OCR Interpretation


Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, May 22, 1891, Image 5

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84025968/1891-05-22/ed-1/seq-5/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 5

STORIES OF BARRETT.
OPINIONS OF THE DEAD ACTOR'S
NEIGHBORS IN WALPOLE.
Where Be Used to llecuporate and Where
He Found Ills Charming Wife—Bow Bo
Was Regarded by Ills Simple Friends
Near Bis Country Borne.
Away up in the hills of Norfolk coun
ty, nestled among the woods, about a
mile and a half from the town of
Walpole, there stands what is now
known as tho Cobb Farm, but at one
time this was the home of the la
mented tragedian, Lawrence Barrett,
and as such it is known for miles around.
The old settlers delight in pointing it
out to visitors. These same i>eople also
love to speak of the good old times when
Mr. Barrett came home.
They all speak of tho tragedian as
"Mr." Barrett.
In an interview with one aged resi
dent of the locality much of the late
actor's career was learned.
"Why, yes; every one in these parts
remembers tbe young actor, and also his
charming wife. It used to be quite a
time when he retnrned after a long tour,
and it was along the shady lanes and in
pretty nooks in the woods that he sought
rest and quiet for hiH overworked brain.
"But I toll you it did not take him
long to recuperate. He would have
hardly been here a week before ho
would be wandering off into the woods,
book in hand, to study. Come, and I
will show you one of his favorite spots
where I have known Mr. Barrett to stay
for hours, rehearsing his part, with
nothing but the birds and squirrels for
his auditors, so far as ho knew. But
many is the time that a few of us neign
bors have stolen down to within earshot
of the actor and listened to his words. It
was a great treat for us all."
BAUKKTT IN LOVE.
In answer to the inquiry as to how
Mr. Barrett came to reside among them
the old gentleman gave quite a chuckle,
and with his face wreathed in smiles,
said:
"Why, bless your heart, ho fell in love
with one of our pretty girls. I say one,
because we havo always had many in this
district. She was a Mary Mayer, who
lived with her uncle, John M. Mayer,
who then resided at the old homestead.
"You see, Mary was a bright, intelli
gent girl, who had been given an excel
lent education by her father, Philip
Mayer. He kept a confectioner's store
on Tremont street, Boston, and al
though Mary lived out here with her
uncle she frequently visited her parents,
and there l>ecame acquainted with Mr.
Barrett. They formed a friendship,
which soon ripened into love, and mar
riage was the result.
"After their marriage they made the
farm their home. It was here their
charming daughters were reared and
educated, and I tell you 'papa's' home
coming every summer was quite a time
for the people of the North End. We
had grand times, and no one appeared
to enjoy them more than did the young
and at that time rising actor.
"He lived ainoug us many years, and
every one in those days had a land word
for Mr. Barrett; he was respected by all
who came in contact with him. He was
generous to a fault, and many are the
people who have lived throughout the
year on the bounty he bestowed during
his short sojourn in the summer months.
I remember that during ono of his visits
he offered to erect a house for a worthy
man and his family and pay tho whole
bill.
"It was his many acts of charity that
made him beloved by the people up here.
We had stirring times in those days. Mr.
Barrett and his friends used to make
things lively, and his genial, generous
disposition was in a measure infectious,
and had a tendency to make every one
pleasant.
HIS GENEROSITY.
"Yes, I have nothing but tho most
pleasant recollection of Mr. Barrett and
his amiable wife when they lived in
these parts.
"He did for others what few men now
adays would do with more money than
ever he possessed. For years he support
ed his mother, his widowed sister and
family and many people who had no
claim whatever upon him. He always
gave largely to any charity, aud at times
going short to do so. I remember his
sister, Miss Barrett, coming to lire at
the farm, but sho soon followed in tho
footsteps of her brother and married Mr.
Tisdale, one of our townsmen. For the
newly wedded pair he purchased a $5,000
house in Walpole.
"As the summer months began to warie
Mr. Barrett used to study very hard,
and you could meet him in the road at
all times talking to himself. It was at
these times that Mr. Barrett used to
cause his friends much »anxiety, as this
hard study was too much for his over
taxed brain, and he several times wan
dered away. On one occasion he was
caught just boarding a train at Dedham
for Boston, having walked the whole
seven miles with but little of his ordi
nary wearing apparel on. But he always
came around all right after a short rest.
"It was just pie for us country fel
lows to get Mr. Barrett to tell us some
of his experiences while on 'tho road,' as
these theater people call it.. We used to
sit on that wall, and Mr, Barrett would
hand out the cigars, %md after we were
all lit up reel off some fine stories that
would be well worth printing if I could
only remember them.
"I could tell you lots of good deeds
performed by Mr. Barrett, but as most
of the people are still alive it would
hardly b« fair. He was a most effec
tj <>uate husband, a loving father and a
mo *t estimable gentleman, and nothing
but 1 "eg re ts were expressed when he de
cided l ° l eave U8 f° r Cohassetj but what
was Wf. loss was Cohasset's.gain.''
