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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, November 06, 1891, Image 10

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THE SIXTH CORPS' IDOL
A FITTING TRIBUTE TO THE MEM
ORY OF A GALLANT SOLDIER.
General ». A. Russell Lost Hl* Life al
Winchester, and Now a Monument Per
petuates His Fame In the. Valley ol
Virginia.
The historic valley of Virginia, wher«
the murderous cannon of Sheridan,
Stonewall Jackson and Jubal Early
thundered in the fierce contests of a gen
eration ago, now and theu experiences a
thrill of excitement over the incursions
of throngs of strangers, whose errand in
these "piping times of peace" is to re
vive old war memories, albeit in a spirit
of good will and friendliness to formei
antagonists. Not long ago the upper re
gions of the valley were stirred by the
notes of the drum, the eloquence of ora
tors and poets, and the hum of 10,00fl
voices in applause around the monument
to Stonewall Jackson at Lexington.
On Sept. 19, at the other extremity of
the valley, music, oratory and applause
will blend in doing honor to anothei
dead soldier, an opponent of Jackson,
and a most gal
lant one at that,
who lost his life
in a charge at
Winchester, Sept.
19, 1864, General
D. A. Russell.
General Russell
was a hero, an
idol, in the old
Sixth corps,
Army of the Po
tomac, which he
joined in 1862, at general d. a. rcssell.
the head of the Seventh Massachusetts
regiment. He was then a trained sol
dier, who had passed through West Point
and won honor as a fighter at Cerro
Gordo, in the Mexican war.
After leading his regiment through
the campaigns of McClellan from March
to November, 1862, Russell succeeded
General John Newton as commander oi
the Third brigade, First division, Sixth
corps. In this command he won great
personal popularity with the men, and
was spoken of throughout the brigade as
"Dad" Russell. He led this body oi
troops gallantly in both of tbe battles at
Fredericksburg and also at Gettysburg.
At Gettysburg he won a brevet in the
regular army. On the way back from
Gettysburg to the Rapidan, Russell com
manded the First division, and at
Rappahannock heights, Nov. 7, the
division stormed the Confederate earth
works with their arms at a trail, going
over the parapets at a bound and cap
turing 1,600 men with their battle flags,
eight in number, and a pontoon bridge
train which they had under protection.
Russell was wounded, but he went to
Washington and presented the captured
flags in person to the war department as
trophies.
In the Wilderness campaign of 1864,
thedivision, with Russell still at its head,
did gallant serv
ice, especially in
the Bloody Angle
at Spottsylvania
and at Cold Har
bor, and after
reaching Peters
burg in Jnne was
called to the de
fense of Wash
ington during the
scare of Early's
raid. Subse
quently the entire
Sixth corps was
sent to help Sher
idan in the Shen
andoah valley,
and in the first
important action
of that memora
ble campaign,
known as Ope
quon or Winches
ter, Russell met
his death. At a
critical moment
in the battle,
THE monument. wnen Sheridan's
lines were disarranged in the center and
a fresh body of Confederate troops was
making a successful charge through a
gap between two of Sheridan's corps, he
dashed into the breach with his division,
flung back the exulting enemy, routing
his ranks and sending two of his gener
als to the dust, and virtually winning
the day for Sheridan. In this action he
was killed instantly.
The monument to the brave soldiei
has been erected by the Sedgwick Me
morial association, which in May, 1887,
placed a monument to the beloved chief
of the Sixth corps, "Uncle" John Sedg
wich, near the scene of his death on the
battlefield of Spottsylvania. The dedi
cation of the Russell shaft takes place on
the twenty-seventh anniversary of the
battle of Winchester. The location of
the memorial is in the National ceme
tery, rather than on the spot where the
general fell, because the changes and
obliterations of old landmarks on the
field render it difficult to determine with
exactness the scene of his noble death.
The funds for the Russell memorial,
like those for the Sedgwick monument,
have been contributed by the survivors
of the Sixth corps. The exercises of
dedication will be under the auspices of
the association.
The excursionists will leave Philadel
phia at an early hour on the 17th of
September, and will reach Winchester
in time to go over the battlefield of Sept.
