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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, December 18, 1891, Image 10

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10
A SUMMER SOLITUDE.
Broad slopes, robed regally in purple Una;,
Where green, moist moss and scented thyme
Ue hid;
And harebells hang the wind stirred grass
amid;
And ferns and foxgloves fringe the peat stained
spring.
Here flames a yellow tnf t of furae, jjnd there
A narrow patch of vivid color shows
Tbe ant built hillocks where theclstns grows;
And ruddy bracken starts up everywhere.
The scattered sheep stray singly o'er the waste;
Above, the plover sounds his plaintive pipe,
Ont yonder rise a pair of startled snipe.
And seek fresh shelter with a timid haste.
And far out west there gleams the wide gray
main—
A silver glory where the snnsprtte spills
His subtle charm—and 'neath the northern
hills
faint smoke goes op of cities of the plain.
A silent, solemn place and holy ground.
Where God speaks in a still small voice, which
they
Hear not who hurry by; but those who stay
Aad hearken catch the tender whispered sound.
And hearing, gain a strange, strong peace of
heart;
A new, sweet patience for the pains of life;
A calmer courage for its stern, fierce strife;
A conscious power to do a nobler part.
—G. Duncan Grey in Chambers' Journal.
, THE COUNTS PICTURE.
We were stationed at the little village
of Z. We used to meet at each other's
rooms, where we never saw anything
but one another's uniforms.
There was only one man among ns who
did not belong to the regiment. He was
about thirty-five, and, of course, we
looked upon him as an old fellow. He
had the advantage of experience, and his
habitual gloom, stern features and his
sharp tongue gave him great influence
over his Juniors.
He was surrounded by a certain mys
tery.
His principal recreation was pistol
shooting. The walls of his room were rid
dled with bullets—a perfect honeycomb.
One afternoon about ten officers were
dining with Silvio. They drank as usual;
that is to say, a great deal. After dinner
we asked our host to make a pool. For a
long time he ref used on the ground that
he seldom played. At last he ordered
cards to be brought in.
Among ns on this occasion was an of
ficer who had bnt lately joined. While
playing he absentmindedly scored a
point too much. Silvio took the chalk
and corrected the score in his own fash
ion.
The officer, supposing him to have
made a mistake, began to explain. Sil
vio went on dealing in silence. The
officer, losing patience, took the brush
and rubbed ont what he thought was
wrong.
Silvio took the chalk and recorrected
it. The officer, heated with wine and
play and irritated by the laughter of the
company, thought himself aggrieved,
and in a fit of passion seized a brass can
dlestick and threw it at Silvio, who only
jnst managed to avoid the missile.
Great was our confusion. Silvio got
np, white with rage, and said with
sparkling eyes:
"Sir, have the goodness to withdraw,
and you may thank God that this has
happened in my own house!"
At the riding school next day we were
already asking one another whether the
young lieutenant was still alive, when
he appeared among ns. We asked him
the same question, and were told that he
had not yet heard from Silvio.
We were astonished.
We went to Silvio's and found him in
the courtyard popping bullet after bullet
into an ace which he had gummed to the
gate.
Silvio did not fight. He accepted a
flimsy apology and became reconciled to
the man who had insulted him.
Silvio's letters used to be addressed to
our regiment, and he usually called for
them himself. On one occasion, a letter
having been handed to him, I saw him
break the seal and, with a look of great
impatience, read the contents.
"Gentlemen," said Silvio, "circum
stances demand my immediate depar
ture." With these words he hurriedly
left.
I went to Silvio's shortly after to bid
him goodby.
"Perhaps we shall never meet again,"
he said. "Before saying goodby I want
to have a few words with yon.
"You thonght it odd," he continued,
"that I did not require satisfaction from
that drunken maniac. Six years ago I
received a slap in the face, and my
wnemy still lives."
"Did you not fight him?" I inquired.
"I did fight him," replied Silvio, "and
here is a memento of our duel."
He rose and took from a cardboard
box a red cap with a gold tassel and gold
braid.
"In my time dissipation was the
fashion," he went on, "and I was the
most dissipated man in the army.
"My comrades adored me, while the
commanders of the regiment, who were
constantly being changed, looked upon
me as an incurable evil.