-Boston mobe. ■
-fatal to Piety.
Woot—Win * are y° u 80 sm " e Blifkius'
piety will bo sh lived?
Van Pelt—He h » birthday yester
day, and his wife t'»ve him a fountain
pen. —Munsey's Wee kly.
Ice! Ice!
Order your ico today from the Citizen's Ice
tompany; telephone to No. HO. I *, or drop a pos
tal card to Citizen's Ice Company, Center and
Turner streets.
The Nadeau Hotel
Ii being painted with Sherwin-WMUmfi paint.
P H. Mathews, agent, cor. Second and Main sts.
Ask for the "Independence," the healthiest
--cordial in the market.
WHERE JEWSHARPS ARE MADE.
A Family of Smiths Do All the Manu
facturing Outside of New York.
The villago of Bath-on-the-Hudson,
though its manufacturing interests are
few, can boast of possessing the only
jewnharp factory in tho United States
outside of Now York city. Simple as
tho jowsharp is, it requires, nevertheless,
no little skill in construction.
The proprietor of the factory in Bath
is John Smith, and he has perfected him
self to such an extent that his work is
recognized as among the best in tho
world. The factory is a small building
situated a short distance off Third street,
and although unpretentious contains
every facility- for the manufacture of
jewsharps.
Twenty years ago, in England, Mr.
Smith began his apprenticeship at the
trade. Hearing from friends in this
country that here would be found a
better market for the sale of his spe
cialty, ho determined to emigrate. Ar
riving in New York he failed to secure
employment, and deciding to start in
business for himself he went to Troy
and opened a factory there. He was
but moderately successful in Troy, and
after a short time moved to Bath, built
a factory afid is perfectly satisfied with
the location. The Smith jowsharp is
sold principally to firms in New York,
Boston and Chicago. These firms sell
the goods to retailers throughout tho
United States.
When the tactory is running at its
fullest capacity over two gross a day are
turned out. The busiest time of the
year is that just preceding the holidays.
During this season the factory employs
five people—the proprietor, his two sons
and two other Englishmen, who live
near the factory.
The manufacture of the "harps" is an
interesting process, and but few people
are aware of the large amount of work
expended in making a jewsharpof good
tone. The frames of the instrument are
not made by Mr. Smith. He buys them
from a foundry. Upon these frames is
bestowed the least work; it is in setting
tho steel tonguo in the frame and filing
the lower portion of the frame to fit tho
tongue that the most care and skill are
required.
The first work done on a jewsharp is
to place the frame in a vise, file off the
roughness and taper down the points, so
that each side presents a sharp edge, be
tween which the tongue is to vibrate.
Tho mo» delicate work then begins. A
piece of steel wire is cut from a coil,
hammered flat at one end and left round
at the other, and tempered with the
greatest care. The flat end is then set
in the arc of the frame, and then the two
ends are carefully pressed and ham
mered until they come as close as pos
siblo to tho tongue without touching it.
The round end of the tongue is then
bent in tho form of a right angle, the
point is turned over, and the "harp" is
ready to be placed in the hands of a
finisher. There are seven sizes and four
kinds of finishing—the common, gold
bronze, lacquered and tin plated. The
harp can be toned to any pitch. To make
the tono high the tongue is made small
and pressed back toward the frame; to
make the tone '.ower it is bent forward.
Mr. Smith is not only a good maker of
the harp, but can extract quite a little
music from the little instrument. He
can also play two at once, which he
tunes so that they are in harmony, by
filing the frames.
When business is rushing Mr. Smith's
whole family is pressed into service, and
each member excels in his or her particu
lar work. Mr. Smith prophesies that
within a few years the instruments he
makes will be in more general use than
now. He has once enlarged his factory,
and expects to do so again.—Albany
Journal.
Conversational Equality.
For conversation society must not be
very unequal. By inequality Ido not
refer to tho doubtful distinction of bank
ing accounts or family trees. So far as
these aro concerned there is nothing so
democratic as conversation. But it does
demand some approach to a similarity—
not in opinions; with good temper these
may widely differ—but in manners and
taste, and, above all, in intellectual
capacity. When people are brought to
gether without care for these similarities
we know what happens. If their num
ber be large enough they invariably split
up, not by cold exclusiveness, but by
natural selection, into mutually appre
ciative groups, of which each member
has some affinity for the rest.
Where this instinctive distribution is,
through smallness of numbers or the
fussiness of a host, impossible we may
expect a dull time. All know Bret
Harte's tale of a man who had never
heard of Adam before and asked "What
was his other name?" But there havo
been talkers in real life also who had to
endure much at the hands of the igno
rant. —Gentleman's Magazine.
Superficial Judgment of Men.
In our judgment of men we are to be
ware of giving any great importance to
occasional acts. By acts of occasional
generosity weak men endeavor to re
deem themselves in their own estima
tion; vain men to exalt themselves in
that of mankind. It may be observed
that there are no men more worthless
and selfish, in the general tenor of their
lives, than some who, from time to time,
perform feats of generosity. Sentimental
selfishness will commonly vary its in
dulgences in this way, and vainglorious
selfishness will break out into acts of
munificence. But self government and
self denial are not to be relied upon for
any real strength, except in so far as
they are found to be exercised in detail.
