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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, May 02, 1891, Image 6

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6
WOMAN'S WORLD.
TO SPEND WINTER EVENINGS PLEAS
ANTLY AND PROFITABLY.
A Working Woman* Appeal—Bmrllsh
Women's Taste—A Woman Designer.
\ Offered to Young Women —An Inter
, Mttng Traveler —The Golden Rose.
I It i»against my principles to do much
real work in the evening unless particu
larly rushed, but I do like a little fancy
work or work not so fancy, but light and
easily handled, that I can pick up a few
minutes when I have an industrious
streak; and I know there are some sisters
'who must do such work evenings, or not
atalL
I made a night dress yoke of crocheted
wheels. The manner of doing it is
this. Take No. 30 or 36 thread, wind
the end around your finger eight or
ten times, slip the ring off your finger
and crotchet single stitch closely around
it, till it is stiff and round; then make
the wheel larger with any stitch you
choose, adding stitches enough to keep
the wheel smooth and flat. Fill the hole
in the middle with rickrack stitch or
the-spider web used in drawn work, and
they look quite antique. Sew together
to form the yokes, children's collars,
tidies, scarf ends, etc
j The other evening sister was home,
and as she has just commenced house
keeping for two she has an eye for fur
nishings of every shape and complexion.
[We had a spell—rattled up in the store
jnoom, scampered down again with a
clothes basket full of rags, planted our-
Iserves 'neath the hanging lamp and pro
ceeded to braid a rug or a border for one.
We took quite a large piece of ingrain
for "the middle, rounded the ends a little,
lined it with a piece of rag carpet to
[make it as thick as our braid, then laid
lit on the dining table and sewed the
braid on around it. We happened to
lehoose colors for the braid like those in
the ingrain, so the rug was really pretty,
very substantial, and didn't cost $10.
She only had one fur and one Smyrna
Tug, and wanted one she was not afraid
to step on accidentally. Mother caught
the fever, and is cutting leaves out of
heavy cloth, buttonholing them with
colored yarns, and declares she is going
to have a rug with ingrain center too.
! Last winter I made a baby yoke ot
novelty braid, the kind used for inser
tion, with picotedge. I crocheted strips
of it together with a zigzag chain,
using two or three stitches in the chain,
and the effect was that of drawn work,
as you could hardly see where it was
'joined.
I I bought a new pair of shoes the other
day, and the dealer gave meoome pretty
cards, baby faces on star shapes, and one
cherub peeping over the moon. These
were on a panel with a calendar in one
corner, and I am just going to politely
amputate them from this advertisement
and put them on plush panels for the
gratification of my own self.—Cor.
Housekeepers' Weekly.
A Working Woman's Appeal.
The working girls' clubs have been
considering for some time the different
reasons why people of leisure look down
with a sense of superiority upon self sup
porting women. In Far and Near, the
organ of the association of clubs, a work
ing woman, Lucy A. Warner, makes an
eloquent appeal to the world for the
answer of the question, which to them
is hard to understand.
"Is it because we lack natural abihty 7"
she asks, and proceeds to call attention
to the delicate and difficult work ac
complished by women requiring the help
of eye and hand and brain, stating con
cisely: "There is no copyrighton brains.
God is no respecter of persons, and so to
us working girls he has intrusted one,
two, and to some even five talents.
"Is it because we lack education?" she
continues, and tells of many working
girls who spend all their leisure in study
because it is a delight to them.
"Ia it because we lack virtue? A noted
man once said, 'Not oven the famed
Hebrew maiden as she stood on the giddy
turret more sacredly guarded her honor
than does many a half starved sewing
Woman in the streets of New York.' We
are proud of our honor, we are as care
ful of our reputation as our sisters who
dress in purple and fine linen. It is true
there are exceptions, but has not the im
moral working girl her rivals among
women who should be her teachers in
all pure and noble living?
"Is it because we work?" she concludes,
and speaks of the professional people
whom the world honors and yet who
are all busy workers. Working women
have discovered to their sorrow that
there is a difference between brain work
and manual toil. "The teacher considers
herself superior to the sewing girl, and
(the sewing girl thinks herself above the
mill girl, and the mill girl thinks the
girl who does general housework be
neath her, and Miss Flora McFlimsey,
;who toils not, neither does she spin,
thinks herself superior to them all. Is
one kind of work any more honorable
than another? Is any honest work de
grading?"
