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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, December 14, 1890, Image 4

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DAILY HERALD.
PUBLISHED
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.
Joseph D. Lynch, Jakes J. A Vitus.
AVERS & LYNCH, - - PUBLISHERS.
Ilntered at the poetofßce at Los Angeles as
second-class matter. J
DELIVERED BY CARRIERS
At 80c Per Week, or 800 Per Month-
TERMS BT MAIL, INCLUDING POSTAGE:
Daily Hebald, one year '? S9
Daily Hebald, six months 4.20
Daily Hebald, three months 2.2N
Weekly Herald, one year 2.00
Weekly Hebald, six months 1.00
Weekly Hebald, three months 60
Illustrated Herald, per copy 15
Office of Publication, 223-225 West Second
street. Telephone 156.
Notice to Mall Subscribers.
The papers of all delinquent mail subscribers
to the Los Angeles Daily Hkrald will be
promptly discontinued hereafter. No papers
will be sent to subscribers by mail unless the
same have been paid for in advance. This rule
is Inflexible. AVERS & LYNCH.
The "Dally Herald"
May be found in San Francisco at the Palace
hotel' news-stand; in Chicago at the Postoffice
news-stand, 103 East Adams street; in Denver
at Smith A Sons' news-stand, Fifteenth and
Lawrence streets.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1890.
WHY WE OUGHT TO HAVE FREE COIN
AGE.
The question of supplying the people
of the United States with a reasonable
amount of currency is and will remain
the leading issue in this country for
some time to come. Its most pro
nounced form of expression will arise
in the struggle for the free coinage of
silver.
On no proposition that has ever arisen
in the United States has there been
more shameless misrepresentations of
fact, or more sophistication of argument,
than on the policy and right of rehabil-
itating silver. The white metal was de
monetized at the instance of British
financiers. The merchants of England,
in their dealings with India, lequire im
mense quantises of silver, which they
desire to buy as a commodity, in order
to. have it coined into rupees, with
which they pay for the wheat, rice and
other staples, which are raised by the
ryots of Hindostan.
In the consideration of this matter the
fact must be borne in mind that the
circulating medium of all the leading
Asiatic nations, including China and
India, is silver. They take no account
of gold as a currency. So that they are
supplied with silver coin, of approved
fineness and standard weight, they are
satisfied. In addition, it must be re
membered that England is the ruler of
India, and controls the mint of that ab
normally populous country. If, there
fore, England can buy silver in ingots
cheaply in the United States, and can
coin them into rupees, she has secured
the agency of an enormous profit to her
shrewd business men, and the lnstru-
V mentality of stimulating the growth of
East Indian wheat. She has to get her
wheat deficit from some source. Russia
serves her purpose measurably
well in this regard, but it costs
a great deal of money to raise
wheat in Russia. The United
States also serves capitally to eke out
the shortage of England in the cereals.
But if the Russian farmer will not work
for nothing, much more decisively is
this the case with the American farmer,
every map of whom is a sovereign, Out
side of India, the cities of Odessa, New
York and Chicago, are the points from
which the kingdoms of Great Britain
and Ireland must draw their supplies of
Wheat.
What an ignoble notion, therefore, to
make silver cheap, without regard to
the noble miners wbo have staked, in
the United States, their all in the ex
ploitation of this standard metal? If
silver could be brought to as low a price
as copper, the purposes of the selfish
autocrats of 'Change and Leadenhall
streets, in London, and of the coupon
cutters of Wall street, in New York,
would be subserved to the point
of perfection. England desires to see
silver disappear as money because she
wants to buy silver as cheaply as possible
as a commodity in ingots, in order that,
buying the white metal as she buys
copper, she may convert it into a potent
currency, which will pay for and stimu
late the growth of East Indian wheat.
The New York bondholder desires to see
silver reduced to a commodity because
such action would diminish the volume
of the currency; and, as he possesses, in
his bonds and debentures, the means of
attracting to New York nearly the sum
total of the currency of the country, he
can make money scarce, and compel
periodical auctions of the effects of his
fellow citizens, which he can buy in at
his own price, and raise the rate of in-
terest while so doing.
No intelligent man, who watched tbe
effects of the demonetization of silver in
1873, can fail to remember them. The
prices of agricultural products steadily
declined. The California wheat farmer
remembers gruesomely the delightful
returns which he received from his
granaries prior to that disastrous event.
The demonetization of silver made the
stimulation of the growth of wheat in
India possible. The demonetized metal
was bought in bars, coined into rupees
and disbursed to the Indian ryot, who
gladly and unquestioningly clutched
the shining symbols. As this action of
the United States had been preceded by
the demonetization of silver by Ger
many, the prospect looked gloomy on
every hand.
