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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, May 15, 1891, Image 5

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CAMILLE DESMOULINS.
RIDPATH'S STORY OF THE MAN WHO
LIGHTED THE TORCH.
Principal Episode* In the Career or Cu
iiiilie —His Qenlus and Character—Work
of "The Old Cordelier"—Final Scene In
the Place <!<■ la Revolution.
ICopyright, 1801, by American l'reas Associa
tion.l
NE man there was
whose head was
cut off for using
the word clem
ent:]). In his news
paper, called J,e
Vieux Cordelier —
for this man, like
Marat, was ;in cil
ltor —ho said that
for his part ho
thought it policy
of clemency ought
now to be adopted
instead of conti D u
ing the Terror,
That word seuled
Bis rate, it was L.'amilie Desnioulins. He
wns tho youngest of the great revolution
ists, mid the most amiable of them all.
For the rest, history, after a century of
time, is not much disposed to wear the
weeds of mourning. Hut for tho versatile
and light hearted Camille she still sorrows
and weeps.
In revolutions history herself prepares
the combustibles and arranges tho train,
but some man lights the match. Patrick
Henry said, "If that be treason, make the
most of it." The match was lighted. An
Kast Indian said ton sepoy soldier, "Every
time you bite that cartridge you eat hog's
fat and tallow." Tho match was lighted
again, and the sepoy rebellion burst out
volcanic. In the French revolution many
centuries hud wrought in forming the
magazine and tilling it with powder. One
day sufficed, as we shall see, for tho strik
ing of the match, and one hand did it—the
hand of Camilla Desmoulins.
This notable personage, ulinost a poet, ,
certainly a brilliant wit and mirthful j
spirit—set almost flowerlike on the bloody [
breast of the French Revolution —was out !
of the town of Guise, in Picardy, where
he Wits born on the 2d of March; but,
strangely enough, the year is iv doubt.
Nearly allot the biographers, until those
of recent date, say 1702, but the later aud
more careful say 1700. For our part wo
say 1701, having, as we shall see, Cauiille's
own authority for his age ou the day of his
trial. From his childhood his mind was
us bright as tho sunshine. Already, at
thirteen years of age, his proud and ambi
tious father scuds him to Paris to enter
tho College of Louis le Grnud, where he is
to be educated for tho law. There he will
have for a senior classmate no other than
the King of the Terror, Maxiinilien Robes
pierre.
The genius of young Camille opened like
a blossom. Ho absorbed all manner of
learning, and became by much the most
distinguished student and soundest classi
cs] scholar of them who were to turn
France upside down in the Revolution.
Most of all did tho literature and history
of the classical nations fix the attention of
the young enthusiast. Perhaps no other
scholar of the revolutionary epoch as well
us ho was able to realize and reproducu in
a popular way tho lives and characters ol
the patriot Greeks and Romans.
But how hardly shall such a man become
« lawyer! So it proved iv the case of Ca
mille. Already in 1785, having been gradu
ated from the law school, he was admit
ted to practice a.s an advocate of the par
liament of Paris. But his lightness of
character, his humors, even his wit and
genius, made against him iv tho gadgrind
Of the courts. .Moreover, ho was crippled,
a.s an orator, with un unimpressive person,
features without prepossessing qualities
and a miserable stammer in-his speech. It
is the good fortune of literary men that
their ugliness, if such be, need not. appear
in their pages. Stammering, also, is o£ the
tongue and uot, of the pen.
Cumille from the first was destined to
another career than t hat of law. For four
years no success came, and he sank into
poverty. With the call for the states gen
eral he broke forth iv an "Ode" which
awakened much patriot enthusiasm, and
then in a very radical monograph, which
he called "The •Philosophy ol the French
People." On the sth of May, 178'J, ho
watched the great procession of the states
general at Versailles, and in the following
months became well known to the rising
democracy as a man of brains and audac-
Camille was now twenty-eight years of
age. It is the summer of 1789. The strug
gle out at Versailles has linally culminated
with the dismissal of Necker from the min
istry. It is the 12th of July, and the news
of this startling eveut creeps into Paris.
