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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, May 01, 1891, Image 5

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SWEET APPLE CIDER.
The Old mid the New Methods of v.x
tracllnjt the Saccharine Juice.
"The sight of a keg of swoet cider on
the counter is more frequent in city res
taurants nowadays than it was a dozen
years ago. A piece of pumpkin pie and
a glass of Bacchan'uo upple juice doubt
less appeal to tho country bred tastes of
many a grizzled merchant ami busy
clerk, and call up recollections of rude
old country cider mills and the great vats
of amber liquor into which they once
inserted the potent rye straw. Or pos
sibly the pretty girl washing glasses at
the counter reminds them of some conn
try Pomona such as John Keats drew in
his poem of "Autumn," who loved to sit
beside a cider press "and watch the last
slow oozings, hour by hour."
The romantic old time cider mill is
being rapidly supplanted by the more
thorough and trustworthy modern sort.
In the old one tho apples were often
ground by horse power. But most fre
quently the cider mill was pitched beside
a small stream, the power of watch, hah
wasted on a great "overshot" wheel, \tss
made to do tho grinding. Oftsn the
Bnpply of water would fail, or the dam
or other contrivances give way, and thon
there was a groat temptation to water
the cider to make np for lost time while
waiting for the dam to fill up. The
pressing was done generally by an up
right screw into which iron bars were
thrust and pushed around by brawny
arms. The writer bas seen a broad back
ed Dntch woman helping her husband at
this arduous work.
The modern cider mill, however,
shows by the puffs of steam that it does
not depend on dams. To bo sure, there
may be a dam a foot high m the neigh
boring ravine, a faU of water enongh to
work a hydraulic ram and feed the
boiler. The grinder revolves at a rate
which makes the building hum. The
ground apple, orpulp, falhxlown through
the floor into canvas sacks, which iwe
hastily closed and laid in a tier of a
dozen on the platform of the hydraulic
press. Then down comes the cover with
irresistible power, and the essence of the
apple gurgles into the vat. From here a
pump, also propelled by steam, forces
the liquid up into a largo vat, from
which it can be drawn into barrels by
turning a spigot. In old tinies the load
ing of a barrel of cider, weighing over
400 pounds, occupied the close attention
of several brawny men, ;us they rolled it
np a pair of "skids," with a concert of
"heave ons." But now a pair of barrel
tongs, a rope thrown over a windlass,
having a large wheel for the hand rope,
and the muscle of one man lifts the bar
rel and swings it into tho wagon.
It is a strong argument for the sweet
cider drinker that the pomaco left after
pressing is absolutely worthless as a food
for anything or as a fertilizer. The
virtue of the apple must therefore go
with the juice.
The best cider is that made late in the
season from the best matured fruit.
Cold weather also conduces to its kill
ing well. Russet apples uiako about the
finest cider in tho market, and it will
bring an extra price. Some other va
rieties, Newtown pippins or crab apples,
make very fine thick cider. If properly
worked, cleared of pomace, and kept
air tight in clean new barrels, it will
keep all winter as rich and pleasant as a
sherry wine, while, of course, leas al
coholic and so lees" harmless.
The pleasure of "sucking cider through
a straw" is not always attainable, as
straws aro not everywhere convenient at
hand. An oxceUent substitute for the
straw is a stick of macaroni.—Pittsburg
Dispatch.
Where Air Id Sol.l.
The Bible house of Constantinople has
heen often deseri*>d. I was conducted
through it by tho son of Dr. Bli6S, so
many years in chargo of it, and who but
a few months: before had died at Assioot,
on the Nile, :is described in a former let
ter. The Bible house is very well
adapted to its purpose, marked in all its
departments by evidences of American
energy, and also by indications of con
servative management.
Looking out of one of the upper win
dows, I perceived a long, low block by
the side of the Bible house, and said to
Mr. Bliss:
"Does the Bible house corporation
own that block?"
"It does not."
"When that is removed, if buildings
of the character of the others in the
street are erected your magnificent views
from these windows will be cut off."
"No," said he; "they cannot do that.
We own the air."
" What does that mean?"
"There is a custom in Constantinople
of selling the air above the houses, which
makes it impossible for the owner of the
building to build above a certain point,
and wa have taken pains to purchase the
air between hero and the end of the
block."—Dr. J. M. Buckley in Christian
Advocate.
Left Court for the Field.
Gen. Butler had a great practice be
fore the war. For years he had two
offices, one in Boston and one in Lowell,
and a partner in each engaged in the
preparation of cases. He was trying
cases in court almost constantly for nine
months in the year. Then, a; now, he
was punctual and methodical in his com
ings and goings between Lowell and
Boston. When the war broke out he had
one of the most lucrative practices in
New England—worth probably $30,000
a year. He was trying a case in court
when the order came for the Sixth regi
ment of his brigade to master on Boston
common in readiness to proceed to
Washington. By the courtesy of the op
posing counsel and the court he was
allowed to leave the court, and the caso
was stopped at that point.—Boston Ad
vertiser.
A Self Preserver-
She—Who is that hearty, well pre
served old man?
He—He is a living monument to the
value of taking care of one's self.
She—Well, who is he?
He—He's a French duelist.—Pitts
burg Bulletin.
Are We All Mad?
