OCR Interpretation


Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, December 10, 1890, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84025968/1890-12-10/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 4

4
DAILY HERALD.
PUBLISHED
BEVEN DAYS A WEEK.
Joseph D. Lynch. Jambs J. A vers.
AVERS & LYNCH, - - PUBLISHERS.
(Entered at the postofflce at Los Angeles as
second-class matter. ]
DELIVERED BY CARRIERS
At *0« Fer Week, or 80c Per Month-
TERMS BY MAIL, INCLUDING POSTAGE:
Daily Hebald, one year $8.00
Daily Hebald, six months *-.2&
Daily Herald, three months j»-2?
Weekly Hebald, one year 2-00
Weekly Herald, six months 1.00
Weekly Herald, three months oO
Illubtkatkd Hebald, per copy 15
Office of Publication, 223-225 West Second
street. Telephone 156.
Notice to Mall Subscribers.
The papers of all delinquent mail subscribers
to the Los Angeles Daily Hebald will be
promptly discontinued hereafter. N» papers
will be sent to subscribers by mail unless the
same have been paid for in advance. This rule
Is Inflexible. A YERS A LYNCH.
The "Dally Herald"
Hay be found In San Francisco at the Palace
hotel news-stand; in Chicago at the Postofflce
news-stand, 103 East Adams street; in Denver
at Smith & Sons' news-stand, Fifteenth and
Lawrence streets.
WEDNESDAY, DKCEMBER 10, 1890.
WHO OUGHT TO BE OUR LEGISLATORS.
Our governmental schools, as con
ducted in nearly all the states, are
divided into three classes —common
schools, high schools and normal
schools. These schools have been es
tablished and fostered by the several
state governments, in order to give the
children of the laboring classes an edu
cation such as is necessary to make of
them good intelligent citizens. The past
history of the world shows that where
there are no government schools, the
masses grow up in ignorance, and are
devoid of that intelligence which is
necessary to good citizenship in a re
publican form of government, where
each male who is twenty-one years
old has the privilege of voting. In
view of this responsibility, surely the
fundamental principles of our govern
ment ought to be taught in all our
schools. The text book in the common
school ought to be simple, giving an out
line of the whole subject, from the forms
and usages in the counties up to the
United States congress. In the high
and normal schools, the text book
ought to be of a higher grade, entering
into the science of government. This
branch of study has been grossly ne
glected in the past. During the past
few years a text book treating of gov
ernment has been introduced in a few of
the high schools.
The tone of the public press indicates
that there is a disordered and unsettled
condition of affairs in our country. This
is largely due to an imperfect under
standing or Comprehension of the duties
of citizens, and the duties and powers of
the government. Wild and communistic
theories are advocated by people who
may be sincere and honeßtin their opin
ions, and yet would never be advocated
by them if they had a correct view of
the fundamental principles of ourgovern
ment. History shows that anarchism,
communism, nihilism, and all forms of
pernicious doctrines, flourish in countries
where the masses are purposely kept in
ignorance of the science of government.
Let the masses be properly educated,
morally, religiously and intellectually,
the latter including the science of
government, and the state will be well
governed.
Another very erroneous idea is largely
prevalent, to-wit, that any man has as
much right and is fit to hold a public office
as any other. The men who administer the
government, whether city, state or na
tional, ought to have ability and special
fitness for their respective positions. In
the past we have had more lawyers in
the public offices than any other class.
Doubtless this has been largely due to
the fact that their professional educa
tion and training have made them much
more familiar with the art of govern
ment than men in any other calling.
Doubtless they were more able to grap
ple with legal and constitutional ques
tions than any other class. Now the
necessity does not exist for giving pref
erence to lawyers to represent ns in our
legislatures. The great and fundamen
tal questions are practically settled, and
there is no need of them longer holding
a prominent place in politics.
Commercial and business questions
are the great problems for statesmen of
the present generation to consider and
settle. Not a few are of the opinion
that "we have reached an era in our de
velopment when the purely professional
men should be succeeded, in both our
state and national legislatures, by prac
tical and experienced business men."
Their training has made them more
competent to deal with the live ques
tions ot the present day than any other
class. On a legal, that is, a question
purely legal, the judgment of a Webster
or a Story is preferable • but on a com
mercial or business matter the judgment
of an enlightened successful business man
is greatly preferable. Such men are far
better qualified to form correct ideas
about tariff's, taxation and the proper
development of the industries of the
country than professional men. Surely,
intelligent, educated men, who are en
gaged in manufacturing, understand
questions of tariff better than lawyers.
80 those engaged in commerce and
transportation know better than lawyers
what is the true and proper character of
maritime laws for the government of
merchant marine. Men who are ac
quainted with and have a practical
knowledge of onr great industries, are
the men to consider and pass upon these
questions. Who is better qualified than
an intelligent, well-educated farmer to
consider the questions pertaining to the
opening and settlement of the large
tracts of govern men t lands? The same
ia true of questions pertaining to min
ing, irrigation, and grazing lands. In a
great country like ours all of the great
industries should have representatives
TIIE LOS ANGELES HERALD: WEDNESDAY MORNING, DECEMBER JO, 1890.
in every legislative body, whether state
or national.