—New York Ledger. •
Granddaughter's Granddaughter.
William Bunce, of Cochituate, became
a happy great-great-grandfather lately,
and Mrs. Neal, of this place, a lady six
ty-eight years old, his daughter, becomes
» great-grandmother. Her daughter is
Mrs. Dean, and Mrs. Dean's daughter is
Mrs, A. Lyons, who has just given birth
to a little daughter. Mr. Bunce is nine
ty- three years old and still hearty and
Strong.—Farmingham (Mass.) Tribune.
Will He Given Away.
Our enterprising druggists, R. W ..Ellis A Co.,
who cany the finest stock "of drugs, perfumer
ies, toilot articles, brushes, sponges, etc., are
giving away a large number of trial bottles of
l)r. Miles' celebrated Restorative Nervine.
They guarantee It to cure headache, dizziness,
nervous prostration, sleeplessness, the ill effects
of spirits, tobacco, coffee, etc. Druggists say it
is the greatest seller they ever knew, and ia
universally satisfactory.' They also guarantee
Dr. Miles' New Heart Cure In all cases of ner
vous or organic heart dlseate, palpitation,
pain in side, smothering, etc. Fine book on
"Nervous and Heart Diseases" free.
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD: FRIDAY MORNING, MAY 22 1891.
LINKS OF TRAVEL.
Southern Pacific Company
IMPORTANT CHANGE OF TIME
SATURDAY, MAY 2, 1801,
Trains leave and are nuo to arrive at
LOB ANOKLKN (AIICAUR DEPOT),
Fifth street, dally, as follows:
Leave For destination. Arr. hroin
3:50p.m Banning 10:15 ».m.
5:10 p. m .Punning 10:00 p. m.
9:05 a. m Colton 4:20 p. m
3:50 p.m Colton 10:15 a.m.
5:10 p. ni Demiug and East 10:00 p. m.
5:10 p. m. ... Xl Paso and East.... 10:09 ).. m.
5:40 p.m. China 8:37 a.m.
9:25 a. m. j 10 "* BM, j 3:27 p.m.
""I S:,r, *' m '
10:40 p. in. Ogden and East, Ist class 2:30 p. m.
1:35 p. in. Ogden and Fast, 2d class 7:25 a m
10:40 p. m Portland, Or 7:25 a. m.
9:05 a. in Riverside 10:15 a. m.
3:50 p.m Riverside 4:20p.m
5:10 p.m. Riverside 10:00p.m
9:05 a. in San Bernardino 10:15 a. m.
3:50 p.m San Bernardino 4:20 p . :
5:10p.m Han Bernardino 10:00 p.m.
.... KedUnds 10:15(a. m
9:05 a. m Rodlands 4:20p rr.
3:50 p.m. Redlands 10:00 p.m.
1:35 p.m. San Fran, and Marram'to 7:25 a. m.
10:40 p. in. San Fran, and Saoram'to 2:30 p. m.
|| 9:37 a.m. Santa Ana and Anaheim 8:55 a. m.
5:02 p. m. Santa Ana and Anaheim || 4:04 p. m.
1:35 p. m Santa Barbara 2:55 p. m.
7:25 a. m Sanln Barbara 9.05 p. m.
9:30 a m San tit Monica. B:3Ha, m.
110:25 a.in Santa Monica t 0:40>. m.
1:17p.m SanlaMonica 11:57 a.ra
5:07 p.m Santa Monica 4:28 p.m.
||0:10 p. m Santa Monica ||7:20 a. m
4:10 p. Nt Tustin 8:43 a.m.
4:40p.m Whittier 8:43 a.m.
Local and through tickets sold, baggage
checked, Pullman sleeping car reservations
made, and general information given upon ap
plication to J. M. CRAWLEY, Asst. G. Pas. Agt.,
No. 200 S. Spring St., cor. Second. CHARLES
SEYLER, Agent at Depots.
fSundays only.
|| Sundays excepted.
RICH'D GRAY, Gen. Traffic Mgr.
T. H. GOODMAN,
al 3m Gen'l Passenger Agt.
Southern California R'y Co.
"SANTA Kit ROUTE."
IN EFFECT SUNDAY, MAY 17, 1891.
Leave. Los Angeles. i Arrive.
•18:20 p. m Overland [» 2:45 p. m.
* 8:15 a.m. .San Diego Coast Line. *12:10 p.m.
* 3:05 p.m. .San Diego Coast Line. * 9:00 p.m
* 8:30 a. m. . Azusa and Pasadena . * 9:55 a. m
"10:25 a.m. . Azusa and Pasadena. * 1:25 p.m.
* 4:00 p.m. . Azusa and Pasadena. * 0:30 p.m.
