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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, December 29, 1890, Image 5

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Highest of all in Leavening Power.—TJ. S. Gov't Report, Aug. 17, 1889.
fcftfej taking
ABSOLUTELY PURE
HOW ARE YOU, MR. KING?
YOUNG AMERICA'S SALUTATION
TO KALAKAUA.
American Sovereigns Turn Out by the
Hundred to Receive Mis Majesty ol
Hawaii—Off to San Diego.
Yesterday afternoon H. It. H. David
Kalakaua, king of Hawaii, passed
through this city, attended only by
Colonel MacFarlane, royal chamberlain,
Colonel Baker, of his suite, and Lieuten
ant Blow, of the Charlston, en route
from San Francisco to San Diego.
The royal party, which was on board
the sleeping car Sacramento, arrived on
train No. 19 at the San Fernando street
depot punctually at 2 :-15 o'clock. Quite
a number of people had congregated at
both this and the Arcade depot to catch
a glimpse of the distinguished visitor,
but they were doomed to
disappointment, as the car was at once
attached to a switch engine and con
veyed to the First-afreet depot of the
Southern California railroad, in order to
catch the train for San Diego, which left
at 3 :20 o'clock.
Mayor Hazard, who was accompanied
by Colonel Otis, General McCook and
Lieutenant-Colonel Jones, intercepted
the car at Downey avenue and rode
down to the First-street depot, where a
crowd of several hundred people had as
sembled.
When the car was drawn up to
the platform, a rush was made for it by
the eager multitude, and the royal party
was compelled to stand a siege. Those
of the crowd who were unable to
squeeze into the car, called upon
Mayor Hazard to bring the distin
guished visitor out in order that they
might see him, and as soon as practica
ble the car was cleared and His Royal
Highness stepped upon the rear plat
form and exhibited himself. Some
doubt appeared to exist as to whether or
not the tall negro, attired in citizen's
clothes, wearing a black felt hat. and
puffing contentedly at a cigar, was really
the person in whom so much interest
was centered. One elderly lady, who
was in the front row of the crowd, point
ing at the dusky monarch, yelled ex
citedly, "Mayor Hazard, is this the
king?" The accent on the "this"
caused a roar of merriment from the
crowd, in which his majesty joined
heartily.
Another incident which caused a good
deal of amusement occurred shortly alter
this. A young man climbed upon the
tender of the switch engine, and after
scrambling over the coals, leaned over
the end of the tender, and extending
his coal-Tjegrimed hand to the monarch,
said, "How are you, Mr. King?" The
king grasped the hand cordially, and the
enthusiastic youth was driven from his
point of vantage by the trainmen,
happy in the result of his perseverance.
His majesty was heartily cheered as
the train pulled out, and appeared to
appreciate the compliment tendered to
him. The royal visitor will remain at
San Diego for four or live days, after
which he intends making a visit to
this city, remaining here a few days be
fore his return to the north. Suitable
arrangements will be made for his recep
tion and amusement while here, in
which all the leading citizens will be
invited to assist.
It is understood that his majesty's
visit is for the purpose of investigating
the possibility of establishing a steamship
line between either San Diego or Redondo
and his kingdom.
David Ivalakaua, king of Hawaii, who
was born on November 10, 1830, is de
scended from one of the chief families
of the Sandwich islands. He was elected
to the throne in February, 1574, and
soon afterward set out on a tour of the
United States and Europe. He was con
veyed to San Francisco on a steam
frigate placed at his disposal by the
United States government, arriving in
that city on November 28th.
After some political excitement in
ISB7 he signed a new constitution, limit
ing the prerogatives of the crown, on
July 10th.
He is a well educated man. and speaks
the English language fluently.
STEPS IN ADVANCE.
What Chino Has Gained This Week.
Lively Progress.
Mr. Henry T. Oxnard, president of
the Oxnard licet Sugar company, with
the company's architect, Mr. H. T. Jul.
