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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, November 16, 1891, Image 3

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AT THE PARK.
The Secular Los Angeles
Sunday Picnic.
Features of the Day at West
lake Park.
Everybody and His Girl Enjoy the
Music.
An Autumn Sunday In Seml-Tropicdoui.
Klch and Poor Knjoy the Occa- ♦
sloa—Some Pencil
Pictures.
if yesterday be taken as a fair ex
ample, it seems that all of secular Los
Angeles on Sundays religiously performs
a pilgrimage to Westlake park to with
in hearing distance of the band stand.
It may not be a pure, unadulterated
love of music which attracts these thou
sands to the sun-kissed shores of the
dainty artificial lake, but in all charity
let us assume that least a great propor
tion of the motive was adulation of the
muses.
It is true that many extremely frivo
lous-looking individuals meandered
about the graveled paths with an eye to
the beauty of the opposite sex, but that
is neither bore nor there. Such traits
are not necessarily signs of viciousness,
and even a purely anima' spirit results
occasionally from all the overwhelming
display of charms scattered broadcast
by bountiful nature in this ideal clime.
The telegraphic dispatches state that
the first snow of the season is clothing
the broad acres of the bucolic city of
Chicago with a robe of white. Today
that pure and delicate robe of innocence
will be defiled and bear the mark of the
windy city's unhallowed touch. Ankle
deep will the miserable denizens of an
effete east wade in slush and mud,
while the happy Los Angelefio will
take a sun-bath in the open air, and
will breathe into his ecstatic lungs the
balmy air of an eternal spring.
Yesterday, too, while the eastern
stroller waß huddling himself into his
fur-lined great-coat and the unfortunate
Maggie Murphy waa dismally warbling
Each Sunday Night before a measly
coal-firo on the grate, the gay young
people of the City of the Angels, as
well as dignified age and frivolous child
hood, disported themselves on the green
in the shadow of the magnolia and
pepper tree, the date palm and the pro
verbial vine and fig tree.
Thus we were, and with the glare of
glorious sunlight, mingled with the
blare ot brass, the tinkle of cymbals
and the mellow melodies of classical
creation. And in the midst of all this
poesy and song a gay young chit of a
thing remarked to her equally gay com
panion : "'l'm done with him now. I
ain't going to chase him any more.
See?"
The most remarkable feature of a
Westlake concert is the number of fash
ionable and unfashionable vehicles
which congregate in the neighborhood.
There were a thousand rigs at the lake
yesterday, if there was one, and they
represented every known variety of car
riage architecture and equine anatomy.
In fact, without any reflections, it may
be truly Baid that Borne of the locomotive
specimens were asinine, for the fes
tive and self-esteeming burro him
self was represented by a fine
and able-heeled contingent. The blooded
steeds of a paneled drag trod the same
earth with shaggy Shetlands and nonde
script nags, and the differences in birth
and education displayed by tbe attached
specimens of humanity were equally
and correspondingly varied. Yet all the
men and women enjoyed, and all the
steeds and melancholy hacks shied at
the same music.
The concert performed by Douglas's
military band was most excellent, the
programme being fully equal if not
superior to that rendered last Sunday.
It was as follows:
Wedding march Mendelssohn
Airsfrom light opera Beyer
Waltz—My Charmer Waldteufei
Gavotte—Kajanka Zimmerman
Overture—Harnionie Mendelssohn
Selection—Frelchutz Weber
Intermezzo—Flirtation (by request) Steck
Conceit polka Levy
Oversure—Light Cavalry Suppe
Idylle—Approach of Spring Ellenheig
Galop—Slelghride Strauss
Some of the unfortunate inhabitants
of the east, who at present are fortunate
enough to be visiting us, to our mutual
advantage, had the pleasure to join in
the general enjoyment. Among those
who strolled among the palms were Miss
Fanny Davenport and Melbourne Mc-
Dowell, and Mr. and Mrs. Krausse, Mrs.
Hill, Miss Sanger, Miss Kuehne, Mjss
Lippet and Mr. Harris of their company.