The people's minister is discharged—a
thing seemingly incredible. Necker is
really gone—gone secretly for a whole day,
en route to his own placo in Switzerland.
Instead of that friend of the people we
have Broglie for minister of war. We
have the base aristocrat Breteuil for an
other minister, and Foulon for another—
Toulon, who said not long ago that the
starving French people might eat grass!
Under such news all Paris rose into fer
mentation, ay, the very boiling of excite
ment. At this time there is a place called
the Garden of the Palais Royal, where the
people, even tho under man, may come
nnd hear patriot speeches. Thither, on
this 12th of July, somewhat in the even
ing, there is a general rush. The place Is
full; but the police are on the outskirts,
watching lest some one, some daring pa
triot, should stand up and appeal to the
multitude against tho dismissal of Necker.
Behold! a young man with flashing eyes
and hair wildly flying about his head and
face, clutching a formidable pistol ill each
hand, rushes through tho crowd and
mounts a table. Will tho police try to
take him—to haul him down? He swears
they shall not take him alive from that
spot.
"Here, O ye friends of freedom 1" he cries
out, "let us stand and die. We are even
as hunted creatures. We are as sheep
crowded into shambles. The police have
for us their butcher knives, but we shall
now stand against them. Let every French
man rise to his duty and die for his coun
try. Let us throw off oppression and fly
into the arms of deliverance. There is only
one cry, one shout for us today, and that is,
To arms! to arms! O ye patriotsl"
That speaker was Camille Desmoulins.
The match was struck. The train was
lighted. Tomorrow shall see all Paris in
glorious insurrection. Tomorrow shall see
50,000 spikes hammered into service in a
single day. Tomorrow shall see the dis
covery of muskets and the seizing of can
non. . Tomorrow will lie the 13th of July,
and the following morning will be the 14th
—that memorable day; that day of the be
ginning of all things; that day when naked
patriotism, fired in this manner, shall
storm the Bastile and liberate its captives;
that day which shall be forever the birth
day of new France, and if of France, then
the world.
It was thus that the great French Revo
lution burst into flame. On the day fol
lowing the storming of the Bastile a new
pamphlet by Camille entitled "La Franco
Libre"—that is, "Free France"—was pub
lished. It was like a torch carried through
the stubble fields. No such brilliant and
audacious attacks had ever been known
before in Europe. The author laid the ax
at the root of the tree. By his argument
he undermined the alleged rights of the
king, of ttie nobility, of the clergy. -He
struek.tho foil mint ion stones from under
the whole existing finler. Uy the same
token he pleaded lor the rights of tho
people, nnd it DOOM bet be noted that tho
"people," Mdenned by t he pen of Camille,
meiint sansculottes, the men of the Fuu
bourgs, M well as tana of breeches ami re
spectability.
From this time forth, as the Revolution
increased iv fury, the voice of Camilla was
constantly heard, like a bugle note in bat
tle. Soon alter the destruction of the
Hostile be began the publication of his
weekly paper called Revolutions de France.
The genius of the editor flashed like lire
through tlie smoke and tumult of 17'JU-l.
[Ik no ot her publication of these stormy
limes may the course and tendencies of
democratic opinion be better traced than
in The Revolutions. At this period of bis
career Desmoaluis, in the first (lush of
triumph and lame, did not display those
amiable ami humane qualities of mind lor
which he was noted during the last two
years of his life, lie was savage, aud his
fickleness was almost as conspicuous as his
genius. Ilis changeable temper, however,
may well be accounted for by the wild
tides of public opinion on which he floated
like a nautilus.
After the September maasaora Camilla
was elected to the national convention,
where he associated himself with Oanton,
to whom he remained faithful ever after
ward, and he to him, The taciturn Dunton
was never satisfied with drinking from the
fountains of Camilla's genius and vivacity.
When the former was chosen minister of
justice, Cuniillo was made his secretary
general. Iv the convention he was always
found among the benches of the Mountain,
moving about anil shooting his barbed wit
ticisms at Ihe enemy. None more than Le
desireil the destruction of the monarchy.
On the question of the king's death he
voted "Qui."
