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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, December 22, 1890, Image 5

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Highest of all in Leavening Power.—U. S. Gov't Report, Aug. 17, 1889.
lewder
ABSOLUTEDf PURE
FROM EAR TO EAR.
FERNANDO CHACON EFFECTUALLY
CUTS HIS THROAT.
Having Lost His Leg and His Friends He
"Was Tired of Life and Ended It in a
Cell in the City Prison.
Shortly after 7 o'clock yesterday morn
ing, Fernando Chacon, an old Mexican,
who was confined in the city prison,
committed suicide in his cell in a horri
ble manner.
Chacon was taken to the police sta
tion on Saturday afternoon at 8 o'clock
by Detective Bosqui, at the request of
an old woman named Josefa Montafio,
with whom he hadjjeen living for some
time on Castelar street. The woman
called upon Chief Glass earlier
in the day and stated that she
was very much afraid of Chacon, who
had been very despondent of late, and
had threatened to do himself harm on
several occasions. Detective Bosqui was
accordingly sent out to bring Chacon in,
and on his arrival at the station the old
man was taken into the chief's office.
The Mexican was unable to speak a word
of English, but through the medium of
Mr. I. H. Polk, who happened to be in
tbe office ut the time, Chief Glass ques
tioned him.
In a perfectly rational manner Chacon
stated that about six months ago he was
taken to the county hospital for treat
ment while sufl'ering from inflam
matory rheumatism, and as a last
resort the surgeons at that institution
amputated his right leg. He was re- '
cently discharged from the hospital, but
being unable to work, he was not wel- j
corned back to his old haunts by his !
former associates. This fact, and the I
treatment he received at the hands of
Josefa Montafio, who was evidently
anxious to got rid of him, preyed upon j
his mind, but his greatest source of
alarm was that he would be sent back
to the hospital. As he hated that place,
he had threatened, and was still deter
mined to kill himself rather than re
turn.
After talking to the old man for some |
time, Chief Glass promised to Bud an
asylum for him at the county poor farm,
at Downey, and ordered that he be
locked up in the city prison for medical
treatment until Monday.
As is usual with all persons before
being taken back into the jail, Chacon
was searched and among other things, a
large clasp knife was taken away from
him, as it was feared that he might
do himself an injury. He was then
turned over to the jailer, and locked up
in a solitary cell. Though evidently not
overjoyed at the fate in store for him,
the old Mexican was apparently resigned,
and slept tranquilly all night. He was
awakened shortly before 7 o'clock by
Jailer Clayton, who left him In order to
superintend the preparations for the
breakfast of his charges. After an ab
sence of about ten minutes the jailer re
turned to Chacon's cell, and hearing a
gurgling sound threw open the iron
door and looked in. To his amazement
and horror he saw the body of the old
Mexican stretched upon the floor, in a
Dool of blood, which spurted out of a
frightful gash, extending from ear to ear
across his throat, completely severing |
the jugular vein, windpipe and muscles,
arid laying bare the spinal column.
Though" ati 11 warm, the unfortunate
man was already dead ; but in spite of
the fact that "death had occurred so
speedily, it was evident from the posi
tion in" which the body lay, that after j
inflicting the ghastly wound, Chacon
had endeavored to aggravate it by rend
ing the severed flesh with the lingers of
his right hand, which still clutched the
flesh.
A large bowie knife, the blood-stained
blade of which was ten inches long and
as sharp as a razor, lay close by the
body, in such a position as to prove
conclusively that it had fallen from the
dying man's hand.
It was learned that Chacon had con
cealed this weapon by suspending it
around his neck with a cord which al
lowed it to hang in a scabbard between
hi»l shoulder blades, and that in this
manner he succeeded in eluding the
vigilance of the officer who searched
him on Saturday.
The coroner was notified and the body
was removed to the morgue, where an
inquest will be held this morning.
Chacon was a native of Sonora, Mexico,
and prior to hi 3 sickness had been in
the employ of Hancock Johnston as a
laborer.
WILY WESTON.
He Reforms in San Francisco and
Elopes With Miss Stelling.