Also Mme. Garso-Dely, Mile. Nina
Bertini, Mme. Olga Essley, Herr Joßeph
Bubo, Herr William Faran, Joe Hirsch
bach and Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Ogden of
the Columbia Opera company. Messrs.
Krausße and Hirschback, respectively
musical conductors of Davenpoit and
the Columbia, expressed themselves
as surprised at the excellence of tbe
local public-park music. The new first
cornet, William Deeble, made a great
hit.
SALTON SEA.
The Latest News About the Des
ert Lake.
The Yuma Times has some correspond-
euce from Joseph S. Carter concerning
f the inflow to Salton sea. Carter says he
met Col. D. K. Allen's surveying party
twelve miles below Yuma. He adds:
In going to and returning from their
camp (Allen's camp) I have found that
the two streams which Mr. Durbrow
and others have examined, flow into
each other again eight miles below the
crevasse; also all the other small streams
which diverge from the New Colorado,
thence into New River, I presume.
Colonel Allen came up a stream lying
east of them. The main stream of New
Colorado, eight miles below, is 300 yards
wide and has two channels four to five
feet in depth. Carter river iB still flow
ing towards Salton, is two feet wide and
Jhirty deep.
Editor Fatton. in his Banning Herald,
says of the lake:
"We don't want to edit the collec* •
ship of Banning, but we still stay by our
original opinion that the lake will be
ten times greater in extent this spring
than it was la.s,t. We have seen nothing
lately to eTlange this opinion, while
everything we saw on our trip tends to
confirm it. A dam at Hall Hanlon's,
.'.bout thirteen miles above the main
break in the river, is a rich scheme, and
Joe Carter's late letter in these columns
exposed the fallacy of an attempt to dike
the breaks. ' >ur esteemed friend Dnr
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD: IHONDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 16, 1891.
brow wants the lake to dry up, as its
presence literally prevents him from
earning bis salt. Jle therefore advances
every argument to convince himself that
it will dry up. On the other hand, we
are not only extremely anxious to have
the basin fill up, but we have viewed
the flood with dispassionate eye, and
are certain our wishes will be gratified.
Let some of those fellows take a little
jaunt for a distance further than eight
miles from the Colorado before they ven
ture such dogmatic opinions. We feel
confident that Carter and ourself will go
from Yuma to Salton in a steam launch
next spring, and we invite Colonel
Ayers and Durbrow to go along."
UNIVERSITY.
Dr. A* C. Williams, pastor, preached
Sunday morning in University M. K.
church from Revelations vii, 16-17: They
shall hunger no more, neither thirst any
more; neither shall the sun light on
them, nor any heat. For the Lamb
which is in the midst of the throne shall
feed them and God shall wipe away all
tears from their eyes.
There are two books which have be
become popular which have for their
object the alleviation of suffering of
mankind. They are Booth's Darkest
England and Bellamy's Looking Back
ward. The former is an experiment with
a practical application of charity; the
latter is a hope without a, realization of
the truth. Both books acknowledge that
these human sufferings may be miti
gated and present for the future plans
that may do so. This planning for the
future is an acknowledgment that the
present state is imperfect, and we are
always hoping for the future. Without
hope man would perish. Men are always
looking for things that may give hope for
the future. They look at history, but his
tory is but the death roll of nations.
Then have even sought to call up the
spirits of the dead to try to fathom the
mystery surrounding it. Why not meet
this yearning of the soul by tbe simple
truths of the Bible? This is wisdom.
God, through the Bible, promises us
freedom from the ills of the present life
in Heaven.
Life ia a constant fight against death.
The grim destroyer confronts us, ready
to take us at the first chance. Men till
the soil, transport the goods and engage
in other business to keep him off. If we
quit eating or drinking we die. How
great is the struggle of man against the
elements. That is why the apostle said :
"The whole creation travaileth in pain
until now." Our suffering, though it
seems long, is but for a moment com
pared with the glorious eternity of joy.
Man of himself has no element of im
mortality. We depend on God for our
physical necessities; why should we not
trust him for our spiritual life?