And well it might. Outside of the
Latin Union—which in sentiment is
flamboyant, and in action always prac
tical—there was not a ray of hope in
the world for people who saw enterprise
stagnant, for the mortgaged who saw
their mortgages tightening like a coil
around their necks, or for those just
minded people who delight in standing
in with the advancement and ameliora
tion of mankind.
The people of the United States and
THE LOS ANGELES HKRALD; SUNDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 14, 1890.
of the world have now probably reached
a point when the great injustice of 1873
will be rectified, and when the remon
etization of silver will energize the pro
ductive capabilities of mankind in all
quarters of the world.
All great reforms are always opposed
with fanatical obstructions. In the
United States we are told that if we dare
to remonetize silver we shall be over
whelmed by the amount of that metal
that will pour into us from other coun
tries.
In the name of all the Clods at once,
where is this redundant silver to come
from? (iermany long ago sold all she
had. France holds on to her own store,
and justly regards it as precious. The
silver production of the world is well
known. It is limited. It barely suffices
for the needs of England and the arts.
As a matter of fact, it does not even
suffice for these two purposes.
Yet we are told that, if we dare to re
store silver to its old rightful status, the
stock of gold now held by the United
States will be drained away from it.
"In the name of the prophet, figs."
If ever there was a non sequititr, or I
what is in the mathematics called a'■
reductio ad almirdam, it is surely here.
England needs our silver. As the bal
ance of trade, as respects the United
States and the outside world, is ordinar
ily enormously in favor of this country,
England must pay for our silver in gold.
In consequence, the higher we rate sil
ver the more gold England will have to
pay for it. She would prefer to buy it
to pigs, as she does iron, copper and
lead, but if she is obliged to buy our
Btandard dollars and melt them down
into rupees, the more gold we shall
have.
If we exact it, gold she must pay. It
amounts to gold in any event.
The conditions of production and
transportation are such in India that
unless England can buy cheap silver
she can't raise wheat in opposition to
the California and other United States
producers of that staple.
As a consequence, the price of Amer
ican and Russian wheat will go up,
while we shall have abundant gold in
return for the American silver the
English perforce must have.
This is the law and the prophets of
the matter, and it is the reason why
every freeborn American thould be in
favor of free silver coinage.
CHANCE FOR ANOTHER RAILROAD HAR
BOR.
In the early part of this week the
chief officials hereof the Terminal rail
road will visit the estuary of Los Ala
mitos. Whilst there is no public giving
out that they are going with a railroad
object in view, yet they will remain at
Captain McGarvin'S for several days,
and include, in their duck-shooting
divertisements upon the inlets and
water sheets of the estuary, a careful in
vestigation of the chances which that
point affords for a harbor terminus for
their railroad.
Whoever haa carefully inspected the
Los Alamitos estuary has been im
pressed with the fact that there is an
excellent opportunity to make a fine
harbor there , with a depth of twenty
feet of water over the bar at the en
trance, at comparatively very little cost.
The advantages it presents for harbor
purposes are many. In the first place,
there is now twelve feet of water on the
bar at the entrance. Next, the bar con
sists of sand, and could be easily deep
ened by jetties run out so as to make
Ibd currents and tides scour the
bed of the channel and carry
the sand into deep water. Third, the
interior harbor could be easily enlarged
and deepened to any reasonable extent
by dredging, as the formation is all soft
alluvion. Fourth, there is no submerged
reef crossing the mouth of the harbor, so
that it is possible to secure depth
enough at the entrance for vessels draw
ing sixteen feet and upwards of water.
Hence, whatever depth it may be desir
able to obtain in tbe harbor by dredg
ing can be maintained over the bar,
there being no hard formation or solid
obstruction to prevent properly placed
jetties from maintaining an open chan
nel at the entrance to conform in depth
with the interior basins.
The harbor is perfectly land-locked,
and the entrance is about half a mile
in width. There are no high promon
tories jutting into the sea on either side
of the entrance, so that even vessels
anchored in the outer harbor could bear
away from the coast and get to cea be
fore a southeast storm could beach her.
This is an advantage oi no small im
portance, as every sailor will admit, for
a harbor of refuge cannot always be en
tered before a storm comes up, and at
such times the facilities for getting
to a point where there is ample sea
room are of the lirst importance.
The interior'harbor as it is now pre
sents a very attractive sheet oi water,
and a small amount of money would
turn it into a spacious and safe harbor
for a large fleet of vessels.
Tlie gentlemen who are about to visit
Los Alamitos, after having satisfied
themselves of the advantages it. affords
for harbor purposes, will doubtless then
take into consideration ita geographical
position as relates to the business
points of the back country. In this
respect they will find that it is about
equi-distant from la)h Angeles and
Santa Ana, so that it would really form
tke apex of a triangle that would in
clude the entire interior oi the three
counties.
