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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, December 13, 1890, Image 5

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THE GREAT CUT IN THE CAJON PASS
A Tremendous Engineering Work — The
Forces of Nature Controlled—The Big
Mountain Slipper Terraced and Brought
Into Subjection.
Yesterday a select company went out
to see the great cut of the Cajon pass in
company with Mr. K. H. Wade, the gen
eral manager of the Southern California
railway, in the private car of that gen
tleman. Amongst the rest were Oen.
A. McD. McCook, the commander of the
department of Arizona, Major Chauncey
B. Baker, of his staff, Mr. Rumsey, an
enterprising capitalist of St. Louis, Mr.
Hunt, of Hunt & Phillips, the notable
engineer, Mr. F. T. Perris, Mr. Hola
bird, and several other gentlemen, in
cluding Col. H. G. Otis, of the Times,
and a representative of the Herald.
The route taken was the celebrated
Belt line, the party going out by way of
Pasadena and Colton, and returning via
Riverside and Orange, a description of
which trip appeared in the Herald in
two papers recently published. We
shall therefore dismißs such matters as
have been already discussed, and get
down to the real objecte of the expedi
tion.
The Cajon pass has long been famous.
It was through the often celebrated
Cojote pass, which branches from the
Cajon, that the extensive trade be
tween Salt Lake City and Los
Angeles was formerly carried
on. The wagon road that once
led up through that break in the moun
tains was a melancholy thing indeed,
choked up as it has been for years with
huge blocks of rock thrown down by the
tumultuous floods. A little higher up a
new wagon road has been constructed
which, though passable, looks difficult.
Still a little higher up, on the other side
of the track of the Southern California,
traces were to be seen of the railroad
which Senator John P. Jones projected
through this mighty cleft in eyelopean
hills. Colonel Joseph U. Crawford, who
was Jones's engineer, planned a road on
a higher grade than that determined on
by the Southern California, and which
would have involved a tunnel of 4400
feet. Four hundred feet of this big hole
had been dug out when Senator Jones
tied up his purse strings and concluded
that railway building was a romantic
rather than a profitable thing for a
private gentleman to undertake single
handed.
A GIGANTIC WORK —SOMETHING ABOUT
GRADES.
About this time one realized that one
was going up hill at a territic rate. An
inquiry as to the grade elicited the fact
that it was 3 per cent., or at the rate of
15S 4-10 feet to the mile. For years and
years one of the leading topics of discus
sion amongst engineers was the diffi
culty of mastering the obstacles pre
sented by the Cajon pass. Not only was
there the question of grade, but the na
ture of ttie ground was a Btibject of
grave alarm, on account of the
slippery character of the moun
tain. These misgivings proved to be
only too well founded. From the time
the great cut was made the officials of
the Southern California encountered ex
penses, delays and vexations innumer
able, trains being delayed ; and, in some
cases, detentions of three or four days
occurring. The last of these happened
last winter, and Mr. K. H. Wade, the
sagacious and indefatigable general
manager of the Southern California, at
once resolved to take tlie bull by the
horns. A force varying from sixty-five to
eighty men, with a proper complement
ol mules and horses, was put on the
work in April, and they have about
completed their undertaking; and that,
fortunately for the company, before the
winter rains had fairly set in.
The constituents of the fj'reat cut were
soapstone and clay, in layers of varying
thickness. On one side the great cut
rose to a height of 125 feet; on tne other,
to about 40 feet, with, of course, a strong
pitch towards the lower side. When
the rains came the clay layers
arrested the water sufficiently to
soak the soapstone, and the latter,
becoming saturated through and
through, naturally began to slide
off the smooth surface of the clay, with
the inevitable result of hurling thou
sands of tons of earth on to the track.
The lateral pressure of the mountain was
so great, as sometimes to force the rails
up a distance of six feet. On other oc
casions, the damp of clay and soapstone
often rose to a height of fifteen feet
above the rails.
Tiie length oi the track exposed to
these difficulties, and covered by the
present work, was about twelve hundred
feet, and the work substantially em
braced that distance.
A GREAT ENGINEERING WORK.
