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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, May 19, 1891, Image 7

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THE MILLER MURDER
Testimony Given at the In
quest Yesterday.
The Police Think They Have
Secured a Clue.
Witness Nelson Made to View the
Dead Man.
Theories So Far Nothing But Guess
"Work—Nelson Views the Corpse >
Without Emotion—The Evi
dence at the Inquest.
The developments in the Miller
murder yeßterday were not of a very
startling character. The detectives are.
busily engaged working on the case, and
have a slight flue, which, however, it
would not be advisable to make public
at the present time.
The stranger who was drinking Satur
day afternoon with the deceased proved
to be a Joseph Nelson. He is a stolid
looking German, and has not been in
the city any great length of time. He
claims to be a railroad man, and at the
inquest yesterday testified that he came
up from Ban Diego about two weeks ago.
Before he was swoin, he was taken out
in the rear room and shown the body.
If the visit was intended to frighten him,
or to make him manifest some indica
tions of guilt, it did not have tbe desired
effect.
Nelson gare his testimony in a very
direct manner, and did not contradict
himself on any material point, and his
story tallied in the main with the other
witnesses who had preceded him.
Mrs. Miller was too ill to appear at
the inquest. She sent Coroner Weldon
word in regard to the name and nativity
of her husband. His full name was
George Washington Miller.
Dr. Kannon stated to a Herald re
porter that both wounds on the head
could have been made by a hard jab
with a billiard cue in the hands of a
strong man.
A detective yesterday stated that he
had noticed blood on the end of one of
the cues.
It is also believed that death was not
instantaneous, on account of deceased
having bled so profusely.
Theories are plentiful, however, but
they are only guesswork at present.
TUB INQUEST.
The inquest touching on the death of
George W. Miller was commenced yes
terday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Quite a
number of witnesses were examined,
but nothing that had any particular
bearing on the murder was adduced.
John Wool ley sworn: I have been
working for George Miller at the Carl
ton billiard hall. Miller was very drunk,
and about 7 o'clock he went in a rear
card room and went to sleep on a sofa.
(Atthe request of Coroner Weldon the
witness drew a diagram of the different
rooms). I went back at about 7:30 and
locked the door of the room in which
Miller was sleeping. It was the door
leading from the room-into the hall
way. 1 never saw him again until
George Miles requested me to wake
Miller."
The witness related at length the
story of finding Miller dead, all of which
has already appeared in the Herald.
"The room wasjdark when I entered.
I did not notice any blood till I got a
light. At about 10 o'clock I noticed
that the door of No. 4 was closed. I no
ticed him with a watch at 9 o'clock in
the morning. Only one stranger that I
noticed. He was drinking with Miller
at 10 o'clock. He wore a gray coat and
vest and was a short, thick set man. He
was drinking at the bar when Miller
said to me:
" 'Jack, here is a man I don't Know
anything about, but I am going to have
a drink with him.'
"I afterward played four games of pool
With the stranger. He was not under
the influence of liquor. The last i saw
of him was at 5:30 that evening."
W. A. Van Sickle sworn: "I am a
clerk. I went into the Carlton about
11; played billiards with Woolley until
about 11:40. I went with Woolley to
wake up Miller. Woolley got over with
a ladder, and I got on top of the ladder.
Woolley shook Miller, and a few seconds
after said: 'My God, there is something
wrong with Miller P J I got down and
struck a light. We then saw that Mil
ler was dead on the sofa."
Mark Donahue sworn: "I am a porter
by occupation. I went into the Carlton
about 10:45. I did not hear any noise
while I was in the room. I stayed there
until the murder was discovered."
-Harry Tennicliffe testified that he was
with Mark Donahue Saturday night,
and his testimony was corroborative of
the former witness.
George H. Miles sworn: "I am one of
tbe proprietors of the Carlton saloon.
George W. Miller was my partner. I
came on watch at noon Saturday.
George was there and had bis buggy
outside. He drank a good deal; had
plenty of money and displayed his
wealth. Just belore going off watch a
man came in whom I had never seen
before, and asked for Bill Rivers.