Doctors do not like to talk to news
paper men, for good reasons. Doctors
are custodians of the best stories in
existence, and when a newspaper man
can worm one of these stories from such
a source it is too good to keep. But of
course the physician must be kept in the
dark. Even then the physician does not
like to talk, because he is afraid his
name might come out. One of tbes"
specialists was talking in his recent i>.'i
room the other day and he made tbi.-'
statement:
"There is nothing new in the proposi
tion that we are all mad. That's a story
as old as the hills and is true. We call
the insanity that is at large latent in
sanity. If it doesn't come in contact
with a shock or somo disease it may re
main latent until death stojis the ma
chinery. I know men in business who
are liable to go to pieces mentally if
the unexpected happens. I once knew a
man who was cashier in a bank, and I
had it from those who knew of his work
that no more competent and accurate
man ever hold a place.
"But I had lx«n his physician and his
father's before him, and I knew that the
man was mad. His insanity was only
asleep. So Well did I know him that I
warned him to keep himself free from
such excitement as would result from a
certain disease. As I had fwired, that
disease finally made its appearance in
the country, and the man blew out his
brains ns soon as he heard of it, al
though tho case was 2,000 miles away."
—Chicago Tribune.
CThimncy Pots.
When wo reflect with satisfaction how
far we havo emancipated ourselves from
the restraints of fashion in the matter of
beards, does it not seem marvelous that
wo still endure the oppressive, though
unwritten law whiclt constitutes the
chimney pot hat to bo tho only decorous
headdress for well to do male humanity?
W6e! woe! tasthetic woe to the sons of
men who, having cast aside one after
another the Phrygian cap, the furred
bin-us, the slashed bonnet, the knightly
beaver, the three-cocked hat and the
feathered glengarry, have resolved that
whosoever will enter good society must
bind his brows with the gloomy cylinder!
None has a word to say in its favor;
every one hates it and condemns it. In
traveling the hideous object has to be
provided with a special case, yet for
more than three generations it has been
held indispensable. There is a cynical
levity in the ribbon which still encircles
its rigid circumference, recalling the
happy days when a hat band was a
reality, used to adjust the flexible cover
ing to the head. Odious as it is admit
ted to be, perhaps the most serious ob
jection to it from the point of view of
taste is tho hindrance it presents to any
tendency in our other garments to be
come more picturesque. Every visible
article of outfit has to be brought to the
aesthetic level of the headpiece. A chim
ney pot hat Crowning a tasteful costume
reduces it to ridicule.—Blackwood's
Magazine.
The Great Irish Famine.
As winter advanced tho distress grew
deeper and fiercer. It was a hard winter,
cold rains and snows alternating. To
famine and fever was added cold. Hun
divds of cabins in County Cork had
nothing on their earth floors save a few
rotten bandies of straw—not a blanket,
"not a stick of furniture." Neither
could the people afford in many cases
even tho cheap peat fires. The men
tramped barefoot through the snow to
the relief works. Their rags hardly cov
ered their bones. It was the commonest
thing in the world formen to bo "struck
with the cold" and die in a day or two.
All over the country men and women
could bo seen ''rediggrng the potato
grounds, in hopes of finding some few
remaining." They were bending over
the fields which the sheep had deserted,
trying to find turnip roots. Families
were known to have lived for weeks "on
the flesh of horses that had died."
A Skibbereen man with a family of
five had nothing for them all to eat from
Saturday to Thursday except eleven and
one-half pounds of potatoes and a head
of cabbage. He walked several miles to
the works and the superintendent gave
him a piece of bread; he tried to swal
low it and dropped dead. —Octave Tha
net in Century.
Metals the Pyramid Builders Locked.
Apparently we are ignorant, and like
ly to remain so, of the mechanical power
which erected the pyramids. Neither
do we know by what process the granite
was cut and polished. With us, having
steel and steam, this is easily done. In
many ot the American cemeteries aro to
be seen shafts, pillars, pedestals and
plinths of red granite, which.is-extreme
ly hard, but can be cut into any shape
and polished to the smoothness of a look
ing glass by simple machinery. Now,
though the ancients sometimes used
iron, and got the metal out of the ore by
great and long continued heat, they did
not know that by adding carbon to it
they could convert it into steel, which is
hard enough to cut all other metals. Be
sides iron the ancients were acquainted
with copper, gold, silver, lead, quick
silver and tin—that is, with seven metals,
whereas we have over fifty.—Thomas J.
Bowditch in Troy Times.
Pair of Rubbers Sixty Years Old.
L. F. Barton has secured a couple of
curiosities for the display windows at
his store. One is a pair of slippers made
of rope, the work being done by a sailor
on board a coal steamer running between
Philadelphia and this port. The second
article is a pair of pure gum rubbers,
which have been in use in one family in
this city for sixty years.—Newburyport
Herald.
A Curious Eating Custom.
The Dyaks divide in pairs when the
hour arrives for taking food, the father
and mother at one platter, two sisters at
one and still two brothers at another.
When the family is not equally divided
as to sex a brother and sister may eat to
gether, but this must always be the
youngest and oldest of tho family.—St.
Louis Republic.
Remarkable Facts.
Heart disease is usually supposed to be incur
able, but when properly treated a large propor
tion of cases can be cured. Thus Mrs. Elmira
Hatch, of Elkhart, Ind., and Mrs. Mary L.