19,1864. In the evening there will be
a camp fire in the court house at Win
chester. On the 18th the party will re
peat Sheridan's celebrated ride, with
some variations, of course,
From Winchester, twenty miles away,
to the battlefield of Uedar creek, where
disaster was happily turned to victory
and Early put to final rout, Oct. 19,1864,
just one month after the Winchester
fight. On Saturday, Sept. 19, the Rus
sell monument will be unveiled with
the usual ceremonies of orations, music
and reminiscences from former com
panions in arms of the gallant dead.
George L. Kilmer.
Answer This Question.
Why do so many people we see around us
seem to prefer to suffer and be made miserable
by Indigestion, Constipation, Dizziness, Loss
of Appetite, Coming up of the Food, Yellow
Skin, when for 75c we will sell them Shiloh's
Vitallzer, guaranteed to cure them. Sold
wholesale by Haas, Baruch & Co., and all re
tail druggists.
WHEN IT COMES to carrying the finest and
choicest groceries, W. Chamberlain A Co. take
the lead. 213 South Broadway.
WW, LOS 'ANGtttrS TTtfIULD: FRIDAY MORNING. NOVEMBER (j 1891
Young Men That Are Plenty.
"It is very difficult," said a business
man, "to make people understand that
one can't always employ young men
starting in life just to please our friends
who recommend them to us. It's bad
business policy to employ more men
than one needs. In these days of cloee
competition, no business man can afford
to spend money unwisely. A certain
volume of business justifies and demands
a certain expenditure in salaries to carry
on that business. It isn't fair to us to
ask us to increase our salary list when
there is no excuse for so doing. It isn't
fair to our trusted and efficient employees
to ask us to employ new men and yet
maintain our salary list We can do
this only in two waya One is to pare
off enough from the salaries of the old
men to provide salaries for the new men.
Another is to discharge old men to make
room for the new. You see that both
plans are out of the question,' other
things being equal.
"People who send promiscuous letters
of recommendation often cause us a
great deal of embarrassment. One likes
to please a friend, and yet one cannot
always, in justice to himself or others,
do this. And have you ever noticed
how many of these letters of introduc
tion describe the bearers of them aa bril
liant young men, who will prove of
value to those who employ them? Hard
ly one man in a thousand of those de
scribed in this way fulfills the promises
made for him. Do those who write such
letters ever consider that if a big busi
ness house employed all the men who
brought letters of recommendation to
the firm it would be overwhelmed with
employees within a year and driven into
bankruptcy in two years by its stupen
dous salary list?— New York Tribune.
How a Spider Ruined a Is'atiou.
When the French quartermaster, Dis
jonval, was confined in prison by the
Dutch at Utrecht he sought to beguile
the tedium of his prison life by atten
tively studying the habits of the spiders
which frequented his cell, and eight
years of imprisonment gave him leisure
to be well versed in their ways. In De
cember of 1794 the French army, on
whose victory over the Dutch depended
Disjonval's restoration to liberty, were
in Holland, and the victory seemed cer
tain if the frost, which was then of un
precedented severity, continued.
The Dutch envoys had failed to ne
gotiate a peace, and Holland was de
spairing when the frost suddenly broke,
The Dutch were now exulting, and the
French generals prepared to retreat;
but the spiders of Disjonval's cell fore
warned him that the thaw would be of
short duration, and he knew that his
little insect weather monitor never de
ceived him. Accordingly he contrived
to communicate his weather knowledge
to the army of his countrymen and its
generals, who duly estimated his (Dis
jonvals) character, relied upon his as
surance that within a few days the
waters would again be frozen so as to be
passable to the French troops.
They delayed their retreat; within
twelve days a sharp freeze set in, and
the French army triumphed. Disjjsnval
was released, and a spider had brought
ruin to the Dutch nation. —St. Louis
Republic.
Specter Pbotnjrraplis.
Mr. Arthur S. Green, an American
photographer, gives the following meth
od of making the camera a source of
amusement by the production of "ghost"
or "shadow" pictures—for example, a
seated man starting back in terror from
his own specter. Make a background of
the proper size by stretching out some
black material. Place the subject, draped
in white or in light clothing, in tbe right
attitude to the right or left of the center
of the background, then focus the cam
era and expose the plate for half a sec
ond. The impression will be that of a
shadowy and ghostlike figure. Take a
chair and table, placing the chair in the
center of the background, and the table
on the side away from the ghos+.
