OCR Interpretation


Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, December 21, 1890, Image 5

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84025968/1890-12-21/ed-1/seq-5/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 5

OUR NEIGHBOR STARS.
THERE ARE SCHOLARS WHO THINK
( THEY ARE INHABITED.
Science Has N<> Means of Proving It, but if
Not the Case Why Were They Created?
Some of the Conclusions Which Have
Been Beached by tbe Professor.
"You remember," said the professor,
as reported in the Cincinnati Times-Star,
"my allusion some time ago to the fact
that Mars resembled the earth in many
of its observed features. It has for years
been the dream of astronomy to prove
that life exists in some or all of the mill
ions of stars which surround us. The
poetic astronomer reasons in this way:
All things were created for the use and
support of living beings. What use do
the myriads of heavenly bodies subserve
if there is no life? Would not the earth
be altogether devoid of interest if life
did not exist? If there was neither life
nor thought what would be the signifi
cance of the universe? Reflections of
this sort enkindle the lively imagination,
and speculation as to what the science of
astronomy will eventually reveal runs
to extravagant extremes.
BUBJECTS OF SCD2NCE IN THE FUTURE.
"Mathematical astronomers, like New
ton and La Place, arouse by their mar
velous calculations a high state of en
thusiasm. But is this the only line
along which we can work? The pre
diction of eclipses, the division of time,
the mapping out of the courses of cer
tain heavenly bodies with perfect ac
curacy, the discovery of comets, planets
and suns—are those to be the final tri
umphs of the science which has revolu
tionized human thought at two or three
stages of man's history? Let me answer
in the words of an enthusiast: 'That is
not the aim. Behold those millions of
suns, similar to that wliich gives light
to the earth, and, like it, sources of
movement, activity and splendor; well,
those are the subjects of the science of
the future—the study of universal and
eternal life. You are going to witness
the dawn of a new day. Mathematical
astronomy will give place to physical
astronomy, to the true study of nature.'
"He goes on to say that by the study
of nature he means the study of the con
ditions of life in the various parts of the
universe, the physical condition of the
planets, their geographical aspects, their
climatology and their meteorology. It
will probably be proved that Mars and
Venus are peopled by thinking beings;
that Jupiter has not yet reached a con
dition where life can be supported; that
the conditions are such on Saturn that
the beings which inhabit it are of an
entirely different organization from our
earth dwellers. Still further, astronomy
will show that the earth is but one place
in the celestial country, and that man is
a citizen of the heavens. It will thus
lead up to a new philosophy, the religion
of superior minds.
NEITHER PROVED NOR DISPROVED.
"Such is the dream and such the final
object of the telescopic search. The
Lest that can be said for it from a scien
tific standpoint is that the facts ob
served neither prove it nor disprove it.
There is only one body where the condi
tions are believed to be such as to sup
port intelligent beings of our kind. But
that is inconclusive. We can observe
■with our telescopes but three or four out
of the millions of heavenly bodies. More
over, there can be definite adaptation.
Should our temperature be greatly raised
or lowered, life as it exists now would
disappear from the face of the earth; but
perhaps there are forms of life which
wonld thrive under the conditions winch
are fatal to us.
"Again, millions of years passed by
■before life got a foothold on our globe,
according to the best evidence that we
have, and for millions of years after life
is extinct here it is expected that our
planet will roll on through space. The
period of intelligent man is but a mo
ment out of an immeasurable lapse of
time. It is not probable that, if it were
possible to visit each one of the 50,000,000
Btars visible through onr telescopes, we
should find more than one or two at the
best where our stage has just been
reached.
"Whether the stars are inhabited or
not, we know something about the ap
pearance of the universe as presented at
some of them by analogy.
"In the solar system of Gamma, in
the constellation of Andromeda, instead
of one sun, shining with a white light,
any possible observer would behold three
suns—a yellow sun, a blue sun and a
green sun. As one of these suns would
be setting another would be rising, and
the color of objects would be constantly
changing. When the blue sun should be
in the zenith all the landscape—the rocks
and the waters —would reflect the blue
rays, throwing, perhaps, slight tinges of
gold or green, due to one of the other
suns as it was setting or rising.
"This is but a suggestion of some of
the magnificent sights which must be
presented near the multiple, triple and
double stars, and we know of this
through telescopic observation.
"The double stars especially love to
show brilliant complementary colors,
taking the hue that will contrast most
charmingly with that of the next star—
a rose colored one beside an emerald, a
sapphire blue with a pale yellow prim
rose for a neighbor, white and ruby,
gold and purple, sea green and orange,
each increasing the beanties of tho
others.
"There is a nebula on the Southern
Cross which is composed of 110 stars, of
which eight of the more conspicuous
ones are colored various shades of red,
green and blue; the whole gives the ap
pearance here of a rich piece of jewelry.
What must be the infinite variety and
beauty of the coloring in the near vicin
ity? Sir John Herschel said that the ef
fect produced on him by this remarkable
group was that of 'a superb piece of
fancy jewelry.'"
The experiment of tanning leather
With palmetto roots has been successful
ly tried at Apalachicola, Fla. The
leather was as soft and pliable as the
finest calf skin.
The Man with v Patent.