Danger in Milk.
But probably more danger lurks in
milk than in water. Milkißg is done
very largely by men whose persons are
uncleanly, and who have no proper ideas
of purity and neatness. But if we can
once get it to the house without its being
contaminated there is no surety that it
Will remain safe for human use. It is
quick to absorb impurities from the air,
'and milk forms an admirable breeding
place for numerous enemies to health.
,It is certain that many an epidemic of
scarlet fever and probably many a death
from typhoid fever might have been pre
jvented if the contaminations of milk
{and their easy transportation from house
to house had been clearly understood.
Several cases of outbreaks of typhoid
lever have within a few years been
traced to the water placed in milk by
dishonest dealers, and taken from pol
luted wells or streams. The washing oi
cans even in infected water is sufficient
to transmit the germs of disease. Scar
let fever is now, perhaps, the most dread
ed foe of our households, and is known
to be communicated by means of minute
particles of the sloughed off skin of the
patient. These infinitesimal particles
are easily taken in by exposed fluids.
Cows also are subject to this fever, and
go the danger is vastly increased. Diph
theria has also been proven to be carried
about in milk, and, last of all, the bacil
lus tuberculosis of consumption.
Many physicians, including Dr. Bis
sell, believe that using milk from cows
affected with lung diseases is the cause
of a large proportion of the pulmonary
disease of human Nothing
should bo taken for granted less easily
than that milk is a safe food. I have
seen enough of the pollution, dangerous
or otherwise, at least disgusting, con
nected with ordinary milking by aver
age farm hands to assure me that it is
impossible to bo too careful what is
bought of this article and what con
sumed. In one case of 1,000 quarts care
fully examined two handfuls of solid
filth remained after distillation. This
danger is by no means confined to city
purchasers. — Physician in St. Louis
Globe-Democrat.
English Women's Taste.
Nowhere in the world can so many
handsome, tasteful women be seen as in
London during the season. Of course
some are foreigners, and Americans are
generally among the most attractive, ami
it must be remembered that the British
kingdom sends its fairest flowers to town
at that time: but the fact remains that
many English women know how to dress
well. Nor is it true that small feet are
an American monopoly. The model of
Lady Holland's foot is one of the attrac
tions of Holland House. She is not alone
in her beauty. English women have
been careless in the matter of shoes, and
shoes make a deal of difference in the ap
pearance of feet.
What I like in the English is that thoy
can't be bullied out of their convictions.
Morris, Rossctti, Ruskin begin a crusade
against the Philistines, against stupid
ugliness, against blind adoration of con
ventionality. Women join their ranks
and attempt to make poetry out of mil
linery. Some of their efforts are very
ridiculous, bnt out of these efforts have
come G ainesboro hats and charming cos
tumes, making the wearers look like fas
cinating old pictures instead of fashion
plates. For the first time England is ex
ercising an influence upon France.
uEstheticism includes too much beauty
to be ignored, and Parisian modistes are
taking lessons of their despised neigh
bors. If I were asked which women to
day had the more taste in dress, Ameri
can or English, I should say the English,
because they are beginning to think, and
are striving to be individual. In the
chaff of affectation there is the grain of
an honest ideal.—Kate Field's Washing
ton.
What a Society Girl Can Do.
What society young ladies can do
sometimes is well illustrated by the
career of a Washington young lad3'.
She had lived in Washington for
a number of years. She has bad in
dependent means, and has lived un
der the care of relatives and friends,
having no immediate family. She
was well known in Washington so
ciety. No one ever would have thought
her capable of running a western ranch.
To jump from the gayeties of Washing
ton to the back of a horse in Texas was
a long leap, and yet this is what this
young lady has done. When forced by
circumstances to go to Texas to look
after her own affairs, she invested a part
of her fortune in a Texas cattle ranch at
a time when such investments were all
the rage.
She found some time ago that her in
vestment in this direction was bringing
in nothing, and probably would be a
loss. As she was a fine horsewoman she
made up her mind to utilize this practi
cal part of her education, and she left
Washington to take charge of her ranch.