"I was calmly, or rather boisterously,
enjoying my reputation, when a certain
young man joined onr regiment. He
was rich and came of a distinguished
family—l will not name him.
"I took a dislike to him. His success
in the regiment and in the society of
women brought me to despair. I tried
to pick a quarrel with him.
"At a ball at the house of a Polish
landed proprietor, seeing him receive
marked attention from all the ladies and
especially from the lady of the house,
who had formerly been on very friendly
terms with me, I whispered some low
insult in his ear.
"He flew into a passion and gave me a
■lap on the cheek. We clutched onr
swords; the ladies fainted; we were sepa
rated, and the same night we drove ont
to fight.
"It was nearly daybreak. I was stand
ing at the appointed spot with my three
seconds. How impatiently I awaited my
opponent! The spring sun had risen and
it was growing hot.
"At last Isaw him in the distance. He
was on foot, accompanied only by one
second. We advanced to meet him. He
approached, holding in his hand his regi
mental cap filled full of black cherries.
"The seconds measured twelve paces.
It was for me to fire first. Bnt my ex
citement was so great that I could not
depend upon the certainty of my hand;
and in order to give myself time to got
calm, I ceded the first shot to my adver
sary. He would not accept it, and we
decided to cast lots.
\
TIIE LOS ANGELES HERALD FRIDAY MORNING. DECEMBER 18, 1891.
"The number fell to him, constant fa
vorite of fortune that he was! He
aimed, and put a bullet through my
cap.
"It was now mv turn. His life at
last was in my hands; I looked at him
eagerly, trying hard to detect some
faint shadow of uneasiness. Bnt he
stood beneath my pistol, picking ont
ripe cherries from his cap and spitting
ont the stones, some of which fell near
me.
"His indifference enraged me.
" 'What is the use,' thought 1, 'of de
priving him of life, when he sets no
value upon it ?' As this savage thought
flitted through my brain I lowered the
pistol.
" 'You don't seem to be ready for
death,' I said; 'yon are eating yonr
breakfast, and I don't want to interfere
with yon.'
" 'Yon don't interfere with me in the
least,'he replied. 'Be good enough to
fire; or don't fire if yon prefer it; the
shot remains with you, and I shall be at
your service at any moment.'
"I turned to the seconds, informing
them that I had no intention of firing
that day, and with this the duel ended.
I resigned my commission and retired to
this little place. Since then not a single
day has passed that I have not thought
of my revenge, and now the hour has
arrived."
Silvio took from his pocket the letter
he had received that morning, and handed
it to me to read. Some one (it seemed to
be his business agent) wrote to him from
Moscow, that a certain individual was
soon to be married to a young and beau
tiful girl.
"You guess," said Silvio, "who the
certain individual is. lam starting for
Moscow. We shall see whether he will
be as indifferent now as he was some
time ago, when in presence of death he
ate cherries!"
• •**»•
Many years passed, and family cir
cumstances obliged me to settle in the
poor little village of N.
Four versts from my place was a large
estate belonging to Count 8., but the
steward alone lived there. The countess
had visited her domain once only, just
after her marriage, and she then only
lived there about a month.
However, in the second spring of my
retirement there was a report that the
countess, with her husband, would come
to spend the summer on her estate, and
they arrived at the beginning of June.
The first Sunday after her arrival 1
went to the village aud presented myself
to the count and countess as their near
neighbor and humble servant.
The doors opened, and a man, about
thirty-two and very handsome, entered
the apartment. I tried to be self pos
sessed, and began to introduce myself,
but he forestalled me.
His easy and agreeable conversation
soon dissipated my nervous timidity.
I was. already passing into my usual
manner when suddenly the countess en
tered and I became more confused than
ever. She was indeed beautiful.
The count presented me. I was anx
ious to appear at ease, but the more I
tried to assume an air of restraint the
more awkward I felt myself becoming.
Meanwhile I walked about the room
examining the books and pictures.
In pictures I am no connoisseur, but
one of the count's attracted my particu
lar notice. It represented a view of
Switzerland. I was not, however, struck
by the painting, but by the fact that it
was shot through by two bullets, one
planted just on top of the other.
"A good shot," I remarked, turning to
the count.
"Yes," he replied; "a very remarkable
shot."
"The best shot I ever knew used to
shoot every day," I said, "and at least
three times every day before dinner."