There were only half a dozen people
fa the palace car all day long, and after
dinner, when the man who had been
Bleeping and reading in seat No. 13 came •
over to me for a chat, I welcomed hin»
with open arms. He said his name was j
Saunders, and that he had a patent or j
improvement on some part of a loco-f
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD SUNDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 21, 1890.
motive. Ho was going through to Cin
cinnati to have it perfected or adopted
or something of tho sort. Ho had been
in partnership with a mean man—a man
who had tried to swindle him out of
fortune. To get even he had stolen the
patent and run away. He had it with
him in a valise. That was all he said
just then, but later on he confided to
me the fact that at a town about thirty
miles away this wicked partner of his
might possibly bo on hand to board the
train and attempt to wrest the treasure
from his keeping. He wanted my ad
vice, and I offered to take charge of the
valise. He thanked me with great ef
fusiveness, and as wo approached the
town he shut himself into the smoking
compartment.
As tho train drew up I saw an old ac
quaintance on the platform, and while
we were talking a posse was hunting tho
train for my friend. They didn't find
him, as he had dropped off and struck
out for the country. I went on to Cin
cinnati, taking his valise along, and al
though I was thero four days he didn't
show tip. I arranged to leave it with
the landlord, and it was carried to the
office to bo opened by a meddlesome
clerk.
Instead of a patent it contained wedges,
drills, a brace, fuse and other neat lit
tle dovices for successfully working a
burglar's job, and it cost me two days of
tho hardest kind of talk to satisfy the
chief of police that I wasn't in it. I had
ridden over 100 miles with a full fledged
burglar, and one who had made his
mark, and I must say ho was a better
talker and more of a gentleman than any
governor I ever met.—New York Sun.
Will a Corpse Bleed?
Formerly there was a popular belief
in a widespread superstition that the
corpse of a murdered person would
bleed afresh from the wounds that had
caused death did the murderer touch it
or even allow his eyes to rest upon it.
Tho belief is shown to have been uni
versally established in Scotland as late
as lb'o'B. In that year one Philip Stands
field was arrested for the murder of a
person who had been buried several
days. Although the man had lain
in the grave almost a fortnight, Sir
George Mackinzie, the crown counsel,
caused the body to be exhumed and
brought into open court to apply what
people thought would be the test of
Staudsfield's guilt or innocence. The
sworn deposition of several witnesses is
as follows:
"God Almighty himself was pleased to
bear a share in tho testimonies which we
produced. That divino power which
makes the blood circulate during life
has ofttimes, iv all countries, opened a
passage for it after death upon such oc
casions. After tho wounds had been
sewed up, and the body designedly
shaken up and down— and, which is most
wonderful, after the body had been
buried several days, which naturally
causes the blood to congeal—upon
Staudsfield's touching it the blood darted
and sprang out, to the great astonish
ment of the surgeons who were there to
wat«h the event. Standsfield, astonished
more than they, threw down the body,
crying, 'Oh r God! Oh, God!* aud, clean
ing his hands, grew so faint that the
doctors had to givo him a cordial." —St.
Louis Republic.
A Practical Lesson.
One chilly evening tho sitting room iv
which my pupils und I sat was warmed
by a grate tire. Shaking out some small
live coals, I bade the boys observe which
of them turned black soonest. They
were quick to see that the smallest did,
but they were unable to tell why. They
wero reminded of the rule they had
committed to paper, hut to no purpose,
until I broke a, large glowing coal into a
score of fragments which became black
almost at once. Then one of them cried,
"Why, smashing that coal gave it more
surface 1" This young fellow was study
ing tho elements of astronomy at school,
so I had him give us some account of
how the planets differ from one another
in size, how the moon compares with the
earth in mass, and how vastly larger
than any of its worlds is the sun.
Explaining to him tho theory of the
solar system's fiery origin, I shall not
soon forget his .feen delight—in which
the others presently shared—when it
burst upon him that because the moon
is mnch smaller than the earth it must
be much colder; that, indeed, it is like a
small cinder compared with a large ope.
It was easy to advance from this to un
derstanding why Jupiter, with eleven
times the diameter of tho earth, still
glows faintly in the sky, and then to
note that the sun pours out its wealth
of heat and light because the immensity
of its bulk has, comparatively speaking,
so little surface to radiate from.—George
lies in Popular Science.
Ono of the Bravest of Deeds.
An incident of tho battle of Waterloo
heard from the great duke himself was
told by Lord Shaftesbury, tho philan
thropist, to the late Sir George Burns, in
whose biography it is given by Mr. Ed
win Hodder. At one moment in the
battle the Duke of Wellington was left
alone, his aids-de-camp having been dis
patched with messages. A gentleman
in plain clothes rode up to him and said,
"Can I be of any use, sir?"
The duke looked at him and instantly
.said, "Yes; take that pencil note to the
commanding officer" (pointing to a reg
iment in the heat of the engagement).
Tho note was taken and delivered, its
bearer galloping through the thick of the
fight to execute its commission. After
the battle tho duke made every inquiry,
but never could find out to whom he was
indebted for this brave service. He told
Lord Shaftesbury that he considered
this one of the most gallant deeds that
had ever como under his notice, seeing
that it was done without prospect of
honor or toward,—London News.
A Mystery Explained.
The papers contain frequent notices of rich,
pretty anil educated girls eloping with negroes,
tramps and coachmen. The well-known spe
cialist, Dr. franklin Miles, says all such girls
are mure or less hysterical, nervous, very im
pulsive, unbalanced; usually subject to head
ache, neuralgia, sleeplessness, immoderate cry
ing or laughing These show a weak nervous
system for which there is no remedy cuual to
Restorative Nervine. Trial bottles and a tine
book, containing many marvelous cures, free
at R. W, Ki.r.is & Co.'s, who also sell, and guar
antee. Dr. Miles'celebrated New Heart Cure,
the finest of heart tonics. Cures fluttering,
short breath,etc.