The officials of the Southern California
took careful note of the situation, and
concluded that the eliding hill should be
cut back to a distance of twenty-six feet
from the track, and that it should then
be terraced to its top. As a result of
this plan, four terraces have been cut
into the treacherous compound and
roofed over, the roof projecting suffi
ciently to protect the sides of the hill
from percolation by the rain, each ter
race reaching back ten or fifteen feet. A
gutter is provided for each of these roofs,
which drains it perfectly. They are cov
ered, also with transverse slats, and
have received a thorough coating
of asphaltum. The angle of the
hill has thus been materially
changed, rendering it almost im
possible that there should be any
slide hereafter, and the bases of the
earth at the foot of the several terraces
have been thoroughly cemented. A
completer piece of engineering work has
seldom been presented to intelligent ob
servers. The company has good reason
to congratulate itself on the clever job
its competent manager has accomplished
through the aid oi coadjutors like Mr.
Perris and others.
The view from the top of this cut is
grand in the extreme. Immense chasms
and towering mountains, the latter
capped with snow, encounter the eye on
all hands. Old Baldy looms up*with
special magnificence, and the whole
Sierra Madre range is outlined with a
Highest of all in Leavening Power.— IT. S. Gov't Report, Aug. 17, 1889.
Rowdier
ABSOLUTELY PURE
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD: SATURDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 13, 1890.
boldness which cannot be obtained from
the San Gabriel side.
A HOSPITABLE HOST AND AGREEABLE
GUESTS.
There are few more entertaining hosts
than General Manager K. H. Wade.
His hospitality is unbounded and his
cuisine is first-class. We may add, there
are few more accomplished raconteurs
than General McCook. His fund of
reminiscence and anecdote are simply
illimitable, and he relates anecdotes of
some distinguished man, or a good story.
with a geniality and success seldom sur
passed. He l* charmed with Los Ange
les and Southern California, and his ap
preciation of the country which be
passed through was expressed wit h great
warmth and discrimination. The party,
as a whole, was pleasant and harmoni
ous; and the visit to the "great cut" of
the Cajon will be recalled with pleasure
by all who participated in it. For a por
tion of the trip the party enjoyed the
pleasure of the society of ivlr. Frank Sa
bichi and Mr. Joseph Wolfskill.
prizeTchickens.
Today the Last of the Poultry Show.
Children's Day.
The judge at the poultry show finished
his task yesterday, and at the close of
the evening the colors on the coops told
the story of many good birds well scat
tered around the room.
Some of the exhibition pens (five
birds) ran up some high scores, and the
race for the sweepstakes prize has been
close, as can be seen by the appended
list:
Score.
Coop No. 1, Silver Wyandotte*. 182^
Coop No. 12, Golden Wyandottes 183
Coop No. 10, White Wyandottes 182
Coop No 19, Plymouth Rocks 177
Coop No. 30, Light Brahmas 1B8!4
Coop No. 100, Red Caps 177
Coop No. SO, K. C. B. Leghorns 179(4
Coop No. 01, Brown Leghorns. .. IS7J,
Coop No. 90, White faced Black Spanish 180
It is to be remembered that this is in
each case so many points out of a dos
sible 200.
It will be seen that the last two are
very close together. Mr. W. W. Thurs
ton of Los Angeles can well be proud of
his tine pen of birds in coop 01, and he
will dream of high-flying birds for more
than a year to come.
The last number ought not to be passed
by without especial mention. Ninety
six is owned by Master Robert Rowan
of Pasadena, a young man of some 14
summers.
The three Wyandotte men are close
after each other, near enough to be re
lated.
The score cards are all up, and to one
interested in such matters it will well
be worth 25 cents and an hour's time to
look over these records. Seldom are so
many really tine birds found together
this side'of the Rockies, The effect of
the last show is in this show-room.
The show will be kept open today for
the benefit of the school children, who
seem to havequite a liking for the feath
ered pets. The admission will be 5 cents
for them. It will be an object lesson
that will last them a lifetime, and none
will be found too old to learn something
new, as well as pass a pleasant hour.
AMUSEMENTS.
Frank Daniels Packing the Los An
geles.
Standing room was at a premium in
all portions of tbe L,oa Angeles last
night again. Frank Daniels in Little
Puck makes the house ring with peals
of laughter. He will appear this even
ing and tomorrow evening.
EMMA ABBOTT COMING FOR CHRISTMAS.
A surprise, and a most pleasant one,
comes with the tidings that Emma Ab
bott and her new grand opera company
are to come on Monday, December 22d,
for a special season of six performances,
four nights and two matinees. The en
gagement is made by special efforts and
inducements on the part of manager
Wyatt oi the Los Angeles theater, who
succeeded in obtaining a change of route
by Miss Abbott's manager, Mr. Pratt.