Fuehrman, Head Carpenter Peter
Schmidt and Beet Farmer Louis A.
Hache, awived on Tuesday. On that
day the site for the factory was defi
nitely located, the stone in the Chino
hills examined and accepted for the
foundation, a contract made with John
Whyte, of Pomona, to make 2.500,000
brick in the Chino yard at the southern
terminus of the Chino Valley railroad.
Work in the brick yard has commenced,
and will on the stone quarry not later
than Monday. •
Wednesday and Thursday the en
gineering of the factory site was done,
some material got upon the ground and
a lot of teams engaged to excavate and
prepare for the stone foundations.
Grading and excavating are now under
way. J. H. Todd of the Pomona Pipe
works was called down yesterday and
engaged to immediately do certain
work.
A contract lias been made with the
Perry Lumber and Mill company of Los
Angeles to supply the cement and about
a million feet of lumber. A part of the
lumber has arrived in Ontario, and will
be rushed on here immediately.
A 40-horse-power traction engine, with
twelve 12-inch plows to turn up the soil
twelve inches deep, arrived today.
The Poßtal Telegraph company ex
pected to have its line here today and an
office open, but Christmas has deferred
the completion of the work for a day or
two.
The Chino Ranch meat market opened
up with a variety of choice meats laet
evening.
Blacksmiths, druggists, barbers and
shoemakers have been here trying to ar
range for opening business.
The Porry Lumber and Mill company
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD. MONDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 29, 1890.
has decided to open a lumber yard in
Chino just as quickly as stock can be
placed liere, with M. A. Murphy of Col
ton as manager.
Many applications have been made for
dwellings to rent. Lot owners can make
good interest on money by building
right, now. Houses and business rooms
are being rearranged;
A lot of money has been already de
posited in local banks.—[Chino Cham
pion.
DR. KOCH'S LYMPH.
The First Lot to Arrive in Southern
California.
Dr. Bowditch Morton, the well-known
resident physician of the Hotel del Cor
onado, says the San Diego Union, is
just in receipt of a telegram from his
brother, Dr. William I. Morton, of New-
York city, advisory of shipment to him
by express of a small supply of Koch's
lymph, which had been procured by
Dr. David Orr Fdson, who is now in
Berlin. This, it is believed, will be the
initiatory consignment on the coast of
the celebrated panacea known through
out the civilized world as Koch's con
sumptive cure.
BULL VS. BEAR.
WITHOUT NATURAL WEAPONS
THEY AFFORD TAME SPORT.
Yesterday's Gathering at Agricultural
Park—Some Specimens of the SSports
of Olden Times.
Yesterday was a typical Southern
California day, and it was a tyoical au
dience of the olden time that assembled
at Agricultural park in the afternoon.
The attraction was a bull and bear tight.
A pit waa fixed up, and the elevated
seats wero crowded. Many ladies even
ventured up on these seats. The Span
ish population was largeiy represented.
They took the liveliest interest in the
proceedings. Pretty senoritas were
quite numerous among the spectators.
Altogether, there must have been about
thirteen hundred people present when
the festivities began. A young bull was
chained securely to a stake in the cen
ter of the ring by a front foot. The
bear was kept securely locked up in a
cage. It took some time to get the bear
out of the cage. She, too, was securely
chined to the stake in the center of the
ring.
In order to prevent, interference by
the authorities,the top of the bull's horns
were cut oil'and padded. The bear was
also muzzled. The bull rushed matters
as soon as the bear showed up. There
was a clinch, the bear grabbing the bull
by the horns. The bull managed to get
the bear under him and horned the na
tive of Acton. The first round ended
decidedly in favor of the bull. The bear
growled and made a rush at the bull
only to run against his horns. The bear,
nothing daunted, fought back gamely,
but was knocked out by the bull without
any greateffort. P>ruin lay groaningon her
back and the bull held aloof, evidently
not wishing to take advantage of a foul
blow. The bear did not feel inclined to
continue the tight, and was only induced
to continue when doused with water by
one oi the attendants. The sympathy
of the spectators now veered around to
the bear, and cries were heard, "Take
the muzzle off." The occupants of the
pit watched one another. The I mil
made an attempt to gore his competitor,
but a savage thrust of the bear's paw
kept him at a respectful distance.