A Kare Opportunity.
Until after the holidays I will make the finest
finished cabinet phtographs, formerly ,f7.00, for
55.00. AH are invited to call and inspect
samples. F. 0. ScHUMACHKit'x Studio,
107 X. Spring street.
. HEATH 4 MIM.IGAN Prepared Paint at
' Scriver & Quinn, 140 S. Main street. #
MEDICAL.
_ •
DR. S T E: i N HART'S
This great strengthening remedy aud uerw
tonic is the most positive cure known fo
NERVOUS Debility, Spermatorrhoea, Semina
Losses, Night Emissions, Loss of Vital Power.
Sleeplessness, Despondency, Loss of Memor
Contusion of Ideas, Blur Before the Ejes,
Lassitude, Languor, Gloominess, Depression ol
Spirits, Aversion to Society, Easy Discourage
ment, Lack of Confidence, Dullness, Listlessness,
Unfitness for Study or Business aud finding
life a burden, Safely, Permanently and Privately
Cured.
PRICES- ~2.50, in liquid or pill form, or five
times the quantity for $10. Address,
DR. P. STEINHART,
Rooms 7 and 8, No. % 18J4, formerly 115>4
West Fl*St St., Los Angeles, Cal.
Office Hours—9 a. m. to 3 'p. m. Sundays
-10 to 1. Sundays 10 to 12.
All communications strict!y confidential.
Please send Dr. Cliamleeaddress of persons with
120 S. Spring st. No knife or pain. Book free.
TO THE UNFORTUNATE 1
Weakness, Impotency and Lost .'ni.;iii»»t per
manently cored. The sick and afflicted should
not fail to call upon hiirc The Doctor has trav
eled extensively in Europe and inspected thor
oughly the various hospitals there, obtaining a
great deal of valuable information, which he is
competent to impart to those in need of his
services. The Doctor cures where others fail.
Try him. DR. GIBBON will make iio charge
unless he eil'eets a cure. Persons at a distance
CURED AT HOME. All communications
strictly confidential. All letters answered in
plain envelopes.
Send ten dollars lor a package of medicine I
Call or write. Address DR. J. F. GIBBON, Box j
1,957, San Francisco, Cal.
Mention Los Angeles Herald. 07-12 m
jk DR. LIEBIG'S
£p-/JV i\ "WONDERFUL
lu?pts?
To Prove its
WBotai' ?u^r;?r i 'fe ,^sV^.i :;: , ; I ' ,
THK REASON THOUSANDS CARROT OFT f!rilF.l> of
Chronic, Prlvu... fci.i-.ial C |,lainl«, NVrvona llcl.inu, I„.
natural W»<|«, 1.0,j ur .M. iu.,ry ami Manhood, l.ii. r.'l.oti--
Madder. Klilm-r an,) Si .m-ub Vr..01,|.-., ilh i of u.i
Rl.~>d, Pi.u|.li-.i,'S.,ri-i ami niln r Skin hl-i-a..-.. 1, owiui! lo »
compllcatine call. ,1 Prosutonlioca with Uyi.urcstbMia, which
UK. LIERIO'B IXVIc'oKATOnSo. 1 tuliennlvnoaltlremii*
fir above .lii, -.-n. q iri.j■ >i. :.u ,1 «ll I, iT.-lal.irrnu-a, Xo. i
botii-s sio; hair-dte hotUea, bslf prioa Booksteytnenflroa
nit. 1.11-lßiri & co. r„ r ~,-arlv n quarter ..ra otnturi Sara
made a specially of Pi-. f,:..t.r M< n. bis, asc, however in.
dnc.il, aneedlly, thnr.>m;Y,y cured; r nt ca- .in a few dai.r
iuvt'tcraio ci-ca f killlul.v tr.rn-.1: ,-lu,r s . . n0.,1,-ralc.
Conauluiioo Frea. Call or addra i, -ioo Soar] sireef.Suu
Frauelaeo. I'al. I'rivat i Lutraln o, liio Mason yro, t.
CAUTION.SSfi~I!
ocruiHllnua, miariinlcclnir cure i lor o: nil.-rins; In n-ruild.
Don'tbaoMMnd—gat DB, ÜBBIQ a ikviuokatos.
STAR'S^
CELEBRATED
HomoßopathiG Specifics
For Nervous Debility, Decay, Etc., and
all other Homoeopathic Medicines fresh
and genuine, at tho Homoeopathic
Pharmacy, No. 505 South Spring Street,
Los Angeles. Hoadquacters lor trusses,
supporters, fancy rubber gooas, etc.
m rJ4ST*"I'I,EASK CUT THIS OUT.
£--v DR. JORDAN & COS.
X Museum of Anatomy,
I CTatou. St., San Francisco.
H > Admission 25 Cents.