Baker, of Ovid, Mich., were cured alter suffer
ing 20 years. S, C. Linburger, druggist at San
Jose, 111., says that Dr. Miles'sHeartCurcwhJeh
cured the former, "worked wonders for his
wife." Levi Logan, of Buchanan, Mich , who
had heart disease for 30 years, says two bottles
made him "feel like a new man." Dr. Miles'*
New Heart Cure is sold and guaranteed by all
druggists. Book of wonderful testimonials free
A New Departure,
The Anheuser-Bush saloon, on North Main
street, opposite Wells-Fargo's office, have en
gaged a first-class ladies' orchestra, which will
dispense music nightly. Mr. E. L. Sienwieke,
the manager, promises the public a fine pro
gramme.
Ice! Ice! Ice!
Order your ice today from the Citizen's Ice
company; telephone to No. 600, or drop a pos
tal card to Citizen's Ice Company, Center and
Turner streets. 1
THE LOS AVGELES ttfißAUr. FRID/ V MORtfLSCr, .MAY L 1891.
It iNHINO HOIJHkii
Southern California National JLJarik,
10l ». BPBINQ f»T., NADEAU BLOCK. 1 1
L. N. BRKBD. President. WM. F. BOSBYBHELL, C. N. FLINT, Cashier.
Capital Paid in Gold Coin Sjaoo.OOO
Hm-pliis itntl Undivided Profltn 25,000
Authorized Capital 800.000
DIRECTORS—L. N. Bieed, 11. T. Newell, H. A. Barclay, Silas Ilolman, W.
H. Holliday, E. C. Bosbyphell, M. Hagan, Frank Rader, D. Remick, Thos. (Joss,
William F. BoHbyshell. jui -tf
Security Savings Bank, Capital, $200,000
NO. 14H SOI Til MAIN ITRIIt, I.OS ANOELEK, CALIFORNIA.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS.
F. N. MYItRS PRESIDENT
ISAIAS W. HKLLMAN President Nevada Bank. .San Francisco; President Farmers and Mer
chants' Bank, l.os Angeles.
ANDREW J. BOWNB. President Fourth National Hunk, Grand Rapids, Mich.; President Hast
lugs National ilank, Hastings, Mich.
MRS EMELINE CHILDS Executrix Estate of O. W. Childs, deceased, Los Angeles, Cal.
11. W. HICI.I.MAN Vicff-prcsldciit Farmers ami Merchants'! Hank, Los Angeles
S. A. FI.Ii.MINU VICE-PRESIDENT
T. L. DUQUK Capitalist alld Wholesale Merchant of Panama, Republic of Colombia
A. C. ROGERS Physician, Los Angeles
MAURICE H. HELLMAN Of llellnian. Waldeck & Co., Wholesale Stationers, Los Angeles
JAMES RAWSON ft Capitalist, Boston
J. A. GRAVE-i Of Graves, O'Melvenv ii Shaukland, Attorneys. Los Angeles
J. F. SARTORI CASHIER; also Vice-president First National Bank, Monrovia, Cal.
FIVE PER CENT INTERBST PAID ON DEPOSITS.
The notice of the public is called to the fact that this bank has a large paid-up capital, and
only loans money on approved real-estate security; lhat among its stockholders are some of the
oldest and most responsible citizens of the community; that, under the state law, the private es
tates of us Stockholders are pro rata liable for the total indebtedness of the bank. These facts,
with care exercised In making loans, insure a safe depository for saving accounts. School
teachers, clerks", mechanics, employees in factories and shops, laborers, etc., will find it con
venient to make deposits in small amounts. CHILDREN'S SAVING DEPOSITS received in
sums of 20 cents and upward. Remittances may be sent by draft or Wells, Fargo ACo.'s express.
3-I'l Omos
5 PER CENT INTEREST ON DEPOSITS.
Main Street Savings Bank and Trust Co.
NO. 420 SOUTH MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES, CAL.
Incorporated Oct. 28th, 1889.
CAPITAL STOCK, ------ $200,000
J. B. LANKERSHIM, Prcst. F. W. DeVAN, Cashier. CHAS. FORMAN, Vice-Prest
5-ceut Deposit Stamps for Sale at Stores in different parts of the city.
Deposits will be received in sums of from one dollar to five thousand dollars. Term deposits
in sums of fifty dollars and ovei.
We declare a dividend early in January and July of each year. Its amount depends on our
earnings. Five per cent, on term and from three to four on ordinary.
Money to loan on mortgages. Bonds and dividend paying stocks bought and sold.
Incorporated Oct. 28,1889.
INCIJEASE OK TOTAL. KESOUHCES.
January Ist, 1890 *»115,87 1.37
April Ist. IS9O 191,715.9' i
July Ist, 1890 387,711.30
Octobnr Ist, 1890 324,804.40
January Ist. 1891 389,453.80
March sth, 1891 440,04,'.! 9
AND MERCHANTS BANK OF
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
Capital (paid up) 1500,000
SurplUß and Profits ~... 643,000
Total $1,143,000
officers:
IBAIAS W. Hellman President
Herman W. Hkllman Vice-President
•John Milker Cashier
H. J. Fleishman Assistant Cashier
DIRECTORS.