He wrote a "History of the Urissotius,"
which was so furious iv its attack on the
Gironde and so deadly in its deductions
that Robespierre was able to avail himself
of the Influence of the pamphlet and tho
rage of public opinion to send the Hebort
ists flrat and the Giroudins afterward to
the guillotine. As for Danton and Camille,
they appear to have beeu astonished and
shocked at the terrible application which
the Revolution made of their own argu
ments.
It, was late in the year 1793 that Camille
established the lust and most famous (bo-
CAMILLA DK.SMOULINS.
cause it was tho best) of his newspapers.
This was Be Vieux Cordelier, or The Old
Cordelier. It was in this journal that the
better qualities of the Dantonist policy
were set forth. That party iv the conven
tion now ventured to suggest and advocate
a limit to the revolutionary excesses by the
substitution of clemency for terror. It
was on this rock that the ship in which
Danton and Robespierre and Camille had
thus far sailed split and went to pieces.
Danton and Camille held together, but the
black gulf soon swallowed them from sight.
Robespierre first sent the Hcbertists, or
the taction of the "Enraged," to the scat
fold, and was then able to turn his ntten
tion to tho Dantonists. Tho latter had
dared to use the deadly word "clemency."
At first Robespierre contented himself
with having certain numbers of "The Old
Cordelier" burnt by decree ot tho conven
tion. But in the next number the irre
pressible Camille replied with the apho
rism, "Burning is not answering." That
taunt lixed his fate.
Ou the :ilst of March, 1794, Danton, Ca
mille and their immediate following were
seized and thrust into prison. They were
haled before tho revolutionary tribunal.
They demanded that their accusers be
brought face to face, which refused, the
issue hung for two days in the balling.
But Robespierre and St. Just had a decree
formulated by which it was declared that
the hearing of evidence might he dispensed
with whenever the court was satisfied!
Against this Danton roared for a moment;
but hut own vehemence and the sarcasms
of Camille were alike in vain. "How old
are you?" said the court to Camille as its
first question. "Thirty-three years," he
answered; "the same age of the good
Sansculotte Jesus—an age fatal to revolu
tionists!" Not even the shadow of death
could extinguish the flash of his genius.
The Dantonists were condemned to die,
and on the same day, April 5, 1794, were
hurried to the guillotine. It was a specta
cle to earth and heaven. Camille strug
gled and raged with them who would put
him in the death cart. His shirt was torn
to shreds. Then his nerves gave away, and
he sobbed lilce a child at the recollection
of the beautiful wife who, in' a few days,
was to follow him to the scaffold. His
courage broke, under the strain, and the
good cheer of the giaut who sat beside him
could hardly revive him from the paralysis
of fear. In the last moment, however, he
mounted the scaffold with some measure
of courage, aud died with delianco ou his
lips. With the fall of the bloody blade the
flashings of light in the ilnest brain of that
audacious revolutionary democracy were
suddenly eclipsed, aud Camille had gone
to join King Louis and the daughter of
Maria Theresa in the land of shadows.
JOUN CLARK RIDPATH.
To Photograph the Heavens.
Viewed from a scieutilic standpoint, one
of the most important projects of the cent
ury will be consummated next July. A
great photographic chart of the heavens is
to be mode by a combination of interna
tional observers. All the necessary ar
rangements are settled, and except in two
countries—Chili aud Brazil—the work
promises to be carried out admirably.
Chili has a civil war on hand, and Brazil's
observatory is not yet completed.
Sudden Deaths.
Heart disease is by larjthe most frequent
cause of sudden death, which in three out of
four cases is unsuspected. Tho symptoms nre
not generally understood. Those are: A habit
of lying on tlie right side, short breath, pain or
distress in side, buck or shoulder, irregular
pulse, asthma, weak and liungrv spells, wfnd in
stomach, swelling of ankles or dropsy, oppres
sion, dry cough and smothering Dr. Miles'
illustrated book on heart disease, free at all
druggists, who sell and guarantee Dr. Miles'
unequaled New Heart Cure, and his Restorative
Nervine, which ernes nervousness, headache,
sltaplessness, effects of drinking etc. It con
tains no opiates.
A Special Sale of Carpets.