Seat the subject in the chair, with his
head turned to the ghost; focus again,
and give the plate a full exposure, which,
if the light is good, should be about two
seconds. Develop and print in the usual
way. Any objects to be seen through
the ghost should be photographed with
fifteen seconds' exposure before taking
the picture of the ghost. Other devices
of the kind might be mentioned, but it
will be more interesting to leave them
to the ingenuity of the amateur. —New
York Advertiser.
Fishing for Dncks.
In India an ingenious scheme is prac
ticed for taking ducks on a line, which
is attached at one end to a flexible stick
stuck up in the mud, the other extremity
having a double pointed needle of bone
attached to it. The latter is baited by
stringing upon it some grains of corn.
Presently along comes Mr. Duck, swal
lows the needle and finds himself a cap
tive the moment he tries to fly away. In
old times the Cape Cod fishermen de
pended largely for bait upon the sea fowl
they took on their voyages. To catch
them they threw out fishing lines with
hooks on the ends, to which were at
tached chunks of cod liver. The latter
floated because of the oil they contained,
and murres, gulls and other birds swal
lowing them were quickly pulled in,
skinned and chopped up.—lnterview in
Washington Star.
Printing by Dog Power.
Printing machines are usually driven
by steam or gas motors, but the machine
which prints a certain newspaper in
America is run by dog power. A large
wheel about ten feet in diameter and
two in width is connected with the driv
ing rigger of the machine by means of a
belt; strips of wood, for foothold, are
placed a foot apart on the inside of the
wheel, where Joe, the journalistic
dog, walks his weary round, and thus
causes the wheel to revolve. Joe has run
the press for about five years, and has
faithfully earned his board and lodging, j
but it is now about time for him to feel
ill and "turn it up," being unable to con
tinue turning it round.—London Tit-
Bits.
Rowels irregular and constipated, resulting
in piles, avoided by taking Simmons Liver
Regulator.
Eckert & Hopf. of Santa Monica,
Have taken charge of the Cafe Royal, at 225 S.
Spring street; and will serve fresh razor clams,
mußsels, fish and game daily direct from Santa
Monica.
Hotel Jackson.
Corner of Third and Main streets. Best board
and rooms, n,50 to »2.00 per day.
The Low Birth Rate in France.
The results of the recent census in
France have moved one of that country's
statisticians to declare that the republic
must count more and more on naturalized
foreigners to defend the republic. At
present there are only twenty-five births
for every 1,000 inhabitants, and an Eng
lish journal commenting thereon says:
"The balance of power in Europe has
been shifted even more conclusively,
perhaps, by the birth rate than on the
battlefield. A hundred years ago there
were three Frenchmen to every Prus
sian. Today there aro only four French
men to every three Prussians. For
every Frenchman born into the world
last year there were five Prussians. The
population of France in Europe, by the
new census, is 38,095,000. That of the
German empire iv Europe is 49,423,928.
Whatever may be the case with their re
spective armies, Germany is beating
France hollow in the cradle."
Where "Hyperion" Was Written.
A quaint old house is that in Portland,
Me., where the poet, Longfellow, spent
his youth. Tho house in which he was
born overlooks Portland harbor, and ia
now used as a tenement. Tho one shown
in tho cut is situated on the main busi
ness street of the town, and is occupied
THE LONGFELLOW HOUSE.
by the two widowed sisters of Longfel
low. There is a delightful garden at
the rear with rose bushes and old fash
ioned flowers. In the dining room is
the table at which Longfellow sat when
he wrote "Hyperion." There are vari
ous mementoes of the poet in different
parts of the house. The furniture is old
and handsome, and many family por
traits hang upon the walls.
Nodoctors' bills presented to the families
who use Simmons Liver Regulator.
California Vinegar Works,
555 Banning street, opposite soap factory,
near Alameda ar.d First streets, one-half block
from electric light works.
F. A. Ferris & Company's Hams.
Something extra flue. H. Jevne's.
WHEN WE SAY we have the best of every
thing, we mean it. We have no old or stale
?:oods to work offon the public. W. Chamber
sin it Co., 213 South Broadway.
