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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, December 11, 1890, Image 4

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DAILY HERALD.
PUBLISHED
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.
Joseph D. Lyhch. Jambs J. AYXRS.
AVERS & LYNCH, -- PUBLISHERS.
(Entered at the postoffice at Los Angeles as
second-class matter.
DELIVERED BY CARRIERS
At 80* For Week, or 80c Per Month-
TERMS BY HAIL, INCLUDING POSTAGE:
Daily Hebald, one year 18.00
Daily Herald, six months
Daily Hebald, three months -J.2">
Weekly Herald, one year 2.00
Weekly Herald, six months 1.00
Weekly Herald, three months 60
Illustrated Hebald, per copy 15
Office of Publication, 223-225 West Second
street. Telephone 156.
Notice to Mall Subscribers.
The papers of all delinquent mail subscribers
to the Los Angeles Daily Herald will be
promptly discontinued hereafter. No papers
will be sent to subscribers by mail unless the
same have been paid for in advance. This rule
is inflexible. AVERS A LYNCH.
Tne "Daily Herald"
May be found in San Francisco at the Palace
hotel news-stand; in Chicago at the Postoffice
news-stand, 103 East Adams street; in Denver
at Smith ,t Sons' news-stand, Fifteenth and
Lawrence streets.
THURSDAY, DECRMBKR 11, 1800.
HOW THE SECTION STANDS.
Here we are approaching very closely
to the end of the year, and with it to
the end of the most important decade
that has yet passed over Los Arjgeles
and all of Southern California. At the
close of 1880 an era was opened that
changed all the section from a sparsely
peopled area usually known as the cow
counties into one dotted with cities of
no little pretension, surrounded by
orange groves and deciduous orchards,
the tout ensemble presenting a scene
matchless elsewhere on the face of the
whole earth. The population of the
city of Los Angeles increased not less
than six fold in the period, and that of
the section known as the semi-tropics
pretty well kept pace with this high
ratio. If one contemplates the
development of our resources, as evi
denced in the shipment of fruit crops, the
marchof progress has been simplymar
velous. In 1880 the movement of crops to
the markets outside of the section was
of very insignificant proportions. The
movement for the present year is not
yet complete, but it will be colossal in
its magnitude and more so in its value.
The chief item would be some 2600 car
loads of oranges, of 300 boxes each, or
780,000, worth over $1,000,000 to the
producers. There will be 5,000,000
pounds of canned goods, 10,000,000
pounds of dried fruit, 2,000,000 pounds
of green fruit, 200,000,000 pounds of
honey, 3,000,000 pounds of nuts, 50,000,
--000 pounds of beans, 10,000.000 pounds
of vegetables. These are a few of the
chief items. Raisins are not included,
for the reason that no railroad reports
on this crop have yet been made public.
Let us reflect on the value of these pro
ducts of our soil. They are not common
commodities, worth acentor so a pound.
Nuts are worth ten times that, raisins
still more, dried fruits more than rai
sins, and beans will bring in two to four
cents a pound. The aggregate returns
from our crops is something hard to re
alize. The profits cf these lines of hus
bandry will range alljthe way from $100
an acre up to $1000 an acre, and even
more.
Now we get down from general re
sults, which interest the community as
a whole, to those which relate directly
to the individual. As we remarked a
day or two ago, an orchardiet at Pasa
dena, with seventy acres of deciduous
fruits, half in bearing, banked a net
profit of $8000 from the sale oi his crop.
Many men with ten acres of fruit in
full bearing have received $5000 from
the products of their trees. The small
communities of a few score people,
living within the limits of a circle
whose radius is less than three miles,
have received $100,000 from what grew
on that small area. Riverside, with
5000 people on as many acres, on which
are 500,000 trees, half in full bearing, has
banked not much less than $2,000,000
from the sale of the crop of the past
season. Think of $300 to $400 per cap
ita for all the people in the place.
These facts are .nil becoming well estab
lished in the minds of all the people.
They are having their natural effect.
Nuw settlers are being attracted from
all parts of the world, who are coming
in and possessing themselves of small
patches of this incomparable land. The
buyers for the most part are paying cash
and are proceeding at once to make a
home and plant trees. From all parts
of the section come the same encourag
ing reports. Those with too much land
are selling part and getting out of debt.
The population is rapidly increasing
with a most desirable class of people,
money is becoming easier, interest is
lower, and the area set to orchards is
being rapidly enlarged.
Thus we enter the last decade of the
century with a prospect before us that
is really bewildering in the manifold
charms of the promises it holds out. By
the middle year of this period the ship
ments of oranges will be increased about
ten times, so that we shall be shipping
25,000 carloads of the fruit per year,
worth $10,000,000. There will be per
haps n#t so marvelous development in
all other lines of our specialties, but it
will be of proportions more or less sim
ilar. By the close of the century there
will be a population of close to 1,000,000
souls in this southern country. No
course of logical reasoning can lead to
any other conclusion. The knowledge
ia being spread broadcast of the profits
of fruit-growing in this section. At
Chicago 1000 people a day visit the per
manent exhibit. They see what we
produce and learn the profits. These
visitors go forthjif to all the country and
repeat the story T .o hundreds of thous-,
ailds. The /05,000,000 of people
in the United States will soon learn of
Southern California. Many of those
who see the exhibit go home at once,
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD: THURSDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 11, 1890.
sell what they have and remove to Los
Angeles. There are few days that some
one doee not turn up at the chamber of
commerce to report from Major Truman.