She has just returned after having made
a successful trip and demonstrated, after
a year of trial, her capacity to run suc
cessfully a Texas cattle ranch. She
6pent hours out of doors every day on
horseback, and for her pluck and cour
age she has had the hearty support of the
neighborhood for miles around her
ranch. It is a novel experience for her,
but as it lias taught her the most inter
esting lesson of independence, her story
should make a good subject for a play.—
Washington Cor. Chicago Tribune.
A Woman Designer.
We have in Boston a young woman of
the name of Miss Mary O'Connor, who at
one time was employed on Broadway,
New York. She was brought to the at
tention of Mr. Belcher, of the firm of R.
H. White & Co., of this city, about a
year ago, and he at once recognized her
abihty as a designer. He offered her a
place in his big establishment, which she
readily accepted. The firm sent her to
Paris and other European cities for the
purpose of studying up styles and becom
ing inoculated, if possible, with the spirit
of that creative genius with which the
foreign atmosphere is charged. She de
veloped wonderfully sensitive receptive
qualities, and when she returned home
was running over with ideas. She be
gan at once to put them into practical
use, and the result has been not only flat
tering to herself but a source of great
profit to her employers, as well as awak
ening a sense of never-ending gratitude
in the ladies she has served. Many of
her conceits would fill the heart of a
Parisian designer with the greenest kind
of envy, and alarm him with fear for the
future of his own city.—Boston Cor.
Cloak and Suit Review.
Offered to Young Women.
C. C. Wood, a retired New York bank
er, now living in Brooklyn, has tendered,
through his wife, $125,000 to the Young
Women's Christian association of Brook
lyn, to put up a new building for the
iissociation. The building will be erected
on the throe lots on Schermerhorn street,
between Third and Flatbush avenues,
which were bequeathed to the associa
tion by tho late S. B. Chittenden.
Mr. Wood had been contemplating the
gift for some time, and decided to make
it if $100,000 could be raised for a per
manent endowment. He consulted with
President Beth Low, D. W. McWilliams,
Truman J. Backus, A- E. Orr, Gen. C.
T. Christensen and a number of others
on Saturday at the Hamilton club, and
the offer was formally made, provided
that the $100,000 is raised by July 1,1891.
Mr. Wood, John Chaplin and Thomas
E. Stillman were made an advisory board.
The proposed building will be five stories
high and will contain classrooms, work
rooms, parlors, baths, library, roof gar
den and dormitories. It is hoped to have
the building ready by May 1, 1892, when
the lease of the present quarters expires.
—New York Commercial Advertiser.
For Small Boys
There is nothing so neat and durable as a Mul
len, Bluett & Co. jersey suit. You can get them
in blue, brown or ecru, atonly $4.50.
ANGELES HERALD; SATURDAY MORNIKQ, MAY 2, 1891.
oivk Snjoys.
Both the method and results when
Syrup of Figs is taken; it is pleasant
and refreshing to the taste and acts
yet promptly on the Kidneys,
Liver and Bowels, cleanses the system
effectually, dispels colds, headaches
and fevers and cures habitual consti
pation. Syrup of Figs is the only
remedy of its kind ever produced,
pleasing to the taste and acceptable to
the stomach, prompt in its action and
truly beneficial in its effects, its many
excellent qualities commend it to all.
It is for sale in 60c and $1 bottles by
all leading druggists.
MANUFACTURED only by the
CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO.
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.
LOUISVILLE "" NEW YORK, N. y,
A NATURAL REMEDY FOR
Epileptic Fits, Falling Sickness, Hyster
ics, St. Vitus Dance, Nervousness,
Hypochondria, Melancholia, In
ebrity, Sleeplessness, Dizzi
ness, Brain and Spinal
Weakness.
This medicine has direct' action upon
tho nerve centers, allaying all irritabil
ities and increasing the flow and power
of nerve fluid. It is perfectly harmless
and leaves no unpleasant effects.
Our Pamphlet tor snnerera ol nervous di
scuses will he 6cnt free to any address, and
poor patients can also obtain this medicine
Iree or charge from us.
This remedy has been prepared by the Reverend
Pastor Kucuig. of Fort Wayne, Ind., for the pus!
ten years, and ia now prepared under his direc
tion by the
KOENIO MEDICINE CO.,
50 Wilt Hidim, cor. Clinton St., CHICAGO, lIX.
SOLD BY DRUCCISTS.
Price $1 per Bottle. 6 Bottles for $5.