For Home Comforts
And good rooking, go to the Hotel Jackson,
Third and Main streets.
Gluten flour, sure cure for diabetes. H.
Jevne, 130 aud 138 North Spring street.
TRY our Eureka brand of flour. W. Cham
berlain & Co., 213 8. Broadway.
Barley Crystals.
At Jevne's.
Truffled Sardines
At H. Jevne's, 136 and 138 N. Spring.
ft
Spring is fickle —
Pearline is reliable. You can
depend upon it to do your
washing: and cleaninewith less
work and more satisfaction
than you have ever known be
fore. It is the modern im
provement on soap. You can
depend upon its harmlessness,
its efficiency,and itscheapness.
You will depend upon it al
ways, after you have tried it.
Never peddled. m 8 JAMES PYLE, New York.
Ask my agents for W. L. Douglas Shoes.
If not for sale in your place nsk your
denier to send for catalogue, secure the
agency, aud get them for you.
SW TAKE NO SUBSTITUTE. JEk
WHY IS THE
W. L. DOUGLAS
S3 SHOE GENT LEW! EN
THE BEST SHOE IN THE WORtD FOR THE MONEY?
It is a seamless shoe, with no tacks or wax thread
to hurt the fcctn.made of the best line calf, stylish
and easy, and because we make more shiwn of th Is
uradc than any other manufacturer, it equals band
sewed shoes costing from $4.00 to $5.i0.
£f* 00 <;<'inline llaml-xewcd, the finest calf
9»W. shoe ever offered for 45.00; equals French
imported shoes which cost from $9.0 Ho $12.00.
U; A 00 Iliinil-Sewcd Welt Shoe, fine cair.
stylish, comfortable and durable. Thebes',
shoe ever offered at this price ; same grade as cus
tom-made shoes costing from $6.00 to $9.00.
CEO 50 Police Shoe! Farmers, Railroad Men
«J><3. und LetterCarriersall wearthern; finecair,
seamless, smooth Inside, heavy three soles, exten
sion edge. One pair will wear a year.
SCO 30 fl,ie cnJfi no better shoe ever offered at
3>sfis this price; one trial will convince these
who want a slmjc for comfort and service.
<CO :i»d 00 Workliigimin's shoes
«*p7Afsa are very strong and durable. Those who
have given them a trial wlli wear no other make.
n nuo l >J.I!»I und 551.75 school shoes are
DU/0 worn bythe boys everywhere; they sell
on their merits, as the increasing sales show.
| MjliAe Hund-Mcwed shoe, best
Lav ICO Dongola, verystylish; equalsF'reueh
Imported shoes costing from $4.00 to $8.00.
Ladies' -2.H0, tfci.oo nnd 551.75 shoe for
51 Irises are the best flue Dongola. stylish and dural ilo.
Caution.—See that W. L. Douglas* name and
Drice are stamped on the bottom of each shoe.
v W. L. DOUGLAS, Brockton, Mass.
MASSACHUSETTS SHOE HOUSE,
129 West First Street, Los Angeles.
C. F. HEINZEMAN,
Drug-gist & Chemist
No. 222 N. Main St., Los Angeles, Cal.
Prescriptions carefully compounded day and
ulghfc in2l-tf
How Lost! How Regained
A Great Medical Work for Young cut
Middle-Aged Men. New Edition.
n. RELF-PRKS KR VA TI ON. A new and onh
Gold Medal PRIZB KSSAY on NKRVOUB am
PHYSICAL DF.BILITY, FURORS ol
Yoi'TII.KXHAUBTKU VITALITY, PRE
MATURE DKCI.INE, and all DISEASI>
ami WEAKNESSES of MAN. SOOpages, cloth
gUf IHS invaluable prescriptions. Only $I.l*
by 'mail, double sealed. Descriptive Prospect
us with endorsements f-nj-ri SENT
of the Press and voluntary I»K1-h I gr.w)
testimonials of the cured. ■ «!»-•». NUW
i 'ousoltatinn in person or by mail. Expert tre.it
ment. INVIOLABLE SECRRCY and CElt
TAIN CURE. Address Dr. W. H. Parker, m
The Peabody Medical MBBHWI .JfsV
Institute, No. 4 Bui- |fiSfijLLsWL3§| > 9
finch BU,BoBton,Maßß. h. ml " — J
or PoetOfilce Box W ■ ftl *Tr *
The Peabody Medical Institutu has many imi
tators bnt no eiiuaL—ilcroid. (Copyrighted.)