The city will be the last to feel the
impulse of this movement. But the
tide will reach even the heights of the
city in time. The longer the delay, the
more pronounced will be the impetus
derived from the filling up of the coun
try. Ten years ago the movement began
in the country. It was 1884 before
there was much pulsation felt in the
city, but when it came it was with a
rush. The improvement outside begins
this decade much earlier than at the be
ginning of the last period. It is more
pronounced in character, and the forces
behind it are much more powerful. The
tide is now running very strong, and it
will not take many months for it to
cover most of the section. Its rise will
not be fitful, but steady and prolonged.
It is hard to forecast where the topmost
wave will strike before the flow is
stayed.
GIVE THE PEOPLE PLENTY OF MONEY.
There is a considerable change of
opinion in the United states concerning
Got. Stanford's proposition to issue cur
rency based on the farmers' products.
At first the plan was looked upon as
chimerical, and the Herald at times
expressed some depreciatory views of
the scheme. But the more carefully it
is examined the less Quixotic does it
appear. The people of the United
States are almost perishing from a lack
of ready money. With entirely the most
mercurial and speculative population on
the face of the earth, we have scarcely
a third of the circulating medium of
Prance. The Frenchman has $52 per
capita to the American's $19, and yet it
is the French-fiscal system which is the
best in the world. After the conclusion
of the Franco-Prussian war the French
people were obliged to pay one billion
gold dollars to the Germans. It
was agreed that the payment
of thia prodigious sum should
cover a period of years, and
that a German garrison should remain
in France until the full amount was
paid. The high-spirited Gaul, however,
gathered the money up at once and paid
the debt off-hand, thus insuring the im
mediate German evacuation of France.
Notwithstanding this enormoiiß pay
ment of gold, France today possesses
more gold than Germany and England
put together. France has not been
afraid to uphold, silver as an honest
money. She maintains both of the pre
cious metals on terms of equality, and
instead of being denuded of gold—the
inevitable effect of paying due respect, to
silver, according to the monometalists —
France is blessed with a redundant gold
coinage. (
France is not afraid to give her people
a sufficient circulating medium. The
people of the United States Bhould imi
tate this enterprising and progressive
chief of the Latin races. It is pleasant
to note that the Farmers' Alliance are
taking up the matter of a sufficient
coinage, and that it will seek to
obtain it by the free coinage of
silver. But, however it is attained,
the people should have abundant
money. Stanford's plan is an excellent
one in some respects. It is perhaps
doubtful whether the rate of interest
proposed by him is high enough. But
that is a mere feature of detail. If the
proposed interest is too low it could be
raised. The plan of interesting the
government of the United States in ex
tensive warehouse schemes for the stor
age of the farmers' produce may not be
acceptable to our more conservative
citizens, but the currency ought to be
doubled, without undue haste.
No man who desires to see the United
States reach its acme of wealth and
greatness ought to have any hesitation
in demanding a sufficient currency.
The mass of railway and other securities
has increased to such an extent that our
present supply of money is hardly
sufficient to pay the dividends which
they are made to earn under our vicious
fiscal system. New York City is rapidly
becoming an octopus that is in danger
of strangling the masses. Half of the
money of the whole country is now con
centrated there, and the rest is follow
ing in the wake by an irresistible grav
itation. This tendency must be checked
if the nation would live, or at least if it
would care to realize its best conditions
of growth. The Farmers' Alliance will
have done a great work if it shall in
crease our stock of money. This organi
zation is really a coadjutor of the Demo
cratic party. Its moßt priceless service
to the people is the downright disinte
gration of the Republican party, whose
leaders have always delighted to play
into the hands of Wall street.
No patriotic American should cease
his efforts till we shall have as much
money per capita as a Frenchman.
Then we shall know what it is to expe
rience an abounding energy and pros
perity throughout all our borders, enter
prise will be stimulated and legitimate
speculation encouraged.
Our esteemed contemporary, the
Times, yesterday, made a most inexpli
cable break in relation to certain testi
mony educed in a case now pending in
the court. The cause is a suit for dam
ages, brought by a young girl against a
man whom she alleges betrayed her.
The particular line of evidence referred
to was the bringing out of the fact that
Taylor knew the girl's dead father to
have been a Mason, and that Taylor
represented himself to be a Mason.
That was legitimate inquiry in the case
for this reason : This tie of fellowship
won the confidence of the girl as hardly
any other means could have done.