Miller talked with the stranger." The
witness then related substantially the
same story as already published in re
gard to Miller going to sleep in the rear
room and the discovery of the murdered
man. "In the early part of the evening
I went into a room occupied by Ea
Lewis to take a drink with him. There
were several young men in another
room at the time I went into the room
to have a drink. I would know the
stranger if I saw him again. He was an
old man about fifty years old."
E. L. Lewis, sworn: "I was in the
Carlton last Saturday night. I was in
one of the card rooms about half an
hour. I heard some one snoring in the
adjoining room when I left about 9
o'clock. I heard no scuffling while I
was in the room."
C. M. Stott, sworn: "I was in the
Carlton Saturday night. I was in one
of the card rooms. There were several
others in tbe room with me. Left just
before 10. Did not hear any snoring or
scuffling."
John Goodwin, sworn: "Went into
the Carlton about 8:30 o'clock Sat
urday night. Was in one of the rooms
about an hour. Did not hear any unu
sual noise or any groaning."
Joseph Nelson sworn: "I am a railroad
man. I live on Wilmington street. I
work for the Santa Fe railway. I think
I saw Miller on Saturday. First met
him Saturday afternoon at the Carlton.
Never saw the deceased be fore Saturday.
I had several drinks with him. I saw
him display a $20 bill. He was a little
drunk and wanted to make a bet. I
was not in the Carlton after 6 o'clock. I
was never in one of the card rooms. I
went in there tv inquire about a friend
named Rivers."
Officer J. F. McGuire sworn: "I was
called to the Carlton Saturday night and
found George W. Miller dead on the
lounge. The body was cold."
Dr. M. M. Kannon sworn :"I made
an autopsy on the body of G. W. Miller.
The body was that of a well nourished
man." The doctor then gave an able
exposition of the wounds and stated that
death must have resulted within two
hours of the time the body was found.
Either of the wounds might cause in
stantaneous death.
George Gerhkins: "lam a barkeeper
at the Carlton. 1 was there Saturday
evening between 9 and 10. Was
not in any of the card rooms.
I noticed a stranger there. He said he
had come from Salt Lake City. He
drank with Miller. He did not appear
to be drunk. Did not see the stranger
there that evening. Saw him go to the
rear of the saloon with Miller."
Joseph Nelson, recalled: "I am work
ing for the Santa Fe just at present. I
came from San Diego two weeks ago."
Owing to the absence of one of the
witnesses, the inquest was continued
until 10 o'clock this morning. The wit
ness is a teamster who saw someone
rushing out the alley back of the Carl
ton at about 11 o'clock.
Southern California I:mule Company.
San Francisco, May 18.—The South
ern California Ramie company was in
corporated today with the following di
rectors : Sol Ephraim, O. M. Oakley,L.
Haight, Eugene O. Davis, H. A. Brown,
Charles Gore and Percy L. Davis. The
purposes of the corporation are to culti
vate and manufacture ramie fibre and
to manufacture it into commercial com
modities.. Of a capital stock of $200,000,
$70,000 has been Subscribed.
„ Humors of a Wreck,
Kansas City, May 18.—Mrs. A. A.
Center, of Pottsdam, New York, who
has been visiting at the home of W. M.
Morgan, says a bridge on the Atchison
at Albuquerque lell last Friday,
carrying with it a passenger
train, two hours ahead of tho tram by
which she was traveling. Mrs. Center
says it waß reported twelve or fourteen
people were killed. No telegraphic re
port of such a wreck has been received.
The Encyclical Distributed.
Rome, May 18.— The long expected
encyclical of the pope upon social ques
tions has been distributed among all the
cardinals. The synopsis recently pub
lished, presented the main points.
THE PRESIDENT'S PLEASANT TRIP.
He Sees, tho South and West at Their
Best —Launching the Monterey.
President Harrison and party have had
one of the most delightful excursions on
record. Their progress through the south
was marked by great enthusiasm; at every
point there were rousing receptions, unlim
ited hand shaking and considerable oratory.