1 ease. Consultation and treatment
\ft II V> torrhoea or genital weakness and
ft lj all disease of men. Send fur
book, private office 211 Geary street. Consul
tation free. ap2ll-w-12in
PENNYROYAL WAFERS.
f Prescription of a physician who
SRb has had a life long experience in
|f*f treating female diseases. Is used
<St}\ monthly with perfect success by
/r> over 10,000 ladies. Ploasant, safe,
3 effectual. Ladies ask your drug
\ gist for Pennyroyal Wafers and
.Wbil take no substitute, or inclose post
"teS&pNage for scaled particulars. Sold by
all druggists, $1 per box. Address
THE EUREKA CHEMICAL, CO., Detroit, Mice
hi. W. ELLIS & CO.. DHUGGISTS
Sole Agents, 113 S. Spring St 12-ly
TO WEAK MEN
Buffering from tbe effects of youthful errors, early
decay, wastimr weakness, lost manhood, etc., I will
Bend a valuable, treatise f sealed) containing full
particulars for homo euro, FREE °f charge. A
splendid medical work ; should be read by every
man who is nervous and debilitated. Address,;
Frof. v. C FOWLER. Sloodus. Conn.
n ing a li acknowledged
the leaiiing reifcc.ly foi
ure»in Wm (jonorrhiea «* Gleet,
ggSr I T<l - r ' DAYS'. Thoonlv sale remedy fo(
" t-eocorrliwaorWhites,
■Pj Mr,toniji>T safe in recomroundingi|
13|ft TutEvAHSCHEMifai Ho. to all suft'erei-s.
I, tM A,... STON ER M. D.,
' mwM Soldi hv DruaraTiaiaaV
'$ t»ns* E ai.oo.
$500 Beward !
WE will pay (he t'jove reward tor any case of Liver
Complaint, Dyspepsia, Sick Headache, ludigintion. Con
stipation or OoseTvenesg v.o cannot ears with Watt's
Vegetable Liver 1111s. when the directions Mro strictly
nomplied with. Th-y are perely Vegetable, Bl ll never
(aUtoglvßisatUfaotlan. BugarOoated. Lawra boxes,
containing no Pills, U rents. Beware of efnnterfstl.
and Imitations, tbs genuine inanufactuil«B only by
THE JOHN 0. WEST COMPANY,
Sold by 11. M. SALE A SON, 22" S. S)irlngst.
JOHN AVIELANI), FREDERICKS
BURG, UNITED STATES and
CHICAOO BREWERIKS.
EXTRA PALE PILSENKK, STANDARD, ER
LANGEIt nnd CULMBACIIER BEI'ltS of high
repute. Also brew the best POKTEKttiid ALE
JACOB ADLOFF,
General Agent. Los Angeles.
Telephone, 468. P. O. Box 12111, Station C.
Corner New North Main, Mission and Chavez
sts., opposite Naud, Wevse it Co.'s warehouse.
11-1-ttm
WAGON MATERIAL,
HABD WOODS,
IRON. STEE L_
Horseshoes and Nails,
j Blaoksmith's Coal, Tools, Etc.
JOHN WIOKIORE,
I 117 and 110 South I.os Angele) Stree
I jul tf
BANKING HOUSES.
LUKMERS AND MERCHANTS BANK OK
I.OS ANOKL&S, CAL.
Japital (paid up) 1500,000
surplus and Profits 750,000 .
Total )1,250,000
officers:
Isaias W. Hellman President ,
Herman W. Hkj.lman Vice-President
loiin llilnkk Cashier I
U. J. Fleishman Assistant Cashier
DI HECTORS.
L. L. Bradbury, Krueline Childs, J. B. Lauker
ihim, C. K. Thorn, c. Ducommun, H. W. Hell
nan, L. C. Goodwin, A. Glassell, 1. W. Hell
nan.
STOCKHOLDERS.
Estate 0. W. Childs, J. B. Lankershim, Chas.
"mpommnn, Domingo Amestoy, Sarah J. Lee,
Imeiine childs, Sarah J. Loop, L. L. Bradbury,
I. L, Duque, Jacob Kuhrts. Louis Polaski, r.
.eeoavreur, Estate D. Solomon, Prestley C.
daker, L. C. Goodwill, Philippe Gamier, A.
rtaas, Cameron E. Thorn, Oliver H. Bliss, Chris,
denne, Andrew Glassell, Herman W. Hellman,
Isaias W. Hellman. jul
ERN CALIFORNIA NATIONAL BANK
NADEAU BLOCK.
L N. BREED presideu
IVM. F. BOSBYSHELL Vice-Presiden
:. N. FLINT Cashie
Paid-in Capital $200,000
Si'KCi.cs 20,000
Authorized Capital 5y0,000
Directors—L. N. Breed, H. T. Newell, H. A
Barclay, Charles IC. Day, A. W. Richards, E. C.
Bosbyshell, 11. Hawaii, Frank Rader, D. Remick,
thos. Goss, William F, Bosbyshell. jultf
TJOU ANGELES SA^INGS^A^uXi
130 North Main street.
Japital tIOO.OOO
U C. GOODWIN President
If. M. CASWELL Secretary
DIRECTORS.
f. W. Hellman, John E. Plater
ttobert Baker, J. B. Lankershim,
L. C. Goodwin.
Term deposits will be received in sums of
fIOO and over. Ordinary deposits in sums ol
510 and over.
Money to loan on flrst-clans real estate.
Los Angeles, July 1, 1889. Jul-tf
ANGELES COUNTY BANK,
Lob Angeles, Cal.
gjgSJ
Capital Stock Paid Up, 1100,000.
Surplus, |124,000.
lOHN E. PLATER President
K. S- BAKER Vice-President
JEO. H. STEWART Cashier
directors:
R. S. Baker, Lewcllyn Bixby.B
s. B. Dewey, Geo. H. .Stewart,
Jotham Bixuy, Geo. W. Prescott,] j
John E. Plater.