Eventually the bull made a rush through
the gate, and the crowd scatteied with
alacrity. Several persons were thrown
down in the stampede, but none were
injured. The bear, who was clearly hois
dv combat, was then coaxed back into
the cage. She was not injured to any
great extent, but was very much dis
tressed. She was tired out before the
fight was commenced, for it appears that
it took several men from 8 until 1 o'clock
to muzzle her. She resisted the elforts
of the men and tired herself out.
After the cage with the bear had been
removed from the ring, three Mexicans
attired in fantastic and gaudy costumes
entered the ring. They marched
around the ring once and then
waved their hats at the crowd.
Tliey each carried bauderillas. A bull
was then let in the ring and the fun be
gan. The bull made a little fellow
called "Chapo" beat a hasty retreat,
and the bull tossed the little, fellow as
lie climbed-out of the pit. The caution
he aftei wards displayed made the crowd
laugh heartily. "Chapo" kept at a
respectful distance for several minutes,
until his pluck came back, when his
clownish maneuvers created no end of
amusement. The bull rushed at the
men, who stepped aside very cleverly.
Three different bulls were brought into
tho ring, and the fun was kept up for
an hour or more. An old Mexican,
about 50 years old, stepped in the ring
and evoked considerable applause when
he approached the bull with a red flag.
The old man showed that he was an old
' hand at the business.
A ST. LOUIS PHYSICIAN.
He Teste a California Production. — Hl*
Report.
A Bt I-ouls gentleman whose affliction was
sick headaches was so surprised at the cure
effected by Joy's Vegetable Sarsaparilla, that he
called it to the attention of a relative, who hap
pened to be none other than Dr. F. A. Barrett,
the well-known St Louis physician of 2652 Shen
andoah Street The doctor saw at once that it
differed from the potash preparations iv that it
was purely vegetable, and becoming interested
in it, began a series of investigations, and in •
subsequent letter candidly admitted its curative
properties, and says: —
Wishing to test its virtues further, I used tt
in my own family, and prescribed it for patients
who required a Kene*al system regulator. As ■
result, I can say ft Is an almost absolute cure for
constipation, biliousness, dyspepsia, indiges
tion, and sick headaches. These troubles usu
ally come from a disturbed condition of the
stomach and bowels, and Joy's Vegetable Sarsv
parilla is the best laxative and stomach regula
tor 1 have over seen, and as a general system
corrective is almost perfection itself. •
ISiguedl F. A. BARKETT, If. D.,
26&! Shenandoah bt, St, Lomls.
HEATH A MILLIGAN Prepared Paint at
Scriver & Quinn, 146 S. Main street.
HANGING UNDER DIFFICULTIES.
A Prisoner in the City Jail Attempts
Suicide.
Yesterday afternoon about 5 o'clock
W. llappes, alias Philip Spiegel, who
was arrested by Detective Auble on Sat
urday for petit larceny, attempted to
commit suicide in his cell at the city
jail, by hanging himself with a strip of
blanketing.
Hearing a peculiar sound
emanating from Spiegel's cell, Jailer
Clayton opened the door, and to his
surprise found his prisoner in a stooping
p sition on the threshold, slowly strang
ling to death. The would-be suicide,
who was unconscious, was at once con
veyed to the receiving hospital, and
Police Surgeon Morrison was summoned
as hastily as possible.
He soon recovered consciousness, but
suffered horrible agonies, and relapsed
into convulsions. His neck and throat
swelled up in an alarming manner, and
though unable to speak his moans gave
evidence of the terrible pain he en
dured. The physician did everything
possible to relieve the patient's suffer
ings, but without avail for sometime;
the unfortunate man, however, rallying
somewhat a few hours later. At a late
hour last night he was pronounced out
of danger, but his condition was such as
to need constant attendance.