The diva is reported to be in
brilliant voice, and to have a great
big organization that discounts
in size and make-up any former Abbott,
company. The size of the organization
may be judged by the list of principals,
sixteen in number: Abboti, Anondale,
Mirella, Emma Broderick, Michelena,
l'ache, Rudolphi, Dttßois, Keaby, Pru
ette,- Broderick, Karl, Bornik", Vernon
and Ellerington. Herr Albert Krausse
wields the baton over a powerful chorus
and a doable orchestra, said to be by
far the strongest the Abbott manage
ment ever carried. A repertorie of new
and old operas has been arranged, viz :
Ernani, Borneo and Juliet, Bohemian
Girl, Anne Boleyn (the greatest opera
Emma Abbott ever brought out), Rose
of Castile, and II Trovatore, in the or
der named.
THE DIME MUSEUM.
The managers of the Dime Museum
have a treat In store for the school
children this afternoon. They give a
special matinee for the scholars and
have arranged a programme that will
delight the hearts of the youngsters.
Each scholar is to receive a souvenir in
addition, and their childish hearts will
be made doublj glad thereby.
French Physicians Favor a Device for
neatness.
PAJUS, December 12.—Physicians look with
favor upon ihe invention for relieving deaf
ness, which was recently in reduced bore by H.
A. Wale:-, of Bridgeport. Conn., aud say It is
undoubtedly the Highest development which
science has reached towards aiding ihe deaf.
The Corner-Stone Laying at San Ber
nardino.
The laying of the corner-stone of the
state insane asylum at San Bernardino
next Tuesday promises to be an event
ful affair. The officers of Masonic Grand
lodge, Governor Waterman and Gov*
emor-eleot Markham and four companies
of the state militia will participate in
the ceremonies. The Southern Cali
fornia Railway company (Santa Fe route)
is the only direct line to the site. The
company will make a rate of one fare for
the round trip from all stations to the
asylum site.
Today
We sell miss's button shoes, $1.25.
.Lewis, 201 N. Spring street.
Go to Mullen, Bluett & Co. for silk mufflers.
TWO OF A KIND.
MESSRS. CHARLES RKITEB AND
DENNIS O'BRIEN.
Yesterday's Proceedings in the Marshall
Damage Suit—The Defense Introduces
Some Unsavory Witnesses.
There were sensational developments
in the $50,000 damage case yesterday.
The young plaintiff, Miss Bessie Mar
shall, wept bitterly at intervals, es
pecially when Charles Reiter testified
that he had been intimate with her
when she was employed as a wait
ress at the Del Mar hotel. Miss Moore,
who was employed at the Del Mar as
book-keeper, testified that she had
noticed that Bessie Marshall and Dennis
O'Brien were on very familiar terms.
She also stated that when Miss Marshall
was taken ill that she called upon her
with $60 from Mr. Taylor. In return for
the money she got a statement to the
effect that Harry Branscom was respon
sible for her unfortunate condition, and
that the statement was obtained at the
request of Taylor. The witness, upon
cross-examination, stated that she
! opened Mr. Taylor's letters and had a
! copy of all the letters sent Taylor and
I O'Brien by the plaintiff and her mother.
'In brief, Miss Moore testified that she
| had been Mr. Taylor's confidential clerk.
In the afternoon Mr. White, of Now
| hall, was put on the stand in rebuttal.
I He stated that he never knew of a party
named Harry Bostwick, living at New
hall.
It was reserved for a chunky little
German named Charles Reiter to create
the biggest sensation of the trial thus
! far. He testified that he was cook at the
■ marine hospital at San Diego, and that
; he had once upon a time been a cook at
the Del Mar hotel. Reiter stated in a
j most cold-blooded, matter-of-fact way
i that he attempted to seduce Miss Bessie
1 Marshall, but that he did not succeed.
The witness then related his sue-
I cess the second time, and went
into the disgusting details without
the least concern. Reiter stated that he
had only been intimate with heron one
occasion. Upon cross-emamination, he
testified that the girl had requested him
not to say anythiag about the intimacy,
and that he had promised that he would
not. The attorney for the defense asked
the witness with as much sarcasm as
he could, if he didn't feel ashamed of
himself in telling any other party. Tbe
witness replied that he had only told
one person, viz.a Mr. Bennett, a brother
in-law of Taylor, the defendant in this
case.
The case will be resumed today.