343 S. SPRING ST.
Our trade bas increased so rapidly that
we are compelled to carry no less thau
$20.(X)0 worth of goods, bought entirely
of the largest manufacturers and import
ers, and we are ever ready to prove to
the public that we can sell our goods 50
per cent cheaper than any other millin
ery store on the coast. We will exhibit to
our patrons in a few days 200 of the finest
pattern Hats and Bonnets, made of the
finest material and pure silk velvets in
all colors, and we intend to sell those
goods at prices that will agreeably sur
prise all who will be fortunate enough to
visit the: surprise:.
We also carry an enormous stock of
Ribbons at remarkably low prices. Call
and see for yourselves. Remember our
number is 242 South Spring. We have
no connection with next door.
Buckram frames, bonnets, all new ..$ .05 each
Hat frames, the latest, 100 styles 10 "
China Milan straw hats, 25 styles. . ,25
Union Milan straw hats, 25 styles. .50 "
Wool felts, new hats, 25 styles 50 "
Fur felts, the finest, 25 styles 1.25
Beaver flats, all colors 1.25 "
1000 pieces silk velvet ribbon, all
colors • 05 yard
5000 pieces ribbon.sold cheaper than
any special sale in dry goods house.
500 "fancy feathers, finest iv the
market 05 each
50doz fancy feathers with eigrette,
all colors .... 25
100 doz. bunches ostrich tips 25 for J
All colors silk velvets 05 yard
And many other goods too numerous to men
tion. Convince yourself of their fine quality.
10-7-lm
SEEDS!
SEEDS!
SEEDS!
We offer to the public for coming
planting season Our stock of
Northern grown and imported Gar
den, Field, Tree and Flower Seeds,
of which we have the largeßt and beet
assortment on the coast.
Dutch and Japanese Flowering Bulbs.
Utah Alfalfa. Grain and Grass Seeds
at lowest market price.
Complete Assortment of Implements
for the Garden.
Florist Supplies and Fancy Baskets
of our own importation from Switzer
land and Germany.
Imported Memorial Designs in metal
and norcelain; Immortelle artificial
flowers. TheEe are of late introduc
tion and are proving very popular.
Our NURSERY carries a large stock of Orna
mental Plants. Shrubs and Trees. Cut Flowers
and Floral Designs furnished on short notice
and at reasonable prices.
Catalogues mailed to any part of the country
on application.
GERMAIN FRDIT CO.
SEED HOUSE—Baker Block.
GREENHOUSES AND NURSERY,
Corner Fourth and Los Angeles Sts.
10-23 d&w3m
DO YOU
Wish to Economize ?
If so, discard your present Coal Grates orStoves
and in their stead use our improved
GAS GRATES and
GAS HEATING and
COOKING STOVES.
No Danger of Fire or Explosion.
Call and see our eltgant stock, or send for our
Illustrated Catalogue.
LOS ANGELES LIGHTING COMPANY,
GAS STOVE DEPARTMENT,
10-13 lm Basement Bryson-Bonebrake Block
Sierra Madre Villa!
Situated at the base of Ihe mountains, 20 miles
from Los Angeles. This Hotel is now open for
guests.
Free 'bit. to the Hotel meets every train at
I.amaiula Turk.
The hotel has been entirely refurnished and
reuovatedthrniighoiii. Spring water from the
mountains in every room.
Reliable conveyances to Wilson's Peak
Telephone-connection at the Hotel.
Terms Reasonable.
11-3 14t H. L. BAKABP.
UNITED STATES STABLE,
PETER CLOB, Proprietor.
Horses, Cirriages and Saddle Horses To Lei
AU Kinds of Horses Bought and Sold.
Horse* Boirded by the Day, Week or Month
j Telephone 255.
No. 952 flower street, Los Angeles, Oal
j ]yl4-tl
KALBOMINING AND PAPERING,
STAB SIGN C( ~ 6-23 tf 222 Franklin
BANKING HOCMB.