There is one class which ought to be
permanently retired, never again to
have a seat in any of our legislative
bodies —the professional politician. He
has outlived his usefulness, and he is
now running the ship of state into
shoals and quicksands, and if not retired
will soon wreck her upon rocks which
lie just below the surface, and therefore
are the more dangerous. These rocks
are anarchism, nihilism, communism,
and such like. He is no patriot only so
far as he can fill his pockets from the
public coffers. He is in politics to ag
grandize self and to fatten on the emol
uments of office. On matters affecting
the welfare of the people and the pros
perity of the nation, he does not consult
the wishes*of his constituents, or even
himself, but blindly follows the orders of
some party boss who sits behind
the scenes and pulls the wires. Party
is more to him than the public welfare.
This is the class of men who have dur
ing the past generation run our govern
ment. Away with them. Indeed, it is
a most humiliating spectacle to all
lovers of honest, clean government.
That such men should longer continue
in office is a disgrace to the American
people. It is time for all newspapers to
advocate the election to the public offices
of good and true men. Also for all good |
citizens to vote for only good and honor
able men. It is high time to inaugu- 1
rate a system that will not tax a candi- j
date more than his salary when elected
to office. It matters not how intelligent,
how well qualified a man may be to fill
any given office, if he is poor, he cannot
receive a nomination ; for he cannot suf- j
ficiently fee the wire-pullers. The
primaries ought to be attended by all j
the good and true men, nominate only
good men, and then keep money in the
back ground during the canvass.
The great combination of the western
and Pacific coast railroads—the pet
scheme of Jay Gould —is destined, we
fear, to work injury. Not that we be
lieve that settled rates on a reasonable
basis will produce serious harm, but
that the agreement entered into by the
combination to discourage the building j
of new roads will arrest the healthy de- i
velopment of localities that are not yet |
provided with transportation facilities.
If Gould's ideas are to control
the policy of the combination, they !
will prove a serious drawback to I
progress, for he has declared that !
there are enough roads already built in
thil part of the United States to meet
the business wants of the people for
five years to come. When we look
closely into the meaning of this declara
tion, it portends a policy to make large
dividends, on inflated stock in many
cases, without seeking to increase the
area the business would cover by the ex
tension of the roads into new sections,
and thus create new industries and new
productions that would give the roads a
wider range of business. The effect of
thia stand-still policy has proved disas
trous already to some great railway
corporations. We beiieve it is with rail
roads as it is with other enterprises,
they must be progressive or go behind.
In a new country like ours, a business
that is not progressive becomes tainted
with dry rot, and will be passed in the I
race for success by more adventurous
and enterprising competitors. It may
be said that the great combine is beyond
the reach of competitors. But il the
field is on this coast —as it undoubtedly
is—for the successful employment of
capital in new roads, they will be built,
and the established companies may wake
up to find, what the Southern Pacific
railroad| realized in Southern California
a few years ago, that some other Santa
Fe company has entered the field and
taken possession of territory which they
have imprudently neglected.
Monometalists one and all are men
tally muddled as to one effect they al
lege will follow the free, unlimited coin
age of silver. It is alleged by these
special pleaders for the yellow metal that
Buch a programme, if carried into prac
tice, will drain our country of gold, and
make this tlie dumping ground for sil
ver. How so? They will not be able
to come here and effect a direct change
of one metal for the other. A free coin
age policy put in practice will force sil
ver up at once to its full coin value,
on a ratio of one to sixteen.
The country can be drained of gold in
exchange for merchandise only by our
buying tbe goods of other nations. With
a properly adjusted tariff schedule, we
will sell more than we buy, and the bal
ance of exchanges will be in our favor.
How, then, will our gold be lost? If
anyone questions our ability under fair
trade laws to sell more than we buy, he
either underestimates the capacity of
our country to produce or of
our people to develop their re
sources. Ours is the most independent
position on the face of the- earth. We
we can grow or manufacture nearly all
we need. Cheap money is one of the
chief needs of the country to enable us
to do this. Whatever silver other na
tions might dump on us at first, at any
price below $1.21) per ounce, will be so
much gained by us, and will enable us
to play the game England is now play
ing on us when she buys our silver for
$1 and 3ells it to her Indian colonies for
$1.29. It is a winning game for Eng
land.
Genbbai. Mii.es is generally regarded
aa a man of excellent judgment and un
failing determination. He will do much
to confirm these good opinions by deal
ing wisely and promptly with the Indian
difficulty in Dakota. Now is the time
to subdue the hostiles. It is the depth
of winter in a severe climate. The Bad
lands is a district of bald rocks, barren
canons and deserted plains. Without
rations, Sitting Bull and Short Bull, the
Messiah and all his chiefs must soon be
forced to submit. They would all die
of starvation or freeze to death if they
were denied relief at the hands of our
government. Let spring once come, and
thia ghost dance will go whirling into a
devil's dance to death through all the
homes of the settlers in the northwest.
This is no matter for silly, sickly senti
ment to expend itself on. Bring these
bloodthirsty savages to taw at once by
the most stringent methods devisable,
and make good Indians of every last red
devil in the camps before the grasses be
gin to spring up on the plains.