Dear at tho Price.
| A change of mind has often occurred
after the marriage bans have been pub
lished. A clergyman tells recently of a
man having put in the bans, and after
they had been twice published asked if
he might substitute the name of another
girl for tho one first entered, adding by
way of explanation: "I think she will
i suit me better in the long run." On
: being told that tho change could not be
I effected unless tho first bans were with
j drawn, others substituted and the fees
paid a second time, also that tho full
interval, including three Sundays, lnus*
elapse before the marriage could be cele
brated, the man hesitated. "Do you
mean to say tbat I should havo to begin
all over again?" he asked. "Certainly,"
was the reply; "the bans must be pub
lished three times in the names of the
persons who are actually to be married."
'•And most I pay all over again if I have
the other girlV" "Yes," said the clergy
man. 'Weil, I caU that too bad."
The candidate for matrimony remained
for some moments in a brown study,
then broke out with: "Then I'll stick to
the first girl. I'm not going to pay
twice over for anybody." He was mar
ried during tho following week in accord
ance with this decision, evidently con
sidering the proposed subsititution would
be too dear at the price of double fees.
This did not say much for No. 2, as
would be bridegrooms are usuaUy of all
people most inclined to be liberal.—
Latlies' Treasury.
Steel Tanks for Storing Grain.
A new method of storing grain is be
ing introduced. Steel tanks are filled
with grain and by a suction pump the
air is partly exhausted and a quantity
of carbonic acid gj/s admitted.—Lewis
ton Journal.
A RUSHING BUSINESS.
St. Paul's Young Ladies and Their
Bazaar.
The bazaar given by the St. Paul's
guild in aid of the St. Paul's hospital,
closed last night. It is expected that
the affair will net something like If4oo.
The attendance last evening was large
and the different booths did a rushing
business. A gentleman remarked in tbe
hearing of the Herald reporter "that
he had never seen so many pretty girls
at a bazaar before."
Mrs. Fred terry made an ideal presi
dent, and was ably seconded in her efforts
by Miss Sallie Miles, Miss George Arnold,
Miss Gephard, Mrs. Ida White, Mrs.
Sanford Johnson, Mrs. Hugh Vail, who
conducted the different booths. Miss
Norman Robinson, Miss Mamie Miles,
Miss Tyler and Miss Robinson were
gracefully receiving all visitors to the
Paper booth. Mrs. Otheinan Stevens,
Miss Mary Banning, Miss Lucy Banning,
Miss Daisy Rose, Miss Burnett, were
present in the booths for the first time.
The ladies of the Fancy booth did
Splendidly, disposing of nearly all their
artistic needlework. The Gautenmla
booth was universally admired for its
quaintnees and originality. Latenser's
Mandolin club furnished the music.
The promoters of the bazaar are to be
congratulated on the artistic and finan
cial success of their undertaking.
DAILY REAL ESTATE RECORD.
Friday, Dec. 12, 1890.
TRANSFERS.
Asa Cogswell to E Nidever—Lot 1 blk C, Max
ons sub of Mcl-ean estate; $2200.
M X Kellogg to E Nidever—Assignment of
contract for the sale of lot 1 and W> 4 of lot S,
blit D, Maxons of MeClain estate, M R 31 p 50;
$1200.
E E Pollard and W P Barnes to E W Parsons—
Lots 5 and 0, rcsub of lot I and 2, blk 82,Azusa;
$1000.
James M Davies to A J Johnson—Lot 3, Tem
ple and Texas trt, $1100.
Geo T Butterfield »nd Clara A Butterfleld to
Benjamin Atkinson—S 10 acres of NEUof NE> 4
of Sec 19, T 2, S R. 13 W; $5000.
Mrs Amanda Melvina Wiley to Mrs Elizabeth
J Sweetman and Mary A Doyle—Lots 15 and 16,
blk 44, E Santa Monica; $1000.
Maggie O'Connor to E B Smith—Und % int in
93.4 acres com ou N line of San Bernardino
road In Ro San Jose; $4500.
B Riviere to F H Ware—Agmt to convey 15
acres in Ro La Cienga; $1500
Ellen (,' Warren and Charles E Warren to W
P Mcintosh—Lot 5 bl 8 Park trt; $1000.
Eliza M Smith to Same—Lot 15 bl 5 Park trt;
$2000.
Daniel Freeman to Lorin J Perry—Lot 1 sub
of SW'i of sec 33 T 2 S R 14 W and lots 12 and
13 bl 6 Inglewood; $1075.
Estate of M O Santa Cruz deceased—Order
confirming sale of lot com at intersection of E
line of confreres and Reyes sub With S line of
9th st to Alexander Weill; $1200.