L. L. Bradbury, Kmeline Childs, J. B. Lanker
shim, C. E. Thorn, C. Ducommun, H. W. Hell
man, L. C. Goodwin, A. Glassell, I. W. Hell
man.
STOCKHOLDERS.
W. If. Perfy, J. B. Lankershim, Chas. Du
commun, Domingo Amestoy, Sarah J. Lee,
Emeline Childs, Sarah J. Loop, L. L. Bradbury,
T. L. Duque, Jacob Kuhrts, Louis Polaski, F.
Leccuvreur, Estate D. Solomon, Prestley 0.
Baker, L. C. Goodwin, Philippe Gamier. A.
Haas, Cameron E. Thorn, Oliver H. Bliss, Chris.
Henne, Estate O. W. Childs, .»ndrew Glassell,
Herman W. Hellman, Isaias W. Hellman. jut
JjHBST NATIONAL BANK OF LOS ANGELES.
CAPITAL STOCK $200,000
RESERVE $255,000
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY. .
B. F. BPENOE President
J. D. BICKNELL Vice-President
J. M. ELLIOTT Cashier
G. B. SHAFFER Assistant Cashier
Directors—E. F. Spence, J. D. Blcknell, 8. H.
Mott, Win. Lacy, J. F. Crank, H. Mabury, J. M.
Elliott. jul
rOS ANGELES NATIONAL BANK,
Cor. First and Spring streets.
Capital $500,000 00
Surplus 80,000 00
Total .'. $580,000 00
GEO. H. BONEBRAKE. President
JOHN BRYSON, SR Vice-President
F. C. HOWES Cashier
E. W. COE Assistant Cashier
No interest paid on deposits.
directors. v
Dr. W. G. Cochran, H. H. Markham,
Perry M. Green, John Bryson, Sr.,
Dr. H. Sinsabaugh, F. C. Howes,
George H. Bouebrake. Warren Gillelen.
No interest paid on deposits.
Exchange for sale on all the principal citieß
of the United States and Europe. MS
rpHE NATIONAL BANK OF CALIFORNIA,
Corner of Spring and Becond streets,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAI $250,000
board of directors:
Dr. W. L. Gravei., E. F. C. Klokke. 0. T. John
son, W. Hadley, Dan McFarland, M. 11. Sher
man. Fred Eaton, John W'olfskill, Thos. K.Baru.
J. M. C. MaRBLS, President,
• O. H. Churchill, Vice-President,
Perry Wildman, Asst. Cashier.
10-31 A. Hadley, 2d Asst. Cashier.
E. F. Bpence, John N. Hunt,
Pres't. Secy and Treas.
Savings Bank of Southern California,
Southeast corner Spring and Court streets,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAL, - - - $100,000
DIRECTORS:
Geo. H. Bonebrake, H. L. Drew, J. M. Elliott,
C. N. Hasson, P. C. Howes, John B. Hunt,
Hiram Mabury, E. F Spence.
Interest paid on deposits. Money to loan on
first-class real estate. 3-26-12 m
THEUNIVERSITY BANK OF LOS ANGELEs",
No. 317 New High street.
Capital stock fully paid up $100,000
Surplus 40,000
R. M. WIDNEY President
GEO. L. ARNOLD Cashier
DIRECTORB.
R. M. Widney, D. 0. Miltimore, S. W. tittle, C.
M. Wellß, John Mc Arthur, C.A.Warner, L.J. P.
Morrill.
General Danking business, and loans on first
class real estate solicited. Buy and sell first
class stocks, bonds and warrants. Parties wish
ing to invest in first-class securities on either
long or short time can be accommodated.
ANGELES SAVINGS BANK^
130 North Main street.
Capital $100,000
L. C. GOODWIN President
W. M. CASWELL Secretary
DIRECTORS.
I. W. Hellman, John E. Plater
Robert Baker, J. 3. Lankershim,
L. C. Goodwin.
Term deposits will be received in sums of
$100 and over. Ordinary deposits in sums of
$10 and over.
Money to loan on first-class real estate.
Los Angeles, July 1, 1889. Jul-tf
qaufobiua~ban~k,
Cor. Broadway and Second St.., Los Angeles.
Subscribed Capital $500,000
Paid up Capital $300,000
Surplus v $ 20,000
directobb:
Hervey Llndloy, J. C. Kays, E. W. Jones,
G. W. Huges, Sam*. Lewis.
I.C. Witmer President
T, Fraukenflold Vice-President
T. J. Weldon, Cashier.
J. M. Witmer, Assistant Cashier.
General Banking and Exchange Business
transacted. m4-4m
rpHKCITT BANK,
X 37 South Spring street.
Capital Stock $300,000
A. D. CHILDRESS President
lOHNS. PARK Cashier
DIRECTORS.
W. T. Childress, Polndexter Dunn
J. J. Schallert, E. E. Crandall,
John S. Park, R. G. L"nt,
A. D. Childress.
General banking. Fire and burglar proof safe
deposit boxes rented at from $3 to $20 per an
num, ml 12m
JJOS ANGELES COUNTY BANK,
Los Angeles, Cal.
Capital Stock Paid tip, $100,000.