Buyers will tind it to their interest to inspect
our goods and prices. No old stuff, all new,
clean, fresh goods and latest patterns. W. K.
Beeson, 221 -. Spring street.
WHY WIXL YOU cough when Shiloh's Cure
will give immediate relief? Price 10 cts, 50
cts. and $1. For sale by Heinzeman, 222 N.
Main, or Trout, Sixth and Broadway
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD: FRIDAY MORNING, MAY 1„ 1891.
LINES OF TKATKI.
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Train* leave anil are due to arrive at
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Filth street, daily, as follows -
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5:10 p. iv Banning 10:00 p. in.
9:05 a. m Colton 4:20 p. vi
3.5(» p. m Colton 10:15 a. m.
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> :25 a. m. j { Um * B £Sg o * nd SaU j 3:27 p. m.
i L " ng Ba,Xfro. »***»
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T. H. GOODMAN,
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"SANTA FK ROUTE."
IN KFFECT SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 1891.
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t 5:22 p.m.j. Azusaaud Pasadena, f 4:40 p.m
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KKDONDO RAILWAY TRAINS
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Leave Arrive
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9:00 a.m. 9:50 a.m.
io:2sa. m. 11:15 a.m.
1:30 p.m 2:20 p.m,
5:00 p. m. -5:50 p. m.
NORTH
Leave Arrive
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President
N. BUTTON,
leB-tf Trainmaster.
LINES OmT TRAVEL.
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5:10 p. in | Monrovia | . 5:04 p. m.
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books or complicated accounts. New books
opened, kept and balance sheets prepared.
Office, 218 NORTH MAIN ST., Los Angeles.
12-29-1 yr
JOHN WIELAND, FREDERICKS
BURG, UNITED STATES and
CHICAGO BREWERIES.
EXTRA PALE PILSENER, STANDARD, ER
LANGER and CULMBACHER BEERB of high
repute. Also brew the best PORTER and ALE
JACOB ADLOFF,
General Agent, Los Angeles.
Telephone, 468. P. O. Box 1231, Station C.
Corner New North Main, Mission and Chavez
sts., opposite Naud, Wevse & Co.'s warehouse
11-l-6m
Naud's Warehouse.
GRAIN, WOOL,
—AND—
General Merchandise Warehouse.
ADVANCES MADE ON WOOL. ml2-tf
UNITED STATES STABLE,
PETER CLOB, Proprietor.
Horses, Carriages and Saddle Horses To Let.
All Kinds of Horses Bought and Sold.
Horses Boarded by the Day, Week or Month
Telephone 255.
N0.295 Flower street, Lob Angeles, Cal
)vl4-tf
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF LOS AN
geles County, State of California.
Chorles M Plum, George Schonewald and
Edwin H. Mastick, surviving Trustees of the
James Lick Trust, plaintiffs, vs. George R.
Shatto, The International Mining Syndicate,
Limited, a Corporation organized and existing
under and by virtue of the lawsof Great Brituin,
The Santa Catalina Development Company,
Limited, a company incorporated under the
Joint Stock Companies Acts, 1862 to 1889.
John Medley Stuart. George 0. Ford, Frank O.
Whittley and Patrick O'Neil, defendants.
Action brought in the Superior Court of Los
Angeles county. State of California, and the
complaint riled m said county of Los Angeles,
in tlie office of the clerk of said Superior Court.
The people of the State of California send
greeting to George R. Shatto, Ihe International
Mining Syndicate, Limited, a corporation
organized and existing under and by virtue of
the laws of Great Britain', The Santa Catalina
Development Company. Limited, a company
incorporated under the Joint stock Companies
Acts, 1802 to 1889, John Medley Stuart, George
0. Ford, Frank 0. Whiltloy and Patrick O'Neil,
defendants.
You are hereby required to appear in an
action brought ugainst you by the above named
plaintiffs in the Superior Court of the county of
Los Angeles, State of California, ana to answer
the complaint filed therein within ten days
(exclusive of the day of service) after the
service on you of this summons, if served
within this county, or if served elsewhere
within thirty days, or judgment by default will
be taken against you according to the prayer of
said complaint.