The president's speeches in reply to ad
dresses of welcome have been well received.
The excursion train was a revelation even
in these days of luxurious travel. It con-
A CHAT IN THE OBSERVATION CAB,
[From Harper's Weekly.]
Bis ted of five palatial coaches containing
smoking apartments, dining and drawing
rooms, bath rooms, library and barber
shop. Mrs. Harrison's ia described as *
paradise in white and gilt.
At San Francisco the festivities partook
of a royal character. The city was hand
somely decorated, and the party was re
ceived with every form of enthusiasm.
One of its features was a trip down the
beautiful bay and ten miles ont to sea.
The party embarked on the steamer City
of Pueblo, and was followed by the war
ship Charleston, the government steamer
Madrono and the revenue cutters Rush
and Corwin, which fired salutes of twenty
one guns. On other vessels in the harbor
it is estimated 20,000 people were assem
bled in honor of the event.
Upon returning the president assisted in
the launch of the Monterey. A platform
was built around the bow of the vessel for
the accommodation of the president and
other distinguished guests. As Mrs. Har
rison touched the electric button which
sent the vessel gliding into the bay a band
played the national air.
The Monterey, which is intended for
coast defense purposes, carries a heavy
battery and thick armor. She is expected
to be able to resist the heaviest vessel that
may be sent to attack seaboard cities of
the United States. She is a twin screw
vessel, 256 feet in length. Her extreme
THE MONTEREY.
beam is 59 feet; mean draught, seagoing
trim, \"<M feet; horse power, 5,400, and
speed, 16 knots. Her displacement in fight
ing trim is 5,000 tons, and she is fitted with
submersing tanks, into which water is ad
mitted when preparing! for action, and
which bring the ship lower in the water
aud Increase her displacement by 500 tons.
Of Interest to Ladies.
Ladies' Fine Shoes of B. C. Burt's make re
duced from $7.00 to $3.50 a pair, in order to
clear them out. The Mammoth, 315 and 317
South Spring street.
Pabst's Blue Ribbon Beer
Is the finest brewed. Nothing better as a tonic.
California Wine Company, Sole Agent.
m .
Eucaloline
Will cuie the worst ease of piles known.
New shapes again pouring in the millinery
department from New York, at the New York
Bazaar, 148 North Spring street.
Ask for the "Independence," the healthiest
cordial in the market
CATARRH CURED, health and sweet breath
secured, by Shiloh's Catarrh Remedy. Price 50
cents Nasal Injector free. For .sale by Heinze
man, 222 N. Main, or Trout, Sixth and Broad
way.
Use German family soap.
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD: TUESDAY MORNING, MAY .19, 1891.
CHILDREN IN OPERA.
THE PRESENTATION OF GOLDEN
HAIR AND TBE THREE BEARS.
The Little Ones Do Good Work—Features
of the Performance—A Full List of
Those Who Participated.
The little folks were in their element
last evening. For weeks the young ones
had conjured up the presentation of the
Golden Hair and the Three Bears, and
they were all anxiety all day yesterday.
The Grand opera house was well filled
last evening when the curtain went up
for the first act. The little ones did
splendidly, and their parents in the
audience watched them with unfeigned
delight. Little Una Fairweather made
a very graceful Golden Hair, and Miss
Alice Austermell, the Woodland Queen,
sang and acted very acceptably. A. W.
Hare showed himself to be possessed of
a splendid voice, and his singing was
much admired. Misses Florence Auster
mell, Tillie Rusche, Iva West and Fern
West acted their parts very cred
itably, their singing being very
much enjoyed. Miss Annie Dunn
was a sweet and cunning
Will o' the Wisp. Malcolm Frazer was
immense as Big Bruin. Miss Annie
Hare captivated the audience as
"Mummy Muff," and little Leonora
Mackenzie made a clever Tiny Cub and
looked exquisite in her pretty costume.