* 1:25 p.m. . Azusa and Pasadena. * 7:40 a. m
t 5:22 p.m. . Azusa and Pasadena, t 4:40 p.m
{ 6:30 p.m. . Azusaand Pasadena. $ B:soa.in
"12:20p.m Pasadena * 2:45 p.m.
* 7:45a.m Pasadena * 8:50 a.m.
* 8:30 a.m. i. .San Bernardino..) * 9:55 a, m.
*12 20p.m. \ via J *2:45p.m
* 4:00 p.m. ( Pasadena ) * 6:30p.m,
•10:00 a.m. <San Berdnard'o vlai "10:15 a. m.
t 4:00 p.m. ] Riverside and Or-> * 5:39 p.m.
5 6:40 p. m. < ange ..)
* 8:30 a.m. (Overside via Pasadena * 6:30 p.m
*10:00 a. m. Riverside via Orange "10:15 a. m.
t 4:00 p.m. Riverside via Orange' 5:39 p.m
5 6.40 p. m Riverside via Orange
* 8:30 a.m. (Redl'ds & Mentone) * 9:55 a. m
'12:20 p.m. \ via \ * 6:3op.ir
t 4:00 p.m. ( Pasadena > ♦ 2:45 p.m.
*10:00 a.in. (Redl'ds & Mentonei * 5:39 p.m.
t 4:00 p.m. <viaOrange&River-> flo:lsa.m.
$ 6:40 p. m. 'side >
t12:20p.m. S. Jacinto via S. Bdno f 6:30 p.m.
iTeraecula & S. Jac. ( J
fl0:00a.m. ) viaOr'ge i E.R'vsdj r 5:39 p.m.
* 8:15 a.m SantaAua * B:soa.|iii.
* 3:05 p.m Santa Ana *12:10 p. m.
Santa Ana * 5:39 p.m.
* 5:05 p.m Santa Ana * 9:00 p.m
t 3:05 p.m.'Escondido viaC'st line tl2:lop.m.
"10:15 a.m Redondo Beach.... J 8:29 a. m,
* l:30,"p. m. ... Redondo Beach » 3.53 p.m.
* 5:25 p.m. Redondo Beach .
Redondo Beach ( 5:18 p. m.
$ 9:10 a. m Redondo Beach $ 6:19 p.m
"Daily tDaily except Sunday. $3undavs only.
ED. CHAMBERS, Ticket Agent,
First-street Depot.
CHAS. T. PARSONd, Ticket Agent
129 Noith Spring street,
Depot at foot of First street. 123
Pacific Coast S. S. Go.
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., GENERAL
Agents, San Francisco. Northern routes
embrace lilies for Portland, Ore.; Victoria, B
C, and Puget bound, Alaska, aud all coast
points.
SOUTHERN ROUTES.
Time Table for May, 1891
LEAVE SAN FRANCISCO.
For
Port Harford.... 13. S. Pomona, May 3, 11, 19
Santa Barbara... I 27, June 4.
San Pedro (3. 8. Corona, May 7, 15, 23,
San Diego J 31, June 8.
For \ S. 8. Coos Bay, May 5, 13,21,
Redondo 1 29, June 6.
San Pedro and IS. 8. Eureka. May 1,9,17,
Way Ports J 25, June 2.
LEAVE SAN PEDRO.
For 1 8. S. Corona, May 1, 9, 17,
1 25, June 2
San Diego fS. S. Pomona, May 5, 13, 21,
J 29, June 0.
LEAVE SAN PEDRO.
For IS. S. Corona, May 3,11, 19,
San Francisco... 1 27, June 4.
Port Harford.. ..IS. 8. Pomona, May 7,15, 23,
Santa Barbara... J 31, June 8.
LEAVE BAfl PEDRO AND REDONDO.
For la. S. Eureka, May 4,12, 20,
Sau Frauclsco i 28', June 5.
and fS. S. Coos Bay, May 8, 10,
Way Ports. J 24, June 1.
Cars to connect with steamers via San Pedro,
leave S. P. R. R. depot, Fifth street, Los An
geles, a£9:25 o'clock a. m.
Passengers per Coos Bay and Eureka via
Redondo, leave Santa Fe depot at 5:25 p. m.
Plans of steamers' cabins at agent'B office,
where berths may be secured.
The steamers Eureka and Coos Bay will call
regularly at Newport pier for and with freight
and passengers
The company reservo the right to change the
steamers or their days of sailing.
gjtkT-Vor passage or freight as above or for
tickets to and from all important points in
Europe, apply to
W. PARRIS, Agent,
Office, No. 124 West Second St., Los Angeles.
Los Angeles Terminal Railway Co.
Leave I>os Angeles for Leave Pasadena for
Pasadena. Los Angeles.
t 6:45 a. rat e; 00 a. m.
t 8:00 a. m 7:15 a. rr
* 9:00 a. m t 8:00 a. m.
"10:00 a. m * 9:00 a. m.
"11:00 a. m -. "10:00 a. m.
"12:01 p. m "11:00 a. m.
* 2:00 p. m...' * 1:00 p. m
* 4:00 p. in * 2:00 p. m.