The said action is brought to obtain a decree
of this court for the foreclosure of a mortgage
described in the said complaint, and executed
by the said George R. Shatto on the 11th day
of August, 1887, to Beeure the payment of five
certain promissory notes of even date with said
mortgage, each for the sum of J26,666.66, pay
able respectively in one, two, three, four and
five years after the date thereof by said George
R. Shatto to Richard 8. Floyd, Charles M. Plum,
George Schonewald and Edwin B Mastick,
Trustees, etc., or a majority of them or the sur
vivors »f them, and payable only in gold coin
of the United States, with interest thereon at
the rate of six per cent per annum from
date until paid, payable quarter annually,
and if not so paid to bo compounded,with
the principal and bear tlie same rate of interest
as the principal. All of said notes are now due
under the terms of said notes und mortgage by
reason of the lailure of the payment of interest
thereon, as provided in said notes and mortgage,
upon which said notes there now rcmnins due
and unpaid the *urn of tllB,185.2«, together
with interest thereon, at the rate of 6 per cent,
per annum, from November 11th, 1890, said
interest to be compounded with the principal
every three mouths and bear the same rate of
interest as the principal.
That the premises conveyed by said mort
gage, (except that portion thereof heretofore
released from the lien of said mortgage by in
strument in writing duly executed by Richard
8. Floyd, Edwin B Mastick, George Schone
wald snd Charles M. Plum, trustees of the
' Jumes Lick Trust, dated the 7th day of Novem
ber, 18SS, und recorded In hook 20 of releases,
page 262. records of Los Angeles county, a
copy o! which said release is attached to the
complaint filed In the above entitled action),
may be sold and the proceeds applied to the
pavinent of the amount remaining due and un
paid under saKl promissory votes, together with
attorneys' fees In a sum equal to five per cent,
on the amount found due to plaintiffs und costs
in this action. That all said sums may be made
payable in cold coin of tlie United Slates: that
said sale may be made for like gold coin: and
if it appear from the sheriff's return that there
is a balance due to the plaintiffs after applying
all tlie moneys applicable thereto to the
: payment of the amount fouud one and
payable as uforesaid, that the defendant
George R. Shatto may be adjudged to pay such
dellcieney in like gold coin, and that plaintiffs
may luve execution therefor, and also that the
defendants and all persons claiming by, through
or under them, or either of them, may be barred
and foreclosed of all right, title, claim, lien,
equity of ledeinptionandinferestin and to said
'. mortgaged premises; and also that a receiver be
1 appointed to take possession of the land upon
t which said mortgage is a lien, to collect the
reins and profits thereof, and lease, control aud
manage the same during the pendency of this
action, and for further and other relief. Kefer
. enee is had to tlie complaiut for further partic
ulars.
And you are hereby notified that if you fail
to appear and answer the said complaint as
above required, the said plaintiffs will apply to
the court for the relief demanded in said com
plaint. . ._'■ •., •
l Given under my hand and the seal of the Su
perior Court of the county of Los Angeles, state
of California, this 14lh day of February, in the
year of oor Lord one thousand elgat hundred
and ninety-one.
[sal.l T. 11. WARD, Clerk.
By A. W: Skater, Deputy.
John D. Bioknell, attorney for plaiutiffH
4-3-frlOt
BANKING HOUSES
Southern California, National Bank,
10l S. SPRINQ e»T., NADEAU BLOCK.
L. N. BREED. President. WM. F. BOSBYSHELL, Vice-President. o. N. FLINT, Cashier.
Capital Paid in Gold Coin $300,000
Surplus and Undivided Profits 35.000
Authorized Capital 800.000
DIRECTORS—L. N*. Bieed, 11. T. Newell, 11. A. Barclay, Silas Holman, W.
H. Holliiiay, K. C. Bosbyshell, M. Hagan, Frank Radcr, D. Hemick, Thos. Goes,
William F. lioabyahell. jui-tf
Security Savings Bank, Capital, $200,000
NO. 148 SOUTH IIAIN STREET, LOS ANGKLJtS, CALIFORNIA.
OFFICERS AND DiKIXTOIW.
