by the Btrong endorse
ments of Its thousands of constant wearers.
Se.OO Genuine Hand-Hewed* an elegant and
9 stylish drons Shoo which commendH itself,
%_M .OO iland-Nfivcd Welt. A fine calf Shoe
■fr unequalled for stylo and durability.
$0.50 Goodyear Welt Is the standard dress
w Shoe, at a popular price.
$0.50 Policeman's Shoe (3especially adapted
0 for railroad men, farmers, etc.
All made In Congress. Button and I.nc
s3 & $2 SHOES
have been most favorably received since Introduced
and the recent Improvements make them superioi
to any shoes sold at these prices.
Ask your Dealer, and if lie cannot supply you send
direct to factory enclosing advertised price, e>r t
portal for order blanks.
W. L. DOUGLAS, Brockton, Mass
MASSACHUSETS
Boot £ Shoe House,
Sole Agents for Los Angeles,
fel-5m 129 WEST FIRST ST.
Holiday Photos. Christmas Presents.
Only $8.50 fc- $3.50
Everybody desiring Photographs for Holiday
Presents should remember that Dewey is mak
ing his elegant and finest finished $7.00 Cabinets
for $3 50 per dozen. "Nothing finer in the
6tate." Large photos for framing at very low
prices. Family "groups, babies and children's
photos a specialty. Developing, printing and
finishing for amateurs. Old pictures copied
and enlarged. Come early and avoid the rush
DEWEY'S ART PARLORS,
11-27-3 m 147 8. Main street.
WILKE'S
DELICAGY STORE
203 N. MAIN STREET,
TEMPLE BLOCK.
All kinds Cold Meats and Salads.
Foreign and Domestic Cheese, Etc.
SMOKED BEEF AND TONGUE.
lunchTi^oom,
11-14-3 m
SALE OF DELINQUENT STOCK.
Southern California Blue Gravel Mining Com
pany's office, No. 120 South Spring street, Los
Angeles, California.
NOTICE— THERE IS DELINQUENT UPON
the following described stock on account
of assessment No, 2, levied on the 22d day of
October, IS9O, the several amounts set opposite
the names of the respective shareholders, .as
follows:
names, certificate. share! Amount -
Z.W.Fauuce 2 100 i 20 00
" " 3 200 40 00
" 4 300 60 00
" '• 5 400 80 00
" " 6 250 50 00
" 7 250 50 00
" m 8 250 50 00
" 9 250 50 00
" 10 300 60 00
" " 17 200 40 00
B. J. Reeves 20 BOW 1000 00
" 78 2000 400 00
" M 83 500 100 00
Avery McCarthy.... 28 1000 200 nO
Edward Lownes. .63 450 90 00
Mrs. E. F. Gerard .. 68 2'o 40 00
Miss E A. Denning. 09 100 20 00
W. T. Hustin 76 900 180 00
Joseph Bush 84 500 100 00
Johnßobson 94 10 2 00
Sarah W.Baughman 103 30 6 00
P. J. Kennedy 109 100 20 00
M. E. Kennedy, trus
tee for Katurine
Kennedy 119 900 180 00
Mrs. Ella 11. Judah.lll 100 20 00
E. L. Blanchard 113 400 80 00
H. L. Jordan 114 2000 400 00
Henry Greenawalt. 116 500 100 00
Wm. A. Merralls 120 100 20 00
Win. Scrlmgeour .. .121 100 20 00
G.W.Brown I*s 100 20 00
A. C. Wurmser 124 100 20 00
A. C. Wurmser 127 79,150 15,830 00
B. T. LeWaine 105 100 20 00
Geo. H. Little 75 500 100 00
James Kensella 22 5000 1000 00
James Kensella 34 5000 1000 00
Dr. B. E. Fryer 123 100 20 00
And in accordance with law, and an order of
the Board of Directors, made on the 22d day of
October, 1890, so many shares
of each parcel oi such stock as
may be necessary will be sold at the office of
the company, No. 126 South Spring street, Los
Angeles, California, on the 15tn day of Decem
ber, 1890, at 10 o'clock a. m. of such day. to
pay delinquent assessments thereon, together
with costs of advertising and expenses of sale.