* 5:25 p. m * 4:00 p. m
* 6:30 p. m * 5:25 p. m.
* 9:30 p. m " 7:00 p. m.
"11:30 p. m "10:30 p.m.
Running time between Los Angeles and Pasa
dena 30 minutes.
Leave Los Angeles for Leave Glendale for Los
Glendale. Angeles.
t 7:00 a. m t 7:50 a. m.
* 8:25 a. m *10:10 a. m.
"11:40 a. m * 1:10 p. m.
* 2:15 p. m ♦ 3:15 p. m
* 4.10 p. m .• * 5:05 p. m.
* 6:05 p. m. , * 6:40 p. m.
Runniug time between Los Angeles and Glen
dale, 30 minutes. Add 5 minutes for Verdugo
lark time.
Leave Los Angeles for Leave Altadena for
Altadena. Los Angoles.
t 6:45 a. m , ♦ 7:43 a. m
U2:01 p. m 4 1:00 p. m
» 4:00 p. m * 5:00 p. m
Running time between Los Angeles and Alta
dena, 55 minutes.
"Daily. tDaily, except Sundays. {Saturday
night only.
Special rates to excursion and picnic parties
Depot east end Downey-avenue bridge.
General offices, rooms 12,13 and 14, Burdick
block.
T. B. BURNETT, flen. Manager
]y2-tf W. WINCUP. G. P. A.
PHOTOGRAPHER.
Fine Cabinet PI otograpb,s a specialty. Price
from |3 to $4 per dozen. Guaranteed first-class
or no charge.
We excell in babies' photographs. For the
best resuits the forenoon is preferred.
137 WEST FIRST STREET,
1.19-tlni Between Main and Spring.
LINKS uic TRAVEL.
S, G. V. RAPID TRANSIT^Y
Wilson's Peak and Sierra Madre—Busses for
above points connect at Baldwin's station with
trains from Los Angeles.
Trains arrive and depart from depot, corner
of Allxo and Anderson streets, as follows:
LEAVE FOB j DESTINATION. ARRIVE FROM
7:55 a. ni ] .. Monrovia' 7:49 a. m.
11:10 a. m Monrovia 9:54 a. m.
3:10 p. vi Monrovia 2:04 p.m.
5:10 p. m Monrovia 5:04 p.m.
SUNDAYS ONLY. ~
9:30 a. m.... 1.. Monrovia" 8:49 a.m.
5:(J0 p. m | Monrovia 4:49 p. m.
Take street car or 'bns from corner of Main
and Arrailia streets direct for depot
W. Q. KERCKHOFF, H. P. JEWJTT,
al-3m Receiver Gen. Manager
Tfor redondo beach.
RKDONIH) HAIIiWAY TRAINS
On and after Monday, January 12, 1801,
Trains of this company will leave their depot,
corner of Jefferson and Orar.d avenue, connect
ing with the Ixis Angeles, cable railway and
the Main-street and Agricultural park street
car line, as follows:
SOUTH
Leave Arrive
Los Angeles. Redondo Beach.
9:00 a. m. 9:50 a.m.
10:25 a.m. 11:15 a.m.
1:30 p.m 2:20 p.m,
5:00 p. in. 5-50 p. m.
NORTH
Leave Arrive
Redondo Beach. Los Angeles
7:10 a. m. 8:00 a. m.
8:35 a.m. 9:25 a.m.
11:00 a.m. 11:50 a.m.
3:40 p. m 4:30 p. m
GEO. J. AINSWORTH,
. ' President
N. SUTTON,
leB-tf Trainmaster.
Compagnie Gcneralc Transatlantique.
FRENCH LINK TO HAVRE.
CIOMPANY'S PIKR (NEW) NO.
/ Null hri ver.foot of Morton sinvi.aßpj.
Travelers by this lino avoid both transit by
English railway mid the discomfort of crossing
tbe Chaunel in a small boat.
LA CHAMPAGNE, Boyer,
Saturday, April 4, at 1 p. m.
LA GASCOGNE.SanteIIi,
Saturday, April 11, at 7 a. m.
LA NORMANDIE, De Kersabiec.
Saturday, April 18. at 1 p. m.
LA BOURGOGNE, Frangeul,
Saturday, April 25, at (I a. m.
For freight or passage apply to
A. FORGET, Agent,
No. 3 Bowling Green, New York.
J. F. FUGAZI & CO., Agents, 5 Montgomery
aye.. San Francisco. d29-tf
MEDICAL.
TO UNFOKTUNATE!
Weakness, lmpotency and
manently cured. The sick and afflicted should
not fail to call unon him. The Doctor has trav
eled extensively in Europe and inspected thor
oughly the various hospitals there, obtaining a
great deal of valuable information, which he is
competent to impart to those in need of his
services. The Doctor cures where others fail.
Try him. DR. GIBBON will make no charge
unless he effects a cure. Persons at a distance
CURED AT HOME. All communications
strictly confidential. All letters answered in
plain envelopes.
Send ten dollars for a package of medicine
Call or write. Address DR. J. F. GIBBON, Boi
1,957, Sau Francisco, Cal.