An investigation of his cell showed
that Spiegel had torn one of his blan
kets into strips, and with one of these he
had made a rope.oneendof which he had
tied to a small bar in the ventilator over
the cell door. The other end he had
tied in a loop, through which he passed
his head. After stuffing his coat into
the ventilator, in order to prevent the
noise he made from being heard outside,
he then deliberately squatted down
until his whole weight was borne upon
hia throat. In this position he became
unconscious, and would, in all probabil
ity, have accomplished his aim, had he
not been discovered.
RAILWAY NOTES.
The old story is revived that Mr. L.
M. Felton will succeed Mr. John King
as president of the Erie.
A railroad is to be constructed from
Niagara Falls to Lewiston, a distance of
seven miles, along the rapids.
Schenectady, N. V., is making a strong
effort to secure the New York Central
shops and yards now located at Albany.
The Atlanta Journal is authority for
the statement that the Richmond Ter
minal company will build a through
line from Norfolk to Cincinnati.
The Toledo, Peoria and Western has
paid the last claim against it on account
of the Chatsworth disaster, it costing
the company $330,000 in round numbers.
An operator in Atchison says: "It is
calculated Jay Gould received 61,000
shares of Atchison and C. P. Huntington
35.000 shares in exchange for the Frisco
stock."
Railway clerks from all over the Uni
ted States met in Cleveland, 0., recent
ly and formed a national organization.
The name adopted was the American
Association of Railway Clerks.
At the annual convention of the
National Brotherhood of Railway Train
men, held in Los Angeles, Cal., the
treasurer's report showed that $275,000
had been paid out for disability and
death claims during the year.
Tourists,
Whether on pleasure bent or business, should
take on every trip a bottle of Syrup of Figs, as
it acts most pleasantly cud efiectually on the
kidneys, live and bowels, preventing fevers,
headaches and other forms of sickness. For
s-ilu in 50c. and »1.00 bottles, by all leading
druggi ts.
The Druggists
In Lowell, Mass., agree in saying that they sell
more of Hood's Sarsaparilla than of all othel
blood purifiers. For iustunce:
F. C. Goodale: I sell more of Hood's Sarsapar
rilla than all other blood purifiers.
A. W. Dows & Co.: Hood's tukes the lead of all
other sarsaparillas.
C. F. BLANCKA&D* Wo sell more of Hood's Sar
■aparilla than of any similar.
Mabston St Shaw: With us the sale of Ilood'a
Is 9 to 1 of uny other kind.
F. & E. BaILEY <fc Co.: Hood's Sarsaparilla is
one of the host medicines.
Carlton & HO VET: Hood's Sarsaparilla is one
of the best medicines we have. Its sale increases
every year.
F. P. Moody: We sell twice as n-.uch of Hood's
Barsapartlla as of anything similar.
C. A. Swan: Hood's is the most popular sarsa
parilla of the day.
TniBTY Other druggists sp?ak similarly.
This popularity at home, where Hood's Sarsa
parilla and its proprietors have been known for
many years, could not continue if the medicine
not possess merit And these facts should
certainly convince people In other sections, ol
the country that Hood's Sanaparilla is a good,
reliable medicine.
Hood's Sarsaparilla
Sold by druggists, II; Bix for |5. Prepared only
by C. I. HOOD & CO., Apothecaries, Lowell, Mass.
I GO Doses One Dollar
HANKING HOUSES
S VKll CENT INTEREST ON DEPOSITS.
Main Street Savings Bank and Trust Co.
NO. 4Hi SOI Til MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES, CAL.
Incorporated Oct. 28th, 18S9.
CAPITAL. STOCK, ------ $200,000
J. B. LANKKKSHIM, Prest. F. W. DeVAN, Cashier. CHAS. FORMAN, Vice-Prest,
The Desigjn for this Institution la to Afford a Safe Depository
For the earnings of all persons who arc desirous of placing their money where it will be free from
accident, and at the same time be earning for them a fair rate of interest.