SUMMARY.
Number of transfers of $1000 and over, 12.
Amount, $23,075.
Number of transfers under $1000, 21.
Amoant, $2575.
Nominal transfers, 7.
Total amount, $20,230.
Note—Transfers for which the consideration
is under $1000 are not published iv these col
umns,
LEAUKELL'fi OIL.
Prevents tendency to wrinkles or ageing of
skin. Prevents withering of the skin or drying
up of the flesh. Nature's wonder for preserving
youth and freshness. $1.00, largo bottles, at
druggists.
Wedding bells at the Violet, 235 South Spring
street.
Auction lotlay.
Rhoades & Reed, 243 South Main street, have
a fine Jersey cow. one team ponies, harness
and buggy. Several good work horseß, bug
gies, Ac.
Go to Mullen, Bluott & Co. for underwear.
A New Floral Store.
Simpson, formerly with Garey's, can be found
at 235 South Spring, where he will be pleased
to see all of his old customers needing anything
in the floral line. Wedding and funeral pieces
a specialty. Halls decorated on short notice.
Today
We sell infants' red button shoes for 50c.
Lewis, the Leading Shoe House.
Go to Mullen, Bluett & Co. for overcoats.
Fine Blooded Stock at Auction!
Messrs. Rhoades & Reed will sell to the
highest bidder at auction, on Saturday morn
ing, December 13th, at 10 a. m., at their yards.
243 South Main street, the fine full blooded
bull "Hercules," aged 2 years, valued at $25u.
Go to Mullen, Bluett & Co. for sflk umbrellas.
Today
We sell gents' calf shoes, any style, for $2.50.
Lewis, 201 N. Spring street.
Go to Mullen, Bluett it Co. for business suits.
Bnttonhole boiiuets at the Violet, 235 South
Spring street.-
A Rare Opportunity.
Until after the holidays I will make the finest
finished cabinet phtographs, formerly $7.00, for
$5.00. All are invited to call and inspect
samples. F. G. SCHUMACHER'S Studio,
107 N. Spring street.
Go to Mullen, Bluett Ss Co. for choice neck
wear.
Today
We sell ladies' kid button shoes, patent leather
tips, any size or width, at the remarkable price
of $2.00. Lewis, 201 N. Spring street.
Go to Mullen, Bluett it Co. for boys'overcoats.
This is the lastdayof the Singer Manufactur
ing Co.'s grand art exhibit at their sales rooms,
316 South Broadway. Come one, come all.
Open from 9 a m. to 9 p. m.
Today.
Gents' calf shoes, any style, $2.50.
Lewis, 201 North Spring street.
Go to Mullen, Bluett & Co. for boys' cloth hats.
W. Galer, printer, 310 West First street.
Go to Mullen, Bluett & Co. for knee pants.
DIED.
HUNT—Samuel B. Hunt, December, 11, 1890.
Funeral at late residence, corner Witmer and
Silver streets, 2 p. m., Sunday, December
14th. Burial at Evergreen cemetery.
AUCTION
OF
Horses and Milch Cows
RHOADES & REED
WiD Sell, by order of the owner, on
TUESDAY, DEC. 10th, 1890,
AT 10 O'CLOCK, A."M ,
IN LOS ANGELES CITY,
Cor. NINTH and MAIN STS.
45 Head of High Grade Work
Horses, Mares and Eoadsters.
88 Head of Good Grade Milch Cows.
The Horses are mostly grade Normans, well
broke, and fine stock. Tho Cows are nearly all
grade Shorthorns and Holsteins.
This is an important, sale of stock, and will
be sold to the highest bidder. Terms, cash.
BEN. O RHOADES,
H. H. MATLOCK,
. Auctioneers.
Office, 150 Broadway. Los Angeles, Cal.
12-13-4t
Justice Meat Market.
Grand Opposition Fight
For the Benefit of the
PEOPLE OF LOS ANGELES
The proprietor of this market has
come to the conclusion to sell his meats
cheaper than any market in this city.
He has nothing else but inspected
meats, stamped by the inspector, so he
can be relied on as having pure and
healthy meats. The finest meats of all
varieties can be seen at my place.
Special prime cuts for the holidays.