Secretary Windom, in speaking of
his financial policy, its practice and re
sults, condemns the present administra
tion. The secretary Btates that in nine
teen months he has disbursed from the
treasury in round numbers $100,000,000,
to aid in the relief of stringency in the
money market. He does not Bay
whether this is a net increase in the
currency of the country. If it inclndes
all disbursements for the purchase of
bonds, et cetera, it would not be
a net increase. But supposing
it to be all new money, it is an increase
of about $t>5,000,000 a year. That is an
increase of about $1 per capita per an
num. What does it amount to? The
country now has only a circulating me
dium of $23 per capita. The demand of
the Farmers' Alliance for $50 per capita
is not much out of the way. The coun
try could stand quite that amount
of money without disturbance. In
view of these figures, Mr. Windom's
efforts at relief are of the homeopathic
sort, and dilute at that. If instead of
$100,000,000 in two years. Mr. Windom
will add to the currency $1,000,000,000 in
one month he may be said to be dealing
adequately with this question of reliev
ing stringency in the money market.
We want to* get over this scare we all
suffer from, lest we may get too much
money in the country.
AMUSEMENTS.
Things Past and Future in Music
Circles.
At the Los Angeles theater last night,
before an immense audience, J. H.
Brenner and his able corps of assistants
gave their benefit concert in behalf of
St. Paul's hospital building fund. Tlie
following programme was excellently
rendered:
Overture, William Tell, the Arend or
chestra; 'cello solo, selected, Mr. B.
Bierlich ; violin solo, Allegro Maestoso
and Adagio, from Ninth concerto, (De
Beriot,) Miss June Reed ; (a) recitation,
The Erl King , Mrs. E. L. Swaine, (b)
piano, The Erl King, (Schubert-Liszt,)
Mr?. R. M. Lancaster; vocal, Dreams,
Only Dreams, Mrs. J.S.Owen; vocal,
double quartette, Rest Thee on This
Mossy Pillow, (Smart,) Mesdaines Mo
dini-Wood, Owens, Larrabee, Dr.
Luiiimis, Wenger, Lyndall, Misses
Cochrane, Perry, Selby; vocal,
double quartette. Rosebud Fair,
(Many,) Messrs. Defty, Nuelle, Nay,
Alexander, Pring. Stephens, Wallace.
By rain, Robert E. Paulsen, director;
soprano, selected, Mrs. Modini-Wood;
recitation, letter scene from Macbeth,
Mrs. E. L. Swaine; piano, Bendel's
Souvenir de Hongrie, Mrs. R. M. Lan
caster; vocal, Stella Confidente, (Ro
baudi,) Signer Modini-Wood, 'celloobli
gate, Mr. B. Bierlich; Trip to Great
Britain, the Arend orchestra.
For tonight there are outlined two at
tractive programmes. At Illinois hall
the great Swedish quartette will appear
in their vocal programme. These sing-'
ers are reputed to be very artistic. The
press everywhere teems with warm
words of commendation in their behalf.
At Turner hall tonight Fraulein Adelc
aus der Ohe will give one of her great
piano recitals. This lady comes here
with a reputation as wide as two conti
nents. In San Francisco she was loaded
with honors.
Tomorrow night Frank Daniels will
appear at the Los Angeles in Little
Puck.
NOT A CHARLEY ROSS.
Claudius Turns Up All Right, and the
Detectives Take a Rest.
Claudius Suize, the lix-year-old boy
who so mysteriously disappeared on
Sunday last, was yesterday found at
Inglewood, and returned to his father
last evening.
It appears that after leaving the
house, 821 Lyons street, where he had
been visiting, he walked all the way to
Inglewood, from which place lie was
lecently brought to thin city by his
father, and remained at the house of
some friends, who were unaware that he
hadrun away until yesterday.
The boy's parents were separated
some time ago, the cuatDdy of the child
being awarded to his father; and when
he disappeared it was suggested that
Mrs. Suize had caused him to be kid
naped and taken to San Francisco.
Several detectives were scouring the city
in every direction on Monday, their the
ory being that ihe boy had been induced
to accompany some evilly disposed per
son, who sought to make capita! out of
him.
Go to Mullen, Bluett A Co. for overcoats.
Toward the Setting Sun
Myriads of emigrants take their way. Thou
sands upon thousands of acres covered with the
virgin forest still await the axe of the pioneer.
"Holding down a claim" on the frontier, it
should be remarked, has other draw backs be
sides that of disputed possession. Many an en
terprising settler who, with indomitable har
dihood, has cleared the waste, just as the scanty
area is ready for tillage, is stricken by that foe
of the frontiersman, mßlaria. What a boon to
th.it man and his family is Uostetter's Stom-eh
Bitters, what wise forethought has he shown if
he has ohtuined an adequate supp y. The f ir
est fields for agricultural and mining enter
prises on this continent and abroad are subject
io this Infliction. Protected hy Hoetcttei's
Stomach bitters it m ybe defied. It will not
do to confide iv a robust constitution alone.
Malaria prostrates the strong und weak alifc.\
Take the Bitters, too, for rheumatism, dys
pepsia, biliousness, kidney trouble.
Go to Mullen, Bluett & Co. for overcoats.
Big Time at the Mammoth.
Today the Mammoth Shoe House will com
mence to give to every purch ser of boots,
shoes and dippers a handsome holiday
present.