Any further reference made to the mat
ter was not by the girl's attorney, but
by that of the defendant. The testimony
was not introduced to influence any
member of the jury through his Masonic
affiliations, but merely to show bow the
facts influenced the girl to trust Taylor,
and how Taylor, by means of the confi
dence so Required, accomplished her
ruin. That was surely legitimate in- j
contemporary should make this the
occasion of belaboring "secret societies"
in general, and Masonry in particular.
For nearly a month the supervisors
have advertised the old county court
house for sale. The minimum price to
be accepted is $85,<XX), and a deposit of
20 percent, must be made on the accept
ance of the bid. The proposition will
be closed on the 15th of this month,
next Monday. We give this offer the
publicity of editorial mention so that
parties who may desire to bid, but have
not had their attention drawn to the ob
scure advertisement of the board, may
be enabled to take the proposition into
consideration. The property is cer
tainly worth considerably more than the
minimum limit the supervisors have
fixed upon it. It is in the very center
of the business part of the city, consists
of a triangular block fronting on streets
on all sides, and is one of the most
attractive investments that could be
offered persons contemplating the pur
chase of business property in Hub city.
We will just state, for the benefit of
those whom it may concern, that the
Herald baa never been more popular
than it is today. Those who scan its
advertising columns cannot fail to note
the evidences of the patronage of the
business community*. There is some
thing quite notable in the rapidity with
which our circulation is going up daily.
The attempts to create a sentiment
against the Hkrald in certain quarters
are feeble and ridiculous. For every in
stance in which we lose one subscriber
we gain ten. This journal is accepted
as the staunch friend of this section,
and its devotion to sound principles and
progressive Democracy has never been
questioned by intelligent people.
There is something remarkable in the
growth of the American press of late
years. The rate at which the circula
tion of the New York World has run up
is positively phenomenal. That journal
claims a guaranteed average circulation
of 318,453, yet when Mr. l'ullitzer took
charge of it it was less than twenty
thousand. The advances of the San
Francisco Examiner since Mr. William
li. Hearst took charge of it are almost
equally remarkable considering the dif
ference of the fields.
The New Yori Herald is evidently a
joker of the first order. Its proposition
that Charles A. Dana should be elected
senator from the Empire state is highly
amusing, not because he is not quite
well qualified to fill the oflice, or any
other post in the gift of the American
people, but because he has made so
many enemies by his caustic wit that a
bolt would seem to be inevitable.
WINEBURGH'S.
OS SPECIAL SALE TODAY.
The majority of our customers know
that they can do well by trading with
us, and they go out of their way to reach
us. Our motto is "Good goods at low
prices." We have gained a reputation
for fair dealing, which we intend to keep
up. Our economical expenses enable us
to quote low prices on all our wares. We
place on sale today :
30-inch square felt table covers, embroider* tl
with sils in 4 corners, scalloped and p.need all
round, worth $1.50. for 98c.
2' i-yard long lambrequin and mantle board
starTs, three rows satiu ribbon work, beavv felt,
worth $1.75, for $1.29 each.
IW-yard long Japanese silk picture throws
and mantle scarfs, \& yard wide border of h'md
pai ted bolting clotn, silk tassel ends, worth
$.S, for $1.89 each.
17-inch square tine Japanese white hemstitched
silk handkerchiefs, worth 75c, for4'.)c each.
Ladies' white Japanese silk handkerchiefs,
richly embroidered corner, scolloped a! round,
worth 90c, for 49c each.
28-inch Gloria silk umbrellas, steel paragon
frame, gold handles, worth $2.75, ' for $1.90
each .
Ladies' silk lustre gray electric waterproof
circulars, worth 11.50, for $1 each.
Leatherette toiietsets. colored lining case,two
pieces worth $I.ot>, for 75c each.
Ladies colored kidglovcs,genuine French kid,
every pair fitted to the hand, worth f1.35, for
$1.00 a pair.
Silk plush opera glass cases, satin lined,worth
90c. for 69c each.
36-38 inch strictly all wool plaid flannel dress
goods, worth 65c, for 50c a yard.
Klack satin handles,black pocket folding fans,
worth 40c, for 25c each
Boys Scotch wool underwear, gold and cardi
nal mixed, all large sizes, worth 90c, for 69c
each.
Ladies' fine scarlet all wcol underwear, silk
bound, regular $2 article for 11.20; shirts or
drawers.
Infant's lougcashmere cloaks, silk embroid
ered, cream, tan. cardinal and sapphire, worth
$2.25, for f1.75 each.
Just opened a new line of ladies'all wool
union suits, indudiug Jenuess Ml ler styles
aud Ypsilnnti goods at, low prices. Store open
eveuiugs, commencing tonight.
Winewtroh's, 309 to 311 8. Spring St.
Go to Mullen, Bluett A Co. for overcoat*.
The superb stock of the Silver House, Main
street, Baker block, amounting to $25,000, of
the most costly goods ever imported into this
city, is now offered without limit or reserve, nt
public and private sale. This presents a fine
opportunity for beautiful gifts at ninth lets
than eastern prices.