"Golden Hair and the Three Bears"
is a romantic opera. Especial attention
was paid to tableaux, and the artistic
effect deserves mention. The following
named participated in the production
last evening: k
Golden Hair Little Una Fairweather
Woodland Queen Miss Alice Austermell
Bard Mr. A. W. Hare
Faithful Florence Austermell
Lightfoot Tillie Rusche
Frailty Iva West
Airy Fern West
Will o' Wisp Annie Dunti
Big Bruin Mr. Malcolm Frazer
Mummy Mufi* Miss Annie Hare
Tiny Cub Miss Lenora Mackenzie
Spirits of the Night: Mattie Hare, Anita
Brown.
Captains: Frank Fanning, George Hare.
Forest Warden: Robbie Burns.
Queen's Herald and Page: Paul Brown.
Dots: Maudie Adams, Hazel Budinger.
Queen's Attendants: May Williams, Jennie
Jones, Louise Bosbyshell, Agnus Hawley, Flos
sie Dodge, Edna Murphy.
•Nymphs: Iris.Virglnia Blennerhas<iet: Daph
ne, Maria Russel; Philomela, Anita Brown; Ca
milla, Mattie Hare.
Zephyrs: Fannie Farrell, Ada Ford.
Tiny Sweethearts: Juanlta Austin, Ida Hot
ter, Vera Hes, Ellen Green, Bessie George, Jen
nie Molette, Bessie Hare, Vera King, Betsy
Harndon, Ora King, Mabel Molette, Stella lies,
Jessie Gordon.
Little Bweetthoughts: Maud Budinger, Josie
Baker. Mamie Spencer, Florence Folsom. Lizzie
Busch, Ethel Levi.
Dainty Flowerets: Julia Baker, Sadie Hare.
Annie Elser, May Robson, Maud Haines, Lily
Robson.
Forest Prettyints: Belle Baswitz, Rookie
Quinn, Maud Roney, Amelia Brown, Georgie
Basserman, Sadie Green.
Woodland Guards: Robbie Burns, George
Hare, Frank Fanning, Walter Brown, Edgar
Galbraith, Bryant Denis, Morgan Galbraith,
Lewis Baswitz, Fred George, Oscar Brooks, Oscar
Leigh Ford, Silas Dunsinore.
The Harmony orchestra, consisting of
the following young gentlemen, per
formed during the evening:
C. Pemberton, A. Brownstein, D.
Brownatein, R. Klages, G. Wilson, C.
Wilson, N. R. Martin, Add Day, Frank
Sigler, Will Lake, Clarence _ Stevens,
Geo. Lawrence, Alex M. Tuthill.
Miss Ethel Haines presided at the
piano; Henri Fairweather was the
musical director and Wilfrida Fair
weather officiated as stage manager.
The operetta will be presented this
evening for the last time.
IN SOCIETY.
The Chesterfield club will not have a
dance at Redondo hotel, as previously
announced. The club give their next
dance at tbe Bellevue Terrace on the
29th.
a
» *
Miss Klokke and Miss Jevne will en
tertain a few of their friends to a picnic
at Eaton's canon today.
m
* »
Invitations are out for an equestrian
party on Friday evening.
4)
» »
Miss Lee Reddy leaves today for ber
home in Lexington, Ky.
**.
Miss Millie Kurt* will give a birthday
party Wednesday evening in honor of
Mies Presence of Chicago.
#**
The Ladies' Aid society of the Vernon
Congregational church will give an ice
cream social at Niles's Hall, on the cor
ner of Compton and Vernon avenues, on
Wednesday evening. A capital pro
gramme has been prepared. All are
cordially invited to attend.
» #
The Alhambra Tennis club will enter
tain the tennis clubs of Southern Cali
fornia next Saturday at Alhambra.
* *
Mesdames Hutchinson, Henderson,
Powers, Truitt, and Misses Peabody,
High, Stewart, Dawson and Hazeltiue
picnicked at Eaton's canon last Satur
day.
»*#
Miss May E. McGregor of Chicago is
expected to arrive next week.
**•
The engagement of E. P. Johnson and
Miss Florence Perry has been made pub
lic.
The Signal corps ball takes place next
Thursday evening.
Temperance Temple, cor. Temple and
Broadway.