Wherever a good harbor can be made 1
that is within easy reach of Los Angeles, j
it is to the interest of our people to en- j
courage its development by every means
in their power. If a moderate expend
iture of money will give us a good har- j
bor at Los 4.lamitos, with an entrance
that will admit deep-sea vessels of |
the ordinary draft to reach it,
then it is our duty to call attention j
to the fact, and to do our utmost to se
cure inch private or public aid as will
remit in its successful development. If i
a great railroad enterprise should, after j
careful investigation, determine to make j
Los Alamitos its ocean terminus, we j
could with good reason ask congress to
make such appropriations as the work
of creating such a harbor would require.
The lack of natural harbors on this
southern coast warrants us in taking
advantage of every opportunity that
offers to carve out a harbor that will
afford increased facilities to our com
merce. Harbors are good things, and
we cannot have too many of them.
We are not in the habit of often mak- j
ing allusions to ourselves. But the phe
nomenal increase of our subscription
lilt justifies the mention of a fact that i-
at once gratifying and complimentary to
the conductors of the HebajbD, Whilst
it is true that the steady increase of the
population oi Los Angeles accounts in a j
measure for the great accession of sub- '
scribers, yet the fact that the Herald is !
conducted on progressive principles and
in the interest of every movement that
tends to develop our matchless resources,
as well as on a plane of journalism that
commends itself to the best thought of ;
our people, cuts no insignificant figure
in the marvelous increase in the nnm
ber of our subscribers.
When Senator Vest, on Friday, came
back at Dolph with his terrilic rejoinder
in the discussion upon the force bill, he
might have added that the report of the
senate labor committee, in 1883, showed
that in the great factories and mills in
Massachusetts the operatives were com
pelled to vote as their employers dic
tated or lose their situations. There
may be intimidation in the south, but
we have the positive proof that the
practice is common in tiie east. The
operatives may not be told in so fcriany
words that they will be discharged un
less they vote as the boss indicates; but
it. is well understood that they will lose
their places unless they do so.
Thebb is a damage suit on trial in
this city which has brought out a phase
of character in some of the witnesses
which should consign them to popular
infamy. Glib fellows get upon the
stand, and without the slightest sense
of shame testify to acts which not only
stamp upon their foreheads the seal of
an inexpiable depth of depravity, but
deprives their testimony of the slightest
credence with honorable men. It has
the indelible stain of infamy upon it,
and is as worthless for the purpose of
arriving at truth as would be the pro
verbial "dicers' oaths."
AMUSEMENTS.
Little Puck Tonight at the Los Angeles.
Other Attractions.
Frank Daniels, in Little l'ucfc, con
tinues to crowd the Los Angeles nightly.
Standing room is at a premium at every
performance. The season closes tonight
with a Sunday evening performance.
Fraulein Adele Aus der Ohe gave her
second conceit last night at Turner hall
before a select and delighted audience.
This young lady is certainly the greatest
pianist that lias visited this coast at any
time.
Emma Abbott's present engagement
in San Francisco shows that the strength
of Abbott opera this season is positive
and marked, for the week just closed is
the most successful any Abbott com
pauv ever had in that city. The secret
of the surprising success this season is
the uniform strength of tho company
throughout, from Emma Abbott down •
to the big bass liddle in tbe orchestra.
As a whole the company is new, though
a number of familiar faces appear in
the list. The operas are reported to be
magnificently staged also, the Abbott
toilets for the season costing $40,000 in
round numbers. "Such toilets were
nevei seen on any stage," one critic
wrote of them.
The ■ bbott season at the Los Angelei
theater begins Monday, December 22,
running four days, with matinee
on Wednesday, and a special
Christmas matinee on Thurs
day. Emma Abbot will sing at
every performance. An exceptional
repertoire is provided—"Einani, ' ''Ro
meo and Juliet," "Bohemian Girl,"
"Anne Boleyn,'' "Rose of Castile" anil
"II Trovatore.' The sale for all per*
(ormances will open tomorrow morning
at the Los Angeles theatre.
QBAMD OPBBA HOUSE.
Messrs. McLain & Lehman announce
as their Christmas week attraction tlie
Fiimia Jueh (irand Fnglish Opera com
pany, in the following operas:: "The
Huguenots," "Faust," ''Lohengrin,"
"is Africane," "Kigoletto" and "II
Tiovatore." Orders will he taken on
Monday at the box otlice for seats (or
the entire engagement.
TBI "Wis.
i The society evenfr*of the week will be
! the production of Ksmeralda for the
I benefit of the Ladies' Benevolent jo
ciety on Thursday evening, December
18th. Tickets are selling very rapidly,
the boxes and loges being already in de
mand by theater parties. The perform
ance being given for inch a worthy
charity as the Ladies' Benevolent so
ciety, it is gratifying to know thai the
house will be packed. The full east of
the performers is given in another col
umn.