Go to Mullen, Bluett A Co. for overcoats.
si
// stands alone,
Pearline —the only perfect
washing medium. It cleans
your house or your hands —it
washes j our finest clothes or
carpet It does it easily
and thoroughly. N othi ne can
be harmed by it; labor is les
sened by it; it saves time,
money, and w ear. Millions use
it—almost every soap maker is
trying to imitate it. Pearline
is better than soap -soap is
better than nothing—there's
nothing better than Pearline.
N«vor pedaled. a „ JAMES I'YLE, New York,
Cancer of the Nose.
In 1875 a sort appeared on my nose. aoo.
giew rapidly. As my lather had cancer,'
and my husband died ol it, I became alarm
ed, ami consulted my physician. Hia treat
ment did no good, and the sore grow larger
and worse in every way,until I had conclude
ed that 1 was to die from ita effects. I waa
peivuaded I o take S. 8. S„ and a few bottles
cured mo. This was after all the doctors and
other medicines had failed. 1 have had no
return of tbe cancer.
MKS.M.T. MABEN.
Woodbury, Hall County, Texas.
Treatise on Cancer mailed free.
SWIFT SPECIFIC CO., Atlanta, Ua.
DO
YOU KNOW
THAT THE
BEST PLACE
IN
THE CITY TO GET
YOUR FAMILY
WINES AND LIQUORS
18 AX
J. P. TAGGART & CO.'S,
THEY
HAVE A FINE
WHOLESALE STORE,
AND PAY
STRICT ATTENTION TO
THE FAMILY
TRADE.
ON NEW HIGH ST.,
NEAR TEMPLE,
NEXT DOOR
TO THE
UNIVERSITY BANK.
TELEPHONE NO. 3©Q.
STREET NOS. 311 AND
313.
MAIL
OR
TELEPHONE ORDERS
ARE ATTENDED TO
PROMPTLY. 12-9-lm
Ural Pharmacy,
ITT AND 1 79
North Spring St.,
LOS ANGELES.
DRUG WAR.
I am now selling Drug*, Medicines, Toilet
Articles, indeed everything that goes to make
up an immense stock in my line, including an
elegant line of
HOLIDAY GOODS
At prices that will meet tho views of everyone.
A FEW QUOTATIONS:
Ayer's Sarsaparilla 700
Aver's Vigor 55c
Hood's Sarsaparilla 70c
Pierces Favorite Prescription 70c
Warner's Safe Cure 85c
King's Discovery 70c
Simmons' Liver Regulator 70e
Cuticura Soap 15c
Pear's Soap 15c
. Hoyt's Cologne (geuuiuo) 15c
Ilunyndi Junos Water ' 35c
Scott's Emulsion 70c
Oriental Cream 95c
All Recauiier Preparations 11 10
Camelline 35c
Creme de Lis 40c
Syrup Figs, small 40c
Byrup Figs, large 75c
Pond's Extract, small 35c
Pond's Extract, 8 or. size 75c
Wyeth's Beef, Iron and Wine 76c
Pore Cod Liver Oil, per pint SOo
Dr. Bosanko's Cough Syrnp 40c
Dr. Bosanko's Pile Remedy 40c
Chamberlain's Cough Syrup 80c
Homeopathic kinds 18c
Hance's Cream 26c.
Anita 80c
Ruin aud Quinine Hair Tonic 75c
Pozzoni'sPowder ... 36c
La It hie he Powder 30c
Saunders Powder 30c
Bwans Down Powder 10c
11-25 3m
TO EXCHANGE.
WANTED TO BFJ>IT OK EXCHANGE FOR
TT busluess property, a line double house in
ibe bestrtsldence part of tho city, each con
taining 9 rooms and bath, each equal to any 12
-room house, with plenty of closots, cellar and
all the latest Improvements. Inquire 134 N.
Los Angeles sl. 12-7-lm
'IX) EXCHANGE—CI EAR, UNINCUMBERED
1 lands and town lots, and a stock of cigars,
to trade for furniture, horses, harness, buggies,
wagons, cows or merchandise. E. RIMAN,
, laotf 8. Bpring st. 11-21tf
MEETINGS.
o ouTHERhT California' ~vmjmmC~so
Cj 728, Royal Arcanum—Meets second and
I fourth Friday evenings of each month, atK.o
P. Hall, No. IIBH S. Spring Btreet; visitln
brothers cordially invited 8. E. LEVIS
Box 1176. Secretary
maia-tfm
SHERIFF'S SALE.
T OS ANGELES TRIBUNE—THE COMPLETE
ncwspaperoutllt of the Los Angeles Tribune
will be sold at sheriffs sulc to the highest bid
der for cash, on Saturday. December 13,1890,
at 10 o'clock a. m., either as a whole or in sep
arate parcels, at No. 120 North Spring sirett,
Los Aitgeles. The plant comprises newspaper
(brevier, minion and nonpareil) and advertising
type, 1 lands, cases, leads, rules, imposing stones,
chases, galleys, proof press, ink, mailing outfit,
composing sticks, furniture, etc. Also one 20
horse-power boiler and engine,shafting, piping,
pulleys aud belting: one complete stereotyping
outfit, office desks, safe, library and other furni
ture. Also equity in a Potter web perfecting
press. 12-11 3t
FIVE CENTS A LINK.