Henry Byron Weston lived in this city
up to 1887, when he was committed to
a term of two years' imprisonment in
SanQuentin for the robbery of the United
States mail. Upon the expiration of his
term in July.lßß9, he went to San Fran
cisco and took up his residence at the
Mission. It seems that he had some
means, together with a pleaeing address
and persuasive manners. For a time he
lived a most exemplary life, regularly
attending the Howard Presbyterian
church and often visiting the Young
Men's Christian association. He went
also into society and, says the San Fran
cisco Chronicle, soon ensnared the affec
tions of Miss Minnie Stelling of 23 La
pidge street. Last summer Weston pur
chased the Golden Gate Tea store at
792 Valencia street, paying a small sum'
of the purchase price on account, the
balance to be paid in January, 189 L.
After buying all the stock he could get
on credit from Cerf, schloss & Co., J. A.
Folger & Co., Lievre, Fricke & Co. and
other houses, Weston sold out the busi
ness to a man named Price for $700 cash
last Thursday. It has since been ascer
tained that Weston has departed in
quest of a wider field of activity, and has
taken with him Miss Stelling, whom he
is believed to have married.
Found.
A large stock of strictly riBST-CLaM ranges,
something entirely new, possessing all modern
Improvements, perfect in operation, economi
cal in fuel. Especially adapted for this climate
-at very low prices. F. E. BROWN, 138 South
Main. ,
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD: MONDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 22, 1890.
NEW BOOKS.
Perhaps if the results could be
weighed, baled, or measured, the fierce
zeal of Luther would be found of
less moment, than the jolly, biting, 1
scornful laughter of Rabelais. Thisahil
itv to be possessed of a mission, to live j
with a great purpose at heart,and at the
same time preserve, or rather work out
a glorious end by means of quip, and
joke, and sarcasm, developing an eter
nal verity by eternal laughter, is char
acteristic of reformers of Latin blood.
One of these has been pulled from
temporary oblivion by Benjamin M.
Tucker, of Boston, who has translated
and published Mem Oncle Benjamin, a
humorous, satirical and philosophical
novel, by Claude Tillier.
Tillier's life forms an appendix to the
story and is as full of romance, of jollity
and misery, of struggle, bravery, failure
and achievements, and heroic devotion
to principle, as was only possible
to a keen progressive mind,
which found itself in France
in the first years of the nineteenth
century. Tillier fought the good light
of the cause of the people, the over- I
throw of shams, the development of lib- j
erty. Nothing can be pictured more !
sombre than the features of his life, I
but judging by Oncle Benjamin, fewJ
natures could contain more contempt
for misfortune, or laugh more at sorrow.
It is the ability of the Latins to be
brave and gay. The men of Angle
blood are none the less brave, but they
always have to be serious about it. The
Frenchman cries "a la bonheurl''
whether on his way to a fete or to the
guillotine.
Oncle Benjamin is a picture of Niver
nese life in the last century. The humor
is a bit broad, and Miss" Veneering or
Mr. Slialiowpate may be pleased to
term it sometimes vulgar. The student
of life and of humanity will
revel in it. It is a creation which is
scarcely less vigorous than Don Quixote,
Gil Bias or Tristam Shandy ; one which
people laughed at and benefited by fifty
yearn ago, and which will be just as ef
fective in centuries to come.
MON ONOLK BENJAMIN—By Claude Tillier.
For sale by Edwards & McKnight, Lot An
geles.
»#*
Fifteen Years in Hell is the title
under which Mr. Luther Benson writes
of a portion of his life. Mr. Benson is j
now a temperance lecturer, and a zeal
ous, sincere worker in the cause he has
chosen. For many years he was a
drunkard, and wilh a wonderful frank
ness he describee his essays to overcome
his habit of drinking. It is a dreadful
picture of horror, degradation and weak
ness he draws, but he limns it bravely,
he unbares hia soul, and calls on the
world to gaze into its recess
es. The book is as effective
a temperance argument as any lesson of
its kind can be. Its kind is of the buga
boo type, with which parents seek some
times to frighten children from ill-doing.