This evolution from earthly woes to
Heaven's joys is greater than Huxley's
or Darwin's theories.
It has perpetuity. The stream in the
canon may give out, dry up, but God's
supply of grace will last forever.
This life is not our home, and we
make a mistake when we put all our
energies into it, We are too large for
this world ; like an orange or pine tree
in a conservatory or hot house. Bal
maceda, the Chilean usurper, put all bis
energies into this life; he failed in his
aspirations here on earth and there was
no future for him, therefore he suicided.
So with Boulanger.
The hope of a future bliss helps us to
bear our present ills. The ocean pas
senger bears his inconvenience because
land will soon be reached. This hope is
the staff of old age.
Young people, life is worth living;
make an earnest, honest fight. The
poet sings:
"Life is rea\ life is earnest,
And the grave is aot its goal."
Many people wonder why great, trials
and troubles come to chem, but the
word says that "they came up through
great tribulations," and therefore they
are next to the throne of God. Your
troubles may give you a right to a place
next the throne. These promises areas
a rock. May our feet be firmly planted
on this rock !
Tho Loa Angeles Business College nine
beat the Woodbury Business College
boys at a game of baseball played on
the University grounds Saturday after
noon last. The score stood 15 to 13.
The battery of the l.os Angeles, Smith
and Harmon, were "too much" for the
Woodburys. Flint and Reynolds, the
VVoodburys' battery, did very poorly,
and when McGraff entered the box, it
was adding woree to bad. Still, it was
an interesting game.
The boys of the Los Angeles Football
club were practicing on the University
grounds Saturday, preparing for a game
with a University team on next Thanks
giving, so we understand.
The Sigmi Chi and Delta Gamma
Greek fraternities held a reception at
the residence of Dean Matthewß on last'
Friday night. The grounds were bril
liantly lighted with Chinese lanterns,
while within the house the Sigmi Chi
boys, decked in paper crowns, were try
ing to help their sisters of the Delta
Gamma to enjoy the evening. Refresh
ments were not forgotten, but formed
quite a feature of the evening, with the
singing of college songs. One o'clock
on Saturday morning witnessed the de
parture of" the guests to their several
homes.
The eighth session of the Loa Angeles
district convention of the Woman's For
eign Missionary society will be held in
University M. E. church, next Wednes
day and Thursday, November 18th and
19th.
The programme for the sessions will
be:
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18tH.
AFTBKNOON.
I:3o—Devotional exerciser, Mrs. W. M.
Sterling.
2:oo—President's address, Mrs. Thomas
Stalker.
2:10—Solo, Mrs. Gerhardy.
2:15 — Minutes, xecordlng secretary, Mrs.
Mary Woodcock.
2:2o—Appointment of committees.
2:25 —Report of correspouding secretary,
Mrs. B. Z. G. Van Clcve.
2:3s—Report of troasurer, Mrs. G. D. Whit
comb.
2:40 — Reports from auxiliaries, Boyle
Heights, Compton, First church, Glendora.Gar
vanzs, Simpson, University.
3:id—A Plea for the Mite Box, Mrs. Holmes.
a:20—Solo, Mjs. Mattie Williams.
3:2s—Report of secretary of juvenile work,
Mrs. J. R. Umsted.
qpo Baking
vl^Powder
Used in Millions of Hones— 40 Years the Standard.
3:2s—Exercise by juvenile bands, Florence,
Vincent, First church, University.
4:00 —Address of welcome, Mrs. A, C.
Williams.
4:lo—Response, Mrs. J. 0, Oliver.
Hymn, collection, benediction
EVKNINO,
7:oo—Praise service.
7:llo—Missionary prayer-meeting, led by Dr.
A. C, Williams.
THUBSDAY, NOVEMBER 19TII.
MdUNINC.
o:ls—Devotional exercises, Mrs. J. 8. Kline.
9:3o—Reports of auxiliaries— Pasadena, South
Pasadena, Asbury, Whittier, Vincent, San Per
nando, Florence
10:05—Paper, Mrs. A 8. Pilklngton.
10:15—Election of officers.