Buy and Sell Exchange on Sau Francisco,
Sew York, London, Paris, Berlin aud Frauk
lort.
Buy Exchange on all partsof theUnitedStates
md Europe.
Receive Money ou open account and certifi
:ate of deposit, and do a general banking and
ixchange business. jul
HE CITY BANK,
37 South Spring street.
Capital Stock t300,000
D. CHILDRESS President
lOHN S. PARK Cashier
111 RECTORS.
VV. T. Childress, Poiudexter Dunu.
!. J. Schallert, E. E. Crandall,
lohn S.Park, R. G. L 'nt,
A. D. Childress.
General banking. Fire and burglar proof safe
leposit boxes rented at from $3 to $80 per au
aum. m4l2m
piRST NATIONAL BANK OF LOS ANtTELKs!
CAPITAL STOCK £200,000
RESERVE t255,000
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY.
E. F. SPENCE President
J. D. BICKNELL Vice-President
J. AT. ELLIOTT Cashier
G. B. SHAFFER Assistant Cashier
Directors—E. F. Spence, J. D. Bic'.tnell, 8. H.
Mott, Wm. Lacy, J. F. Crank, H. Mabury, J. M.
Elliott. jul
SECT lUTY SAVINGS BANK AND TRUST
Company.
CAPITAL,, 5300,000
No. 148 S. Main Si., Los Augeles, Cal.
F. N. MYERS, S. A. FLEMING,
President. Vice-President
J. F. SARTORI, Cashier.
directors;
IsPiaS W. Hellman, Mrs. Emeline Childs,
J.A.Graves, S. A Fleming,
I. L. Duque, James Rawson,
Herman W. Hellman, A. C. Rogers, M. D.,
A. J. Browne, J, F. Sartori,
Maurice S. Hellman, F. N. Myers.
Five Per Out. Interest Paid on
Deposits.
The uotice of the public is called to the fact
that this bank lias the largest paid up capi
tal of any Savings Bank in Southern Califor
nia, and only loans money on approved
real estate security; that it does not loan money
to itSHtockholders. officers or clerks; tbatamong
its stockholders are some of the oldest and most
responsible citizens of the community; that un
ier the state law, the private estates of Us .
stockholders are pro rata liable for the tota.
debtedriess of the hank.
These facts, with care exercised in making
Loans, insure a Saie depository for savings ac- ■
counts. School teachers, clerks, mechanics, !
employees in factories and shops, laborers, etc., I
will find it convenient to make deposits in
small amounts.
CHILDREN'SISAVINGS DEPOSITS received
in sums of 25 cents and upward.
Financial agents for eastern and San Fran
Cisco capital. Money to loan ou ranches and
city property. Bonds and mortgages bought.
Remittances may be sent by draft or Wells
Fargo Express. je2s-ly
T OS ANGELES NATIONAL BANK,
L> Cor. First and Spring streets.
Capital t500,000 00
Surplus 77,500 00
Total 1577,500 00
GEO. H. BONEBRAKE President
JOHN BRYSON, SR Vice-President
F. 0. HOWES Cashier
E. W. COE Assistant Cashier
No interest paid on deposits.
DIRECTORS.
Dr. W. 0. Cochran, 11. H. Markham,
Perry M. Green, John Brvson, Sr.
Dr. H. Siusabaiigh, F. 0. Howes,
George li. Bonebrake. Warren Gillelen.
No interest paid on deposits.
Exchange for sale on all the principal cities
of the United States aud Europe. raB
rJUIE NATIONAL BANK OFCALIFORNIA,
Corner of Spring and Second streets,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAI $250,000
officers:
J. M. C. Ma rule, President;
Owen H. CHURCHILL, Vice-President;
W. G. Hcohes. Cashier;
Perry Wildman, Asst. Cashier.
hoard of directors:
Owen H. Churchill. Thos. R. Bard.
Gen'l M. H. Sherman. Dr. VV. L. Graves.
Capt.George B. Lemon. E. F. C. Klokke.
Dan McFitrland. Fred Eaton.
Perry Wildman. w: G. Hughes.
J. M. C. Marble. 10 31
QA LI FORN IA BAN X,
Cor. Broadway and Second Sts., Los Augeles.
Subscribed Capital »500,000
Paid up Capital $300,000
Surplus ... ...» 20,000
directors:
Hervey Liudley, J. C. Kays, E. W. Jones,
G. W. Hugeß, Sam. Lewis.
H. C. Witmer President
J. Fraukenfleld Vice-President
T. J. Weldon, Cashier.
. M. Witmer, Assistant Cashier.
General Banking and Exchange Business
transacted. ml-4m
HE UNIVERSITY BANK OF LOS ANGELEs",
No. 317 New High street.
Capital stock fully paid up tIOO.OOO
Surplus 31,000
R. M. WIDNEY President
GEO. L. ARNOLD Cashier
directors.
R. M. Widnev, D. 0. Miltimore, S. W. Little. C.
M.Wells, L.H. Titus, O.A. Warner, L. J.P. Morrill.
General banking business, ami loans ou first
class real estate solicited. Buy and sell first
class stocks, bonds and warrants. Parties wish
ing to invest in flrst-elass securities on either
lone; or short time can be accommodated.
111112 m
HAN KINO HOUSES.