STATEMENT Of THE CONDITION OF THE 1.08 ANGELES NATIONAL BANK OF LO
Angelea, California, September 25, 1891.
RESOURCES. LIABILITIES.
Loans and Discount* 1833,334 f»0 Capital *500,000 00
Hanking House and Fixtures .. . 173,954 04 Surplus,. - • ■ 82.500 00
Government Bonds |4» 1,500*30 Undivided profits .... 13,859 87
Cash ou baud aud National Bank notes outstanding 42,000 00
sight exchange . 418,480 37 849,980 37 Deposits 1,218,910 04
T al 11,857,269 91 Total »1,857,209 91
Security Savings Bank, Capital, $200,000
NO. 148 SOUTH MAIN STKKKT. I.OS ANGBLBS, CALIFORNIA.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
F. N. MYERS PRESID
ISAIAS W. HELLMAN, Presideut Nevada Bank, San Francisco; President Farmers and M
chants Bank, Los Angeles.
ANDREW J. BOWNK President Fonrth;Natlonal Bank, Grand Rapids, Mlc
H. W. HELLMAN Vlce-prosideut Farmers aud Merchants Bank, Los Angeles
8. A. PI EMING , VICK-PKErIDKNT
T. L. m t.fK . . Capitalist, la>h Angeles
A. C. ROGERS '..' Physician, Los Angeles
MAURICE 8. HELLMAN 0( Hellman, Waldeck A Co., Wholesale Stationers, Los Angele
J. A. GRAVES Of Graves, O'Melveuy m Shaukland. Attorneys, Los Angeles
JAMES RAWSON Capitalist, Burton
J. F. SARTORI CASHIER; also Vice-president First National Bank, Monrovia, Cal.
FIVE PER CENT INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS,
THE NOTICE OF THE PUBLIC IS CALLED
To the fact that this bank has tbe largest paid up capital and surplus combined of any savings
bauk in Southern California, aud only loans mouey on approved real estate security; that
among its stockholder are some of the oldest and most rcsponslulo citizens of the community;
that, under the State law. the private estates of its stockholders are pro rata liable for the total
indebtedness of the bank. These facts, with care exercised lv making loans, Insure a safe
depository for saving accounts. School teachers, clerks, mechanics, employees in factories and
shops, laborers, etc., will find it convenient to* make deposits in Bmall amounts. CHILDREN'S
SAVINGS DEPOSITS received in sums of 5 cents and upward. Remittances may be sent by
draft or Wells, Fargo A Co.'s express. 3-14 Oni
Southern California National Bank,
10l S 6PEINQ 6*T.. NADEAU BLOCK..
L. N. BREED. President, WM. F. BOSBYSHELL, Vice-President. C. N. FLINT, Cashier.
Capital Paid in Qolci Coin $200,000
Sufpluß and Undivided Profits- 38,000
Authorized Capital 000.000
DIRECTORS—L. N. Bieed, H. T. Newell, H. A. Barclay, Silas Holman, W.
11. Holliday, E. 0. Bosbyshell, M. Hagan, Frank Rader, D. Rernick, Thos. Gosb,
William F. Bosbyshell. tni-tf
426 S. MAIN STRBBT, LOS ANGKI.KS, CaL.
CAPITAL, - $1200,000.
B. LANKERSHIM, PBKS'T. CHAS. FORMAN, VICK PBKS'T FRANK W. DE VAN, CaSHIIB
PAYS 6 PER CENT. INTEREST ON DEPOSITS. RECEIVES DE
POSITS FROM $1.00 TO $5000.
5-cent deposit stamps for sale at stores In dilTerent parts of the city and county.
(Incorporated October 28,1889.)
INCREASE OF TOTAL RESOURCES.
January 1, 1890 1116,871 37 January I. IS9I 1389 453 86
July 1, 1890 287,711 86 July 1,1891 533,254 03
DIRECTORS.