Come and hear Dr. Sivarta this evening, and
see the great paintings of the New City. The
only representation of the coming city ever
painted. Subject: The New Jerusalem, with
Its Gates, Temples and Mansions, as We Shall
B.uild Them. Lecture to commence at 7:30.
Admission, 25 cents.
Royal Baking Powder
of Greatest Strength
"As a result of my investigations I find
the Royal Baking Powder far superior to the
others. It is pure, contains none but whole
some ingredients, and is of greatest strength.
" F. X. Valade,
" Public Analyst, Ontario,
"Dominion of Canada."
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
Monday, May 19.
Edwin M Brown to W T Hpillman—Agree
ment to reconvey 40% acres in lot 47 Watt's
sub of Ro San Rafael; $5000.
Mrs Ella Phillips to Mrs Helen P Rice—Part
of bl 49 Pomona; $1250.
Helen P Rice to Lewis -Wright—Part of bl 49
Pomona 3-90; $1000.
J1) Bethune to Ruth J Orr—Lot 6 Scott's add
to Santa Monica; $1000.
Mrs N J Paulk to Mrs Mattie A Wakefield—
Lot 7 and part of lot 0 bl D Bonnie Brae trt;
$sooo.
N J Paulk to M A Wakefield-Lot on W line of
DeLacy st 228U ft N W from N line of Colora
do st; $1500.
H L Macneil, H C Hubbard, Geo C Hagar and
R M Widney, trustees to J C Wallace and G C
Wallace—E part of bl 195 Ro Ex Mis de San
Fernando 37-5 and water to correct deed 682—
103; 11410.
B E Wbite to Albert Biles—Lots 7 and 8 bl 25
X Los Angeles 3—194; $2500.
James A Paxton to Margaret J Rupe—Part of
NEW sec 8 T 2 8 R 13 W; $3200.
William Beddeme to R M Town—Lot 4bl 4
Rivera 28—31, lot Abl 1 H M Ames' first sub
Veruon 24—42, lot 4 bl 9 Downey City 2—434;
11750.
Robert M Town to William Beddome —That
part of lot 137 W of San Fernando aye Lanker
shim Ranch Land and Water Co 31—30; $3750
H L Macneil, H C Hubbard, George C Hagar
and R M Widney, trustees to Mary L Dryer-
Pant of bl 193 Ro Ex Mis de San Fernando and
Water37—s; $1029.
Milton D Painter to William Gray—Lots 5 and
6 bl H, M D Painter's sub of part of bl Q, Pain
ter and Ball trt 18—26: $1340.
Ella Curry to Jas W Eyestone— Und % of lots
5 and 6 bl 11 lots 46 47 50 and 51 in bl 6 La
in and a Park 7—93; $1200.
E J Baldwin to T P Lukens—4o acres in Ro
San Francisquito: $6000.
E J Baldwin to E E Jones—2o acres in Ro San
Francisquito; $3000.
Milton D Painter to J 8 Bartlett-Part of E M
of lot 4 O'Hara trt 31—67: $4225.
Elmer T Kooken to E W Spencer—Part of sec
28 T 8 N R 16 W and water; $1100.
SUMMARY.
Number over $1000 18
Amount $48,654
Nunber under $1000 15
Amount 3,805
Number nominal 10
Total $52,459
Note—Transfers for which the conuiderationis
under $1000 are not published ln these col
umns.
If Ton Feel Dry
Ring up the California Wine Company, tele-
E Hone 110, and order a dozen of Pabst s Blue
.Ibbon Beer, the best bottled beer in the mar
ket, or leave orders at 222 8. Spring St.
All on Account of Heels.
Large lot of Misses' and Children's Shoes are
being sold at half price on account of heels.
Mammoth, 315 and: 317 South Spring street.
9 powt^
A Pure Cream of Tartar Powder.
Superior to every other known.
Used in Millions of Homes—
40 Years the Standard.
Delicious Cake and Pastry, Light Flaky
Biscuit, Griddle Cakes, Palatable
and Wholesome.