SltHßtlons obtained, help secured, houses
rented, property of all kinds bought and sold,
aud money loaned by advertising iv these
columns.
Everybody Heads Them.
WAN X X I>—MIS CE L 1 A NKO IJ ■.
WANTED—LADY BOARDERS; INQUIRE
TT at 019 W. SIXTH ST. 12-7-7t
«7ANTED-SE<:OND-7FaND GOODS; HIGH
TV est cash price paid, COLGAN'B, 241 8.
Main. 11-14-lm
YX7 ANTED—PICTURES TO FRAME, OHKAP
TT est place at BURNS'S, 250 S. Main St.
au2l-tf
WANTED—AGENTS.
W ANTED—THE PACIFK) ENDOWMENT
League admits to uiembersliip both sexes,
intures for £3000, und pays in coupons of $500
each; no death liabilifcs, no medical examina
tions; membership, 0500; surplus funds, $110,
-000; admission fee. *f>. Wanted, intelligent
male and female agents. BYRON K. HUNT,
agent. 321., B. Bprigs »■ 12-7-tf
WANTED—SITUATIONS.
IX) HORSEMEN —AN "EXPERIENCED
. driver and trainer wants employment; also
understands care of stallions and brood mares.
Leave orders at 0. K. STABLES, 248 S. Maiu st.
Uf.ij.Bi
WANTED— POSITION OF 80ME KIND BY
expert book-keeper; highest recommenda
tions. Address P. 0. box 1007, Station C.
12 !) 7t
WANTED—HELP.
Employment or any information, address
E. NITTINGER'S BUREAU; established 1880
Oftice, 8. Spring; residence, 151 S. Hope
st, cor. Fifth, Los Angeles. Cal. Telephone 113
11-20
WANTED—MULE
■VtrXNTE aTrI? MULeITnOT
TT over seven years old. weighing 1050 to
1100, and well broken; will take wagon and
harness if cheap. Apply Monday, Dec. 15th,
FASHION STABLE. 210 East Eirst St., between
Hand 12 a.m. W. D. SMITH. 12-11 3t
IVOR KICNT—HOUSES."
rent-a~Vice"house' of'iTrooms
JT near Santa Fe and Southern Pacific depots.
The house is hard finished, papered and fres
coed, and is iv every respect desirable. Rent
very low to permanent tenants. Address J. C.
P., box 30, Hkkald, or apply to C. A. SUMNER
A: CO., 107 8. broadway. 12-3 tf
T,>olt - RICNT"(TITEA^—A LODGING HOUSE
_T at San Pedro. L SCHMIDT, 209 w. First
St., room 13. 12-3 7t
IrH)R~RIONT—HOUSES ALL OVERTHiTcTty!
1* C. A. BUMNER &CO., 107 S. Broadway.
mlOtf
FOX BENT—ROOM 8. ~
IX)R RENT—AT SANTA MONICA, FUR
-1 nisbed rooms in Boehme block, and at the
Boehme cottage, Ocean avenue: also a five
room furnished cottage; everything first class;
prices reasonable. Apply or address MRS.
BOEHME, cor of Oregon aiid Ocean aye.
12-3-lni
RES4M AKERS—W ANT ED, TO RENT ONE
or two nicely furnished rooms close in,
suitable for a dressmaker, in part exchange for
Instruction iv dressmaking. Address 8. E.. this
offlce. 11-22-tf
I7IOR RENT — A NICELY FURNISHED
3 front suite in private houte. 520 8 Spring
street. 11-21-lm
Kbit KKNT—MISCELLANEOUS.
PIIH RENT—HALF OF STORE, AT V.'.H
X 1 South Spring st.. between First and Sec
ond, Irom January Ist. 11-23-tf
FOR SALE!
SALE—A BARGAIN, THE FURNITURE
of a 7 room house; everything complete for
housekeeping; will be sold, at a sacrifice; house
for rent, immediate possession given: only 3
blocks from the Nadeau hotel, on tbe hill. Ap
ply to M. G. WILLARD, 110 8. Broadway.