To-Morrow. To-Morrow.
Great scarilice of elegant goods at the Silver
' House, 314 North Main street. Baker block
i The auction sals continues by catalogue v* 10
ja. m. Yesterday tbe large salesroom WM
; Crowded with buyers.
See tbe People's Stoic advertisement
! elsewhere in the Hkkai d.
Go to Mullen, Bluett & Co. for cutaway suits
Gordan Bros.' Reopening.
! New stock imported fall und wlntei Styles
' just received. Halts to order from TlB and up
wards 118 S. Spring street.
Paints, Oils and Glass,
Corner Second and Main. P. H. Mathews.
j Go lo Mullen, Bluett & Co. for business iniU,
Overstocked.
i Cordon Bros., 118 S. Spring street, the place
, for bargains in ilouitwiic Mud imported woolens,
j Call and be convinced.
Go to Mullen, Bluett it Co. for overcoats.
| .
I Send a Christmas present to your eastern
I friends of Puro California Wines. It. J
Woollacott, 124 and 120 N. Spring st., will de-
I liver two eases 21 bottles, to any part of the
; United States for $9 00.
[ The best place in town to get a good mer
{ caDtlle lunch is at John Brink's, 21!) North
; Spring street.
i.o to Mullen, BluettiSi Co. for boys' cloth hats.
Tents and wagon umbrellas at Foy's saddlery
! house, 315 N. Los Angeles street
I Go to Mullen, BluettA Co. for holld«y pres
ents.
WINEBURGH'S.
OX SPECIAL SALE MONDAY.
It is drawing on to the end of the
year, the time when we desire most of
all to reduce our stock, besides next
week we wish to devote our time to holi
day goods. So, for this week we will
place very low prices on all goods, as
you can see by the following v hich we
place on sale for Monday. Also give
free a Jumping Jack, one for one child
of each family.
BS Inch wide, nil wool ladies' cloth greys and
brow ns worth 7, r >e for 500 a yard.
1..-yard wide, wool mixed large and small
plaid dress goods worth 8 c for ;), r ie a yard.
40-inch wide greys and browns camels hulr
serge dress goods worth 75c for 45c a yard.
23-inch wide pongee silk, fast black and
cream, tor underwear, etc., worth 90c, for 05c
n yard.
22 inch wide India silk, strictly all silk, all
shades and colors, worth 75c, for 40c a yard.
36-inch line French raven black all-wool
serge, worth 75c, lor 40c a yard.
2 yards wide scarlet and blue heavy felt, for
■carfl and mantel-boards, worth (1,25, for 85e
■ yard.
50-inCh pure linen, unbleached table linen,
worth 40c for 23c a yard.
•10-lnch bleached heavy butcher lluen, worth
40c, for 29c a yard.
Pull width genuine Kentucky jeans, extra
heavy, for boys' and men's panls. worth 40c,
for 190 a yard.
Ladies' Hue wool high-neck, long-sleeve,
ribbed wool vests, silk trimming, worth $1, lor
75c each.
Children's merino vests, sizes IS to 26, worth
40c. for 26c. each.
A ILMI'ISIi-JACK FKKK—(INK FOR ONE CHILD UF
EACH FAMILY.
Vine Japanese silk handkerchiefs, embroid
ered corner and scalloped all round, worth 75c,
for 4t»e each.
Veneered and perforated wood whisk broom
holders, worth 25c, for 10c each.
Ladies' hemstitched and cord border linen
initial handkerchiefs, worth $1.85, for 90c a
box.
children's 4 and 5-button kill gloves, all
sizes worth $1, for 760 a pair.
Pure silk ball pon-pons, all colors, worth 40c,
for 83c a dozen.
RSI HO THE CHILDREN FOR THK jrMPINC-.rArKS.
Infants' all wool silk emoroidered and Bcal
loped flannel shawls, worth |1.25, for 89c
each.
WINSBVBOH'B, 309 to 311 S. Spring St.
Go to Mullen, Bluett A Co. for men's trousers.
Go to Mullen, Bluett & Co. for silk mufflers.
FOR NEURALGIA & HEADACHE.
t'se "Rough on Pain." Instant relief. 25 and
50c. ROUGH ON CORNS. Liquid, 15c. Salve
10c.
ROUGH ON WORMS. Safe, sure cure, 25c.
Free Open Air Concerts.
A very entertaining and refined open air cop
cert is given nightly in the open lot on Spring
street, between Second and Third, by Dr. C A.