Surplus, $118,000,
JOHN K. PLATER ... President
R. S. BAKER Vice-President
GEO. H. STEWART Cashier
directors:
R. S. Baker, Lewellyn Bixby,
Jotham Bixby, Geo. H. Stewart,
8. B. Dewey, Geo. W. Prescott,
John E. Plater.
Buy and Sell Exchange on San Francisco,
New York, Londou, Paris, Berlin and Frank
tort.
Receive Money on open account end certifi
cate of deposit, and do a general banking and
exchange business. jul
State Loan ancT Trust Co.
OF 1 LOS ANGELES
Subscribed Capital 81,000,000.
Capital Paid Up 8035,000.
BANKING ROOM, N. W. CORNER SPRING
AND SECOND STREETS, BRYSON
BONEBRAKE BLOCK.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORB.
GEORGE H. BONEBRAKE, President
WSfflff'*- j Vice-Presidents.
A. E. FLETCHER, Cashier.
J. F. TOWELL, Genl. Manager.
W. G. Cochran. P. M. Green.
H. J. Woollacott, Wm. 11. Crocker,
O. T. Johnson, San Francisco,
L. W. Dennis, A. A. Hubbard.
We act as trustees for corporations and estates
Loan money on first-class real estate and
collaterals Keep choice securities for saie.
Pay interest on savings deposits. Five per
cent, paid on time deposits. Safe depoait boxes
for rent. Best tire insurance companies
represented. Applications for loans received
from borrowers In person or by mail
DOCTORS
ARE COMING.
The Staff of the renowned European Physi
cians, Surgeons and Specialists, DR. LIEBIG
A CO., the Original and Only Genuine European
Specialists, from San Francisco and Kansas
City, will visit
LOS ANGELES,
And open offices for One Week Only, at
123 SOUTH MAIN STREET,
Between First and Second streets, opposite
Grand Opera House,
—FROM—
May 4th to May 9th Inclusive, 1891.
The doctors treat every form of disease and
deformity.
Incurable cases will not be taken, but will be
told the facts of their case, so as to avoid fur
ther expense.
On account of enormous Increase of special
practice all over the coast, Dr. Lieblg it Co.
cannot visit any of the smaller Southern Cali
fornia towns this trip. All per-ons desiring to
consult with the great specialists must come
to Los Angeles. Can only spare one week in
Los Angeles, May 4th to May itth Inclusive.
Call early, as tho doctors' offices will be
crowded during the afternoon and evening.
TENTS 7
AWNINCS, FLAGS, TRUCK, HAY ANo
WAGON COVERS.
A. W. SWAN FELDT,
115 15. Second Street.
Take Notice—l have removed from No. 202
East Second. 4-7-Um
C. F. HEINZEMAN,
Druggist & Chemist
No; 222 N. Main St., Lou Angeles, Cal.
Prescriptions carefully coimounded day and
uighL ra2l-tf
Naud's Warehouse.
GRAIN, WOOL.,
—AND—
General Merchandise Warehouse.
ADVANCES MADE ON WOOL. ml2-tf
Baker Iron Works
950 to 966 BUBNA VISTA BT,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.,
Adjoining the Southern Far'Hn Grounds. Tele
nbone 124. m 22
PIONEER "TRUCK CO.
(Successors to McLain <& Lehman,)
PROPRIETORS OF THE
Pioneer Truck & Transfer Co.
Piano and Safe Moving a Specialty.
Telephone 137 3 Market St. Los Angeles' Cal
iel-tf
MEDICAL.
Dr. K. C Nerve im, lir.us Treat-
KENT, a guaranteed specific for Hysteria, Dizzi
ness, Convulsions, Fits, Nervous Neuralgia,
Headache, Nervous prostration caused by tho
use of alcohol or tobacco, Wakefulness, Mental
Depression, Softening of the Drain resulting In
insanity and leading to misery, decay and
death, Premature (lid Age, Barrenness, I.oss of
Power in either sex, Involuntary Losses aix'
Spermatorrhea caused by over-exertion of the
brain, self-abuse or over-indulgence. Each tcx.
contains one month's treatment. $1.00 a lex
or six boxcß for $5.00, sent by mail prepaid ti
receipt of price.
WE GUARANTEE SIX UOXKS
To cure any case. With each order received t •
us for six boxes, accompanied with $5.00, v><=
will send the purchaser our written guarantee
to refund the money if the treatment doeß not
effect a cure. Guarantees Jssued only by
H. M. SALE & SON,
Druggists, sole agents, 226 S. Spring street,
Los Angeles, Cal.
a & is acknowi^d^r.
jtßSfr ''ling remedy io;
».°»">f«•!.«• A
a*W o»u«e Stricture. ■
•gf I Drcscrll c Hand feel
«WI «r,'Miii, fafoinrecrmmt:iKiiuß!>
|3U THEtVAHSCHC7"-»' to all sufferers.
VtiAt^m^W tawfcl PRICE 61.00
JOHN WIELAND, FREDERICKS
BURG, UNITED STATES and
CHICAGO BREWERIES.
EXTRA PALE PILSENKR, STANDARD, ER
LANGER and CULMBACIIER BEERS of high
repute. Also brew the best PORTER and ALE
JACOB ADLOFF,
General Agent, Los Angeles.
Telephone, 408. P. 0. Box 1231, Station C.