Mention I.os Angeles Herald. 07-12 m
LADIES SHOULD USE
For all Irregularities
"CREOLE"
FEMALE TONIC
For sale at all Drug Stores.
At wholesale by P. W. RRAUN & CO.
12-10-0 m
S ! ''" "' acknowledged
" 10 'eading remedy foi
twSF ""T 5 x 3 'Gonorrhoea A ii'lcei,
r .HoW '' ho only sale remedy for
§Bf cL""sufm;J. * Lencorrh«.aor\Vhites.
5«« I Drcsfcribe it and feel
[SJJI _ Mi\> only bj safe in recommending it
to all sufferers,
jiHCiNN*Ti,n jjfjjfM A. .-. STONER, M. 0.,
l! -Sold by B»i liuuiat*.
t»R»«'E 81.00.
inn
Best and Safest Oil
MANUFACTURED.
Si|irEXTRA 1| ' ■
H if*- 0 /?**!*.
iStia j tram;/vmark *<X
■ gimrahieed|so^ iretest
b whittier fuller&c?
j'ljtjjLOS ANGELES^*I
H»y~ Give this oil a trial and you
will use no other.
JOHN WIELAND, FREDERICKS
BURG, UNITED STATES and
CHICAGO BREWERIES.
EXTRA PALE PILBENER, BTANDARD, ER
LANGER and CULMBACHER BEERS of high
repute. Also brew the best PORTER and ALE
JACOB ADLOFF,
General Agent, Los Angeles.
Telephone, 408. P. 0. Box 1231, Station C.
Cormy: New North Main, Mission and Chavez
sts., opposite Naud, Weyse & Co.'s warehouse
11-1-tiin
"tents,
AWNINCS, FLAGS, TRUCK, HAY AND
WAGON COVERS.
A. W. SWANFELDT,
115 E. Second Street.
Take Notice—l have removed from No. 202
East Second. 4-7-3 m
,E. W. HOPPERSTEAD & CQ.,
Barber Supplies and Cutlery,
133 AY. Third St., Los Angeles, Cal.
THE MOST COMPLETE GRINDING' PLANT
on the Pacific Coast.
Sole manufacturers of the celebrated Diamond
Festus Razors. China Painting and Burning
done to order. 4-12-3 m
BANKING HOUBEB
Southern California National Bank,
10l 3. 9PKINO PT„ NADEAU HLOCK.
L. N. BREED. President. WM. F. Vice-President. C. N. FLINT, Cashier.
Capital Paid In Gold Coin $200,000
Burplun and Undivided l'roflts ..SX'SSS?
Authorized Capital 800.000
DIRECTORS—L. N. Bleed, H. T. Newell, H. A. Barclay, Silas Holman, W.
H. Holliday, E. C. Bosbyshell, M. Hagan, Frank Rader, D. Remick, Thos. Gosa,
•William V. Rosbyahell. iul-tl |
Security Savings Bank, Capital, $200,000
NO. MX SOUTH MAIN STREET, I.OS ANGELKH, CALIFORNIA.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS.
F. N. MVKKS .. PRESIDENT
ISAIAS W. HELLMAN. President Nevada Bank. San Francisco; President Farmers and Mer
chants' Bank, Los Angeles.
ANDREW J. BOWNE President Fourth National Bank, Grand Rapids, Mich.; President Hast
ings National hank, Hastings. Mieli.
MRS. EM KLINE CHILDS Executrix Estate of 0. W. Childs, deceased, Los Angeles, Cal.
11. W. HELLMAN Vice president Farmers and Merchants's Bank, Los Angeles
8. A. FLEMING , VICE-PRESIDENT
T. L. DUQUE Capitalist and Wholesale Merchant of Panama, Republic of Colombia
A. C. ROGERS Physician, Los Angeles
MAUUIi'K S. HE] LM AN Of Hellman, Waldeck & Co., Wholesale Stationers, Los Angeles
JAMES RAWSON Capitalist, Boston
J. A. GRAVES Of Grave s, O'Melveny & Shankland, Attorneys, Los Angeles
J F. SARTORI ~CASHIER; also Vice-president First National Bank, Monrovia, Cal.
FIVE PER CENT INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS.
The notice of the public is called to the fact that this bank has a largo paid-up capital, and
only loans money mi approved real-estate security; that among its stockholders are some of the
oldest and most responsible citizens of tin; community; that, under the state law, tbe private es
tates of Its stockholders are pro rata liable for the total indebtedness of the bank. These facts,
with care exercised in making loans, insure a safe depository for saving accounts. School
teachers, clerks, mechanics, employees in factories ami shops, laborers, etc., will find it con
venient to make deposits in small amounts. CHILDREN'S SAVING DEPOSITS received in
sums of 25 cents and upward. Remittances may be sent by draft or Wells, Fargo ACo.'s express.
3-H 6mos
5 PER CENT INTEREST ON DEPOSITS.
Main Street Savings Bank and Trust Co.
NO. 486 SOUTH MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES, CAL.