SPECIAL NOTICE
OF THE
lain Street
Savings Bank
AND
Trust Company.
5-Cent Deposit Stamps.
At the annual meeting of the Board of Direc
tors of the above institution it was resolved, in
order to increase the usefulness of the Bank,
and to encourage small deposits, that the sys
tern of 5 cent deposit stamps be adopted after
January 1, 1 SIM. This system has been in use
many years in Europe, and has recently been
adopted in the United States, and is regarded as
very beneficial, tending to teach children and
young people the advantage of saving money.
Agents will be appointed in all parts of the
city and county for the sale of 5 cent deposit
stamps. Each purchaser of two deposit stamps
will be furnished with a book often leaves, each
leaf ruled for twenty stamps. The agent will
send the name and number of each book
chased to the Bunk. ■ Whenever any depositor
has filled a leaf with twenty stamps, he can
bring this or send it by mail to the Bank. You
Will then receive " regular deposit book, with
one dollar to your credit, and whenever another
leaf is tilled and sent to the Bank another dollar
is entered on your book. Or, the entire stamp
book of ten leaves may be filled and sent to
the Bank at one time.
The Main-street Savings Bank and Trust Co.,
incorporated October 28. ISS9, has had SOO de
positors during the year.
The Bunk is already on a paying basis, nnd its
growth has been very satisfactory to its depos
itors and stockholders. Its Board of Directors is
composed of the following well-known citizens:
CHAS. FORMAN, I. W. HELLMAN,
J. J. BCHALLEET, I. N. VAN NUYS,
J. H. JONES, G. J. GRIFFITH,
GEO. H. PIKE, A. HAAS,
J. B. LANKERSHIM.
12-l-tf
State' Loan and Trust Co.
OK LOS ANGELES.
Subscribed Capital SI ,000,000.
Capital Paid Up 11575,000.
BANKING ROOM, N. W. CORNER SPRING
AND SECOND STREETS. BRYSON
BONEBRAKE BLOCK.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS.
GEORGE 11. BONEBRAKE, President.
{ Vice-Presidents.
SAMUEL B. HUNT, Cashier.
A. K. FLETCHER, Asst. Cashier.
J. F. TOW ELL, Geul. Manager.
W. G. Cochran. P. M. Green.
H. J. Woollacott Wm. 11. Crocker,
San Francisco,
We act as trustees for corporations and estates
Loan money on first-class real estate and
collaterals. "Keep choice securities for sale,
pay interest on savings deposits. Five per
cent, paid ou time deposits. Safe deposit boxes
for rent. Best tire insurance companies
represented. Applications for loans received
from borrowers in person or by mail
rnar!9-iiies-i'ri sun
LINES OF TRAVEL.
Los Angeles, Pasadena & Glendale R'y
Leave Los Angeles for i Leave Pasadena for
Pasadena. Los Angeles.
t 7:00 a. ra i ♦ *> ;0 ° a - m
t 8:00 a. in • 7:00 a. m.
• 8:45 a. rat 8:00 v. m.
•10:00 a. m * 8:45 a. m.
•11:00 a. m *10:00 a. m.
•12:01 p. m *11:00 a. m.
• 2:00 p. m • 1:00 p. m
• 4:00 p. m * 2:00 p. m.
| • 5:25 p. m * 4;0O p. ni
• 0:30 p. m * 5:25 p. m.
• 9:00 p. m * 7:00 p. m.
•11:30 p. ra *10,30p,m.
Running time between Los Angeles and Pasa
deua 30 minutes.
Leave I.os Angeles for Leave Glendale for Los
Glendale. Angeles.
• 6:40 a. m t 5:55 a. m.
• 8:25 a. m * 7:50 a. m.
•11:40 a. m *10:10 a, m.
• 2:15 p. m * 1:25 p. m.
• 4:10 p. m * 3:15 p. m
• 0:05 p. in • 5:05 p. m.
Running time between Los Angeles and Glen
dale, 30 minutes. Add 5 minutes for Verdugo
Park time.
Leave Los Angeles for Leave Altadena for
Altadena. Los Angeles.
• 8:45 a. m * 9:38 a. m
•14:00 p. m * 5:00 p. m
Running time between Los Angeles and Alta
dena, 55 minutes.
•Daily. tUaily, except Sundays.
night only.
Special rates to excursion and picnic parties.
Depot cast end Downey-avenue bridge.
General offices, rooms 12 and 14, Burdick
block.
T. B. BURNETT, Gen. Manager.
jy2-tf W. WINCUP. G. P. A.
Compagnie Generate Transatlantic.
FRENCH LINE TO HAVRE.
COMPANY'S PIER (NEW) NO. 42/4_SSTL.
North riv< r. foot of Morton street. JtSESsmL.
Travelers by this line avoid both transit by Eng
lish railway and the discomfort of crosslug the
Channel in a small boat.
LA CHAMPAGNE—December 20, noon.
LA BOURGOGNE—December 27, 5 a. in.
LA BRETAGNE —January 3, 1891.
LA GASCOGNE—January 10, 1891.
For freight or passage apply to
A. FORGET, Agent.
No. 3. Bowliug Green, New York.
J. F. FUGAZI & Co., Agents, 5 Montgomery
avenue, San Francisco. d2P-tf
RAMONA!
The Gem of the San Gabriel Valley
Only Three Mites from City Limits of Lot
Angeles.
Property of Sail Gabriel Wine Co.,
Original owners.