GAY W. BROWN, Secretary.
Office, 126 South Spring street, Los Angeles,
CaL .V25-td
3
Horns m S£«TAm»NTi.
ILLICH'S
RESTAURANT.
Everything' New and First-Class.
146 and 147 M. Main Street,
ap29-tf JERKY ILLICIT Proprietor.
OPTICIANS AND JKWKLKEB.
THIS 18 N OX OUR WAT.
ThiB> OUR WAY of Fitting Glasses.
The importance of perfect-fitting glasses is
Belf-evident to every Intelligent reader. Hl
fltting glasses cause discomfort, injuries, partial
or total loss of sight. Beware of the ignorant
jewelers; they are frauds posing as opticians.
We guarantee you a thorough, reliable and
perfect scientific fit at lowest prices. Eyes
tested free. Call and see.
S. O. MARSHUTZ, Scientific Optician,
114 S. Spring st , between First and Second.
We carry also a full stook of artificial eyes.
CO M ,
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is 5
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3 EC >* £
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RAMONA!
The Gem of the San Gabriel Valley
Only Three Miles from City Limits of Los
Angeles.
Property of San Gabriel Wine Co.,
Original owners.
LOCATED AT SHORB'S STATION,
On line of 8. P. R. R. and Ban Gabriel Valley
Rapid Transit R. X ,
From 10 to 15 minutes to the Plaza, Los An
geles City.
CHEAPEST SUBURBAN TOWN LOTS,
VILLA SITES, or
ACREAGE PROPERTY.
POPULAR TERMS.
PUREST SPRING WAXES
Inexhaustible quantities guaranteed.
Apply at Office of
BAN GABRIEL WINE CO..
Ramona, Los Angeles County, Ca..
10-26U Or to M. D. WILLIAMS, Ramona.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
County of Los Angeles. State of California.
In the matter of tho estate of George Wilshire,
deceased.
Notice is hereby given that Thursday, the 11th
day of December, 1800, at 10 o'clock a. m. of
said day, at the court room of said Superior
Court. Department Two thereof, corner Frank
lin and New High streets, in the city of Los
Angeles, county of Los Ange!e«. ana state of
California, has been appointed a> the time and
place for hearing the application of George P.
Wilshire and Alexander McDonald, pray
ing that a document now on file in said
court, purporting to be a copy of t' c last will and
testament of the said deceased, and tbe probate
thereof in the bister state of Ohio, duly
authenticated, be allowed and recorded in this
court, and that letters testamentary on said
will be issued to said George P. Wilshire and
Alexander McDonald, at which time and place
all persons interested therein may appear and
contest tlie same.
J. M. MEREDITH, Clerk.
By M. J. ASHMORE, Deputy.
Dated November 28. 1890. 11-30-12t
NOTICE OP CONSOLIDATION.
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN—NOTICE IS
hereby given, that the Los Angeleß snd Glen
dale Railway Company; the 1 os Angeles, Pasa
dena and Glendale Railway Company, and the
Los Angeles Terminal Railway Company, have
consolidated and amalgamated all their capital
stock, debts, property, assets and franchises in
the manner required by law, into a new com
pany called "Los Angeles Terminal Railway
Company." and that such consolidation will go
into effect in one month after the first insertion
of this notice in this paper.
Bated November 27th, 1890
T.B. BURNETT.t'resident,) Los Angele-AGlen-
WM. WINCUP, Secretary, (dale Railway 00.
B. F. HOBART, President,! Los Angeles. Pasa
_ _ > dena A (ilendale
T. B. BURNETT,Secretary,) Railway Co.
B.F. HOBART, President, j Los Angeles Tcr-
T.B. BURNETT, Secretary, I minal Railway Co.
11-29-301

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