F. N. MYERS PRESIDENT
ISAIAS W. HELLMAN president Nevada Bank. San Francisco; President Fanners and Mer
chants' Bank, I.os Angeles.
ANDREW J. BOWNE President Fourth National Bank, Grand Rapids, Mich.; President Hast
ings National Bank, Hustings. Mich.
MRS. EMELINE CHILDS Executrix Estate cl 0. W. Childs, deceased, Los Angeles, Cal.
H. W. HELLMAN Vice-president Farmers and Mercbants's Hank, I.os Angeles
8. A. FLEMING VICE-PRESIDENT
T. L. DUQUE Capitalist and Wholesale Merchant of Panama, Republic of Colombia
A. C. ROGERS Physician, 1 os Angeles
MAURbCE 8. HELLMAN Of Hellman, Waldeuk & Co., Wholesale stationers, I-os Angeles
JAMES RAWSON Capitalist, Boston
J. A. GRAVES Of Graves, O'Melvenv ik Shankland, Attorneys, Los Angeles
J F. SARTORI CASHIER; also Vice-president, First National Bank, Monrovia, Cal.
FIVE PER CENT IN fERKBT PAID ON DEPOSITS.
The notice of the public is called to the fact that this tiank lias a large paid-up capital, and
only loans money on approved real-estate security; that among its stockholders are some of the
oldest and most responsible citizens oi the community; that, under the state law, ihe private es
tates of its stockholders are pro rata liable foi -the total indebtedness of the bank. These facts,
with care exercised In making loans, insure a safe depository for saving accounts. School
teachers, clerks, mechanics, employees iv factories and shops, laborers, etc., will find it con
venient to make deposits in small amounts. CHILDREN'S SAVING DEPOSITS received in
sums of 25 cents and upward. Remittances may be scut by draft or Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express.
:;- I I limps
5 PER CKN'T INTEREST ON DEPOSITS.
Main Street Savings Bank and Trust Co.
NO. 438 SOUTH MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES, CAL.
Incorporated uct. 28th, 1889.
CAPITAL STOCK, - $200,000
J. B. LANKERSHIM, Prest. F. W. DhVAN, Cashier. CHAB. FORMAN, Vice-Prest.
5-cent Deposit Stamps for Sale at Stores in different parts of the city.
Deposits will be received in sums of from one dollar to five thousand dollars. Term deposits
in sums of fifty dollars and ovei.
We declare a dividend early in January aud July of each year. Its amount depends on our
earnings. Five per cent, on term and from three to four on ordinary.
Mouey to loan on mortgages. Bonds and dividend paying stocks bought and sold.
Incorporated Oct. 38,1889.
INCREASE OF TOTAL HESOUHCEB.
January Ist, 1880 , 8110,871.37
April Ist. XB9O 191,715.92
July Ist, 1800 i 587.711.36
October Ist, 1890 35M.804.46
January Ist. 1891 389,403.86
March Otli, 1891 440,048.19
■JpARMERS AND MERCHANTS BANK OF
LOS angeles, cal.
Capital (paid up) $500,000
Surplus and Profits 643,000
Total $1,143,000
officers:
Isaias W. Hellman President
Herman W. Hellman Vice-President
John Milner Cashier
H. J. Fleishman Assistant Cashier
DIRECTORS.
L. L. Bradbury, Emeline Childs, J. B. Lanker
shim, C. E. Thorn, 0. Ducommun, H. W. Hell
man, L. C. Goodwin, A. Glassell, I. W. Hell
man.
STOCKHOLDERS.
W. H. Perry, J. B. Lankershim. Chas. Du
commun, Domingo Amestoy, Sarah J. Lee,
Emeline Childs, Sarah J. Loop, L. L. Bradbury,
T. L. Duque, Jacob Kuhrts. Louis Polnski, F.
Lecouvreur, Estate D. Solomon, Prestley C.
Baker, L. C. Goodwin, Philippe Gamier, A.
Haas, Cameron E. Thorn, Oliver H. Bliss, Chris.
Kenne, Estate O. W. Childs, ...ndrew Glassell,
Herman W. Hellman, Isaias W. Hellman. jul
NATIONAL BANK OF LOS ANGELES.