Corner New North Main, Mission and Chavez
sts., opposite Naud, Weyse & Co.'s warehouse
11:10 m
WAGON MATERIAL,
HARD WOODS,
I RON. STEEL
Horseshoes and Nails,
Blacksmith's Coal, Tools, Etc.
JOHN WIGMORE,
117 and 119 South I.os Angeles Stree
iul tf
NEW STORE OF
J. JEPSEN 6c SON,
Wholesale and Retail Manufacturers of [ .
Harness and Saddlery Goods,
Blankets, Robes. Whips, Horse Clothing.
Agents for J. o'Kane & J. A. McKerron's cele
brated Horse Boots. Repairing promptly done
1 10 South Main St., I.os Angeles, Cal.
4-B-lm ■
NOTICE.
108 ANGELES AND PACIFIC RAILWAY
J Company.—Location and principal place
of business, Los Angeles city, California. There
is delinquent upon the following described
stock, on account of assessment levied Febru
ary 27,1891, the several amounts set opposite
the names of the respective shareholders, as
follows.
OEKTIFI- NO. OF
SUBSCRIBERS. CATE NO. SHAKES. AMOUNT.
( 24 100 $200.00
A. Gayford \ 25 100 200.00
( 26 100 200.00
C. Cole 200 50 ion.oo
S P Rees ( 33 r, ° 100.00
a. r. rtees j 31 50 100.00
T. Bennington 82 20 40.00
C. B. Woodhead .. . 250 7 14.00
Jennie L. Wicks ... 248 300 600 00
M. L. Wicks 257 50 100.00
And in accordance with law and an order of
the Board of Directors, made on the 31st day of
March, 1891, so many shares ef each parcel of
said stock as may be necessary will be sold at
No. 200 N. Los Angeles street, Los Angeles eitv,
on the 20th day of April, IS9I, at 11 a m. of
said day, to pay delinquent assessments there
on, together with costs of advertising and ex
pense of sale.
4-4-td F. E, FRANTZ, Secy.
At a meeting of the Board of Directors, held
on the 20th day of April, 1891, it was resolved
that the above advertised sale of stock be post
poned to Wednesday. May 20, 1891.
4-21td F. E. FRANZ, Secretary.
ESTATE OF GEORGE WILSHIRE,
DECEASED.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY THE
undersigned, executors of the last will and
testament of George Wilshire, deceased, to the
creditors of, and all persons having claims
against the said deceased, to rxhibit them with
the necessary vouchers, within ten months
after the first publication of this notice, to the
said executors, at the office of Lee & fcott,
No. 21 Temple block, in the city of Los An
geles, State of California, the same being the
place for the transaction of business of the
estate of said deceased.
GEORGE P. WILSHIRE,
ALEXANDER MCDONALD,
Executors of the last will and testament of
George Wilshire. deceased.
Dated April 24, 1891. 4-26-30t
NOTICE.
OFFICE OF THE SAN JOSE RANCH COM
pany, corner of Court and Main streets,
Los Angeles, Cal., April 17,1891.
The regular annual meeting of the stock
holders of the San Jose Ranch Company will be
held at the company's oihee Friday, Ist day of
May, 1891, at 2 o'clock p. m., for the purpose
of receiving the annual report, election of a
Board of Directors for the ensuing year, and
the transaction of such other business as may
properly come before said meeting.
4-18-2W L. M. ANDERSON, Secretary.
STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE
annual meeting of the stockholders in the
San Luis Obispo Bituminous Rock Company
will be held at the office of the company, No".
214 North Spring street. Los Angeles ci'y, Los
Angeles county, Btate of California, on the first
Wednesday in May, viz.. on the 6th day of
May, 1891, at the hour of 2 p.m. of that day.
4-25 td T. E. ROWAN. Secretary.
LINES OP TRAVEL.
S, G. V. RAPID TRANSIT R'Y
Wilson's Peak and Sierra Mndre—Busses for
above points connect at Baldwin's station with
trains from Los Angeles.
Trnins arrive and depart from depot, corner
of Aliso and Anderson streets, as follows:
LEAVE FOR DESTINATION. | ARRIVE FROM
7:55 a. m Monrovia .. I 7:49 a.m.
11:10 a. m Monrovia 9:54 a.m.
3:10 p. m Monrovia 2:04 p.m.
5:10 p. m Monrovia. . 5:04 p.m.
sun^yTondy!
9:30 a. m Monrovia 8:49 a.m.
S:CO p. m Monrovia 4:49 p.m.
Take street car or'bus from corner of Main
and Arcadia streets direct for depot.
W. G. KERCKHOFF, 8. P. JEWITT,
sl-3m Receiver Gen. Manager
Compagnie Generale Transatlantique.
FRENCH LINE TO HAVRE.
COMPANY'S PIER (NEW) NO. 42AjaHL. i
North river,foot of Morion street. JaHSSSOK.
Travelers by this line avoid both transit by
English railway and the discomfort of crossing
the Channel in a small boat.
LA CHAMPAGNE, Boyer,
Saturday, April 4, at 1 p. m,
LA GASCOGNE, Santelli,
Saturday, April 11, at 7 a. m.
LA NORMANDIE. De Kcrsabiec,
Saturday. April IS, at 1 p. m.
LA BOURGOGNE, Frangeul,
Saturday, April 25, at 6 a. m.