Go to Mullen, Bluet' & Co. for overcoats.
Eastern Produce Co., 123 East First St.
Best eastern hams, 11c and 13'»r; bacon,
pork, 10c; lard, Oc.
Creamery bu'ter, 25c and 30c. Best roll
butter always on baud.
Go to Mullen, Bluett it Co. for overcoat*.
Notice.
Sale of cloaks advertised by Rhoades A Reed
indefinitely postponed. Will not take place
until further notice.
Go to Mullen, Bluett <St Co. for overcoats.
W. Oaler, printer, 316 West First street.
Go to Mullen, Bluett Si Co. for overcoats.
DIED.
KEYKS—At her late residence. No 43:1 8.
Broadway, December 0, 18i)o, Mrs. Sophia A.
Keyes, sge<l 63 years.
Notice of funeral hereafter.
1 8. IB
fatal Pharmacy,
ITT AND 1 79
North Spring St.,
LOS ANGELES.
DRUG WAR.
I am now selling Drugs, Medicines, Toilet
Articles, indeed everything that goes to make
up an immense slock in my line, including an
elegant line of -
HOLIDAY GOODS
i
At prices that will meet the views of everyone. •
A FEW QUOTATIONS:
Ayer's Sarsaparilla 70c j
Aver's Vigor sbc j
Hood's Sarsaparilla 70c j
Pierces Favorite Prescription 70c
Warner's Safe Cure 85c ,
King's Discovery 70c
Simmons'Liver Regulator 70c |
Cuticura Soup 15c
Pear's Soap .. 15c
Hoyt's Cologne (genuine) 15c |
Hunysdl Janos Water 35e j
Scott's Emulsion 70c
Oriental Cream 90c i
All Keeamicr Preparations $1 10 1
Camelline 36c i
Creme de Us 40c
Syrup Figs, small 40c
Syrup Figs, large 75c
Pond's Extract, small 30c
Pond's Extract, 8 oz. size 75c
Wyeth's Beef Iron and Wine 75c
gnre Cod Liver Oil. per pint 50c
Dr. Bosanko's Cough Syrup 40c
Dr. Bosanko's Pile Rcmeay 40c
Chamberlain's Cough Syrup 80c
Homeopathic Remedies, all kinds 15c
Hance's Cream 20c
Anita 50c
Rum and Quinine Hair Tonic 70c
Pozzoni's Powder. ..A 30c
La Blaobe Powder 30c
Saunders Powder 30c
Swans Down Powder 10c I
11 25-3 m
DO
YOU KNOW
THAT THE
BEST PLACE
IN
THE CITY TO GET
YOUR FAMILY
WINES AND LIQUORS !
IS AT
J. P. TAGGART & CO.'S,
TH EY
HAVE A FINE
WHOLESALE STORE,
AND PAY
STRICT ATTENTION TO
THE FAMILY
TRADE.
ON NEW HIGH ST.,
NEAR TEMPLE
NEXT DOOR
TO THE
UNIVERSITY BANK.
TELEPHONE NO. 3©c.
STREET NOS. 311 AND
313.
MAIL
OR
TELEPHONE ORDERS
ARE ATTENDED TO
PROMPTLY. 12 9 1m
tFexchanoe
wanted to sell or exchange ~for
business property, a fine double house in
the best rt.idenco part of the city, each con
tainiug 0 rooms and bath, each equal to any 12
-roo-.n bouse, with plenty of closets, cellur and
all the latest improvements. Inquire 131 N.
Los Angeles st. 12-7-lm
EXCHANGE—FOR* FRtJFF~oTt~F~A~RM
Jl lands, lti-room residence, with all mod
ern Improvements, finely arranged grounds,
centrally located iv Los Angeles; $10,000. i
Call on or address E, R THRKLDKELD,
Boyle Heights, los Angeles, cor. First and
Bailey sts. 11-21-13t
rpb~ EXCHANGE—CLEAR. UNINCUMBERED
-I lands and town lots, and a stock of cigars,
to trade for furniture, horses, harness, bnggief,
wagons, cov.-s or merchandise. E. RIMAN,
120;.J S. Spring St. U-21tf
SPECIAL NOTICE.
VTITIDNEY'S TOY STOKE !IAS~K~EM7>\ r ED
TT to 055 South Broadway, near Sixth,
where low rents will give you tbe lowest prices
in the city.
a¥gELEsIhTY WATER
Company will strictly enforce the follow
ing rule: Tbe hours tor sprinkling are between
6 ond 8 o'clock a. m., and 0 and 8 o'clock p. m.
For a violation of the above regulation the
water will bo shut off, and a fine of $2 will be
charged before water will be turned on again.
Hul7-ly
-__ BojraOPATBMIE.
SS. SALISBURY, M. D., HOMiKOPATHIST.
• Office, rooms 11 and 12, L. A. Bank build
ing, cor. First and Spring sts. Residence, 648
8. Pearl st. Office hours, 11 a. mto3p. m. Tel
ephone Nos.: Office, 597; residence, 577.
ni24-tf
RB. BEACH & BOYNTON. OFFICE, 37 N.