11:00—Solo, Miss C. Gay.
11:10—Paper, Mrs. J. Kahler.
11:20—Question drawer, Mrs. J. A. Dough
erty.
AFTERNOON.
1:30— Devotional exercises, Mrs. W. A. Bwaln.
2:00--Paper, Mrs. A. L. Reid.
2:lo—Young ladles' hour, conducted by Mrs.
E. C. Seymour.
2:20—Solo, Mrs. Hawver.
2:3o—Unfinished business.
3:oo—Reports of committees.
3:3o—Question drawer.
3:4o—Consecration service.
4:00—Doxology.
The second in the library course of
lectures being delivered in University
chapel next Friday evening, Rev. M. F.
Colburn of San Diego will be the speaker,
and his subject, "Alaska and Its Won
ders." L.
November 15th.
THE CROPS.
The Report Issued by the Weather
Bureau.
Observer Franklin, of the weather
bureau, has issued the following report
of the condition of the crops in Southern
California during the week ending
Friday last:
Hueneme, S. L. Mack—The weather
continues dry, with occasional fogs.
Corn shelling still in progress, and be
ing hauled to the warehouses as fast as
shelled. Farmers are dry-plowing.
Lancaster, James P. Ward—Weather
cold, with considerable frost. Work has
commenced on the Cull irrigation sys
tem. Water will be brought from Little
Rock creek. There will be 17 miles
of main ditches, from 12 to 25 feet wide
and 214 to 4 feet deep. Three miles of
ditch had been finished by last Satur
day, and it is expected to have nine
miles completed by December Ist.
Rodea de los Aquas ranch, H. H.
Denker—Walnuts and winter apples are
being gathered; yield and quality excel
lent. Lemon trees set out last year will
yield about one-quarter of a box of fine
fruit this season. Tbe prospect for
sugar-beet culture is excellent.
Los Angeles (Germain Fruit company,
by Eugene Germain) —The dried-fruit
crop all gathered, and rain is now
needed. The quality of products is very
fine, and farmers were fortunate in hav
ing no rain to interfere with fruit dry
ing.
Los Angeles (TJ. S. weather bureau),
George E. Franklin—The temperature
ranged slightly below the average the
first and the latter part of the week;
the remainder showed an excess. High
est temperature, 85 degrees ; lowest, 40
degrees. Occasional high fogs occurred
during the night. The local markets
are well supplied with fruits and vege
tables.
West Vernon, 8. McKinley — Fogs '
prevailed in tbe mornings, clearing off
by 9:30 a.m. Vegetables are looking
well. The late potato crop is in full
bloom and doing nicely. String beans
and roasting-ear corn were never better.
Lima beans continue in excellect condi
tion. The late pear crop is still on the
trees; will pick about Ist of December.
Oranges are turning; the crop is light,
but of extra-large size.
Monrovia, T. J. Barnes—Crops are
about all gathered and the farmers are
waiting for rain to begin plowing and
planting. Fine weather and cooler
nights prevail.
Pomona, John Wasson — Weather
slightly cooler, but no frosts. Fruit all
cared for except grapes, which are still
bfeing crushed at the winery and some
shipped away. Oranges are coloring.
Riverside, W. E. Keith —The raisin
crop is nearly all in and it has been a
heavy one. The temperature has been
decidedly above the normal for the paßt
eleven Novembers. Maximum temper
ature, 84degrees; minimum, 38.5 degrees.
Santa Aria, H. A. Peabody—Fogs dur
ing the night and morning have delayed
peanut and bean drying. Oranges are
looking well, but the crop will not be as
large as last year. Dry plowing has be
gun in some localities.
Tustin, E. D. Buss —A desert atmos
phere, without wind, prevailed for sev
eral days, changing the night of the
11th to a heavy, wet fog. Crops are
about all gathered; some dry plowing
for barley being done. The temperature
ranged from 40 degrees at 7 a. m. to 76
degrees at noon.