LOCATED AT SHORBVS STATION,
On line of S. P. R. R. ami San Gabriel Valley
Rapid Transit R. R.,
From 10 to 15 minutes to the Plaza, Los An
geles City.
CHEAPEST SUBURBAN TOWN LOTS,
VILLA SITES, or
ACREAGE PROPERTY
POPULAR TERMS.
FTJIJEST SPRING WATER
Inexhaustible quantities guaranteed.
Apply at Oflice of
SAN GABRIEL WINE CO.,
Ramona, Los Angeles County, Ca..
10-2(itf Or to M. D. WILLIAMS, Ramona.
5
LINKS OF TKAVKL.
Sonthera Pacific Oompanyl
IMPORTANT CHANGE OF TIMK.
FRIDAY, DEC. I2th, 1890,
Trains leave and are due to arrive at
LOS ANGELES (ARCADE DEPOT),
Filth street, daily, as follows' •
Leave For j destination, i Arr. From
3:50 p. mJ Banning #20 a.m.
5:10 p. m, 1 Banning. 10:00 p. m.
9:05 a. m Colton 0:20 a. m.
3:50 p. m Colton 4:20 p. m.
5:10 p. m Doming and East... 10:00 p. m.
5:10 p.m El Paso and East.... 10:00 p.m.
u.o« „ „. (Long Beach and San j «,„, „ _
9:25 a.m. j " p edroi | 8:27 p.m.
r i., ~, )Long Beach and* a.-,*. _
5.12 p.m. J San Pedro. j 8:15 a.m.
10:40 p. in. Ogden and East, Ist class! 2:55 p. m.
1:35 p. in. Ogden and East, 2d class 7:25 a. m.
10:40 p.m Portland, Or 7:25 a.m.
9:05 a. m Riverside 9:20 a.m.
3:50 p.m Riverside 4:20 p.m.
5:10 p.m Riverside 10:00 p.m.
9:05 a. m San Bernardino 9:20 a. m.
3:50 p.m San Bernardino 4:20 p.m.
5:10 p.m. San Bernardino 10:00 p.m.
9:05 a.m. Redlands 4:20 a.m.
3:50 p. m. Redlands 10:00 p. m.
1:38 p. m. San Frau. and Sacram'to 7:25 a. m.
10:40 p. m. San Fran, and Sacram'to 2:55 p. m.
|| 9:37 a. m. Santa Ana and Anaheim 8:55 a. m.
5:02 p. m. Santa Ana and Anaheim ||4:04 p. m.
1:35 p.m. Santa Barbara I 2:55 p.m.
7:25 a, m. Santa Barbara 9:05 p. m.
9:30 a m.l Santa Monica 8:33 a.m.
1:07 p.m Santa Monica 12:13 p.m
5:07 p.m .-.una Monica 4:28 p.m.
||6:10 p.m. ......SantaMonica ||7:20 a.m.
I 9:37 a. m Tustin |8:55 a. m.
||s:o2p.ni Tustin 4:04 p.m.
4:40 p.m Whittier | 8:43 a.m.
Local and through tickets sold, baggage
checked, Pullman sleeping car reservations
made, and general information given upon ap
plication to J. M. CRAWLEY. Asst. G. Pas. Agt,
No. 200 S. Spring St., cor. Second. CHARLES
SEYLER, Agent at Depots.
|| Sundays excepted.
RICH'D GRAY, Gen. Traffic Mgr.
T. H. GOODMAN,
al 3m Gen'l Passenger Agt.
Soflta Galiforaia R'y Co.
"SANTA FE ROUTE."
IN EFFECT SUNDAY, NOV. 23, 1890.
Leave, i Los Angeles. I Arrive.
•12:15 p. m.| Overland * 3:00 p.m.
* 8:15 a. m. l . San Diego Coast Line. * 1:16 p. m.
* 3:20 p.m.l.San Diego Coast Line.!* 9:00 p.m.
* 8:30 a. m.l. Azusa and Pasadena .I* 7:40 a.m.
"II :50 a. in |. Azusa and Pasadena. * 9:55 a. m.
* 1:25 p. m.l. Azusa and Pasadena. * 2:50 p.m.
* 4:00 p.m.j. Azusa and Pasadena * 0:30 p. m.
* 5:22 p.m.l. Azusa and Pasadena. J 4:40 p.m.
•12:15 p.m.! Pasadena I* 3:00 p.m.
t 7:45 a.m. Pasadeua ( 8:50 a.m.
* 8:30 a.m. (. San Bernardino..) I* 9:55 a.m.
•12:15 p.Jm. S via Si* 3:00 p.m.
* 4:00 p. M.i ( Pasadena ) * 8:30 p.m.
•11:00 a.m. (San Berdnard'o via( • 5:50 p.m.
t 4:00 p.m. I Riverside & Orange I (10:15 a.m.
* 8:30 a.m. Kiverside via Pasadena • 6:30 p.m.
*11:00 a. m. Riverside via Orange * 5:50 p. m.
t 4:00 p. m. Kiverside via Orange fl0:15 a. m.
* 8:30 a.m. (Redl'ds & Mentone) * 9:55 a.m.
* 4:00 p.m. 1 via > • 6:30 p.m.
112:15 p.m. ' Pasadena > t 3:00 p.m.
t 4:00 p.m. (Redl'ds it Mentonej * 5:50 p.m.
ill :00 a.m. f via Orange AR'side) (10:15 a.m.