L W. HELLMAN, ABE HAAS, J. J. BCHALLERT,
J. H. JONEB, CHAS. FORMAN, X. N. VAN NUYB,
GEO. H. PIKE, G. J. GRIFFITHS, J. B. LANKERSHIM
Los -Axififeles Savings Bank,
,)86 NORTH MAIN STREET,
CAPITAL STOCK 83100,000
SURPLUS fJIB.OOO
L. C. GOODWIN, President J. E. PLATER, Vice President.
W. M. CASWELL, Secretary.
STOCKHOLDERS:
I. W. Hellman L.C. Goodwin, J. E. Plater.
R.S.Baker, J. B. Lankershim, A. A. Curtis,
G. W. Prescott, 0. E. Paxton, H. H. Paxton.
6-5 if. Five Per Cent. Interest Paid on Term Deposits.
JpABMERS AND MERCHANTS BANE OF
LOS ANOKLES, CAL.
Capital (paid up) $500,000
Surplus and Profits 075,000
Total 11.170,000
officers:
Isaias W. Hellman President
Herman W. Hellman Vice-President
John Milneb Cashier
H. J. Fleishman Assistant Cashier
BIBKCTOKS.
W. H. Perry, Emeline ChUds, J. B. Lanker
shim, 0. E. Thorn, C. Ducommun, H. W. Hell
man, L. 0. Goodwin, A. Glasselll. W. Hell
man.
Exchange for sale on all the principal cities
of the United States, Enrope, China and Japan.
QALIFORNIA BANK,
Cor. Broadway and Second St.., Lot Angeles.
Subscribed Capital , 1500,000
Paid up Capital 1300,000
Surplus ... I 20,000
DIRECTORS:
Hervey Lindley, J. C. Kays, E. W. Jonee,
6. W. Hugos, Sam. Lewis.
H. C. Witmer President
I, Frankenfleld Vice-President
T. J. Weldon, Cashier.
J. M. Witmer, Assistant Cashier.
General ISanking and Exchange Business
transacted. mA-im
ANGELES COUNTY BANK,
Los Angeles, CaL
Capital Stock Paid Up, $100,000.
Surplus, $118,000.
JOHN E. PLATER President
ROBT. 8. BAKER Vice-President
GEO. H. STEWART Cashier
DIRECTORS
R. 8. Baker, Lewellyn Bixby,
Jotham Bixby, Geo. H. Stewart,
L. T. Garnsey, Chas. Forman,
John E. Plater.
Buy and Sell Exchange on San Francisco,
New York, London, Paris, Berlin and Frank
fort.
Receive Meney on open account and certifi
cate of deposit, and do a general banking and
exchange business. jnl
rpHE NATIONAL BANK OF CALIFORNIA,
Corner of Spring and Second streets,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAL $250,000
BOARD OF DIRECTORS:
Dr. W. L. Graves, E. F. C. Klokke. O. T. John
son, W. Hadley, Dan McKarland, M. H. Sher
man. Fred Eaton, John Wolfskill, Thos. R.Bard.
J. M. C. Mabblb, President,
O. H. Churchill, Vice-President,
Pbbby Wildman, Cashier.
10-31 A. Hadley, Asst. Cashier.
THE UNIVERSITY BANK OF LOS ANGELES,
No. 317 New High Btreet.
Capital stock fully paid up $100,000
Surplus 40,000
R.M. WIDNEY President
D.O. MILTIMORE Vice President
GEO. L. ARNOLD Cashier
DIBBCTOBB.
B. M. Widney, D. 0. Miltlmoro, 8. W. Little, C.
M. Wells, John McArthur, C.A.Warner, L.J. P.
Morrill.
General banking business, and loans on first
class real estate solicited. Buy and sell first
class stocks, bonds and warrants. Parties wish
ing to invest in first-class securities on either
long or short time can be accommodated.
rpUK CITY BANK,
J. 37 South Spring strcot.
CAPITA L STOCK. I $300,000
A. D. CHILDRESS President
JOHNS. PARK Cashier
DIKKCTOBH.
W T. Childress, Polndexter Dunn
J. J. Schallert, K. E. Crandall,
Johnß. Park, R. G. L~nt,
A. D. Childress.
General banking. Fire and burglar proof Bale
deposit boxes rented at from $3 to $20 per an
num. m * 12m
-piIRST NATIONAL BANK OF LOB ANGELES.