Incorporated Oct. 28th, 1889.
CAPITAL STOCK, ------ $200,000
J. B. LANKERSHIM, Prest. F. W. DuVAN, Cashier. CHAS. FORMAN, Vice-Prest.
5-cent Deposit Stamps for Sale at Stores in different part* of the city.
Deposits will be received in sums of from one dollar to five thousand dollars. Term deposits
in sums of fifty dollars and ovei.
We declare a dividend early in January and July of each year. Its amount depends on our
earnings. Five per cent, on term aud from three to four on ordinary.
Money to loan on mortgages. Bonds and dividend paying stocks bought and sold.
Incorporated Oct. 28, 1889.
INCIJEASE OF TOTAL RESOUHCES.
January Ist, 1890 «1 15.871.37
April Ist. 1890 191,710.93
.July Ist, 1890 387.711.36
October Ist, 1890 334,804.46
January Ist. 1891 389,403.86
March sth, 1891 440,643.19
STATEMENT OF THE CONDITION
OF THE
LOS ANGELES NATIONAL BANK
OF LOS ANGELES, CAL.., MAY 4-, 1891.
RESOURCES : LIABILITIES !
Loans and discounts $ 822,287 91 Capital $ 500,000.00
Banking house and fixtures 173,954 04 Surplus Hl.ooo 00
Sovernment bonds.s43o,ooo OOi Undivided profits 24,867 58
Due from banks . 479,438 91> National bank notes outstanding 45,000 00
Cash on hand 270,023 57) 1,179,462 48 Deposits 1,525,837 45
Total $2,175,705 03 Total $2,175,705 03
5-16 2w
JpARMERS AND MERCHANTS BANK OF
LOB ANGELES, CAL.
Capital (paid up) $500,000
Surplus and Profits 043,000
Total $1,143,000
officers:
Isaias W. Hellman President
Herman W. Hellman Vice-President
John Milner Cashier
H. J. Fleishman Assistant Cashier
directors.
L. L. Bradbury, Emeline Childs, J. B. Lanker
shim, C. E. Thorn, C. Dncommun, H. W. Hell
man, L. C. Goodwin, A. Glassell, L W. Hell
man.
stockholders.
W. H. Perry, J. B. Lankershim, Chas. Dn
commun, Domingo Amestoy, Sarah J. Lee,
Emeline Childs, Sarah J. Loop. L. L. Bradbury,
T. L. Duque, Jacob Kuhrts. Louis Polaskl, F.
Leeouvreur, Estate D. Solomon, Prestley C.
Baker, L. C. Goodwin, Philippe Gamier, A.
Haas, Cameron E. Thorn, Oliver H. Bliss, Chris.
Henne, Estate O. W. Childs, undrew Glassell,
Herman W. Hellman, Isaias W. Hellman. jnl
JfURST NATIONAL BANK OF LOS ANGELES.
CAPITAL STOCK $200,000
RESERVE $200,000
E. F. SPENOE President
J. D. BICKNELL Vice-President
J.M. ELLIOTT Cashier
G. B. SHAFFER Assistant Cashier
Directors—E. F. Spence, J. D. Bicknell, 8. H.
Mott, Wm. Lacy, H. Mabury, J. M. Elliott, D. M.
McQarry. Jul
QALIFORNIA BANK,
Cor. Broadway and Second 8t.., Lob Angeles.
Subscribed Capital $500,000
Paid up Capital $300,000
Surplus $ 20,000
directors:
Hervey Lindley, J. C. Kays, E. W. Jones,
G. W. Hugos, Sam. Lewis.
T. C. Witmer President
J, Fraukenfleld Vice-President
T. J. Wcldon, Cashier.
J. M. Witmer, Assistant Cashier.
General Banking and Exchange Business
transacted. m4-4m
rpHE NATIONAL BANK OF CALIFORNIA,
Corner of Spring and Second streets,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAL $250,000
board of directors:
Dr. W. L. Graves, E. F. C. Klokke. O. T. John
son, W. Hadley, Dan McFarland, M. H. Sher
man. Fred Eaton, John Wolfskill, Thos. R. Bard.
J. M. C. Marble, President,
0. 11. Churchill, Vice-President,
Perry Wildman, Asst. Cashier.
10-31 A. Hadley, 2d Asst. Cashier.
E. F. Bpence, John N. Hunt,
Pres't. Secy and Treas.
Savings Bank of Southern California,
Southeast corner Spring and Court streets,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAL, ... $100,000
DIRECTORS:
Geo. H. Bonebrake, H. L. Drew, J.M. Elliott,
C. N. Hasson, F. C. Howes, John B. Hunt,
Hiram Maburv, E. F Spence.
Interest paid on deposits. Money to loa on
first-class real estate. 3-26-12 m
THE UNIVERSITY BANK OF LOS ANGELES,
No. 317 New High street.
Capital stock fully paid up .$lOO,OOO
Surplus 40,000
R. M. WIDNEY President
D. O. MILTIMORE Vice President
GEO. L. ARNOLD Cashier
DIRECTORS.