C. F. HEINZEMAN, Druggist and Chemist,
222 North Maißi>r reet. - - Los Angeles, Cal
PliDrC Bronchitis,
LUIiLO Hoarsoness, Whooping Cough, Croup,
Sore Throat, Asthma, and every affection of the
Throat, Lung?end Chsst.inc!.:d:n?Consumption.
Speedy aud permanent. Lici-.eine signed "I. Eut'.S."
NEW STORE OF
J. JEPSEN 66 SON,
Wholesale and Retail Manufacturers of
Harness and Saddlery Goods,
Blankets, Robes, Whips, Horse Clothing.
Age'uts for J. O'Kane & J. A. McKerron's cele
brated Horse Boots. Repairing promptly done
110 South Alain St., Los Angeles, Cal.
4-8-lm
NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL ESTATE
UNDER EXECUTION.
TF. JOYCE, PLAINTIFF, VS. JOHN EG
• gen, defendant.
Sheriff's sale—No. 5000.
By virtue of an execution issued out of the
superior court of the county of Los Angeles,
state of California, wherein T. F. Joyce,
plaintiff and John Eggert defendant, upon
a judgment rendered the Hist day of October,
A. D. 1889, for the sum of live hundred forty
ninc.and 12-100 dollars, in lawful money
of the United States, besides costs and interest,
I have this day levied upon all the right, title,
claim and interest of said defendant, John
Eggert, oi, in and to the following described
real estate, situate in the city of Los Angeles,
county oi I.os Angeles, state of California, and
bounded and described as follows:
Lot No. 54, block No. 2, of the Meadow Glen
tract, us shown by a man ot said tract and re
corded in the office of the county recorder of
Los Angeles county, California, in book 21,
miscellaneous records, at page 85 thereof, to
which map reference is hereby made for a full
description.
Public notice is hereby given, that I will, on
Wednesday, the 29th day of April, A. D. 1891,
at 12 o'clock m., of that day, in frontof the
court house door of the county of Los Angeles,
on Spring street, sell at public auction, for cash
lawful money of the United States.all the right,
title, claim 'and interest of said defendant
John Eggert, of, in and to the above de
scribed property, or so much thereof as may he
necessary to raise suflieient to satisfy said judg
ment, with interest and costs, etc., to the high
est and hest bidder,
Dated this 3d day of April, 1891.
E. D. GIBSON,
Sheriff of Los Angeles County,
By F. 0, Hannon, Deputy Sheriff.
Di Pi'v ifcßently, Attorneys for Plaintiff.
4-4-sat-4t
IN THE SUPERFOR COURT OF I.OS AN
geles county, State of California.
In the matter of the estate of John Wright,
deceased.
Notice is hereby given that George W. Daw
has filed herein his petition praying that upon
the payment by him of ts9<>4 9-100 to the ex
ecutors of the estate of John Wright, deceased,
that they, said executors, be ordered by the
court, pursuant to the agreement of the said
deceased, to convey to said Daw all that cer
tain lot or parcel of land situated in the county
of Los Amides, and state of California, and
boundeil and particularly described as follows,
to wit: All that strip of land lying north of the
new Vernon and Fruitland road, and bounded
on til? west by Conipton road, on the north by
land of Morrison and Kellogg, on the east by
laud of Mill tan, south by Vernon and Fruit
land road, and containing three acres, more or
less: also nil that land lying on south side of
Vernon and Fruitland road, bounded on west
by Compton road, on north by Vernon and
Fruitland road, and east by land of l'inney,
and extending along Compton road a d land of
Pinney an equal distance so as to embrace nine
acres, more or less, making in all a full
twelve acres, being the rame property which
said deceased uirreed Io convey to said Daw by
agreement dated February 14, 1887. The
hearing of said petition has been set for the
29th day of May, 1801, at 10 a.m., before de
partment two of said superior court, at
which time all persons i nterested therein may
appear aud contest said petition,
T. H. WARD,
Clerk of the Superior Court.
By F. E. I.OWEY, Deputy.
4-25. 5-3, 9,16.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
TESTATE OF 0. 0. TRANTUM, DECEASED.