Jib other baking powder does such work.
" Familiar in Millions of Mouths
as any Household Word."
The Times, London.
Apollinaris
"THE QUEEN OF TABLE WATERS."
" The Apollinaris Spring yields
enough water' not only for present
requirements, but also for those of a
future which is still remote."
" The existing supply is adequate
for filling forty million quart bottles
yearly"
" The volume of gas is so great
that it is dangerous to approach
the spring on a windless day."
The Times, London, 20th Sept. rBQo.
Notice for Publication of Time for
Proving- Will, Etc.
IN THE BDPERIOR COURT, STATE OF CALl
fornta, County of Los Angeles, ss.
In the matter of the estate of Jean Begue,
deceased.
Notice is hereby given, that Tuesday, the 2d
day of June, 1891, at 10 o'clock a.m. of said day,
at the courtroom of this Court, Department Two
thereof, in the City of Los Angeles, County of
Los Angeles, and State of California, has been
appointed as the time and place for hearing
the application of Luisa Alaniz de Begue, pray
ing that a document now on file in this Court,
purporting to be the last will and testament of
the said deceased, be admitted to piobate, that
letters testamentary be issued thereon to Luisa
Alaniz de Begue, at which time and place all
persons interested therein may appear and
contest the same.
Dated June 2,1891.
T. H. WARD, County Clexk.
By F. E. Lowry, Deputy.
' 519 IQt
rpHE NEW VIENNA BUFFET.
j THE ONLY FAMILY RESORT j
114 and 116 COURT ST., opp. Courthouse.
F. KERKOW, Proprietor.
Free Entertainment and Concert Nightly.
Matinee on Wednesday from 2 to 4.
THE
: KINQSLEY FAMILY.
Fine Lunch and French Dinners from 11 to 3 p.m.
Imported Pilsner-Krlanger. '■
Lemp's Extra Pale on draught. 4-29 lm
THREEJREfIT MEN!
We have not yet had the pleasure of measuring either President Harrison,
Ex-President Cleveland or John L. Sullivan.
To tell the truth, we are not anxious to obtain their custom. We are satis
fied with the generous patronage of the people of California, who know how to
appreciate local enterprise and to whom we can especially recommend our
Fine Clothing, Furnishing Goods,
-a AN D HATS, k-
Thie Week we are showing some High Novelties in
ENGLISH CHECK SACK SUITS
—NATS—
$12.50, $16.00, $18.00, $20.00, $22.50 and $25.00.
The above lines are exclusive patterns, confined strictly to us, and cannot be
found elsewhere.
QUITE NEW AND STRIKING
Tarn O'Snanter Straw Hats For Boys!
IN ALL COLORS, WITH COMBINATION CROWNS,
$1.25 ! .
GLOBE CLOTHING CO.
H. C. Proprietor,
240-251 SPRING ST., NEAR THIRD,
BEN. L. MORRIS, Manager.
Before using the Anti-Vermin Celebrated and Successfully ' t
. ~„,. „ ... Tried Vermin and Moth
and Moth Remeay. . Remedy
ANTI-VERMIN AND MOTH REMEDY.
MP* By putting this powder under the edges of carpets, I guarantee that there will be no
Moths. It has the same effect if used for upholstered furniture, woolen goods, wearing ap
parel, etc. Address all communications to JOSEPH MEHLKR, San Bernardino, Cal., Sole
Agent for the Pacific Coast. For sale by C. F. HEIN ZEMAN. 222 N. Main St.; C. H. HANCE.
177 and 179 N. Spring st.; F. J. GIESE, 103 N. Main St., aud all leading druggists. 5-1 if
i 1 ,v
AMTJSBMENTB. J
NOVELTY * THEATER.fc-
North Main, near First Street.
WEIEIK mAY 16. |
FAMILY MATINEES EVERY DAY. ' '
A HIGH CLAS9 VAUDEVILLE SHOW, REPLETE WITH MIRTH, MIMICRY AIID MUSIC!
by the following talented artists :
Alice Evans! Felix Haney! Gertie Long! Wm. Stanley! Nora Williams! Otto Eric!