To weak natures it may be an effective
means. No man on reading Mr. Ben
son's experience could deliberately wish
to become a drunkard, yet the efficacy of
such lessons is very doubtful. Humanity
cannot be frightened into or out of its
course. The bugaboo argument is not a
satisfactory method of teaching children,
much less men. If there is "a temper
ance question," the solution of it cannot
be found by holding up to view "terri
ble examples." A refining influence as
a reformative power is immeasurably su
perior to mandator} - or admonitory
measures.
FIFTEEN years in" HELL—By Luther Benson. '
Tor sale by Merrill dkoook, Los Angeles.
FRUIT SHIPMENTS.
The Amount Carried by the Southern
California Road.
General Freight and Passenger Agent
Hynes, of the Southern California rail
road, has made public the following sta
tistics relative to fruit shipments over
his road for the year ending June 30,
181)0:
Of dried fruit the shipment for 1800 is
02,510,780 pounds, of raisins 88,187,600,
green fruit 80,280,000, and canned goods
77,181,800. The company's shipments
of grain amounted to 63,430,000 pounds,
and of flour 9,450,000 pounds, while
other mill oroducts shipped amounted
to 5,222,000.
With this report Mr. Hynes furnishes
the statement that the Southern Cali
fornia operates nine branch roads, the
total mileage of which is 470, and the
average number of men employed by
the company is 1000 hands. The total
shipments over the company's lines in
oranges, lemons, fruits, vegetables and
honey for the year commencing July 1,
1889,"and terminating June 80, 1890,
amounted to 73,860,000 pounds or about
30,925 lons. These totals show in each
instance a very heavy increase oyer the
shipments of previous years.
Cigarette Smoking Increasing.
"The laws against cigarette smoking,"
said a member of one of the largest firms
that manufacture that article, "which
forbid their sale to minors and call, in
New York at least, for tho immediate
arrest of every youth under sixteen who
is caught smoking thorn in public places,
have not had the slightest effect on the
cigarette market. Despite these laws
and the thunderings of the medical press
the cigarette business has grown steadily,
and the entire output of the factories to
day is fully one-third greater than that
of two years ago. Even if the laws
against the cigarette smoking minor
were strictly enforced, which they are
not, it would not at all influence the
trade.
"The reason is found in the fact that
the average little boy who affects tln>
paper wrapped weed has only a very lim
ited capital at his command. As he buys
only the cheapest brands the big dealers
wont waste time in selling to him. He
rarely invests in a whole package, and
deals almost entirely with those queer
little shops in side streets where cigar
ettes are sold in broken lots at the rate
of two for a penny. As you can easily
see, the entire suppression of this branch
of the business is not liable to exercise
much influence upon the trade at large."
—New York Tribune.
SPORTY BOYS.
THEY (JO TO MONDONVILLE BUT
SEE NO FIGHT.
Ryan and Barr the Alleged Contestants.
Five Rounds Make the Latter Tired
and the Former Gains the Contest.
"Once bitten twice shy" is a proverb
that sometimes does not hold good.
How many times have the sportively
inclined Afigelenos lost a good night's
sleep and a pocket full of change for the
purpose of witnessing an alleged glove
contest. Last evening while the good
people of the city were wending their
way homeward from church, the
hackmen were reaping a har
vest in carrying a number of
young bloods to Mondonville, the
place selected for a fight between
Ryan and Barr. No great attempt was
made at secrecy, and at 9:30 about fifty
well known young gentlemen could be
seen grouped around the building. The
principals were late in arriving. The
crowd became a little impatient. The
startling intelligence reached Mondon
ville at 10:30 that a bus containing
thirty-one sports had broken down at
the corner of Washington and Jefferson,
streets. This mishap accounted for the
delay of the pugilists. The barn
selected tor the event of the evening was
ill lighted and the ring was less than
fifteen feet square. There were no seats
and the admirers of the manly art were
obliged to make themselves comfortable
on their feet.
An elderly gentleman, who, judging
from his dialect, hails from Lancashire,
made a short, address, and announced
that young Cardiff and young Peter
Jackson would don the "mittens."
They were "honeys" at the business of
banging one another. For three rounds
they entertained the spectators with a
decidedly good exhibition. It was give
and take from the jump. Jackson
showed to be very clever, but the supe
rior weight of his muscular opponent
was too much to overcome;
Ryan and Barr were next announced.