CAPITAL STOCK %M9Si\
RESERVE $200,000
l- v apKHrit President
j.d; bh;kn!ll: ::::::::: viee-p^ent
G.^.^bKFFER....'... ....' • ■ Assistant Cashier
Directors-E. F. Spence, J. Bicknell. P. H.
Mott, Wm. Lacy, H.Tiabury, J. M. Elliott, D. M.
McGarrv Inl
QITIZENS' BANK OF LOS ANGELES, ;
Corner Third and Spring streets., j
Capital ~Z7. IffIW.CWOO \
T 8 C I OWE President
t! w. br0thert0n...■....... y'^-K^A 6 "' ,
F. D. HALL , A t M R ji I
Directors: T. 8. C. Lowe, L. W. Bllnn, Ja- ;
bez Percival, C. F. Oronin, T. W. Brotherton.
it. D. Stlmson, Robert Hale. ,
General banking business. Bonds for sale
and other first-class investments. i-Z 12m
J __l.l
B. F. Bpence, John N. Hunt,
Pres't. Secy and Treas,
Savings Bank of Southern California,
Southeast corner spring and Court streets,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAL - - - 8)100,000
DIRECTORS:
Geo. H. Bonebrake, H. L. Drew, J. M. Elliott,
C. N. Hassou, F. C. Howes, John B. Hunt,
Hiram Mabury, E. F. Spenoe.
Interest paid on deposits. Money to loan on
flrst-class real estate. 3-2S-12m
— -
State Loan and Trust Co.
OP LOS ANGELES.
~~~
Subscribed Capital 51,000,000.
Capital Paid Dp *«(!<>,OOO.
BANKING ROOM, N. W. CORNER HfRING
AND SECOND STRKETS, BRYSON
BONEBRAKE BLOCK.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS.
GEORGE H. BONEBRAKE, President
JOHN BRYSON, Ba. ( ~. „_„,...
W. H. PERRY. j Vice-Presidents
A. E. FLETCHER, Cashier.
J. F. TOWELL, Genl. Manager.
W. G. Cochran. p. M. Green.
H. J. Woollacott, Wm. 11. Crocker,
0. T. Johnson, San Francisco,.
A. A. Hubbard.
We act as trustees for corporations and estates
Loan money on first-class real estate and'
collaterals Keep choice securities for sale.
Pay interest on savings deposits. Safe de
posit boxes for rent. Applications for loans
received from iwrrowers in person or by mall.
1 ; —
LUMBER YARDS.
J. M. Griffith, President.
H. G. Stevenson, Vice-Pres. and Treas,
T. E. Nichols, Secy. E. L. Chandler, Supt
J. M. GRIFFITH COMPANY,
Lumber Dealers
And Manufacturers of
DOORS, WINDOWS, BLINDS, STAIRS,
Mill work of every description.
984 N. Alameda Street, Los Augeles.
Inltf
KerekholT-Cuzner
MILL AND LUMBER CO.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Main Office: LOB ANGELES. Wholesale Yard,
at SAN PEDRO.
Branch Yards—Pomona, Pasadena, Lamanda.
Aiusa, Burbank. Planing Mills—Los Angeletv
and Pomona. Cargoes furnished to order.
CLARK & HUMPHREYS",
Wholesale and Retail
Luir)t>er : Dealers,
REDONDO BEACH
AND
LOS ANQEL.ES.
Head office, Los Angeles-123K W. Second st.
12-27-3 m
PERRY, MOTT 6c OO'S
LUMBER YARDS
AND PLANING MILLS,
No. 316 Commercial Btreet Inl tf
TO THE UNFORTUNATE
all {'u^fo^^^
Weakness, Impotency and Lost Manhood per
manently cured. The sick and afflicted should
not fail to call unon him. The Doctor has tray
eled extensively in Europe and inspected thor
oughly the various hospitals there, obtaining a
great deal of valuable Information, which he la
competent to impart to those in need of his
services. The Doctor cures where others fall.
Try him. DR. GIBBON will make no charge
unless he effects a cure, Persons at a distance
CURED AT HOME. All communications
strictly confidential. AU letters answered in
plain envelopes.
Call or write. Address DR. J. F. GIBBON, Box.
1,957, San Krancisco, Cal.
Mention Los Angeles Hebald. 07-12bi

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