Rowanpo! Billy Walsh! Nettie Carr!
AND CATULLE'S MASTERPIECE, EL.FIE, THE ANGEL OF THE AIR.
ADMISSION, lOc and 20c. :-: CURTAIN, 3:IB and 8:15 F\ M
NEW LOS ANGELES THEATER.
H. C. Wyatt, Manager.
MAY 21.
MATINEE FOR LADIES AND CHILDREN
Saturday Afternoon, May 23d.
Mrs. Frances Hodgson Burnett's famous
domestic drama,
LITTLE
LORD
FAUNTLEROY
introducing the greatest chiid actress,
LITTLE
GEOKGIE
COOPER
And the regular company.
Prices for this engagement—2sc, soc, 75c, $1.
EW LOS ANGELES THEATER.
H. C. Wyatt, Manager
THREE NIGHTS ONLY.
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday,
May astli, 26th and 27th.
Direct from New York,
Hamlin's Farce Comedy Co.
Wm. F. Mack, Lizzie Derious Daly,
Alf. Hampton, Alice Carle,
Max Arnold, Rosa France,
John Qilroy, Mollie Sherwood,
Geo. Mitchell, Lillian Markham,
Chris. Bergei, Helen Reimer,
Fred Rankin, Dudie Tracy,
8. F. Turner, Stella Ellis.
A Model Company.-N. Y. HERALD.
Presenting Paul M. Potter's Farcical Surprise,
THE FAKIR.
Wm. A. MoConnell, Manager.
QRAND OPERA HOUSE.
BENEFIT OF THE Y. M. C. A. GYMNASIUM!
Under the auspices of Ladles' Auxiliary,
MAY 18 and 19
CHILDREN'S OPERA!
GOLDEN HAIR and THE THREE BEARS!
Magnificent production.
CHORUS OF 70 CHILDREN !
FOREST QUEEN! ANCIENT BARD!
WOODLAND GUARDS! NYMPHS!
WILL '0 THE WISP, ETC.
Admission, 50c: Children under 12, half
price. Reserved Beats can be procured with
out extra charge at Brown's music store, 111 N.
Spring St., on and after Tnursday, May 14th.
THE PALACE,
Corner First and Spring Sts.
The most Magnificent and Popular Resort in
the city.
FREE CONCERTS
Br THE
CELEBRATED PHILHARMONIC SOLOISTS
In connection with tbe most celebrated
CELLO -:- PLAYER -:- MEYER,
Every night from 8 to 12.
Commercial Lunch every day from 11 to 2
o'clock. Dining room epen day and night.
JOSEPH SCHURTZ, PROPRIETOR.
4-Stf
ANHEUBKB- BUBCH CONCERT HALL,
403 N. Main street.
QHAN D
FREE CONCERT I
Every Evening by
MISS ADELE GREVE'S LADIES' ORCHESTRA.
Anheuser-Busch Beer on draft, 5 cents.
KAHLg DUTZLKR & Co., E. L. SIEWEKB,
4-8-tf Proprietors. Manager.
JJOB ANGELES NATATORIUM
NOW OPEN FOR THE SEASON 1
! WA«M SWIMMING BAT HI \
Hot and Cold Batbs for Ladies and Gentlemen
ln Porcelain Tubs at all hours.
Large Dressing Room in connection with
Ladles' Baths.
W. J. McCALDIN, Pres't and Manager.
3-19-3 m
-piERDINAND MEINE,
MANAGER MEINE BROB. ORCHESTRA
Has moved back into the city, and is now going
to attend to business very closely. I have opened
an
OFFICE AT NO. 268 S. MAIN ST., OPPOSITE
THIRD ST.
I can furnish Fust-class Music for Balls, Par
ties, Soirees, Receptions. Can furnish any num
ber wanted. 4-22-1 m
THAT HACKING COUGH can be quickly
cured by Sbiloh's Cure. We guarantee ft For
sole by Heiuzeman, 222 N. Main, or Trout,
Sixth and Broadway.
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