Joe Soto was selected as referee. Barr
proved to be an unassuming sort of a fel
low with a blonde mustache. He looked
to be six feet tall, and was all legs and
arms, and a Santa Ana would have
about keeled him over. Strict orders
were given, however, to keep the doors
closed and even the cracks in the barn
were stuffed with hay. This precaution
was taken to prevent Barr from being
struck by the breeze wafted up from
Santa Monica. Ryan was quite the re
verse of his ministerial looking opponent
and it looked as though it would he nec
essary for him to get a ladder in order
to reach Ban's blonde countenance.
There was no blood spilt in the first
round. Barr several times let go his left
duke. It was a mild let go. In the
second round Barr got mad and with al
will-bit-you-real-hard-next-time appear
ance chased his opponent around the
ring. This bit of bravoda cost Bragg a
bloody nose. At the sight of the gore,
the six-footer nearly fainted. The third
round was the most fierce of a battle
which will live in the history of the
prize ring of America. Seven blows were
registered during this sanguinary round.
The fifth round took the bakery. There
was a clinch ay.d Barr fell to the ground,
but he came in contact with mother
earth in a most remarkably gentle fash
ion. It was a fall worthy a Booth or
Barrett. The spectators did not appre
ciate the fall. Barr lay as motionless as
a corpse. There was this difference: A
corpse cannot hear. Barr could, but he
no doubt wished that he couldn't.
At the expiration of about fifteen sec
onds, Carr made a play to get up. Soto
gave it v.h his opinion that Barr had not
been knocked out, but inasmuch as lie
had quit and refused to go on with the
tight, there was nothing left but to give
the tight to Ryan.
The bankers, lawyers, merchants and
toughs who composed the crowd, made
for the city, all swearing that it was the
very last time that they would be
caught. An admission of $1 was charged
to witness tbe battle. The emulators of
John L. Sullivan will divide up about
$76 between them. Next.
Toys Free.
The Mammoth Shoe House w ill con
tinue to give toys and handsome holiday
presents to all purchasers Monday, Tues
day and Wednesday.
Pure Blood
Is absolutely necessary in order to hare perfect
health. Hood's Sarsaparilla Is the great blood
purifier, quickly conquering scrofula, salt rheum,
and all other insidious enemies which attack the
blood and undermine the health. It also builds
np the whole system, cures dyspepsia and sick
headache, and overcomes that tired feeling.
Scrofula Sores.
"My adopted boy, aged 14 years, suffered terri
bly from scrofula sores on his leg, which spread
till they at one time formed one great sore from
the calf of his leg up to his thigh, partially cov
ered with scab, and discharging matter contin
ually. The muscles became contracted so that his
leg was drawn up and he could hardly walk. We
tried everything we could hear of, without suc
cess, until we began giving him Hood's Sar
saparilla. In just a month, after he had taken
two-thirds of a bottle, tbe sores entirely healed,
his leg is perfectly straight, and he
Can Walk as Well as Ever.
Hood's Sarsaparilla Is the best medicine I ever
saw for scrofulous humor. It has done its work
more than satisfactorily." William Sandebs,
Rockdale, Milam County, Texas.
Hood's Sarsaparilla
Bold by druggists. $1; six for $5. Prepared only
by C. I. HOOD it CO., Apothecaries, Lowell, Mas*.
I OO Doses One Dollar
Stop tlOL&irt |
Chronic Gmm Now.j
( For if you do not it may become con- j
} sumptlve. For Consumption. Scrofula, j
| General Debility an.l IVasHttn Diseases, )
j there is nothing like j
| SCOTT'S!
Emulsion I
Of Pure Cod Liver Oil and
HYPOPHOSPHITES
I Or lilmo and Sodn.
] It Is almost as palatable 03 milk, Far }
botlor Hutu other so-called Emulsions. (
A woudorlul flush producer. j
I Scott's Emulsion!
! There ate poor Imitations. Get the genuine.]
KAOLKBON & CO.
MM & CO.
146 North Spring St
MEN'S
j Furnishing Goods.