J!i Notice is hereby given by the undersigned
administratrix of the estate of O. O. Trantura,
deceased, to the creditors of, and all persons
having claims against the said deceased, to ex
hibit the same with the necessary vouchers,
within four months after the first publication
of this notice to the said administratrix of the
estate of said deceased at the office of Albert
M. Stephens, No. 2, Law building, in tho city
and county of Los Angeles, state of California
Dated this 24th day of April, A D. 1891.
MARY C. TRANTUM,
Administratrix of the Estate of 0. O. Trantum,
deceased. 4-25 Sat 4t
REDONDO BEAOH HOTEL.
— SPECIAL RATES BY WEEK OR MONTH.
EIGHTEEN MILES FROM LOS ANGELES via Redondo Railway and Santa Fo R. R. Hotel new, and Applied with all modern improve
ments—elevator, incandescent lights, etc. Hot and cold water and grates In all rooms. Halls and public rooms thoroughly warmed
Beautiful dining room, commanding a fine view of the ocean. First-class Band for dining room and ballroom in constant attendance.
Lawn tennis, billiards and other amusements. Splendid boating, fishing and surf bathing. Average winter temperature, 61 degrees. The
marine and mountain views at Redondo are unrivalled and the sunsets beyond descriptien. Nervousness, irsomnia and asthma speedily and in
most cases permanently relieved. Table unsurpassed on the coast. Management liberal and progressive. Terms moderate. Forfurthe
information, address, *• w - ROOT, Manager.
LI'MHKK YARD
Kerekhoff-Cuzner
MILL AND LUMBER CO.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Main Office: LOS ANGELES. Wholesale Yard
at SAN PEDRO.
Branch Yards—Pomona, Pasadena, Ijunanda,
Aiusa, Burbank. Planing Mills—Los Angeles
and Pomona. Cargoes furnished to order.
J. M. Griffith, President.
H. G. Stevenson, Vice-Pres. and Treai.
T. E. Nichols, Secy. E. L. Chandler, Supt
J. M. GRIFFITH COMPANY,
Lumber Dealers
And Manufacturers of
DOORS, WINDOWS, BLINDS, HTAIHS,
Mill work of every description.
934 N. Alameda Street, Los Angeles.
tul tf
J. A. HENDERSON, WM. F. MARSHALL
President. Secretary.
J. R. SMt'RR,
Vice President and Treasurer.
SOUTHERN "CALIFORNIA
LUMBER CO.
350 East First Street.
9-19-5 m Los Angeles, California'
CLARK & HUMPHREYS,
Dealers in all kinds of
l_ U M B E R!
YARD—San Mateo and Sevcnth-st. Bridge.
General Business Office, 125 West Second St.,
Burdick Block.
P. 0. Box 1235. Telephone Vt 8.
12-S7-3m
PERRY, MOTT 6c GO'S?
LUMBER YARDS
AND PLANING MILLS,
No. 70 Commercial Street jul tf
TO THE UNFORTUNATE!
Weakness, lmp,)ten(T
manently cured. The sick and afflicted should
not fail to call UDon him. The Doctor has trav
eled extensively in Europe and inspected thor
oughly the various hospitals there, obtaining a
great deal of valuable information, which he Is
competent to impart to those in need of his
services. The Doctor cures where others fall.
Try him. DR. GIBBON will make no charge
unless he effects a cure. Persons at a distance
CURED AT HOME. All communications
strictly confidential. All letters answered in
plain envelopes.
Send ten dollars for a package of medicine
Call or write. Address DR. J. F. GIBBON, Box
1,957, San Francisco, Cal.
Mention Los Angeles Herald. 07-12 m
iGOLD MEDAL, PARIS, 1878...
BAKER'S
Cocoa
Warranted absolutely pure
Cocoa, from which the ex
cess of Oii;hasbeen removed.
It has three times the
strength of Cocoa mixed
• with Starch, Arrowroot and
Sugar, and is therefore far
more economical, costing
less than one cent a cup. It
is delicious, nourishing,
, strengthening, easily di
| gested, and admirablvadapt
ed lor invalids as well as for
persons in good health. Sold by Grocers every
where.
W. BAKER k CO, Dorchester^Mass.
12-19-12 m
LEE KWAI SING,
tAt Chinese Ladies' Store,
306 SOUTH SPRING ST.
Between Third and Fourth sts.
Chinese and Japanese SilK, Canton
(.'rape for dress patterns, in all
colors, 12 yards for 514.00.