CAPITAL STOCK $200,000
RESERVE $255,000
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY.
K. F. SPENCE President
J. D. BICKNELL Vice-President
J. M. ELLIOTT Cashier
G. B. SHAFFER Assistant Cashier
Directors—E. F. Spence, J. D. Bicknell, S. H.
Mott, Wm. Lacy, H. Mabury, J. M. Elliott.
lul
TOB ANGELES NATIONAL BANK,
* Cor. Firßt and Spring streets.
Capital $500,000 00
Surplus 80,000 00
Total $580,000 00
GEO. H. BONEBRAKE President
JOHN BRYSON, SR Vice-President
F. C. HOWES Cashier
E. W. COE Assistant Cashier
No interest paid on deposits.
DIRECTORS.
Dr. W. G. Cochran, H. H. Markham,
Perry M. Green, John Brysou, Br.,
Dr. H. Slnsabaugh, F. C. Howes,
George H, Bonebrake. Warren Gillelen.
No interest paid on deposits.
Exchange for sale on all the principal cities
of the United States and Euro De. mW
rpHE NATIONAL BANK OF CALIFORNIA,
Corner of Spring and Second streets,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAL $250,000
BOARD OF DIRECTORS:
Dr. W. L. Graves, E. F. C. Klokke. O. T. John
son, W. Hadley, Dan McFariand, M. H. Sher
man. Fred Eaton, John Wolfskih, Tho*, R.Baru.
J. M. C. Marble, President,
O. H. Churchill, Vice-President,
Perry Wildman, Asst. Cashier.
10-31 A. Hadley, 2d Asst. Cashier.
E. F. Spence, John N. Hunt,
Pres't. Secy and Treas.
Savings Bank of Southern California,
Southeast corner Spring and Court streets,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAL, - - - $100,000
DIRECTORB:
Geo. H. Bonebrake, H. L. Drew, J. M. Elliott,
C. N. Hasson, F. C. Howes, John B. Hunt,
Hiram Mabury, E. F Spence.
Interest paid on deposits. Money to loa ou
first-class real estate. . 3-26-12 m
HE UNIVERSITY BANK OF LOS ANGELES,
No. 317 New High street.
Capital stock fully paid up $100,000
Suralru 40.000
R. M. WIDNEY President
D. O. MILTIMORE Vice President
GEO. L. ARNOLD Cashiei
DIRECTORS.
R. M. Widney, D. O. Miltimore, 8. W. Little, 0.
M.Wells, John McArthur, C.A.Warner, L.J. P.
Morrill.
General Banking business, and loans on first
class real estate solicited. Buy and sell first
clnss stocks, bonds and warrants. Parties wish
ing to invest in first-class securities on either
long or short time can be accommodated.
ANGELES SAVINGS BANK,
130 North Main street.
Capital $100,000
L. C. GOODWIN President
W. M. CASWELL Secretary
DIRECTORS.
L W. Hellman, John E. Plater
Robert Baker, J. B. Laukershlm,
L. C. Goodwin.
Term deposits will be received iv sums ol
$100 and over. Ordinary deposits in sums of
$10 and over.
Money to loan on first-class real estate.
Los Angeles. July 1. 1889. jul-tf
QALIFORNIA BANK,
Cor. Broadway and Second St-., Los Angeles,
Subscribed Capital $500,000
Paid up Capital $300,000
Surplus $ 20,000
directors:
Hervey Llndley, J. C. Kays, E. W. Jones,
G. W. Hnges, Sam. Lewis.
T, 0. Witmer President
T, Frankenfleld Vice-President
T. J. Weldon, Cashier.
J. M. Witmer, Assistant Cashier.
General Banking and Exchange Business
transacted. ml-4m
rpHE CITY BANK, ~~
A 37 South Spring street.
Capital Stock $300,000
A. D. CHILDRESS President
IOHNB. PARK Cashior
directors.
W. T. Childress, Polndexter Dunn
J. J. Schallert, E. E. Crandall,
John S. Park, R. G. L~nt,
A. D. Childress.
General banking. Fire and burglar proof safe
deposit boxes rented at from $3 to $20 per an
num. m 4 12m
ANGELES COUNTY BANK,
Los Angelep, Cal,
Capital Stock Paid Up, (100,000.