San Diego (U. S. Weather Bureau \
M. L. Hearne—A hot. dry, westerly
wind prevailed the 9th and 10th; re
mainder of the week temperature about
normal. Foggy and cloudy on the coast
until about 10 a. m. No plowing has
been done ; farmers are waiting for rain.
A large number of fruit trees will be
planted this winter, and a large area of
new land will be broken for grain.
Fruit is getting scarce, especially grapes
and tigs.
RAT KILLERS.
An Account of a Recent Match in
This City.
That enterprising paper, the Banning
Herald, furnishes the following bit of
Los Angeles news:
"The great rat-killing match between
Billy Soules's pet dog Millie and John
McCroy's McGinty came off last Sunday
in the court-yard of the St. Elmo hotel.
Col. Al. Berry was referee and Charley
Fox and Frank Huggins time-keepers.
The match was for $100, the owner of the
dog killing fifteen rats in the least time
to win the stakes. Cincinnati pit rules
to govern thiß match were used at Billy
Soules's own suggestion ; who told hrm
about them is a mystery, as he could not
tell them from Queensberry rules. The
match, to say the least, was a very ex
citing one, ending in a draw. It was
well it ended thus, as both McCroy and
Soules had forgotten to put up the
stakes, to the utter disgust of Charley
Fox, who had visions of ringing up the
register to the tune of about 40 por
cent."
MEN !
Suflcring from NERVOUS DEBILITY, LOST
or FAILING MANHOOD, INVOLUNTARY
EMISSIONS, IMPOTENGY, MENTAL WORRY,
PERSONAL WEAKNESS, LOSS OF MEMORY,
DESPONDENCY, KIDNEY and BLADDER
TROUBLE, and nil other diseases of mind and
body, produced by youthful follies and overin
dulgence, quickly and permanently cured by
Dr. Steinhart's
ESSENCE OF LIFE!
THE GREAT YITALIZER.
PRICE $2 PER BOTTLE
Or 0 bottles for $10, or in pill form
at same price.
Call or write to
Dr. P. Steinhart,
S. SPRING ST.,
Los Angeles, .... Cal.
9iSt~ All communications strictly confiden
tial and private.
OFFICE HOURS: From 9 to Tl, and in the
evening, ti to 7:30; Sundays, 10 to 12.
11-14 6m
r . CANCER HOSPITAL,
V / 211 W.Ann st. Office,
V mm\m a \- 129 8. Spring st No
JHhHL ''ay Until Well. No
BR! Knife or pain. Testi
nSBBBBK monlals and treatise
«eaS*^V K . «ent free. Blood, skin
A* \ and all catarrhal dis
% ***** V \ eases cured,
* '8. R. CHAMLEY M.I).
NEW FIRM!
NEW GOODS!
We desire to inform the public
that we have bought the stock and
fixtures of the
Goldea EagleGlothingCo.
And will be open and ready for busi
ness, with a large stock of NEW
GOODS added to the present stock,
Saturday, Nov. 15.
Every effort will bo made to sustain
the reputation of the old house for
bargains.
ADLER & FRANK,
Corner Main and Requena Streets,
Under U. S. Hotel.
NO COMBINATION.
A Reputation Gained by Justice and
Fair Dealing.
I desire the public to know that not at any
time have I entered the MEAT POOL.
First quality of meats of all kinds, both fresh
and salted, ir.cludiug sausages, at bedrock
prices, viz:
Roast Beef 7c to lOCLamb Chops 10c
Roast Pork 10c | Boiled Beef.... 4c to 6e
Roast Veal lOcjCorned Beef 6c
Roast Mutton, legs OUc'Salted Pork, sugar
Steaks 7c to loci cured 10c
Cutleis . . 10c to Leaf Lard 10c
Pork Chops 10c'Leaf Laid cooked in
Mutton Chops 9c| cans 10c
Ham, Bacon and all kinds of prime cuts ol
meats retail at wholesale prices.
Delivered free of charge in any part of the
city.
11-6 lm V. LEVY,
THIS IS NOT OCR WAY.
THIS IS OUR WAY OF FITTING GLASSES •
The careful nnd proper adjustment of Frames
is as important as the correct fitting of lenses.