Spring Bt., Los Angeles, CaL Office hours,
6to 12 m., 1 to 4 and 6toBp. m. Dr. Bovu
ton's residence, 735 Olive sL ml9t'f
ISAAC FELLOWS, M. D., IToMEOPATHIST '
Office hours, 11 to 12 a. in., 2to 5 p. m.
Office, Nos. 2 and 5 Odd Fcllowb' building, Los
Angeles, CaL Residence, 508 South Main St.
mg-tf
SPECIALISTS."""
CTHAS. W. l5?~-DLSEAHEH~OF
J women a specialty. 13SU 8. Spring it.,
rooms 2 and 3. Telephone—Office, 796; resi
dence, 798. 11-20
eII~EVUE LYING-IN HOBPIFr~AIL Ts NOW
open, under the management of Mrs. Dr, J.
H. Smith. Patients can havo their choice of
physicians, and the best of care Is given. Mld
wlferv a uneclaltv 145 BellevllP nve. m2"lf
- ABSTRACTS.
ABSTRACT AND TITLE INSURANCE COM
p»ny of Los Angeles, N. W. cor. Franklin
and <»» High streets. ml7-0m
STORAGE.
JUNCTION " WAREHOUSE" — JUNCTION
Downeyave. and San Fernando st. Rates
reasonable. TeL 385. C. RAPHAEL ii CO. .
jy3-6m
FIVK CENTS A LINK.
situations obtained, help secured, bouses
rented, property of all kinds bought and sold,
aud money loaned by advertising in these
columns.
Everybody Heads Them.
W ANTKTd"-MISCELLANEOUS"
VX7ANTED—TO RENT FURNISHED HOUSE,
TT six or seven rooms ami hath; southwestern
portion of city. Address C. X. 8., office of this
paper. 18-7-9.
\\7ANTED—LADY BOARDERS; INQUIRE
TT at Oil) W. SIXTH ST. 12-7-7t
YX7ANTED-BKCOND-HAND GOODS: HUM
TT est cash price paid, COLGAN'S, 241 H.
Main. 11-14-lm
TAT A NTE D—PICTURES TO FRAM~fi~"c~H~EAP
TT est place at BURNB'S, 206 S. Main St.
au2l-lf
WANTED—AOKNTS.
WANTED— THE PACIKD; ENDOWMENT
League admits to membership both sexes,
inmres for 19000, and pays in coupons of $000
each; no death liabilities, no medical examina
tions; membership, 0500) surplus fundß, $1 10.
-000; admission fee. $5. Wanted, intelligent
male and female agents. BYRON E. HUNT,
agent. 321>_ S. Spriiu st. 12-7-tf
WnMTCP— Agents to sell the Pinlesß Clothes
HtHnIL.U Line; the only line ever invented
that holds the clothes without pins; a perfect
success; patent recently Issued; sold only by
agents, to whom the exclusive right is given;
on receipt of 50 cents we will send a sample
line by mail, also circulars; price list and terms
to agent ; secure your territory at once. Ad
dress The Pitiless Clothes Line Co., 17
Herraon street. Worcester. Mass. 10-25-w sa-3m
WANTED—SITUATIONS.
TTTANTED—POSITION OF SOME KIND BY
TT expert book-keeper; highest recommenda
tions. Address P. 0. box 1007, Station C.
12-9 7t ■
WANTED—HELP.
! riiHß LADLES 7 TArLoSTsTHE
; J. tern for ladies that tailors use for gentlemen,
employing the same principles in dress-cutting
that are used by every successful mechanic. It
I is Hie most convenient, simple and complete
j ladies' tailoring system In the world. Call al
: ;iIOS. Springstreot. 12-7-41
ANTED—ALL NEEDING HELP FREE—
Employment or any information, address
|E. NITTINGER'S BUREAU; established 1880
; Office, 8. Spring; residence, 101 S. Hope
st , cor. Fifth, Los Angeles. Cal. Telephone 113
' __; 11-20
FOR KENT—HOUSES.
! RENT— OCEAN
;JT front, pretty seven-room cottage, fur
l nished, handsomely decorated, modern im
provements, plenty iiowers Also upper part,
! lour tine, large sunny rooms, furnished, private
■ residence, beautiful grounds. Rents reasonable.
Mrs. M. H. Kimbal , Second street, bet. Oregon
l and Arizona ayes. 12-2t*
Ii OR RENT—A NICE HOUSE OF li ROOMS
near Santa Fe and Southern Pacific depots,
i The house is hard finished, papered and fres
coed, and is in every respect desirable. Rent
very low to permanent tenants. Address J. ('.
P., box 30. IlF.it.vLi>, or apply to C. A. SUMNER
a CO., 107 s. Broadway. 12-3 tf
U'lK RENT, CHEAP—A~U>DOING HOUSE
|JT at San Pedro. L. SCHMIDT, 20!) *. First
St., room 13. 12-3 7t
t~"""OR RENT— HOUSES AuToVEßTlle"c7ty"
1 C. A. SUMNER &CO., 107 S. Broadway,
j mlO-tf
fobTkknt—ko~o~""~~~
] u*6p kent—at Ban ta monica, fur-
I I nished rooms in Boehme block, and at the
Boehinc cottage, Ocean avenue: also a live
room furnished cottage; everything first class;
j prices reasonable. Apply or address MRS.
i IiOKHME, cor of Oregon and Ocean aye.