12-11 -3t
| fJVRUIT TREES FOR SALE— I HAVE ON
I_T my rancho, 2 miles northeast ol Downey
j tiT.d 1 mile south of Rivera, a choice selection
of citrus and deciduous fruit trees for sale;
lies and walnuts a specialty; all at lowest
| market prices; guaranteed true to name. Cor
! respondents solicited JAS. STEWART, box
| 52, Downey, Cal. 12-ti-lm
I~~X)R SALE—T HE CI IE A PEST PLOW HAR
-1 ness in town, at HENRY EWALD'S harness
| shop, 270 South Main, near Third st. 12-ll -3t
J'OR SALE—ONE SQUARE PIANO, IN GOOD
order and very sweet toned; price si.so.
| Call at 840 Bellevue avenue 12-11-lm
FOR BALE—FARMING IMPLEMENTS; TWO
seated Concord spring wagon, good farm
I wagon, Cassidy sulky plow, 10 in.; scraper,
harrow, cultivator, plows, etc. Owner, XC-
I LECTIO BOOK STORE, corner Second and
j Main. 12-0 sat-tues-thur-tf
T/OR SALE—A FIRST-CLASS CONCORD
1 wagon in splendid coudilion, with top,
weather aprons, etc.: good as new ; price $110
Apply at 308 WILMINGTON ST. 12-10-3t
TTVOR SALE—AN ESTABLISHED PLUMBING
F and gas litting business. Address, I. R,,
this offlce. 12-8-3w
TX)R SALE — WAGONS AND OARRIAGES
F bought, sold and exchanged. 128 SAN
PEDRO BT. 9 12-3 m
FOR SALE—Country Property.
I^^R^SALE— IN EHCONDIDO, SAN~DIEGO
3 couuty, a nice home of 10% acres, inside
city limits, frou ing on the l>est residence
street; solid two-story brie house of 9 rooms;
large brick kitchen and cellar; good well and
windmill: barn, chicken bouses, etc.; 3 acres
in assortedjgrapes; 3 acres in deciduous fruit
trees, three years old; balance in pasture; all
good orange land; no frost. For particulars,
address ED. K. UTTER, P. 0, box 7, Escondido,
California, 11-21-eod-lm
FX)R SALE—A PARTY WHO WANTS A
' piece of ground lo improve aud mase a
living on, can buy 10 or 20 acres 10 miles from
Los Angeles nnd a half mile from railroad, on
his own terms; this is excellent soil and is
well adapted for deciduous or small fruits, or
chicken ranch; cash no object; a good opportu
nity for the right man. Address P. O. Box 000,
Los Angeles. 12-10tf
SALE.—GLENDORA ORANGE LAND,
1 with water, $100 per acre, on live years'
time. 11. E. 81DDALL, 139 8. Broadway.
12-9-3t.
OR SALE—ORANGE LAND, WITH WATER
piped, at $140 per acre; five years time. H.
E. SIDDALL, 139 8. Broadway. 12-9-3t
QiTac¥eS - FIRST-CLASB ORANGE LAND
Ol" for Bale cheap, or exchange for city im
proved property. A. J. MEAD, 238 W. First
street. 12-7 tf
"4""BARGAIN—IO4"A(JRES, f 100 PwTaCRE,
ii. 3 miles from center of city; 20 acres in
bluegum, 1 year old. Address J. W. POTIS. box
543, Station C. Will sell half of above land.
12-7 lmo
I7OR SALE—ROAD-HOUSE ATA BARGAIN,
F on Mission Itoad. Address P. O. box 03,
S atiou B, East Los Angeles, 12-l-10t
FOR SALE—LIVE STOCK^
PART JERBE
' good, gentle cow; ftio. Cail at 117 East
Twenty-seventh street. 12-10-5t
IX) R SALE—CHOICE FRESH MILkTcOWS:
1 reaHonaolc; 10 head are at 815 W Wash
ington street. ' Call. 12-10-31
IX)R MALE- GRAY HORSE, 333 8, BUNKER
1 Hill aye. 1; 10 7t
|X>R SALE—WELL-MATCHED TEAM OF
JT black horses; large and fine; will be sold at
abai'xaiu. Apply to McKOON & GAY, 105k
S. Broadway. 12-7-tf
LOST AND FOUND.
FOUND — STRAY~ MAY
recover the same by applying to A. A. D.,
this office. 12-11-2t
OST—EXPRESS WAGON SEAT. HEA AKD.
720 Olive st. C. HUDSON. 12-10 2t
STRAYED OR STOLEN—A black bay mare,l6
hands high, branded P-8; hind foot white:
weight ulK)iit 1000: heavy mane and tail; 7
years old; HO reward. CHAS. MOORtt, New
hall. 12-9 7t
SPECIAL NOTICE.
W'IDNEY'S TOY SToTtITIiIATIoJMTLVED
to 555 South Broadway, near Sixth,
where low rents will giye you the lowest prices
in the city.
OTICE—THE LOS ANGELES CITY WATER
Company will strictly enforce the follow
ing rule: The hours for sprinkling are between
fl and 8 o'clock a. m., and 0 and S o'clock p. m.
For a violation of the above regulation the
water will be shut off, and a fine of 12 will be
charged before water will be turned on again.
au!7-lv
CHANCES.
I'pOß SALE OR EXCHANGE—
1 shop doing a goqi business. Corner FIRST
AND ALAMEDA STS. 12-10 lm
PERSONAL.
AT 329 B.
X» Bpriug St.; must be sold In 30 days. MRS.