Deposits will be received in sums of from one dollar to five thousand dollars. Term dcposio
in sums of fifty dollars and over.
We declare a dividend early in January and July of each year. Its amount depends on out
earnings, five per cent, on term and from three to four on ordinary.
Money to loan on mortgages. Bonds and dividend paying stocks bought and sold.
GERMAN-AMERICAN SAVINGS BANK,
No. 114 Boulh M«tin Street, Los JVnjjeles.
CAPITAL. STOCK, - $100,000
E. N. MoDONALD, President. VICTOR PONET, Treasurer.
W. M. SHELDON, Vice President. LOUIS LICHTENBERGER, Vice President.
M. N. AVERY, Secretary. T. F. SCHUMACHER, Asst. Secretary.
Deposits received in any sums over One Dollar, and interest paid thereon at the rate of Three
per cent on ordinary deposits and Five per cent on term or long time deposits.
First mortgage loans made on real estate at lowest current rates. 10-16-lim
CITIZENS' BANK OF LOS ANGELES,
OOI<KJEI? XJIIJ?D AND SPHING STS.
CAPITAL, - - $200,000
OFFICERS;
T. S. C. LOWE President.
T. W. OROI'IIERTON Vice-President.
F. D. HALL Asst. Cashier.
DIRECTORS:
T. 8. C. I.owe, H.L.Williams, C. F. C'ronin, L. W. Blinn, T. W. Brotherton
Transacts a general bunking business; sells exchange; discounts notes; accepts accounts
I subject to check; pays interest on time deposits. Give us a call. 11-11-6 m
EAOLBRON & CO.
146 North Spring Si
MEN'S
Furnishing Goods.
We have made Extra Preparations
for Holiday Trade. On hand
A VERY
LARGE STOCK
HOLIDAY GOODS!
NECK DRESS,
SUSPENDERS,
GLOVES,
DRESS SHIRTS,
Initial Handkerchiefs,
UNDERWEAR,
UMBRELLAS,
MUFFLERS, ETC.
Popular Prices.
LUMBER YARD
Kerekhoff-Cuzner
MILL AND LUMBER CO.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Main Oflice: LOS ANGELES. Wholesale Yard
at SAN PEDRO.
Branch Yards—Pomona, Pasadena, Lamauda,
Azuoa, Burbank. Planing Mills— Los Angeles
and Pomona. Cargoes tarnished to order.
J. JI. Griffith, President.
11. o. Stevenson, Vice-Proa, and Treas.
T. E. Nichols, Secy. E. L. Chanoier, Sup!
J. M. GRIFFITH COMPANY,
Lumber Dealers
And Manufacturers of
DOCKS, WINDOWS, BLINIJS, STA I its,
Mill work of every description.
984 N. Alameda Street, Log Angeles.
lul tf
PERRY, MOTT St GO'S
LUMBER YARDS
ANT) PL AMINO MILLS,
No. 7(5 Commercial Street, jul tf
J. A. HENDERSON, WM. F. MARSHALL
President. Secretary.
J. R. SMUER,
Vice President and Treasurer.
SOUTHERN ""CALIFORNIA
LUMBER CO.
1350 East First Street. ■
9-10-5 m Los Angeles, California.
REDLANDS IMPROVED LANDS
FOR SALE BY
w. p. Mcintosh,
144 S. MAIN STREET, - - LOS ANGELES, CAL.
20 Acres in ORANGES, Peaches, Apricots and Raisin Grapes. Income, $2,500
-annually. Water-right over 80 years old. Price, $600 per acre. Terms, one-third
cash ; one-third in three years: one-third in six years. Tliis is the best located
20 acres in the valley, and produces the best raisins and best Washington Navel
oranges of any place in California. The orange crop, 2,bT>o raisin trays, and 120 .
sweat boxes go with the land.