We make the scientific adjustment of classes
and Frames our specialty, and guarantee a per
fect fit. Testing of the eyes free Full stock of
artificial eyes on hand. Glasses ground to order
on premises.
S. O. MARSHUTZ, Scientific Optician,
229 8. Spring street, Theater Building.
Full stock ol fine opera glasses on hand.
7-17 tf
I- T. MARTIN,
tiffin DEALER IN
-New and Second-Hand
iiIIFURNITURE
Carpets, Mattresses and Stoves.
Prices low for spot cash, or will sell on install
ments.
481 SOUTH SPRING STREET,
Between Fourth and Fifth Streets.
Telephone 984. P. 0. box 1921. 7-21-tf
H. Hillbr, Pres't. S. W. Hillkb, Sec.
Los Angeles Lumber Co,
DEALERS IN
Lamber, Cement, Fire Brick and Clay, Etc..
SAN PEDRO ST., Bet. Fourth and Fifth.
Telephone 109. 9-29 tf P.O. Box 87.
C. F. HEINZEMAN,
Druggist & Chemist
No. 233 N. Main St., Los Angeles, Cal.
Prescriptions carefully compounded day and
night. m2l-tf
KALBOMINING AND PAPERING,
STAB SIGN CO., 6-23 tf 822 Franklin
WAGNER'S KIMBERLEY,
125 S. SPRING ST.,
Manufactaring Jeweler and Silver Smith.
The largest and finest selected stock in Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, solid Silver Ware, Ac,
in Southern California. We make it our business this fall to sell goods at very'low prices,
especially in ladies', gents' and children's watches of any description, and at such low figures
that it will surprise any one. We are bound to sell them, not at cost, but so closn that no house
in California can undersell us. We are tho people to sell you goods in this line, Our reputation
in the state for square dealing is known to the public for the last eleven years. Goods are never
misrepresented; they are sold on their merits. We have the largest aud finest establishment
fitted up in California. You will find anything from the .imallast article up to the finest in
Diamonds. We carry the best in the market. Call In and see our prices before purchasing
elsewhere, as we save you fully 25 per cent; also on Watches from 10 to 25 per ceat. We carry
a large stock of the celebrated Howard Watches, for which we are headquarters; also fine im
ported Hair Goods for ladies. One glance at our goots and prices will convince you that this is
the store for to get your moneys worth. All the latest novelties in the market. We invite
especially all our old customers; we are always ready to show goods and give you the prices.
Square dealing is our motto. Come all and see us.
125 8. Spring St., Wagner's Kimberley.
10-11-lyr
IFOR LADIES.
Edwin C. Burt's, D. Armstrong & Co.'s, and
Faunce & Spinney's FINE SHOES.
■■w-.nn.ii a.—, li nam I. —m ■■■■■■i... ■ —r-i.i
FOR GENTLEMEN.
W. L. DOUGLAS GENUINE HAND-SEWED $a SHOE FOR $4.
BUTTON, HA I AND CONGRESS.
Churchill & Alden's Warranted FINE SHOES. 1
I— W. GO DIN, I
IC>4 NORTH SPRING STREET. I
AUCTION EXTRAORDINARY!
THE LARGEST LOT OF
WORK ANIMALS AND FARM IMPLEMENTS
Ever offered at public sale in Southern California,
ON PREMISES, LAG UNA RANCH,
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1801.
As the lease of this 11,000-acre ranch expires December 31st, the syndicate
have decided to sell, at public auction, on liberal terms, all their Live and Rolling
stock. The catalogue consists of 110 head of Large Work Mules, weighing from
1100 to 1400 lbs., all in fine condition and ready for work ; Farm Wagons, Ploughs,
Harrows, Rollers, Reapers, Mowers, Thrashers, and in fact every implement
required on a farm.
Intending purchasers can leave Santa Fe depot, foot of First street, at 8:15
and 10:25 a.m., and 12:20 p.m. Round trip ticket for 35c. On arrival of the
10:25 train an old-time barbecue will be awaiting guests, and a cordial welcome ie
extended to everybody attending sale. For further particulars, inquire
JOS. GILBERT, Superintendent of Laguna Ranch and Farming Company,
Or of E, W. NOYES, Auctioneer.