HAAGEN. 12 11-lm
I>ARTIE9 HAVINi7~fTeDGEB ON WHICH
the time has expired will please call and
redeem the same or pay tbe accrued interest,
Otherwise they Will bo sold. This notice in
cludes pledges to No.- 1 . 2003. and date May Ist,
1890. Pledges consisting ol gold and silver
watches and chains, diamonds, etc., for sale.
A. 8. JOSEPH, 217 N. Spring st. 12-9 3t
KS 11. JACKSON HAS REMOVED FROM
316U South Spring to 133 North Main St.,
Rooms 27 and 28. 12-0-3t
RS. NELLIE fleld" HAS REMOVED
from 310> a South Spring to 303 South
Main St., Rooms 2 and 3. 12-9-3t
npilE MENLO, 420 SOUTH MAIN BTREET,
X corner Winston. This elegant house has
been refurnished, and under new management:
location central; sixty sunny roonw. en sulto
and single, from ?7 upward: transient from 30
cents tosl .25 per day. livery attention paid to
guests. MRS. if. H. HEATH, Proprietor.
11-23 3m
<kT?CONOMIC" PRICES—SUGAR, 20 LBS.
jVj brown or 15 lbs. white, f1; sack flour, 80c;
Northern flour, $1.15; mincemeat, 10c lbiapple
butter, 10c lb; dried peaches, 10c lb; (i lbs.
raisins, 25c; 4 lbs rice, sago or tapioca, 25c;
13 lbs. white beans 25c.; 8 lbs. corumeal, 15c;
4 packages starch,2sc; germea, 20c; good black
or Japan tea, 35c; 12 cans salmon, fl; 9 cans
oysters, fl; potted tongue or ham, sc; 441 burs
soap, fl; bacon, 12Uc; hams, 14c; pork, 10c.
ECONOMIC STORES, 509-511 8. Spring St.
Telephone 975. MS tf
RS. PARKER, RELIABLE CLAIRVOYANT,
business, mineral aud IDe reading med
ium; magnetic treatment for nervousness,
rheumatism, stomach and kidney trouble.
Develooing circles Thursday, 7:30 p. nt., 324
South Spring st. ■
IVORCE LAW A SPECIALTY; ADVICE
free. W. W. HOLCOMB, attorney-sl law,
I offlce, old Wilson block, 120 W. First st.,*ooms
10 and 11. ma29-tf
ERSONAL — INTERESTING TO EVERY
body How to make and save money. Read
the class, ed advertisements in tho Hriiald
daily. A few cents spent in an advertisement
may" make thousands of dollars for you. You
may procure a situation; sell your house and
lot; rent your vacant property; buy a paying
business or sell to advantage; loan your idle
money or borrow cheaper than from agents,
and in a thousand different ways use these col
umns to advantage. On this page advertise
ments arc only FIVE CENTS A LINE A DAY.
DENTISTS!
FM. PARKErTd" D. 8.7 145 N. 3PRING
* St.; gas administered; painless extracting.
au2l-tf
R. C. STEVENS A SONS, 107 N. SPRING
St., Schumacher block, rooms 18 and 19;
teeth filled and extracted painlessly; plates f4
to $10; hours, 8 a. m. to 5 p.m., Sundays, 9 a,
m. to 1 p, m. je2o-tf
IW. WELLS, COR. SPRING AND FIRST
v. sts., Wilson block; take elevator; teeth
filled and extracted without pain; gold crowns
and bridge work a specialty. Room 36. m4tf
R. TOLHURST, DENTIST, 10H% N.SPRING
St., rooms 2, 6 and 7. Painless extracting.
RO. CUNNINGHAM, DENTIST, REMOVED
• to No. 31 N. Spring St., rooms 1 and 2,
Phillips block, Los Angeles, Cal. mlstf
I ATTORNEYS.
BJ. FRANKLIN, ATTORNEY AND COUN
• seloratlaw. Rooms 22 and 23 Bryson-
Bonebrake block, Los Angeles. 12-10-3 m
ISIDORE B. DOCKWEILER, ATTORNEY-AT
law, rooms 10 and 11, Bryson-Bonebrake
| block. ml 9 6m
i Gisorge H. Smith. Thomas L. Windku
I OMITH, WINDER A SMITH," ATTORNEYB
-1 C_> at-law, will practice in all the State and
• Federal Courts. Offices: Rooms 1, 2, 3 and 4
University Bank building, 117 New High sf.
Los Angeles. Cal. Telephone No. 583. ml4tf
Kl> UCATIONAL.
rpHE OF THE" HOLY NAMES,
I X a branch of the convent of Our Lady of the
Sacred Heart, Oakland, have opened a boarding
■ school at Ramona, Cal .; the location cannot be
I surpassed in beauty and salubrity : the course of
1 instruction is of the highest grade. For terms
apply to the LADY SUPERIORESS. Theclasscs
will be resumed Sep* Ist 1800. 125-11
ACADEMY OF IMMACULATE HEART, PICO
Heights—The scholastic year comprises
I two sessions of five months each. The first
! fx'ssion commences on the Ist of Sept. and
the second on the Ist of Feb. Pupils are re
ceived at any time. For particulars apply on
j the premises. jul 5m
| QCHOOL OF CIVIL, MINING, MECHANICAL,
ij Engineering, Surveying, Architecture,
, Drawing. Assaying. A. VAN DER NAI 1.1 K.N,
; 723 Market st, San Franeißco. mlO-tf
! "WOODBURY'S BUSINESS COLLEGE
j Ti —AMD-
SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING
INSTITUTE,
I 159 South Spring Street, Los Angeles, Cal
SESSIONS DAY AND EVENING.