Call and inspect my goods and "learn
the prices, as follows:
Sirloin steaks 11c a pound
Porterhouse steaks 13c "
Round steaks Oc "
Ribsteaks ' 8c "
Roast Beef 8c to 10c !>
Boiled beef 4c to Gc "
Corned Beef Oc "
Leg of Mutton 9c "
Mutton Chops 9c "
Mutton Stew 5c "
I.limb Chops 10c "
Veal Cutlets 12t>;e "
Koast Veal 10 C "
Roast Pork 10c "
Pork Chop 10c "
Salt Pork, Suuar Cured 10c "
lie sure and get your healthy and
cheap meats at the
JUSTICE MEAT MARKET,
Los Angeles and First Sts.
FELIX LEVY, Proprietor.
Telephone 703. 12-13-lm
METROPOLITAN SHAH DYE WORKS
038 Buena Vista st., also, 241 Franklin st.
Fine dyeing and cleaning a specialty.
1213-lm
WAGON MATERIAL,
HARD WOODS,
IRON, ST E E L.
Horseshoes and Nails,
Blacksmith's Coal, Tools, Etc.
JOHN WIOMOKK,
117 and 110 South I.os Angeles Stree
jul tf
Naud's Warehouse.
GRAIN, WOOL.,
—AMD-
General Merchandise Warehouse.
ADVANCES MADE ON WOOL. ml2-tf
California
A Pioneer's Experience With
Jlovd's Sarsaparilla.
"I am a pioneer in this county, having been
here 30 years. Tour years ago my little son
Ellery became blood-poisoned by Impure virus In
vaccination. His arm swelled terribly, causing
great agony; physicians said the arm must be
amputated, and even then his recovery would
be doubtful. One day I read about a blood puri
fier, new to me, and was surpised to learn that It
wss prepared by C. I. Hood, with whom I used to
go to school in Chelsea, Vt I decided to have
my boy try Hood's Sarsaparilla, and was much
gratified when It seemed to help him. He con
tinued to grew better as we gave him the Bars*
parllla, and having used 8 bottles is now entirely
cured. As Hood's Sarsaparilla has accomplished
such wonderful results, I recommend It all I pos
sibly can." Jerome M. Sleeper, Upper Lake,
Lake Co., CaL
The City Treasurer
Ot Lowell, Mass., says: "'/he above is from my
brother, whose signature I recognized. lam also
glad to testify to the excellence of Hood's Sarsa
parilla, and to say that C. I. Hood & Co. are con
sidered one of the most reliable firms In New
England." Van B. Sleeper, City Treasurer,
Lowell, Mass.
Hood's Sarsaparilla
Sold by druggists. $1; six for $5. Prepared only
by C. L HOOD & CO., Apothecaries, Lowell, Mass.
I OO Doses One Dollar
CHANGE _0F FIRM.
To mv Patrons and all whom it may concern:
This is to certify that I have sold to
Messrs. Alexander B. Anderson and
Peyton L. Randolph, and have received
from them the purchase price for all my
business, heretofore carried on and con
ducted by me at the Mott Market, in the
city of Los Angeles, under the name
"Los Angeles Fishing Company," to
gether with the goodwill thereof, and all
the furniture, fixtures and general otlt
flt belonging to said business, anQ hav
ing obligated myself to refrain from
carrying on or conducting any market
business whatever in the city of Los An
geles of the character of that so sold by
me, I hereby earnestly commend to my
former patrons, one and all, my succes
sors in said business, Messrs. Anderson
and Randolph, and bespeak for them a
continuance of the patronage so liberally
bestowed upon me in the past. Very
respectfully, F. Haniman.
Witness: J. L. De Jarnatt.
Los Angeles, Cal., Dec. 5, 1890.
In view of the above, and as it is our
intention to have always on hand the
most complete assortment of fish,
oysters, game and poultry obtainable,
we would respectfully request a continu
ance of your patronage, which we will
endeavor to merit through our prompt
attention to your orders.
Yours very respectfully,
12-9-iit Los Angeles Fishing Co.
09 j L^^^SS^
PHOTOGRAPHER!
Will make 3>ou as fine Photographs as you con
get anywhere in the city, and will guarantee
them as such or refund your money and make
you a present of the pictures besides.
Price, only $3 50 per dozen; try Uicm; if not
good will cost you nothing.
WESNER, 127 W. First Street.
11-30-lm
C. F, HEINZEMAN,
Druggist & Chemist
No. la* N. Main St., Log Angeles, Cal.
Prescriptions carefully cormounafid day and
night- m2l-tf
Baker Iron Works
950 to 966 BUENA VISTA ST,
LOS ANQELES, CAL..,
Adjoining the Southern Pacific (..rounds. Tele
phone 124. m 22
Summons.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
State of California, in and for the County of
Los Angeles, Department 2.