I 12-3-lm
DRESSMAKERS— WANTED, TO RENT ONE
or two nicety furnished rooms close in,
! suitable for a dressmaker, in part exchunge for
: instruction in dressmaking. Address S. E., this
I office. 11-22-tf
i T7H)K REST — A NICELY FURNISHED
A 1 front suite in private 520 S Spring
street. 11-21 -lm
FOR KKNT^MIIsCKTEANEOIis.
t l?OK REST— hTlf" OF ' STORE, AT 188
iJP South Spring st.. between First and Sec
! und, from January Ist. 11-23-tf
I
FOR SALE.
JXIR SALE—A FIRST-CLASS CONCORD
wagon in splendid condition, with top,
! weather aprons, etc.: good as new; price $110
Apply at 308 WILMINGTON ST. 12-10-3t
F' VIR S A LE—STO RE FIXTURES, SB OWC ABE,
counters, ice box and peanut roaster, at
STALL NO. Broadway market, opposi c post
office. 12-10-lt
JaOK SALE—B FLAT VALVE TROMBONE,
1} good as new Lyon & Healv make. Ad
dress R. 11. M., Aihambra. Cal. ' 12-9-2t
I?OR SALE—AN ESTABLISHED PLUMBING
and gas-fitting business. Addre-s, I. R.,
this office. 12-S-3w
FO It"SALE — WAGONS AND CARRIAGES
bought, sold and exchanged. 128 SAN
PEDRO ST. 9-12 3m
~ FOR~BALE—City Property.
17 oli~ SALE—HOU4E aVd~l
I F side Hill, near Pico; $2200; terms to suit; a
bargain INNES & MAUGRUM, 207 W. Second
street. 12 3-7t
FOR SALE—Country Pro]>erty.
a
piece of ground to improve nnd make a
living on. can buy 10 or 20 acres 10 miles from
l/os Angeles and a half mile from railroad, on
his own terms; this is excellent soil and is
well adapted for deciduous or email fruits, or
chicken ranch; cash no object; a good opportu- ■
nity for the right man. Address P. O. Box 600,
Los Angeles. i2-10tf
I7<OR HALE.—GLEN DOR A ORANGE LAND,
with water, $100 per acre, on five years'
time. H. E. SIDDALL, 139 S. Broadway.
12-9-31.
l?OH SALE.—ORANGE LAND, WITH WATER
M? piped, at $140 per acre; five years time. 11.
E. SIDDALL, 139 S. Broadway. 12-0-31
OA ACRES FIRST-CLASS ORANGE LAND
OU for sale cheap, or exchange for eitv im
proved property. A. J. MEAD, 238 W. 'First
street. 12-7 tf
YBARGAI N—lOTA CRES, $100 PErTcRE,
3 miles from center of city; 20 acreß iv
bluegum, 1 year old. Address J. W. FOT'lS.box
048, Station C. Will sell half of übove land.
12-7 lmo
FOR BALE-I HAVE ON
' my rancho, 2 miles northeast oi Downey
and 1 mile south of Rivera, a choice selection
of citrns and deciduous fruit trees for sale;
Ars and walnuts a specialty; ull at lowest
market prices; guaranteed true to name. Cor
respondence solicited JAB. STEWART, Box
32, Downey, Cal. 12-6-lrn
ijMJR SALE—TOADTIOUSE ATA BARGAIN,
F on Mission Road. Addresß P. 0. box 03,
8 ation I), East Los Angeles, 12-l-10t
FOR SaLfT-^LIV* T'STTjCKi
F""»R iALB—COW; PART
good, gentle cow ; $00. Cail at 117 East
Twenty-seventh street. 12-10-0t
OR BALE—CHOII;E~KRIciSTMILK COWS;
reasonable: 10 head are at 815 W. Wash
ington street. Call. 12-10-3t
IfiOß SALE-GRAY HORSE, 333 P, BUNKER
1 Hill aye. 1 . -10 7t
Ij~OB SALE—WEI TE A M OF
Mack horses; large and fine: will be sold at
abargnin. Apply to McKOON & GAY, 105;-,
S. Brondwr.y. 1 2-7-tf
lostTnd f6unb%
Jost —express Wagon sbat?"i?lsvvalu".
729 Ollvo St. C. HUDSON. 12-1021
STRAYED OR STOLEN—LAST SATURDAY,
pug do*; answers to the nime Paddy. Re
ward will be paid if returned to 200 Wiiming
ton st. It
O TRAY ED OK STtlLEN—XwTeklai"y nmre.lO
>~ hands high, branded P-S; hind foot white:
weight aliout 1600: heavy mime and tail; 7
years old; $10 rewurd. CHAS. MOOKK, New
nall. 12 !> 7t
T OST-A LADY'S GOLD WATcIiT OPEN
\J face, with locket attached, small gold
chain, between New Commercial street aud
Main; return to CENTRAL MARKET, 149 N.
Spring: suitable rewurd. 12-7-4t
business" CHANCES. '
I,V>U HALE* ORF. X CII A N G E—A B U TGhlk R
shop doing a good business. Corner FIRST
AND ALAMEDA STS. 12-10-lm
I7IOR BaTe~~FRU.IT AND CIGAR STORE;
owner leaving the city. Inquire at 004
South Spring. 12-3-7t
— ~C 7 .7MJKETINOff.