,12:15 p.m. S. Jacinto via S. Bdno f 6:30 p.m.
jSJacinio viaOr'ge/
tll:ooa.in. (and East Riverside! t 5:50 p.m.
* 8:15a.m Santa Ana * 1:15p.m
* 3:20 p.m Santa Ana • 5:50 p.m.
'■ Santa Ana * 9:00 p.m.
t 5:05 p.m.j Santa Ana t 8:50 a. m.
t 3:20 p. m.lEscondido via C'st line i 1:15 p.m.
•10:15 a.m. I Redondo Beach * 8:29 a.m
* 4:45 p.m. ... Redondo Beach * 3.53 p.m.
fl0:15a. m.l Port Ballona f 3:40 p.m.
•Daily, finally except Sunday.
ED. CHAMBERS, Ticket Agent,
First-street Depot.
CHAS. T. PARSONS, Ticket Agent
129 North Spring street,
Depot at foot of First street. 123
Paciflc Coast S. S. Go.
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., GENERAL
Ageuts, San Francisco. Northern routes
embrace lines for Portland, Ore.; Victoria, B
C, and Puget Sound, Alaska, and all coast
points.
SOUTHERN ROUTES.
Time Table for December, 1890.
LKAVR BAN FBANCISCO.
For
Port Harford "I S. S. Pomona, Dec. 2, 10, 18.
Santa Barbara... I 2t>, and Jan. 3.
San Pedro (3. S. Santa Rosa, Dec. 6,14,
San Diego J 22, 30, and Jan. 7.
For 1 8. H. Eureka, Dec. 4,12, 20,
Redondo I 28, and Jan. 5.
San Pedro and (S. S. *Santa Cruz, Dec. 8,16
Way Ports J 24, and Jan. 2.
LEAVE SAN FEDRO.
For I S. 8. Pomona, Dec. 4,12, 20
1 28, and Jan. 5.
San Diego /S. S.Santa Rosa, Dec. 8, 16,
J 24, and Jan. 1.
LEAVE BAX FEDRO.
For 1 8. 8. Santa Rosa, Dec. 2, 10,
Ban Francisco... 1 IS, 26, Jan. 3.
Port Harford.... 1 8. 8. Pomona, Dec. 6,14, 22,
Santa Barbara... J 30, and Jan. 7.
LEAVE SAN PEDKO AND REDONDO.
For 18. 8. *Banta Cruz, Dec. 11,
San Francisco I 19. 27, and Jan. 5.
and fB. S.Eureka, Dec. 7, 15, 23.
Way Ports J 31, and Jan. 8.
•For freight only.
Cars lo connect with steamers via San Pedro,
leave S. P. R. R. depot, Fifth street, Los An
geles, at 9:25 o'clock a. m.
Passengers per Eureka, via Redondo, leave
Santa Fe depot at 4:45 p. m.
Plans of steamers' cabins at agent's offloe,
where berths may be secured.
The steamers 'Santa Cruz and Eureka will
call regularly at Newport pier lor and with
freight and passengers.
The company reserve the right to change the
steamers or their days of sailing,
«fJr"For passage or freight as above or for
tickets to and from all important points in
Europe, apply to
W. PARRIS, Agent,
Office, No. 124 West Second St., Los Angeles.
S. G. V. Rapidjransit R'y.
Leave I>os Angeles from No. 9 Arcadia street,
opposite Baker block, for Alhambra and
Monrovia.
WEEK DAYS
Forenoon, Afternoon,
7:40 11:00 3:00 5:05
Returning—Leave Monrovia for Alhambra and
Los Angeles,
Forenoon, Afternoon,
7:00 9:05 1:15 4:15
SUNDAYS
Leave Los Angeles lor Alhambra and Monrovia,
Forenoon, Afternoon,
8:40 4:40
Returning—Leave Monrovia for Alhambra and
Los Angeles.
Forenoon, Afternoon,
8:00 4:00
Time betweeu Los Angeles and Monrovia
one hour.
INTERMEDIATE STATIONS BETWEEN TERMINAL
POINTS, BEGINNING AT LOS ANGELESi
Soto Street, San Marino,
Batz, San Gabriel,
Ramona, Sunuv Slope,
Alhambra, Chapman,
Mayberry. Baldwin,
Lake Vineyard, Arcadia,
Wilson's Peak and Sierra Madre 'buses for the
above points connect at Baldwin's station with
trains leaving Los Augeles at 11:00 a. m. and
3:00 and 5:00 p. ra.
JOHN BRYSON, SR., F. Q. STORY,
al-3m President Gen. Manager.
For Redondo Beach.
REDONDO RAILWAY TRAINS
On and after Monday, Bept. 22,1890,
Trains of this company will leave their depot,
corner of Jefl'erson and Grand avenue, connect
ing with the Los Angeles cable railway and
the Main-street and Agricultural park street
car line, as follows:
SOUTH
Leave Arrive
Los Angeles. Redondo Beach.
9:30 a.m. 10:20 a.m.
1:30 p. m. 2:20 p. m.
5:00 p. m. 5:50 p. m.
NORTH
Leave Arrive
Redondo Beach. Los Angeles.
7:30 a.m. 8:20 a.m.
11:00 a. m. 11:50 a. m.
3:40 p. m. 4:30 p. m.
GEO. J. AINSWGRTH,
President
N. SUTTON,
leB-tl Trainmaster.

xml | txt