Pontee Silk, fine Chinese Silk and Crape
Shawls; Embroidered Table Covers and
Bedspreads; Chinese Officer Chairs.
My stock consists of the finest CHINESE and
JAPANESE ART GOODS ever brought to this
coast To satisfy yourself you must call and
see them. Fine Silk Wrappers yery cheap.
4-2-lm LEE KWAI SING.
Fish, Poultry, Game,
Oysters, Lobsters, Shrimps,
Fruits, Vegetables,
Groceries, Meats,
The choicest in Uie city.
ROCK BOTTOM PRICES.
Mott Market, South Main St
CARPETS -:- CARPETS
Oilcloth, Linoleum and. Matting's.
FURNITURE! ■;• FURNITURE!
DRAPERIES, SHADES, ETC.
The Newest and Best Assorted Stock in Southern
California. Prices that defy competition.
•Freight paid on country orders.
W: S. ALLEN,
332 and 334 S. Spring Street.
NORTH REDONDO
A Home by the Seaside!
Fertile Farms Where Cool Breezes Blow!
Superb fruit and vegetable land, with the advantage of the perfect climate of the ocean beach
and a view of ocean, beach, landscape and mountains unsurpassed in the world
B. C. Wright, John I. Redick and J. F. Cond have subdivided 1,531 acres of the best land in
the;Sousal Redondo, and adjotniug the to wn of Redondo on the north, into 5, 10, 20 and 40 acre
lots. A street runs a 1! aiouud each 40-acre lot. The railroad runs through the land, and a
station will be placed at a convenient point Thi* is all fine land, and most delightfully
situated. Seekers for homes should see It. Prices reasonable. Title perfect, certificate furnished.
For further information apply to B. 0. WRIGHT, Redick Block, Room 2, city: L. M
BROWN, 313 West First street, city; ROBERT McGARVIN, South Spring strejet, city;
Room 2 Redick block, city: or to BRUNSON & EADS. Redondo Beach P. O.
ASK YOUR RETAILKR FOR TUB S3 SIIOB/^^ftfc—ft
JAMES MEANS $4 SHOE miPMmf
' genuine unless itamped /r 1 BB WKU
on the soles, " James /, j. BffffiMrT
-OR [TIK— Means'S3 Shoe." g&Bß
JAMES MEANS $3 SHOE gf^^gß^
ACCORDING TO YOUR NEEDS.
JAMES MEANS $4 SHOE is neat and stylish. It fits like a stocking, and
BEQUIHE9 NO "BREAKING IN," being perfectly easy the first time it is worn.
It will satisfy the most fastidious. JAMES MEANS 853 SHOE is absolutely the
only shoe of the price that has ever been placed extensively on the market In which durability
is considered before mere outward appearance.
„ r , J A Z IES MEANy *2 SHOE for Boys, JAMES MEANS FARMER SHOE and JAMES MEANS
QUARTER EAGLE BOOTS FOR FARMERS are.all staple lines that always give satisfaction.
Boots from factory are sold by
N. BENJAMIN,
(Solo Agent£for Los Angelei)
BOSTON SHOE STORE
j.-i-12m COR. MAIN AND SECOND, LOS ANGELES.
SUMMONS.
TN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF I.OS ANGE-
X lea county, state of California.
J.W. Met lolland, plainlifl', vs. J. I). Siemens,
defendant,
Action brought in the superior court of Los
Angeles county, slate of California, and the
complaint filed in said county of Los Angeles,
In the oflicc of the clerk of said superior court.
The people of the state of California send
greeting to: J. I). Siemens, defendant.
You are hereby required to appear in an
action brought against you by the above
named plaintiff in the superior court of the
county of Los Angeles, state of California, and
to answer the complaint filed therein, within
ten days (exclusive of the day of service), after
the service on you of this summons, If' served
within this county, or, If served elsewhere,
within thirty days, or judgment by default will
be taken against you according to the prayer of
said complaint.
The said action is brought to obtain a decreo
of this court for the foreclosure of a mortgage
described in the said complaint, and executed
by the said J. D. Siemens to the said plaintiff.