Southern' california^council,"n~o*
728, Royal Arcanum—Meets second and
I fourth Friday evenii gs of each month, atK.o
,P. Hall, No. 8. Spring street; vlsitiu
| brothers cordially invited S. E. LEVIS
Box 1175. Secretary
ma 13-6 m
PERSONAL.
ON WHICH
X the time has expired will please call and
redeem the same or pay the acorued interest,
otherwise they will be sold. This notice in
cludes pledges to Nos. 2005, and date May Ist,
18i)0. Pledges consisting of gold and silver
watches and chains, diamonds, etc., for sale.
A. S. JOSEPH., 217 N. Spring st. 12-9-3t
KS U. JACKSON HAS REMOVED FROM
316W South Spring to 133 North Main St.,
Rooms 27 and 2S. 19-9-81
RS. NELLIE FIELD HAS REMOVED
from 316'_ South Spring to 305 South
Main St., Rooms 2 aud 3. 12-9-3t
riiHK MENLO, 420 SOUTH MAIN STREET,
A corner Winston. Tbis elegant house haß
been refurnished, and under new management:
location i entral; sixty sunny rooms, en suite
and single, from 17 upward: transient from 50
cents t011.25 per day. Every attention paid to
guests. MRS. H. H. HEATH, Proprietor.
11-23 3m
"tTTNCONOMIC" PRICES —SUGAR, 20 LBS.
Jt_ brown or 18 lbs. white, tl;sack flour, 80c;
Northern flour; fl. 15; mincemeat, 10c lb;apple
butter, 10c lb; dried peaches, 10c lb; 6 lbs.
raisins, 25c; 4 lbs rice, sago or tapioca, 25c.;
131b8. white beans 25c; 8 lbs. corumeal, 15c.;
4 packages starch, 25c; germea, 20c.; good black
or Japan tea, 35c.; 12 cans salmon, tl: 9 cans
oysters, tl; potted tongue or ham, sc; 40 burs
soap, tl; bacon, 12}_c; hams, 14c; pork, 10c.
ECONOMIC STORES, 509-511 8. Spring St.
Telephone 975. m 5 tf
RS. PARKER, RELIABLE CLAIRVOYANT,
business, mineral and lie reading med
ium; magnetic treatment for nervousness,
rneumatism, stomach and kidney, trouble.
Developing circles Thursday, 7:30 p. m., 324
South Spring st.
IVORCE LAW A SPECIALTY; ADVICE,
free. W. W. HOLCOMB, attorney-at-law,
oflicc, old Wilson block, 120 W. First St., rooms
10 and 11. ma29-tl
PERSONAL — INTERESTING TO EVERY
body How to make and save money. Read
the class, ed advertisements in the Herald
daily. A few cents Bpent in an advertisement
may make thousands of dollars for you. You
may procure a situation; sell your house and
lot; rent your vacant property; buy a paying
business or sell to advantage; loan your idle
money or borrow cheaper than from agents,
and iv a thousand different ways use these col
umns to advantage. On this page advertise
ments are only FIVE CENTS A LINK A DAY.
DENTISTS.
FM. PARKER. I). D. 8., 145 SPRING
• St.; gas administered; painless extracting.
au2l-tf
R. C. STEVENS & SONS, 107 N. SPRING
St., Schumacher block, rooms 18 aud 19;
t teeth filled and extracted painlessly; plates $4
Ito tlO; hours, 8 a. m. to 5 p. m., Sundays. 9 a.
j m. to 1 p, m. je26-tf
W. WELLS, COR. SPRING AND FIRST
• sts., Wilson block; take elevator; teeth
I filled and extracted without pain; gold crowns
and bridge work a specialty. Room 30. m4tf
R. TOLHURBT, DENTIST, 108}$ nTsPRINQ
St.. rooms 2, 0 and 7. Painless extracting.
RG. CUNNINGHAM, DENTIST, REMOVED
• to No. 31 N. Spring at., rooms 1 and 2,
Phillips block, Los Angeles, Cal. mlstf
ATTORNEYS
BJ. FRANKLIN, ATTORNEY AND COUN
• selor at law. Rooms 22 and 23 Bryson-
Bonebrake block, Los Angeles. 12-10-3 m
ISIDORE B. DOCKWEILER, ATTORNEY-AT
law, rooms 10 and 11, Bryson-Bonebrako
block. ml 9 6m
| George H. Smith. Thomas L. Winder
Henry M. Smith.
SMITH, WINDER & SMITH, ATTORNEYB
-at-law, will practice in all the State and
Federal Courts. Offices: Rooms 1, 2,3 and 4
University Bank building, 117 New High sf,
Los Angeles, Cal. Telephone No. 583. ml4tf
EDUCATIONAL.