For freight or passage apply to
A. FORGET, Agent,
No. 3 Bowling Green, New York.
J. F. FUGAZI & CO., Agents, 5 Montgomery
aye., San Francisco. d29-tf
LINKS OF TRAVEL.
Southern Pacific Company
IMPORTANT CHANGE OF TIME.
MONDAY, FEB. 16th, 1891,
Trains leave and are due to arrive at
LOS ANGELES (ARCADE DEPOT),
Fifth street, dally, as follows'
Leave For destination. r Arr. From
3:50p.m Banning 10:15 a.m.
5:10 p. m Banning 10:00 p.m.
9:05 a. m Colton 4:20 p. m
3:50 p. m Colton 10:15 a. m.
5:10 p. m Doming and East 10:00 p. m.
5:10p.m El Paso and East.... 10:00 p.m.
5:40 p. m Chino 8:37 a. m.
9:26 a.m. (Long Beach and San j 3 . 27p . m
vi9nml )Dong Beach and( H . IK . _
5.12 p.m. j San Pedro. j 8:15 a.m.
10:40 p. m. Ogden and East, Ist class 2:55 p. m.
1:35 p. m. Ogden and East, 2d class 7 -.25 a. m
10:40 p. m Portland. Or 7:25 a. m.
9:05 a. m Riverside 10:15 a. m.
3:50p.m Riverside 4:20p.m
5:10 p. m Riverside 10:00 p. m
8:05 a.m. .....San Bernardino 10:15 a.m.
3:50 p. m San Bernardino 4:20 p.m.
5:10 p. m San Bernardino 10:00 p.m.
Redlands 10:15 a.m.
9:05 a. ra Redlands 4:2opm.
3:50 p. m Redlands 10:00 p.m.
1:35 p. m. San Fran, and Sacram'to 7:25 a. m.
10:40 p. m. San Fran, and Sacram'to 2:55 p. m.
|| 9:37 a.m. Santa Ana and Anaheim 8:55 a.m.
5:02 p. m. Santa Ana and Anaheim 114:04 p. m.
1:35 p. m Santa Barbara 2:55 p.m.
7:25 a. m Santa Barbara 9.05 p. m.
9:30 am Santa Monica 8:38 a.m.
1:17 p.m Santa Monica 11:57 a.m
5:07 p. m Santa Monica 4:28 p.m.
||6:10p.m Santa Monica 117:20 a. m
4 :40 p. Nt Tustin S :43 a. m.
_4:40 p.m' Whittier 8:43 a. m.
Local and through tickets sold, baggage
checked, Pullman sleeping car reservations
made, and general information given upon ap
plication to J. M. CRAWLEY. Asst. G. Pas. Agj.,
No. 200 S. Spring st., cor. Second. CHARLES
SEYLER, Agent at Depots.
|| Sundays excepted.
RICH'D GRAY, Gen. Traffic Mgr.
T. H. GOODMAN,
s-l 3m Qen'l Passenger Agt.
Southern California R'y Co.
"SANTA FE ROUTE."
IN EFFECT SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 1891.
Leave. Los Angeles. Arrive.
"12:20 p.m. Overland * 2:45 p.m.
*i 8:15 a.m. .San Diego Coast Line. *12:10 p.m.
* 3:05 p.m. .San Diego Coast Line. * 9:00 p.m
* 8:30 a. m.j. Azusa and Pasadena . * 7:40 a. m
*11;50a.m j. Azusa and Pasadena. • 9:55 a.m
* 1:25 p.m.i. Azusa and Pasadena. * 2:57 p.m
* 4:00 p.m.. Azusa and Pasadena. * 6:30 p.m.
t 5:22 p. m.j. Azusa and Pasadena. ♦ 4:40 p.m
*12:20 p.m., Pasadena * 2:45 p.m.
{ 7:45 a. m.j Pasadena ♦ 8:50 a. m
* 8:30 a.m.; ( . San Bernardino..) I* 9:55 a.m.
•12 ] via S • 2:45 p.m
* 4:00 p.m. ( Pasadena ) * 6:30 p.m.
*10:00 a.m. (San Berdnard'o viaj * 5:39 p.m.
t 4:00 p.m. f Riverside & Orange j fl0:15 a. m.
* 8:30 a. M.i Riverside via Pasadena » 6:30 p.m.
*10:00 a. m. Riverside via Orange * 5:39 p. m
{ 4:00 p. m. Riverside via Orange 110:15 a. m.
* 8:30 a. m. (Redl'ds & Mentonei 1 9:55>.m
* 4:00 p.m. ] via [ » 6:30p.m
* 12:20 p. m. ( Pasadena > ♦ 2:45 p.m.
t 4:00 p.m. (Redl'ds& Mentonej 1* 5:39 p.m.
*10:00 a.m. (via Orange AR'sidej tlo:lsa.m.
f12:20p.m.5. Jacinto via S. Bdno f 6:30p.m,
tS.Jacinto viaOr'gei
tl0:00a. m. (and East Riverside! t 5:39 p.m.
* 8:15 a. m Santa Ana *12:10 p. m.
* 3:05 p.m Santa Ana * 5:39 p.m.
Santa Ana * 9:00 p.m
t 5:05 p. m.j Santa Ana t 8;50a. m.
t 3:05 p.m.lEscondido viaC'st line il2:lop.m.