11-10 tf
Oraiifje Land!
$ioo per acre!
5 miles north of Riverside!
4 miles west of San Bernardino!
On the main lines of the Southern Pacific and Santa
Fe railroads!
Soil —Rich sand loam and disintegrated granite!
Altitude— 1300 feet above sea level, and 400 feet above
Riverside!
PLENTY OF WATER!
The home of the Orange and Lemon. Unexcelled Tor
deciduous fruits, vegetables and berries!
Terms easy, one-fourth cash, balance in four equal
annual payments. '
SEMI-TROPIC LAND AND WATER CO., Rialto, Cal.
L. M. BROWN, Special Agent, 213 W. First St., Lob Angeles, Cal. 9.29
JUST RECEIVED, ]™ E A S MC . &3 Slulfi
c Ivr at. 1 , T T , .. Is the beat made, and is aold/ir BBSBfiff r
Several Now Stylus of tbe Latest Fashion everywhere. This is tho orig-/£ jflHHw
hia) $0 Shoe. Hcware of imi- /<* ;j!j|flHfHfgw
tationa. Positively none/q 7 iBHBBHy ;
JAMES MEANS' ■ ]
J. CO. ■ AX' 'fiPS^'M
$3, $4 and $5 Shoes. Q^^g^y
J AMES MEANS* BS4 3 HOE is neat and stylish. It fits like a stocking, and
REQUIRES NO "BREAKINQ IN," being perfectly easy the first time it is worn.
It will satisfy the most fastidious. JAMES MEANS' 853 SHOE is absolutely the
only shoe of the nrice that has ever been placed extensively on the market in which durability
is considered before mere outward appearance.
JAMES MEANS' $2 SHOE for Boys, JAMES MEANS' FARMER SHOE and JAMES MEANS'
QUARTER EAGLE BOOTS FOR FARMERS are all staple lines that always give satisfaction.
Boots and Shoes from our celebrated factory are sold by
N. BENJAMIN, (Sole Agent for Los Angeles,)
BOSTON SHOE STORE
CORNER MAIN AND SECOND, LOB ANGELES.
ECONOMICAL FUEL. p
S. F. WELLINGTON
r. LUMP COAL r>
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL, V_/
AT REDUCED PRICES.
A lf your dealer does not keep It RING UP TELEPHONE 36, or leave your
orders with /-JL
"HANCOCK BANNING, Importer
T,. I 3° w - SECOND ST. JV
Oak. Pine and Juniper Wood sawed and split to order. 7-29 tf
-2 PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES if-
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
Photographic materials of all kinds. Detective, View and Kodac cameras. Amateur outfits
at Eastern prices. Developing, printing and finishing for amateurs. Orders filled promptly.
Send for catalogue.
JAS. IT. DEWEY,
147 S. MAIN ST. LOS ANQELES, OAL.
EXPERIENCED CHINESE PHYSICIANS,
DRS. HORN Sc OOW,
The Celebrated. Chinese Herb Doctors.
Cure all of the various diseases of the stomach, lungs, liver, blood, nerves, kidneys, bladder,
consumption, rheumatism, asthma, catarrh and dizziness, private, chronic and complicated
diseases. Those who desire to consult us in regard to their cases had better call at the office
for an examination, but if impossible to visit the office personally, can write for a list of
questions and circular, both of which will be sent free of charge. Consultation free. Office
hours: Bto 12 a.m., 2to 5, 6:30 to 9 p.m. Sundays, 9 to H a.m., Ito 4 p.m.
10-29 6m MAIN BTBKKT, Room! !9 and 3.
W. C. AIKEN,
-JiARCHITECTKr
BOOM 12 BUBDICK BLOCK,
10-16 3m Corner Spring and Second sta.
EAGLE STABLES,
122 South Broadway.
Good Teams at Reasonable Bates. Telephone
No 240.
11-5 3m W. F. WHITE, Proprietor.
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