Hessonand Dr. B. H. Westfall. All the latest
H,n;f ami jukes arc given in a very clever man
ner. There is nothing vulgar or coarse iv any
par! of the entertainment, and any lady can
witness the show without the slightest fear of
having her sensitiveness wounded.
<;<i to Mullen, Bluett A Co. for boys' $5 suits.
If XOU Wish to Buy Fine Old
Sherry, angelica, muscatel, port, old Sonoma
and Napa zint'iindel wines, best and purest, go
to la'ou Conner's, 018 South Spring street
Telephone 904
line Kentucky whiskies, grape brandies and
Imported liquors. Goods delivered to any part
of the city.
funeral'pieces at the violet florist store, 236
South Spriugstreet.
,1. It. v..net. Prescription Druggist,
Graduate of Pharmacy, bus opened a first-class
drug store at 329 West fifth street, Park place.
All lirst class goods in that line will be sold at
bed rock prices.
Oo to Mullen, Bluett & Co. for sack'suils.
Drink Kucalypta for headache, lour stomach.
Drink ECCALTPTA, ye thirsty thousands.
Bakery.
Kbinger's bakery and ice cream and dining
parlors, cor. Third and 8, Spring sis.
ECCALYPTA for brain workers.
Senour's Celebrated Floor Paint
A Scrive" t Quinn, 140 South Main street.
ETJCALYPTi purifies the breath.
CHURCH NOTICES.
PLYMOUTH CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH,
I a J. Wells, pastor, 2lst street near Figueroa.
Services nt 11 a. in. and 7.30 p. m, Seals free.
9-27-sata-iuni-tf.
HURCU .OF THK UNITY, CORNER OF
Broadway and Seventh streets. Rev. J. L,
j nnmson, pastor. Services Sunday at 11 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Sabbath school at 9:45 a.m.
Subject San day morning, "Reading Between
the Lines of Life." Subject, evening, "The
Mistakes ol Ingersoll is. in."
TTIIRIST cTl URCH, W. C.T. U. HALL. COR
\ ) ncr Temple st. and Broadway. Services at
II a.m., and 7:30 p.m.; Sunday school at
9 :4.-111. m. Rev. Thomas W. I lai kins, rector.
CI'IRITUALISM, 0. H. BROOKS, TRANCE
speaker, will lecture in Elks' hall, 254 S
Main street, al 7:30 p. m. Subjects taken from
theaudlsnee. Tests after the lector?.
TTNITARIAN—CHURCH OF THE UNITY
U Seventh street, between Broadw ay and Hill
street, Rev. J. S. Thompson, pastor.' Services
at 11 a. ra. Sunday school at 9:45 a. m.
Subject Sunday morning, "God before tlie Judg
ment Seat of Christ." There w ill be no evening
services until further notice.
IMfE NEW CHURCH—THE FIRST NEW
church society of Los Angeles, meets In
Elk's hall, 254 South Main street, at 11 a. m.
The president of Ihe society will give a lecture
on the Doctrine of the Trinity.
CHURCH, COR. THIRD
v.' and Hill streets—lntroductory sermon by
new pastor, Key. J. S. Dill, at II a.m Subject,
' Mutual Burden-Bearing.'' Subject of evening
sermon, •Drifting aud Its Remedy." All a.-c
invited. Scats free.
IHST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, COR
nei Sixth and Hill sts. Pastor, Key. Robert
0. Hutcbiftl, D. D. Services st ll a. m. and
7:30 p. in. In the morning Rev. Ii I.lovd
Jenkins, of Chichester, England, will preach.
Evening, Major II N Burt anil Rev. H. V.
Case will give addresses on the Indian problem.
OIMPSON M. E." TABERNACLE," h'opß
O street between Seventh and Eighth streets.
Rev. Will A. X nigh ten. the pastor, will preach.
Morning subject: 1 Look Out for Dangers."
Evening: ' Pilate's Court and Christ." Sab
bath-school at 11:30 a.m.
IMMANtTiIT PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH',
meets In the Ilanna college, corner Hope
anil Eighth streets. The pastor, Rev. W. J. Chi
chester, 1). D., will preach at 11 a. m. Every
body welcome.
FOB SALK—Country Property.
FWB SALE —A PARTY Will) WANTS A
piece of grounid to improve and make a
living on, can buy 10 or 20 acres 10 miles from
I.os Augeles and a half mile from railroad, on
Ills own terms: this is excellent soil and Is
well adapted for deciduous or small fruits, or
chicken ranch: cash no object; a good opportu
nity for the right man. Address I. O. Box 000,
Los Augeles. 12-10tf
Uik ACRES first"-class~lTkange LAND
O" for stile cheap, or exchange for city im
proved property. A.J. MEAD, 23H W. First
street. 12-7 tf
\ba7T(;aTn— lot acres, $100 per acre,
3 miles irom center of city; 20 acres in
Ulucgam. l year old. Address J. W. POT'lS.box
513, Statiou C. Will sell hull of nliove land.