!We have made Extra Preparations
for Holiday Trade. On hand
A VERY
LARGE STOCK
111 (MODS!
NECK DRESS,
SUSPENDERS,
GLOVES,
DRESS SHIRTS,
Initial Handkerchiefs,
UNDERWEAR,
UMBRELLAS,
MUFFLERS, ETC.
j Popular Prices.
CHANGE J)F FIRM.
To my Patrons and all whom It may concern:
This is to certify that I have sold to
Messrs. Alexander B. Anderson and
Peyton L, Randolph, and have received
from them the purchase price for all my
business, heretofore carried on and con
ducted by me at the Mott Market, iv the
city of Los Angeles, under the name
"Los Angeles Fishing Company," to
gether with the goodwill thereof, and all
the furniture, fixtures and general out
fit belonging to said business, and hav
ing obligated myself to refrain from
carrying on or conducting any maiket
business whatever in the city of Los An
geles of the character of that so sold by
me, I hereby earnestly commend to my
former patrons, one and all, my succes
sors in said business, Messrs. Anderson
and Randolph, and bespeak for them a
continuance of thepatronag* bo liberally
bestowed upon me in the past. Very
respectfully, F. Haniman.
Witness: J. L. De Jarnatt.
Los Angeles, Cal., Dec. 5, 181)0.
In view of the above, and as it is our
intention to have always on hand the
most complete assortment of fish,
oysters, game and poultry obtainable,
we would respectfully request a continu
ance of your patronage, which we will
endeavor to merit through our prompt
attention to your orders.
Yours very respectfully,
12-9-Ut " Los Angeles Fisiiino Co.
CALL AT
CHALMERS & DORAN,
215 S. MAIN ©T. 7
FOR YOUR HOLIDAY GOODS.
Elegant Christmas Cards, Plash Goods,
Albums, Books and Booklets, cheaper than
ever.
Christmas tree candles and ornaments very
pretty and cheap.
Best assortment of parlor games in tbe city.
No trashy goods bought to sell cheap. Honest
goods at honest prices. 12-21-121
LADIES SHOULD USE
For all Irregularities
" CREOLE"
FEMALE TONIC!
For sale at all Drug Stores.
At wholesale by F. IV. BKAUN * CO.
IZ-10-Gui
CHRISTMAS!
TURKEYS! TURKEYS!
OYSTERS! OYSTERS!
GAME! GAME!
Los Angeles Fishing Co.,
MOTT MARK FT.
11-21 lim
CHRISTMAS TREES
FOR SALE CHEAP.
1141 10t 272 SOUTH MAIN.
REDLANDS IMPROVED LANDS
FOR SALE BY
W. P. McINTOSH,
144 S. MAIN STREET, - - LOS ANGELES, CAL.
20 Acres in ORANGES, Peaches, Apricots and Raisin Grapes. Income, $2,509
annually. Water-right over 80 years old. Price, $000 per acre. Terms, one-third
cash ; one-third in three years: one-third in six years. This is the best located
20 acres in the valley, and produces the best raisins and best Washington Navel
oranges oi any place In California. The orange crop, 2,850 raisin trays, and 120
-sweat boxes go with the land.
Also, :15 acres in old Walnutp, Peaches, Apricots, Plums and Oranges, with
oldest and best, water-right, and beautiful stream running through the land. This
place adjoins the City of Redlands on the east, and the cheapest on the market.
Price, $500 per acre ; easy terms.
Also, 10 acres of 5-year-old Washington Navels and Mission Olives. Trout pond,
holding 250,000 gallons. Pressure water and everything complete for $0500.
Also, 20 acres within one and one-half miles of of Redlands City, one
half of which is in Washington Navel and seedling orange trees. Several thousand
strawberry plants, small house and barn. Price, only $350 per acre ;or will sell
10 acres at the same rate.
Also, 20 acres only two miles from center of City of Redlands, nearly all im
proved ; about one-half in orange trees 18 years old. Price, $400 per acre."
People familiar with the value of orange land will at once see that most of the
foregoing is offered for about one-half its present value, the owners being com
pelled to sell to protect their holdings.