T" HE SISTERS OF THE HOL\~NAMEB~
a branch of the convent of Our Lady of the
Sacred Heart, Oakland, have opened a boarding
j school at Ramona, Cal.; the location cannot be
surpassed in beauty and salubrity; the course of
instruction is of the highest grade. For terms
apply to the LADY SUPERIORESS. Tbe classes
will be resumed Sept IsL 1800. (95-11
ACADEMY OF IMMACULATE HEART, PICO
Heights—The scholastic year comprises
two BCSBions of five months each. The first
session commences on the Ist of Sept. and
the second on the Ist of Feb. Pupils arc re
ceived at any time. For particulars apply on
the premißes. jul om
SCHOOL OF CIVIL, MINING, MECHANICAL,
Engineering, Surveying, Architecture,
Drawing, Assaying. A. VAN DEE NAILLEN,
723 Market St., Sau Francisco. mlO-tf
■yjyOODBURY'S BUSINE3B COLLEGE
SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING
INSTITUTE,
159 South Spring Street, Los Angeles, Cal
SESSIONS DAY AND EVENINO.
For particulars, call at office or address
m2O-tf F. C. WOODBURY. Principal.
PHYBICIANB.
TyjRS. DRr^VELLs!
j Removed to "The Clifton," No. 233 N. Broad
j way. Specialty, Diseases of Women. Success
ful painless methods in Rectal Diseases. Office
hours from 10 to 4.
DRS. BEACH A BOYNTON, OFFICE, 37 N.
Spring St., Los Angeles, Cttl. Office hours,
8to12m;1to 4 md 0 to 8 p. m. Dr. Boyu
ton's residence, 835 8. Olive st. 11-20
DR. C. EDGAR SMITH—DISEASES OF
women a specialty; rectal diseases treated
by the Brinkerhoff painless system; office,
corner Main and Seventh sts., Roberts block.
Telephono 1031. ml6tf
DR. M. HILTON WILLIAMS. DISEASES OF
the head, throat, chest and blood a speci
alty. Office 137 South Broadway, MILLER
BUILDING. 9-5-tf
AS. LANGLEY, ELECTRIC PHYSICIAN.
• 355}_ S. Spring st., cor. Fourth st. Electrical
treatment, baths aud massage. Jul-tl
REBECCA LEE DORSEY, M. D. OFFICE
No. 7% N. Main st. Special attention given
to obstetrics, gynecology and diseases of
children. Hours 9 to 11 a. m. and 2to4p. m.
Telephone 513. je2-tf
DR. DARLING, OCULIST AND AURIST,.'
Office 229 W. First st. Office hours, 9a. m.
to 4 p. m. jultfd&w
CHAS. W. BRYSON, M. D.—DISEASES OF
• women a specialty. 44>«_ S. Spring St.,
rooms 2 and 3. Telephone, office, 796; resi
dence, 798. mlltf
DR. C. E. CLACIUB. HAS REMOVED HIS
office from 75 N. Spring to 41 8. Spring st.
Hours, from 11 a. m. to 2p. m. Specialty-
Sexual and skin diseases, chronic diseases in
general. m24-tf
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE.
HENRY N. RANKIN, PLAINTIFF. VS.
Elijah P. Ford and Sarah F. Denny, de
fendants
Sheriffs sale. No. 13,432.
Order of sale and decree of foreclosure and
sale.
U. der and by virtue of an order of sale and
decree of foreclosure and sale, issued out of the
Superior Court of the County of Los Angeles,
State of California, on the2sth day of November..
A. D. 1890, in the above entiled action, where
in Henry N. Rankin, the above named plaintiff;,
obtained a judgment of decree and foreclosure
and sale agaiurt Elijah P. Ford et al., de
fendants, on the 24th day r f November, A. D.
1890, for the sum of $870.47 in lawful
money of the United Slates, which said decree
was on the 25tb day of November. A. I). 1890, -
recorded in judgment book 25 of said court, at
page 79,1 am commanded to sell all those certain
lots, pieces or parcels of land, situate, lying and
being in the county of Ixis Angeles! state of
California, and b_unoed and described us fol
lows:
Lots numbered three hundred and forty-six
(346), three hundred and forty-eight (348),
three hundred and fifty. (350 .three hundred
und fifty-two (352), three hundred and fifty
four (354), three huedred and fifty-six (356),
four hundred and thirteen (413), four hundred
and fifteen (415), four hundred and twenty
three (423 , four hundred and fourteen (414), ,
four hundred and sixteen (416), four hundred
and eighteen 418), four hundred and twenty
(420), four hundred snd twenty-four (424),
four hundred und thirty-one (431 ),andfour hun
dred and thirty-two |432_, of Ford's Temple-st.
addition to the city of Los An eles, as per map
of same in book fifteen (15), at page ninety
seven (97) of miscellaneous records in the
County Recorder's office of Bald Los Angeles
county.
Public notice is hereby given, that on Thurs
day, the Bth day of January, A. D. 1891. *t
12 o'clock M. of that day. in front of the Court
House door of the County of Los Angeles, on
Spring Btreet I will, in obedience to s*ld order
of sale snd decree of fore losuro and sale, sell
the above described property, or so much the'e
ofa« may be necessnrv tosatinfy said judgment,
with interest and costs, etc., to the highest and
best bidder, for cash law fill money of the United '
Slates.
Dated this 9th day of December, 1890.
M. G. AGUIRRE,
Sheriff of l.os Ange es Co.
By A. M. THORNTON, Under Sheriff.
Judsouj Hester & Wood, AWys for plaintiff.
12-10-wed*44

xml | txt