12-7 Imo
UOR BALE—ROAD- HOUSE AT""a~BA RG A> S ,
J 1 on Mis-don Road. Address P. O. box 03,
S ulion B, East Los Angeles, 12 1 Kit
EUCALYPTA!
This popular table beverage excels any
mineral water on the market. IT IS NOT A
MEDICIN'H, but a delicious beverage prepared
from a double distilled extract, and containing
all of the valuable medicinal properties of the
Eucalyptus leaf. It is highly aromatic aid de
lightfully refreshing. It exhilarates, but con
taining no alcohol, it does not intoxicate.
It is a popular beverage with the tired brain
worker, and all that class who have that all
gone feeling in the morning and who suffer
from malaria, catarrh and all disordets, in
llamation and other affections of the mucous
membrane of the'stomacti, bowels, kidneys or
bladder. It purifies the breath, restores lost
vitality and is agreeable to the weakest stomach.
Taken half an hour before meals, it gives a
splendid appetite. It induces refreshing sleep.
Those Buffering from that terrible symptom,
Insomnia, should drink half a tumblerful just
before retiring. It acts directly o» the nervous
system as a tonic. It Is a purely vegetable
preparation, containing no insoluble matter, so
that those suffering from calcaseous deposits
may drink it with perfect safety, (live it a
trial. Price, {2.00 per dozen. For sale every
where.
Los Angeles Chem. Co. Limited,
12 14-lni SOLE PROPRIETORS.
DO
YOU KNOW
THAT THE
BEST PLACE
IN
THE OITY TO GET
YOUR FAMILY
WINES AND LIQUORS
IS AT
J. P. TAGGART & CO.'S,
TH EY
HAVE A FINE
WHOLESALE STORE,
AND PAY
STRICT ATTENTION TO
THE FAMILY
TRADE.
ON NEW HIGH ST.,
NEAR TEMPLE,
NEXT DOOR
TO THE
UNIVERSITY BANK.
TELEPHONE NO. 396.
STREET NOS. 311 AND
313.
MAIL
OR
TELEPHONE ORDERS
ARE ATTENDED TO
PROMPTLY. 12-9-lm
C. E. HANCE'S
fatal Plarmay,
ITT AND 1 TO
North Spring St.,
LOS ANGELES.
DRUG WAR.
I am now selling Drugs, Medicines, Toilet
Articles, indeed everything that goes to make
up an immense stock in my line, including an
elegant line of
HOLIDAY GOODS
At prices that will meet the views ol everyone.
A FEW QUOTATIONS:
A yer's Sarsaparilla 70c
Aver's Vigor 55c
Hood's Sarsaparilla 70c
l'lerce's Favorite Prescription 70c
Warner's Safe Cure 85c
King's Discovery 70c
Simmons' I.iver Regulator 70c
Cuticura Soap 15c
Pear's Soap 15c
lloyt's Cologne (genuine) 15c
Hunyadi Janos Water 35c
Scott's Emnlsion 70c
Oriental Cream 95c
All Recamier Preparations $1 10
Camelllne 35c
Creme de Lis 40c
Syrup Figs, small 4uc
Syrup Figs, large 75c
Pond's Extract, small 35c
Pond's Extract, 8 oz. size 75c
Wyeth's Beef Iron and Wine 75c
Pure Cod Liver Oil, per pint 50c
Dr. Bosanko's Cough Syrup 40c
Dr. Bosanko's Pile Remedy 40c
Chamberlain's Cough Syrup 80c
Homeopathic Remedies, all kinds 15c
Hance's Cream 25c
Anita 50c
Rum and Quinine Hair Tonic 75c
Pozzoni's Powder 35c
La Blaohe Powder 30c
Saunders Powder 30c
Swans Down Powder 10c
11-25-3 m
FOR SALE—LIVE STOCK.
4 work teams, and a good gentleman's driv
ing horse that can show a 2:20 gait at C. W.
NEWTON'S fashion stables, 819 E. First st.
12-14 3t
FOR SALE-COW; PART JERSEY; A REAL
good, gentle cow; $00. Call at 117 East
Twenty-seventh street. 12-10-5t
OR SALE—GRAY HORSE, 333 S, BUNKER
Hill aye. 12-10 7t
IpOR SALE—WELL-MATCHED TEAM OF
black horses; large and line: will be told at
a bargain. Apply to McKOON Ai GAY, 105W
S. Broadway* 12-7-tf
AUCTION BALKS.
ON DECEMBER 22D 1 WILL SELL AT Auc
tion, at Hotel Clarence, San Pedro, one
trunk and contents, consisting of wearing an
parel, etc., left for board and room rent by A.