J. E. Yoakum, Martha P. WagsWfT W. H.
Neiswinder, Chas. A. Neil, F. (). McGarvin, W.
J. Magee, E D. Park, E. F. Breckett. J. S.
Blockman, (,'. B. Blockman, 0. 8. Siephcns and
E. S. Stephens, plaintiffs, vs. Charles E. Patrick
and MorCla A. Patrick, defendants.
Action brought in the Superior Court of the
State of California, in and for the County of
Los Augeles, and thn complaint iiled in said
County of Los Angeles in the office of the clerk
of said Superior Court. No 14,179.
The people of the State of California scud
greeting to Charles E Patrick and Morcia A.
Patrick, defendants.
You are hereby required to appear in an ac
tion brought against you by the above named
plaintiffs in the Superior Court of the State of
California, in and for Los Angeles county, and
to answer the complaint tiled therein, within
ten days (exclusive of the day of service , after
theserviceon you of this summons, if >erved
within this county; or, if served elsewhere,
within thirty days, or judgment by default will
betaken against you according to the prayer of
said complaint.
Tie said action is brought to require you to
set forth to thfs court the nature of your several
claims to several parcels of Land, parts of block
20k of Griffin's Addition to East Los Angeles,
which are now owned by the plaintiffs in sever
alty, and for a decree of this court directing
and adjudging that plaintiff's are the owners of
said premises in severalty, and that
the defendants, or each if them,
have no interest or estate what
ever in or to said lands and premisee, and alio
that said defendants, and each of them, be for
ever disbarred from.asserting any claim what
ever in or to said lands and premises adverse to
the plontifl's or any one of them, and for such
otheraud further relief as to equity shall seem
meet, and for costs of suit. Reference is had to
complaint for particulars.
And you are hereby otifled that if you fail to
appear and answer the said complaint as above
required, the said plaintiff' will cause your de
fault to be entered, and will apply to the court
f- r the relief demanded in Ihe complaint.
Given under mv hand and the seal of the
Superior Court of the State of California, in
and for the County of Los Angeles, this2Bthdav
of November, in the year of our Lord oue thou
sand eight hundred and ninety.
[skal. | J. M. MEREDITH.
Clerk.
By D. E. An.vjis, Deputy Clerk.
Samuel B. Gordon, plaintiffs' attorney.
Dec. 13-lt a wk-2mos.
PROPOSALS TO FUBNLSH AND
EQUIP.
CEALED BIDS FOR THE EQUIPMENT tIF
O the Reform school for juvenile offender.-,
will lie received by tlie board of trustees as per
specifications which w ill be on file at the su
perintendent's office, on and after Ihe Kith of
December, 1890. All bids must l-e in writing
and sealed, and in the hands of said superin
tendent by January 1, 1891, and accompanied
by a check duly certified for 5 per cent, amount
of bid.
The board reserves the right lo reject any and
all bids.
By order of the board of trustees,
HERVEY LINDLEY,
12-13-tojanl-inc Pres. ot Board.
Animal Meeting- of the Azusa Laud
and Water Company.
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN THAT r JIB
annual meeting of the stockholders of the
Azusa Land and Water company will be held at
the office of the company, room 57, Bryson A
Bonebrake building.Los Anßeles. California, on
the first Monday after the first day of January.
1891, at 3p. m. MOKRIS ALBEB, *
Dec-13-Sats-Mons-Tues-2-wks. Secretary
Annual Meeting of the Azusa Agri
cultural Water Company.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE
annual meeting of the stockholders of the
Azusa Agricultural Water company will be
held at the office of the company. room 57 Bry
son 4 Bonebrake building, Los Augeles. Cali
fornia, on the lirst Monday after the tirßt day of
January, 1891, at 3p. m. MOKKI.S ALBEE,
Dec -13-Sats-Mons-Tues-2 wks. Secretary.
5
KA()I,K8(IN & 00. .
EAGLESON & HE
Ii North Spring Sl
MEN'S
Furnishing Goods.
LARGE STOCK
HOLIDAY GOODS!
NECK DRESS,
SUSPENDERS,
GLOVES,
DRESS SHIRTS,
Initial Handkerchiefs,
UNDERWEAR,
UMBRELLAS,
MUFFLERS, ETC.
Popular Prices.
FINANCIAL.