Surplus, $118,000.
JOHN E. PLATER President
R. B. BAKER Vice-President
GEO. H. STEWART Cashiei
directors:
R. S. Baker, Lewellyn Bixby,
Jotharn Bixby, Geo. H. Stewart
S. B. Dewey, Geo. W. Prescolt,
John E. Plater.
Buy and Sell Exchange on San Francisco,
New York, London, Paris, Berlin and Frank
fort.
Receive Money on open account and certifi
cate of deposit, and do a general banking and
exchange business. Jul
State Loan and Trust Co.
OF" LOS ANGELES.
Subscribed Capital •1,000,000.
Capital Paid Dp 5625,000.
BANKING ROOM, N. W. CORNER SPRING
AND SECOND STREETS, BRYBON
BONEBRAKE BLOCK.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS.
GEORGE H. BONEBRAKE, President
JOHN BRYSON, SR. ( ~,„„ p „ oM „ t .
W H PERRY | Vice-Presidents.
A. E. FLETCHER, Cashier.
J. F. TOWELL, Genl. Manager.
W. G. Cochran. P. M. Green.
H. J. Woollacott, Wm. H. Crocker.
O.T. Johnson, San Francisco,
L. W. Dennis, A. A. Hubbard.
We act as trustees for corporations and estat
Loan money on first-class real estate
collaterals Keep choice securities for Bale.
Pay interest ou savings deposits. Bai i.
I posit boxes for rent. Best fire Insu.
i eoiapanlc. represented. Applications for i«i i s
reoefved from Dorrowers in person or by mall.
MEDICAL.
TO THE UNFORTUNATE 1
f^l' its
Weakness, Impoteney and Lost Manhood per
manently cured. The sick and afflicted should
not fail to call unon him. The Doctor has trav
eled extensively iv Europe and inspected thor
oughly the various hospitals there, obtaining a
great deal of valuable information, which he li
competent to impart to those in need of his
services. The Doctor cures where others faiL
Try him. DR. GIBBON will make no oharge
unless he effects a cure. Persons at a distance
CURED AT HOME. All communication!
strictly confidential. All letters answered In
plain envelopes.
Send ten dollars for a package of medicine
Call or write. Address DR. J. F. GIBBON, Boa
1,957, San Francisco, Cal,
Mention Ton Angeles Herald. 07-12 m
LUMBER YARD
Kerekhoff-Cuzner
MILL AND LUMBER CO.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Main Office: LOS ANGELES. Wholesale Yard
at SAN PEDRO.
Branch Yards—Pomona, Pasadena, Lamanda,
Azusa, Burbauk. Planing Mills—Los Angeles
and Pomona. Cargoes furnished to order.
J. M. Griffith, President.
H. G. Stevenson, Vice-Pres. and Treat,
T. E. Nichols, Secy. E. L. Chandler, Snpt
J. M. GRIFFITH COMPANY,
Lumber Dealers
Aud Manufacturers of
DOGRS, WINDOWS, BLINDS, STAIRS,
Mill work of every description.
934 N. Alarnoda Street, Loa Angeles.
jul tf
J. A. HENDERSON, WM. F. MARSHALL
President. Secretary.
J. R. SMURR,
Vice President and Treasurer.
SOUTHERN "CALIFORNIA
LUMBER CO.
350 East First Street.
9-19-5 m Los Angeles, California!
CLARK & HUMPHREYS
Dealers in all kinds of
L. U M B E RI
YARD—San Mateo and Seventh-st. Bridge,
General Business Office, 125 West Second st,,
Burdick Block.
P. 0. Box 1235. Telephone 15 9.
• 12-27-3 m
PERRY, MOTT <& GO'S
I LUMBER YARDS
AND PLANING MILLS,
No. 70 Commercial Street >nl tf
CATARRH CURED, health and sweet breath
secured, by Shiloh's Catarrh Remedy. Price SO
3 cents Nasal Injector free. For sale by Helnie
- man, 222 N. Main, or Trout, Sixth and Broad
way.
5

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