R. M. Widney, D. O. Miltimore. 8. W. Little, C.
M.Wells, John McArthur, C.A.Warner, L.J. P.
Morrill.
General nanking business, aud loans on first
class real estate solicited. Buy and sell first
class Mucks, bonds and warrants. Parties wish
ing to invest in first-class securities on either
long or short time can be accommodated.
ANGELES SAVINGS BANK,
130 North Main street.
Capital $100,000
L. C. GOODWIN President
W. M. CASWELL. Secretary
DIRECTORS.
I. W. Hellman, John E. Plater
Robert Baker, J. B. Lankershim,
L. C. Goodwin.
Term deposits will be received in sums of
$100 and over. Ordinary deposits in sums of
$10 and over.
Money to loan on first-class real estate.
Loa Angeles. July 1. 1889. jul-tf
rpHE CITY BANK,
1 37 South Spring street.
Capital Stock $300,000
A. D. CHILDRESS...-. President
JOHN 8. PARK Cashier
DI RECTO RS
W. T. Childress, Polndexter Dunn
J. J. Schallert, E. E. Crandall,
John 8. Park, R. G. L~nt,
A. D. Childress.
General banking. Fire and burglar proof safe
deposit boxes rented at from $3 to $20 per an
num. m 4 12m
. . .. , .—
ANGELES COUNTY BANK,
Los Angeles, Cal.
Capital Stock Paid Up, $100,000.
Surplus, $118,000.
JOHN E. PLATER President
R. 8. BAKER Vice-President
GEO. H. STEWART Cannier
directors:
R. S. Baker, Lewellyn Blxby,
Jotham Blxby, Geo. H. Stewart,
S. B. Dewey, Geo. W. Preseott,
John E. Plater.
Buy and Sell Exchange on San Francisco,
New York, London, Pans, Berlin and Frank
fort.
Receive Money ou open account and certifi
cate of deposit, and do a general banking and
exchange business. jul
TOS ANGELES NATIONAL BANK,
4 Cor. First and Spring street*.
Capital $500,000 00
Surplus 80,000 00
Total $580,000 00
GEO. H. BONEBRAKE President
JOHN BRYBON, 8R Vice-President
F. C. HOWES Cashier
E. W. COE Assistant Cashier
No Interest paid on deposit*.
directors.
Dr. W. G. Cochran, H. H. Markham,
Perry M. Green, John Bryson, Sr.,
Dr. H. Sinsabaugh, F. C. Howes,
George H. Bonebrake. Warren Gillelen. «
No interest paid on deposits.
Exchange for sale on all the principal cities
of the United States and Europe. MS
State Loan aad Trust Co.
OF LOS ANGELES.
Subscribed Capital •1,000,000.
Capital Paid Up *)620,000.
BANKING ROOM, N. W. CORNER SPKINQ
AND SECOND STREETS, BRYSON
BONEBRAKE BLOCK.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORB.
GEORGE H. BONEBRAKE, President
JOHN BRYSON, SR. | ~,„0
W. H. PERRY i Vice-President*
A. E. FLETCHER, Cashier.
J. F. TOWELL, Genl. Manager.
W. G. Cochran. P. M. Green.
H. J. Woollacott, Wm. H. Crocker,
O. T. Johnson, San Francisco,
L. W. Dennis, A. A. Hubbard.
We act as trustees for corporations and estate*
Loan money on first-class real estate and
collaterals Keep choice securities for sale/
Pay interest on savings deposits. Safe de
poßit boxes for rent. Best Are insurance
companies represented. Applications for loan*
received from borrowers in person or by mail.
LUMBER YARD
Kerekhoff-Cuzner
MILL AND LUMBEE CO.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Main Office: LOS ANGELES. Wholesale Yard
at SAN PEDRO.
I Branch Yards—Pomona, Pasadena, Lamanda,
Azusa, Burbank. Planing Mills—Los Angeles
and Pomona. Cargoes furnished to order.
J. M.' Griffith, President.
H. G. Stevenson, Vice-Pres. and Treas.
T. E. Nichols, Secy. E. L. Chandler, Supt
J. M. GRIFFITH COMPANY,
Lumber Dealers
And Manufacturers of
DOORS, WINDOWS, BLINDS, STAIRS,
Mill work of every description.
034 N. Alameda Street, Lo* Angela*.
iul tf
J. A. HENDERSON, WM. F. MARSHALL
President. Secretary.
J. R. SMURR,
Vice President and Treasurer.
SOUTHERN "CALIFORNIA
LUMBER CO.
350 East First Street.
9-19-5 m Los Angeles, California
CLARK & HUMPHREYS
Dealers in all kinds of
I— U M B El R!
YARD—San Mateo and Beventh-st. Bridge.
General Business Office, 125 West Second rt.,
Burdick Block.
P.O. Box 1235. Telephone 178.
12-27-3 m
PERRY, MOTT <& COS
LUMBER YARDS
AND PLANING MILLS,
No. 70 Commercial Street Jul tf
5

xml | txt