L. Dowing, in November, 1889. MRS. JAS. IN
NIS. 11-23-Su-4w
METROPOLITAN STEAM DYE WORKS
038 Buena Vista St., also. 241 Franklin St.
Fine dyeing and cleaning a specialty.
1213-lm
AUCTION.
On account of business interests demanding
my constant attention in an adjoining county,
necessitating my removal from Pomona, I will
oiler at public auction on
Thursday, Dec. 18th,
AT 10 O'CLOCK A. M.,
THE FOLLOWING PROPERTY:
My home place on (inrev avenue, containing
about 3 acres, well improved with 150 orange
trees, a few deciduous trees, strawberries, black
berries, raspberries, a line assortment of orna
mental shrubs and (lowers.
A good '2-story bard finished house of 9
rooms and cellar, with closets, bath, and hot
und cold water; good wood-house and good
bam,
12 good lots in the Burbank Tract; 0 lots on
Carey avenue, set to 27") French prunes.
Old settlement water right goes with all the
above, property.
Hale of above property will be at corner Garey
and Orange avenues, Pomona.
Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 0 in block 43, town of
Pomona; an v divided half interest In lots 1
and 2, block 30, town of Pomona.
Sale of business property at Garey avenue and
Second street.
The beautiful home, with its spacious grounds,
is most charmingly located on a broad avenue,
within ten minutes' walk of the R. R. depot
and postoffice Tlie orange trees, soon to come
Into bearing, will pay ten per cent Interest on
$7500.
Pomona is well known as one of the most at
tractive and progressive cities in Southern Cali
fornia. Real estate va lies are firm and busi
ness good. As a place of residence, it has no
superior in the Stale.
Lots in block 43 are particularly desirable,
being the corner of Carey avenue and Second
6treet, the heart of tlie business center.
ALSO OFFER THE FOLLOWING
PERSONAL PROPERTY.
One span matched horses, 3 sets double har
ness, 1 good Columbus side bar surrey (2 seats),
1 single buggy, 1 good rood grader, aud other
articles too numerous to mention.
Terms will be made known at time and
place of sale.
CHARLES FRENCH.
W. 11. HOLABIRD, Auctioneer. 12^14-4t
PERSONAL.
W^NTEl h—THB PUBLIC TO KNO W"THAT
Shackleton's Comimn-Sense cure of
Catarrh, Asthma. Bronchitis, Diphtheria,
Croup, etc., can be procured at WALTERS'
GROCERY, cor. Fifth and Los Angeles sts.; alfo
230 Ash st. All orders attended to promptly. It
BARGAINS IX MILLINERY AT 329 S.
Springst.; must bo sold in 30 days. MRS.
| HAAUEN. 12-11-lm
; rpHB MEN LO. 420~~SOUTH MAIIT
I J. corner Winston. This elegant house has
j been refurnished, and under new management;
I location central; sixty sunny rooms, en suite
i and single, from $7 upward: transient from 50
! cents t051.25 per day. Every attention paid to
j guests. MRS. 11. H. HEATH, Proprietor.
] 11-23 3m
f |7<CONOMIC" PRICES—3UUAR, 20 LBS.
I j brown or 19 lbs. white, $1; sack flour, SOc;
Northern flour, $1.15; mincemeat, 100 lb;apple
butter, 10c lb; dried peaches, 10c lb; 0 lbs.
raisins, 25c; 4 lbs rice, sago or tapioca, 25c;
|13 lbs. white beans 26c.; 8 lbs. cornmeal, 15c.;
4 packages starch, 25c; germea, 20c;good black
or Japan tea, 35c; 12 cans salmon, fl; 9 cans
; oysters, til potted tongue or ham, sc; 4(1 bars
soap, $1; bacon, 12Uc; hams, 14c; pork, 10c
ECONOMIC STORES, 509-511 S. Spring St.
Telephone 975. m 5 tf
RS. PARKER," RE LI ABLE CLAIRVOYANT,
business, mineral and li c reading mcd
i ium; magnetic treatment for nervousness,
I rheumatism, stomach and kidney trouble,
j Developing circles Thursday, 7:30 ph., 324
I South Spring st.
IVORCE LAW A SPECIALTY; ~ADVICE
free. W. W. HOLCOMB. attorney-at-law,
I offlce, old Wilson block, 12t> W. First St., rooms
! 10 aud 11. ma29-tf
ersonal to every"
body How to make and save money. Read
I the class, ed advertisements in the Hbrai.d
: daily. A few cents spent in an advertisement
l may make thousands of dollars for you. You
j may procure a situation; sell your house and
I lot; rent your vacant property; buy a paying
j business or sell to advantage; loan your Idle
money or borrow cheaper than from agents,
1 and in a thousand different ways use these col
i umns to advantage. On this page advertise
ments are only FIVE CENTS A LINE A DAY.