J. W. McClelland, on the 10th day of March,
A.D. 1800, to secure the payment of his prom
issory note of $">OO, dated March 10, 1800, to
plaintiff, payable in one year from the date
thereof, with interest at the rate of 10 percent,
per annum from date until paid, a further
description of said note being more fully set
out in said complaint, to which reference is
hereby made, that the premises conveyed by
said mortgage may be sold, and the proceeds
applied to the payment of said sum of J5OO,
with interest thereon as in said note provided
for, and costs of suit, and in case such proceeds
are not sufficient to pay the same, then to ob
tain an execution against Bald J. D. Siemens
for the balance remaining due, an I also that
the defendant and all persons claiming by,
through or under him, may be barredarid fore
closed of all right, title, claim, Hen, equity o<
redemption and interest in and to sata inort
gaged premises, and for other and further-re
lief. Reference is had to complaint for partic
ulars.
And you are hereby notified that if you fail
to appear and answer the said complaint as
above required, the said plaintiff will apply to
the court for the relief demanded in the said
complaint.
Given under my hand and the seal of the Su
perior Court of the County of Los Angeles,
State of California, this 27th day of March,
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hun
dred and ninety-one.
T. H. WARD, Clerk,
By A. W. SeaVEn, Deputy.
Gibbon & Creighton, Attorneys lor Plaintiff.
4-25Sat-10t
WILL YOU SUFFER with Dyspepsia and
Liver Complaint? Shiloh's Vitalizer is guaran
teed to cure you. For sale by Helnzeman, 222
N. Main, or Trout, Sixth and Broadway.
NOTICE OP FORECLOSURE SALE.
tohn McCarthy, no. io,048: d«gear
t) Brothers, No. 10,845; M. N. Avery, No.
10,845; Wyman Oruendike <!i Co., No 10,845;
Clark Si Hiinphrey, No. 10,920; Gibson &
Menkel, No. 11,025; Baker A Reed, et al, No.
11,105, plaintiffs, vs. R. C. Humeston and
Cassie M. Humeston, et al., defendants.
Sheriffs sale No. .
Order of sale and decree of foreclosure and
sale.
Under and by virtue of an order of sale and
decree of foreclosure and sale, Issued out of
the Superior Court of the County of Los An
geles, of the State'of California, on tho 31st day
of March, A. D. 1801, in the above entitled
action, wherein John McCarthy, et al., the above
named plaintiffs, obtained a judgment and de
cree of foreclosure and sale against R. C. Hume
ston et al , defendants, on the lltn day of
March, A. D. 1800, for the sum of 18019.07,.
lawful money of the United States, which
said decree was, on the 29th day of March, A.
I). 1890, recorded in Judgment Book 16 of said:
court, at page 201, I am commanded to
sell all those certain lots, pieces or parcels of
land situate, lying and being in the said County
of Los Angeles, State of California, and bounded
and described as follows;
Lot ten (10) and easterly four fifths (4-5) of
lot eleven (11) of the Grille's tract, Los Angeles
county, California, and being a subdivision of
the Freeman tract, ns per map recorded in
Book 11, page 46, of Miscellaneous Records of
Los Angeles county, fronting ninety (90) feet
on Freeman street and one hundred and sixty
two (102) feet on Thornton avenue.
Public notice is hereby given that on Thurs
day, the !KHh day of April, A. D. 1891, at
12 o'clock M. of that day, in front of the Court
House door of the County of Los Angeles, I
will, in obedience to said order of sale and de
cree of foreclosure and sale, sell the above de
scribed property, or so much.thereof as may be
necessary to satisfy said judgment, with inter
est and costs, etc., to the highest and best bid
der, for cash, lawful money of the United.
States.
Dated this 3d day of April, 1891.
E. D. GIBSON,
Sheriff of Los Angeles Oenntr.
By F. C. Hannon, Deputy Sheriff,
Wells, Monroe & Lee, et al., AMwneya for
Pialntirlk 4-4-sa4t
JOHN WIELAND, FREDERICKS
BURG. UNITED STATES and
CHICAGO BREWERIES.
EXTRA PALE PILSENER, STANDARD, ER
LANGER and CULMBACHER BEKRB of high
repute. Also brew the best PORTER and ALE
JACOB ADLOFF,
General Agent, Los Angeles..
Telephone, 468. P. O. Box 1231, Station a
Corner New North Main, Mission and Chavez
sts., opposite Naud, Weyse & Co.'s warehonsa
11-1-Um

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