Also, 35 acres in old Walnuts, Peaches, Apricots, Plums and Oranges, with
oldest and bes: water-right, and beautiful stream running through the land. This
place adjoins the City of Redlands on the east, and the cheapest on the market. •
Price, $500 per acre ; easy terms.
Also, 10 acres of 5-year-old Washington Navels and Mission Olives. Trout pond,
holding 250,000 gallons. Pressure water and everything complete for $6500.
Also, 20 acres within one and one-half miles of the center of Redlands City, one
half of which is in Washington Navel and seedling orange trees. Several thousand,
strawberry plants, small house and barn. Price, only $350 per acre; or will sell*
10 acres at the same rate.
Also, 20 acres only two miles from center of City of Redlands, nearly all im- ;
proved ; about one-half in orange trees 18 years old. Price, $400 per acre.
People familiar with the value of orange land will at once see that most of the
foregoing is offered for about one-hall its present value, the owners being com- j
pelled to sell to protect their holdings.
The unimproved orange lands we sell on TEN (10) YEARS'TIME, only re
quiring 10 percent cash down, are selling and improving very fast. Buyers take
adyantage of the long time and low rate of interest, and spend their ready money
for trees and buildings.
-*f MENTONE LANDS. X-
The demand for MENTONE lands ie increasing daily on account of the rapid growth made
by the orange trees, the pure water furnished, the superior water system, the fine flavor and
beautiful color of the oranges on account of the high and dry altitude, and the greater quantity
of fruit produced on account that there are no n»avy winds to destroy the blossoms or young
fruit. Mentone is conceded to grow the finest olives and strawberry guavas of any place known.
For further particulars, maps, etc., address or call on
W. P. McINTOSH,
12-1<;-Im Rooms 6 and 7, No. 144 S. Main street, Los Angeles, Cal.
HAP PY NMEN/V YE A R?!
Jfe IS RAPIDLY APPROACHING,
i*^ 5, - ir* !r ~lSr" r^ v V oW ' s c rae *° 011 v your return Presents..
fl*Pl ' ASSORTMENT COMPLETE
In Gentlemen's Furnishings!
-2 PRICES LOW!K
JULIUS M. MARTENS,
BUCCE3SOR TO EVAN E. EVANS,
X8 ; 28 . 1m IOG S. SPRING ST.
DON'T MAKE M MISTAKE!
Call on us before purchasing elsewhere. We will sell
FANCY GOODS FOR THE HOLIDAYS
Positively cheaper than any house in this city.
GOWNS AND SMOKING JACKETS
At extraordinary low prices.
Ladies', Misses' and Children's Cloaks.
25 PER CENT BELOW COST!
Ac we are retiring from this line,
ACLTY OF PARIS,
North. Spring St.
<<ighristmlP
"music boxesT"
BARTLETT'S,
129 N. SPRING STREET.
BAILEY & BARKER BROS.,
DEALERS IN
FURNITURE, CARPETS, ETC.,
The most attractive line in the city.
H OLID AY GOODS
aN O W IN. j£
326, 328 AND 330
Sovitli Main Street, Los Angreles.
11 -SO- lm
SPOT CASH GROCERY HOUSE.
BOWEN & CHILDRESS,
538 & 540 SOUTH SPRING STREET.
Opposite Public School Building.
We are now invoicing and marking our large stock of Staple and Fancy Groceries down lo a
very low CASH price, and on and «fter ianuary Ist, ISOI, will sell strictly for cash. In making
this change we propose to offer such inducement* to all of our old customers as will make It to
their interest fo continue to deal with us, and otter to the public tne finest stock of groceries to
select from in the cttv. At the same time give the lowest prices ever offered west of the Rocky
Mountains. Call at our iarge stores, 538 and 540 South Spring street, and we will make a cus
tomer of you. , ~L
Very respecflplly,
&. CHI t_DRESS.
12-12-lm

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