MEETINGS,
NOTiCE — MEETING—
Notice is hereby given that the regular
anutial meeting of the stockholders of the
Southern California National Ban«, of Ix>s An
geles. Cal., will be held at the parlors of said
bank, in tlie city and county of Los Angeles,
State of California, on Monday the 12th day of
January, 1891, between the hours of 10 a! m.
and 4 p. in. of said day, for the purpose of elect
i inga Board of Directors for the ensuing year,
: and the transaction of such other business as
1 may come before it, that day having been desig
| nated by the by-laws of the corporati n for
that purpose. All stockholders are requested
Ito be present at that time. WM. F. BOSBY-
I SHELL, Vice-President
I Dated I.os Angeles, Dec. 11,1890. 12-12-5t
IQO UTILE RN CALIFORNIA COUNCIL, NO
j O 728, Royal Arcanum—Meets second and
fourth Friday evenings of each month, at K.o
P. Hall, No. 118U S. Spring street; visitlu
! brothers cordially invited S. E. LEVIS
' Box 1175. Secretary
mal3-tim
SPECIAL, NOTICK.
WIDNEY'S TOY BTOIIE~ItAS REmmiD
to 555 South Broadway, near Sixth,
where low rents will give you the lowest prices
in the city.
NOTICE— THE LOS ANGELES CITY WATER
Company will strictly enforce the follow
! ing rule: The hours for sprinkling are between
I 0 and 8 o'clock a. m., and 0 and 8 o'clock p. m.
I For a violation of the above regulation the
! water will be shut oil, and a One of $2 will be
! charged before water will be turned on again.
] au!7-lv
| -
BIJBINKSB CIIANCBB.^
AN ACTFVE ENERGETIC MAN
few hundred dollars, canlobtain an inter
est in a close in, well established grocery (tore
PIEPBK A POWELL, 108 Broadway. 12-14-3t
T?OK SALE OR EXCHANGE—A BUTCHER
P shop doing a good business. Corner FIRST
AND ALAMEDA STS. 12-1.0-lm
LOST AND FOUND.
LOST— TERM DEPOSIT
474 of the Main Street Savings Hank and
Trust Company, belonging to P. Dussand The
finder will pease return the book to the bank,
420 S. Main st. 11-30-Sun4t
BETWEEN - FIRST AND
Third sts., a gents' diamond locket, con
taining portrait of owner; $5 reward. L. A.
I HARKIS, 204 S, Springst. 12-12-tf
BLACK HORSE, NEARLY 8
j years old. PleaFe return to 202 West
| Twenty-second street, city, aud receive reward.
12-12 2t
OST—A BLACK LEATHER POCKET BOOK,
j valuable only to owner. Return to Hotel
Nadeau. 12-12-21
STRAYED OR STOLEN—A black bay mare.ltl
hands high, branded P-S; hind foot white:
weight about 1000: hcavv mane and tall; 7
! years old; $10 reward, CHAS. MOURE, New
hall. h2-9 7t
MINING.
P"a'c'tfic "coast MINING
mining properties bought and sold. Min
ing pro-pects and mines bonded, and capital
furnished for development of those that can he
shown to have merit. NOLAN A SMITH, oflice
132 North Springstreet, Los Angeles, CaL
nu24-Bino
CHIROPODISTS. '
C~ STAFFER. CHIROPODIST—OORNB?mJN-
J, ions aud ingrowing toe nails treated. 209
W. First St., opposite Nadeau. Honrs, 9 to 4
10-ISt.f
m^^^_HOMBOPATHIBTB.
C 8. SALISBURY, M. D., HOMCEOPATHIffK
Office, rooms 11 aud 12, L. A. Bank build
ing, cor. First and Spring sts. Residence, 648
8. Pearl st. Oflice hours, 11 a. mto3p. m. Tel
ephone Nos.: Oflice, 597; residenoe, 577.
m24-tf
DRS. BEACH 4 BOYNTON. OFFICE, 37 N.
Spring St., Los Angeleß, Cal. Office hours,
Bto 12 m., 1 to 4 aud 6toB p. ra. Dr. Boyn
ton's residence. 735 Olive st. ml9tf
TSAAC FELLOWS, M. D., HOMEOPATHIBT
Office hours, 11 to 12 a. m., 2to 6 p. m.
Offlce, Nos. 2 and 5 Odd Fellows' building, Loa
Angeles, Cal. Residence, 508 South Main st.
mf-tf
BILLIARD PABLOBB.
LOS ANGELES BILLIARD PARLQTO, I*o
N. Main »t. CHAS. J. GERARD, Manager,
formerly of the Nadeau. 11-14-lm

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