PACmcTiOAN
in any amounts on all kinds of personal
property and collateral security, on pianos
without removal, diamonds, jewelry, sealskins,
bicycles, horses, carriages, libraries or any prop
erty of value; also on furniture, merchandise,
etc., in warehouses: partial payments received,
money without delay; private offices for con
sultation; will call if desired; W. K. DxGROOT,
Manager, rooms 14 and 15, No. South
Spring st. rn3o
$1,500,000
TO LOAN AT R. G. LTJNT'S
LOAN AND INSURANCE AGENCY.
Redick block, cor. First ABroadway.
Loaus made on improved city and country
property; 9 per cent gross city, 8 per cent
gross country. Buildiug loans made. Bonds
negotiated.
Agent for the
GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY,
of San Francisco, inl-tf
pRAWFORD & McCREERY\
KJ Money to Ix>an
At lowest rate on personal property of all kinds.
Buy Notes and Mortgages.
No Commission.
Room 11, Northeast corner First and Spring
streets. 11-27
O.\U.Y To LOAN AT LOWEST RATE ON
personal property of all kinds; bnv notes
and mortgages; no commission. CRAWFORD
it McCREERY, Koom 11, N. E. corner First
and Spring sts 11-27
MONEY TO LOAN—PARTIES HAVING
gilttdge security can borrow money at 7
per cent, interest in sums of not less than
$5000. Apply to rooms 80 and 87, Temple
block. 12-9 7t
dH AAA T0 LOAN AT 6 TO 9 PER
cent, on improved property
city, town and acreage, in large or small sums.
CHALFANT & GREENING, Perrett building.
127 W. Third st. mlO-llm
lOSI OS ANGELES LOAN CoTwTLL LOAN
j money on pianos, without removal,
diamonds, jewelry, carriages, horses and aDy
thing oi value, private rooms for consultation;
all business confidential; money without delay.
ROOMS 8 AND 9, Wilson block, cor. l irst and
Spring sts. W. D. Eckßtein, manager. m 29 tf
fl£,tAA AAA TO LOAN UPON IMPROVED
city and country property; low
est rates; loans made with dispatch. Address
theNortheiu Counties Investment Trust, Ltd.,
FRED. J. SMITH. Agent. Pomona. Cal.
MONEY LOANED ON REAL ESTATE, DlA
monds, watches, jewelry, pianos, seal
skins, live stock, carriages, bicycles and all
kinds of personal and collateral security. LEE
BROS., 402 S. Spring, mist!
MONEY LOANED ON IMPROVED CITY
and country property, bonds and stocks.
Any amount, low rates. Bonds bought. JNO.
A. PIRTLE, 138 S. Spring street. au3l-3mo
IF YOU WANT MONEY WITHOUT DELAY,
no commission, at prevailing rates cf inter
est, see Security Savings Bank, 148 S. Main st.
0-2J tf
MONEY 111 LOAN CHEAP. F. E. HOIJ.OWAY
15 California Bank Buildin;:. 9-^O-tf
EXCURSIONS.
OVERLAND EXCURSIONS LEAVE LOS AM
gelcs every Tuesday for all points cast via
the New Broad Gauge Line Denver and Hie
Grande, Colorado Midland and Rock Island
Enilw ays, crossing the Sierra Nevada mountaius
by day time via Salt Lake City, l,cadvilre,
Royal Gorge and Pike's Peak, passing through
the grandest scenery of the KocVv mountains
Through tourist sleeping cars fully e.,nipped;
ah.o free reclining chair ears. Call on
or address F. W. THOMPSON. 138 South Spring
st.. Los .i oce'.es Cal. je2-10m
COMETIIfNG NEW. — PERSONALLY CON
(J ducted Excursions East, via "Rio Grande"
Ry . every Monday. Broad gunge car to Chicago
J.C. JI'DKON & t 0., 119 N. Spring st, jcl£lf
O ANTA FE ROUTE STILL - AHEAD OF ALL
C* competitors, both in time and distance, to
all point* East. Special tourist excursion* East
every THURSDAY. Fer full information, ap
i°.- t S^ d 2 reBS ,? n y ll K«ut.w CLARENCE A.
WARNER. Bsc. Manager, 29 N. Spring. Jultf
WALTERS'!
T all points east. Personally conducted to
Boston. 119 N. SPRING ma 29 tf
PHILLIPS— THE ONLY EXCURSIONS RUN
TOORWT SLEEPERS THROUGH TO
| BOSTON. Office, No. 132 N. Spring st.

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