The unimproved orange lands we sell on TEN (10) YEARS' TIME, only re
quiring 10 percent cash down, are selling and improving very fast. Buyers take
adyantage of the long time and low rate of interest, and spend their ready money
for trees and buildings.
-5; MENTONE LANDS, fc-
The demand for MENTONE lands is increasing daily on account of the rapid growth made'
by the orange trees, the pure water furnished, the superior water system, the fine flavor and
beautiful color oi the oranges on account of the high and dry altitude, and the greater quantity
oi fruit produced on account that there are no heavy winds to destroy the blossoms or younir
fruit. Mentone is conceded to grow the finest olives and strawberry guavas of any place known.
For further particulars, maps, etc., address or call on
W. P. McINTOSH,
i2-i«-im Rooms 6 and 7, No. 144 S. Main street, Los Angeles, Cal.
ONE CHANCE IN A THOUSAND.
JD± In the other Nine Hundred and Ninty-Nine
HOLIDAYS
■SVUb You will not Und such an opportunity to purchase really
FIRST-CLASS, STYLISH
JJjL Gentlemens Furoishiog Goods
AT CUT AWAY PRICES.
—————
GOODS FOR THE HOLIDAYS.
•JUST THE THING FOR PRESENTS.
JULIUS M. MAr<TENvS,
106 S. SPRING ST.
SUCCESSOR TO EVAN E. EVANS. 11-22 lm
BAILEY & BARKER BROS,
DEALERS IN
FURNITURE, CARPETS, ETC.,
The most attractive line in the city.
, _
HOLIDAY GOODS
3 NOW IN . X
326, 328 AND 330
South Main Street. Lbs .Anereles.
11-.'tO-lm
HOLIDAY NOVELTIES
APPROPRIATE GIFTS!
DIVANS, SECRETARIES, COUCHES, MUSIC STANDS, SOFAS, CABINETS, LOUNGES,
SCREENS, PORTIERB, EASELS, RUGS, PEDESTALS.
REED AND RATTAN GOODS.
Your Attention and Inspection is Solicited to the most complete line of
FURNITURE, CARPETINGS & DRAPERY GOODS
ON THE COAST.
LOS ANGELES FURNITURE CO.,
351 and 353 Main St., Opposite Baker Block.
spst cash grocery house. ——
BOWEN & CHILDRESS,
538 & 540 SOUTH SPRING STREET.
Opposite Public School Building. _
We are now invoicing and marking our large stock of Staple and Fancy G/tirfries down to a>
very low CASH price, and on and niter lanuary Ist, 1891, will sell strictly.'or cash. In making
this change \vc propose to offer such inducements to all of our old eusjftniers as will make it to
their interest to continue to deal with us. and offer to the public tec finest stock of groceries to
select from in the city. At the same time give the lowest prices er Li offered west of the Rocky
Mountains. Call at our large stores, 511S and 540 South Spring street, and we will make a cus
tomer of you.
Very respectfully, '
BOWEN St CHILDRESS.
12-12-lm
READ! READ!
jSf Another prominent landmark in the mercanti!.'
fljjffl ~*>j U business to the front.
f-5 ■ the Mcdonald shoe house,
118 NORTH SPRING STREET,
JgF Under the management of A. S. McDonald ,for
M' -ififlU merly of McDonald it Fisher). Ladies', chid
ren's and gents'fine footwear. Everything new ,
,' a J jdgg^'... direct from the best lactones. Call and examine
-<fflrfS3§ W'Tr 1 -ootls and prices. Everybody invited; old
s . • "- ■- 'teSyp^ 5 lustomers and new. 11-25 lm
"NILES PEASE,
IMPORTER AND DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF
Eastern Parlor and Ghamber Furniture, Carpets,
Oil Cloths, Linoleums, Window Shades, Etc.
New Nos. 337, 339 and 341 S. Spring St., Los Angeles, Cal.
9-27-Btu
NEW STORE. GEORGE J. BINDER. GOODS.
Furniture, Rattan and Reed Goods.
CHILDREN'S CARRIAGES A SPECIALTY.
No. 223 Broadway, - - Opp. New City Hall.
11-I3m
5

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