For particulars, call at offlce or address
m2O-tf F. C. WOODBURY. Principal.
PHYSICIANS. r
DR. H. ARENSBERG, FROM THE UNl
vcrslty of Berlin. Private, chronic and
nervous diseases a specia ty; also all diseases
of the blood, skin and general weakness arising
therefrom successfully treated. Hours, 9to 12
a. m.,2 to 4 and sto 8 p.m. Offlce, 305 M S.
Spring st, room 10; the Ramona, bet. Third
and Fourth sis. 12-11-tf
j "lyjRS. DR. WELLS.
I Removed to "The Clifton," No. 233 N. Broad-
I way. Specialty, Diseases of Women. Buccess
| ful painless methods in Rectal Diseases. Offlce
| hours from 10 to 4.
DRB. BEACH A BOYNTON, OFFICE, 37 N.
Spring st., Los Angeles, Cal. Offlce hours,
IBtol2m j 1 to 4 and oto 8 p. m. Dr. Boyn-
I ton's residence, 835 6. Olive St. 11-20
DR. C. EDGAR SMITH—DISEASES OF
women a specialty; rectal diseases treated
by the BrinkcrhofT painless system; office,
corner Main and Seventh sts., Robarts block.
Telephone 1031. ml6tf
DR. M. HILTON WILLIAMS. DISEASES OF
the head, throat, chest and blood a speci
alty. Office 137 South Broadway, MILLER
BUILDING. 9-5-tf
AS. LANGLEY, ELECTRIC PHYSICIAN.
• 355L£S. Springst, ©B*. Fourth st. Electrical
treatment, bains and massage. jul tf
REBECCA LEE DORSEY", M. D. OFFICE
No. 71£ N. Main st. Special attention given
to obstetrics, gynecology and diseases of
children. Hours 9to 11 a. m. and 2to4p. m.
Telephone 513. " je2-tf
DR. DARLING, OCULIST AND AURIST,
Offlce 229 W. First St. Offlce hours, 9a. m.
to 4 p. m. jultf d&w
CHAS. W. BRYSON, M. D—DISEASES OF
women a specialty. 8. Bpring Bt,
rooms 2 and 3. Telephone, office, 790; resi
dence, 798. mlltf
DR. C. E. CLACIUS HAS REMOVED HIS
offlce from 75 N. Spring to 41 8. Spring st
Hours, from 11 a. in. to 2p. m. Specialty—
Sexual and skin diseases, chronic diseases in
general. m24-tf
CHIROPODISTS. • '
/S STAFFER, OHIRO POD IST—CORNS, BUN-
V 7. lons and ingrowing toe nails treated. 209
W. First st, opposite Nadeau. Hours, 9 to 4.
10-lStf
'
iiomoiopathist!
• Office, rooms 11 and 12, L. A. Bank build
ing, car. First and Spring sts. Residence, 648
S. Pearl st. Offlce hours. 11 a. mto3p. m. Tol
ephono Nos.: Offlce, 597; residence, 1577.
m24-tf
DR9. BEACH A BOYNTON. OFFICE, 37 N.
Spring st, Los Angei-as, Cal. Offlce hours,
Bto 12 m., 1 to 4 and qtoBp. m. Dr. Boyn
tou's residence, 735 Olivo st. ml9tf
ISAAC FELLO"WB, M. D., HOMEOPATHIBT
Office hours, 11 to li! a. m., 2to 5 p. m.
Offlce, Nos. 2 aud 5 Odd Fellows' building, Los
Angeles, Cal. Residence, 508 South Main st.
mO-tf
_^^^__^J*£ECIAI.ISTB.
W. BRYSON, M.~D.—DIBEASES OF
J women a specialty. 138}*' 8. spring St.,
rooms 2 and 3. Telephone—Offlce, 790
-dence, 798. jl 20
ELLEVUE LYING-IN 1, >,-' \. NOW
open, under the manaf ime lof U A Dr. 1.
H. Smith. Patients can h theli ciiolceof
physicians, and the best of Mid
wlferv a unnclnUv. 14ft Bel. i. \* » re. raSfttJ
ABBTRACT AMDTITLB INSURANOEOOW
pany of Los Angeles, !■ W. oor. F.:..kl»c
and *aw High streets. • V, ■un
JUNCTION SI Sl
Downeytve. and San Fcrnuudost: Ratrb
reasonable. Tel. 385. C. X HAKL A 00.
jy3-6m
I I
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