*10:15 a.m. ....Redondoßeach.... * 8:29 a. BU
* 5:25 p. m.j... Redondo Beach * 3.53 p.m.
•Dally JDaily except Sunday.
ED. CHAMBERS, Ticket Agent,
First-street Depot.
CHAS. T. PARSONS, Ticket Agent
129 North Spring street,
' Depot at foot of First street. f23
Ta¥flcCoast S. S. CoT
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., GENERAL
Agents, San Francisco. Northern routes
embrace lines for Portland, Ore.; Victoria, B
C, and Puget Sound, Alaska, and all coast
points.
SOUTHERN ROUTES.
Time Table for May, 1891
LEAVE BAN FBANCIBCO.
For
Port Harford...'. IS. g. Pomana, May 3, 11,18
Santa Barbara... I' 27, June 4.
San Pedro (3. S. Corona, May 7, 15, 23,
San Diego J 31, June 8.
For 18. 8. Coos Bay, May 5, 13,21 aid
Redondo I 29, June &! '' *'
San Pedro and (8. 8. Eureka, May 1, 9,17,
Way Ports J 25, June 2.
LEAVE SAN PEDRO.
For 1 8. 8. Corona, May 1, 9, 17,
I 25, June 2.
San Diego /8. 3. Pomona, May 5 13, 21.
J 29, June 6.
LEAVE SAN PEDRO.
For IS. S. Corona, May 3,11, 19,
San Francisco... I 27, June 4.
Port Harford.... IS. S. Pomona, May 7,15, 23,
Santa Barbara... J 31, June 8.
LEAVE SAN PEDRO AND REDONDO.
For I 8. 8. Eureka, May- 4,12, 20,
San Francisco I 28. June 5. ■
and fs. 8. Coos Bay, May 8, 16,
Way Ports J 24, June 1.
Cars to connect with Bteamers via San Pedro,
leave 8. P. R. R. depot, Fifth street, Los An
geles, at.9:25 o'clock a. m.
Passengers per Coos Bay and Eureka via
Redondo, leave Santa Fe depot at 5:25 p. m.
Plans of steamers' cabins at agent's office,
where berths may be secured.
The steamers Eureka and Coos Bay will call
regularly at Newport pier for and with freight
and passengers
The company reserve the right to change the
steamers or their days of sailing.
. passage or freight as above or for
tickets to and from all important points in
Europe, apply to
, „ W. PARRIS, Agent,
Office. No. 124 West Second st., Los Angeles.
Los Angeles Terminal Railway Co.:
Leave Los Angeles for Leave Pasadena for
Pasadena. Los Angeles.
t 6:45 a. m ♦ 6:00 a. m.
j 8:00 a. m i 7:15 a. re.
* 9:00 a. m * 8:00 a. m.
10:00 a. m * 9:00 a. m.
"M '9.9 a ' m *10:00 a. m.
*12:01 p.m *11:00 a.m.
* 2:00 p. m * 1:00 p. m
* 4:00 p. m * 2:00 p. m.
* 5:25 p. m * 4:00 p. m
* 6:30 p. m « 5:25 p. m.
* 9:30 p. m « 7:00 p. m.
♦11:30 p. m *10:30 p. m.
Running time between Los Angeles and Pasa
dena 30 minutes.
Leave Los Angeles for Leave Glendale for Los
Glendale. Angeles.
t 7:00 a. m t 7:50 a. m.
* 8:25 a. m n0:10 a. m.
•11:40 a.m * 1:10 p.m.
* 2:15 p. m » 3:15 p. m
* 4:10 p. m » 5:05 p. m.
« 6:05 p. m ♦ 6:40 p. m.
Running time between Los Angeles and Glen
dale, 30 minutes. Add 5 minutes for Verdugo
Park time.
Leave Los Angeles for Leave Altadena for
Altadena. Los Angeles.
* 6:45 a. m '. ...~...t 7:43 a. m
•12:01 p. m » 1:00 p. m
* 4:00 p. m * 5:00 p. m
Running time between Los Angeles and Alta
dena, 55 minutes.
•Daily. fDaily, except Sundays.
night only.
Special rates to excursion and picnic parties.
Depot cast end Downey-avenue bridge.
' General offices, rooms 12*,13 and 14, Burdlck
block.
T. E. BURNETT, Gen. Manager
Jy2-tf W. WINCUP. G. P. A.
Forledondo Beach.
REDONDO RAILWAY TRAINS
On and after Monday, January 12,1891,
Trains of this company will leave their depot,
corner of Jefferson and Grand avenue, connect
ing with the Los Angeles cable railway and
the Main-street and Agricultural park street
car line, as follows:
SOUTH
Leave Arrive
Los Angeles. Redondo Beach.
9:00 a.m. 9:50 a.m.
io:2sa. m. 11:15 a.m.
1:30 p.m. 2:20 p.m,
5:00 p.m. 5-50 p.m.
NORTH
Leave Arrive
Redoudo Beach. Los Angeles.
7:10 a. m. 8:00 a. m.
8:35 a.m. 9:25 a.m.
11:00 a.m. 11:50 a.m.
3:40 p m 4:30 p. m
GEO. J. AINBWORTH,
President.
N. BUTTON,
leB-tf Trainmaster.
5

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