"And what sort of a shot was he?"
psked the count.
"This sort, count; if he saw a fly settle
on the wall—you smile, countess, but I
assure you it is a fact —when he saw the
fly he would call out, 'Kouska, my
pistol!' Kouska brought him the loaded
pistol. A crack, and the fly was crushed
into the wall!"
"And what was his name?"
"Silvio was his name."
"Silvio!" exclaimed the count, starting
from his seat. "Yon knew Silvio?"
"How could I fail to know him? We
were comrades; he was received at our
moss like a brother officer. It is now
about five years since I last had tidings
of him. Then yon, connt, also knew
him?"
"I knew him very well. Did he never
tell you of one very extraordinary inci
dent in his life?"
"Do you mean the slap in the face,
count, that he received from a black
guard at a ball?"
"He did not tell you the name of this
blackguard?"
"No, connt, he did not. Forgive me,"
I added, guessing the truth, "forgive me
—I did not—could it really have been
you?"
"It was myself," replied the count,
greatly agitated, "and the shots in the
picture are a memento of our last meet
ing."
"Oh, my dear," said the countess, "for
God's sake do not relate it! It frightens
me to think of it."
"No," replied the count; "I must tell
him all. He knows how I insulted his
friend. He shall also know how Silvio
revenged himself."
The count pushed a chair toward me,
and with the liveliest interest I listened
to the following story:
"Five years ago," began the count, "I
got married. The honeymoon I spent
here in this village. To this house lam
indented for the happiest moments of
my life and for one of its saddest re
membrances.
"One afternoon we went ont riding
together. My wife's horse became rest
ive. She was frightened, got off tho
horse, handed the reins over to mo and
walked home.
"I rode on before her. In the yard I
saw a traveling carriage, and I was told
that in my study sat a man who would
not give his name, bnt simply said that
he wanted to see me on business.
"I entered the study and saw in the
darkness a man, dusty and unshaven.
He stood there by the fireplace. I ap
proached him, trying to recollect his
face.
" 'You don't remember me, connt?" he
said in a tremulous voice.
" 'Silviol' I cried, and I confess I felt
that my hair was standing on end.
" 'Exactly so,' he added. 'You owe
rue a shot; I have come to claim it. Are
yon ready? A pistol protruded from his
side pocket. .
"I measured twelve paces, and stood
there in that corner, begging him to fire
quickly, before my wife came in.
"He hesitated and asked for a light.
Candles were brought in. I locked the
doors, gave orders that no one should
enter, and again called upon him to fire.
He took ont his pistol and aimed.
"I counted the seconds. I thought of
her. A terrible moment passed! Then
Silvio lowered his hand.
"'I only regret,' he said, 'that the
pistol is not loaded with cherry stones.
My bullet is heavy; and it always seems
to me that an affair of this kind is not a
duel, bnt a murder.
" 'I am not accustomed to aim at un
armed men. Let ns begin again from
the beginning. Let ns cast lots as to
who shall fire first.'
"My head went round. I think I ob
jected. Finally, however, we loaded
another pistol and rolled up two pieces
of paper. These he placed inside his cap;
the one through which, at onr first meet
ing, I had put the bullet. I again drew
the lncky number.
" 'Count, you have the devil's luck,'
he said, with a smile which I shall never
forget.
"I don't know what I was about, or
how it happened that he succeeded in
inducing me. Bnt I fired and hit that
picture."
The count pointed with his finger to
the picture with the shot marks. His
face had become red with agitation.
The countess was whiter than her own
handkerchief, and I could not restrain
an exclamation.
"I fired," continued the count, "and,
thank heaven, missed. Then Silvio—at
this moment he was really terrible—
then Silvio raised his pistol to take aim
at me.
"Suddenly the door flew open; Masha
rushed into the room. She threw her
self upon my neck with a loud shriek.
Her presence restored to me all my
courage.
" 'My dear,' I said to her, 'don't you
see that we are only joking? How
frightened you look. Go and drink a
glass of water and then come back; I
will introduce you to an old friend and
comrade.'
"Masha was still in doubt. 'Tell me,
is my husband speaking the truth?' she
asked, turning to the terrible Silvio; 'is
it true that you are only joking?'
" 'He is always joking, countess,' Sil
vio replied. 'He once in a joke gave me
a slap in the face; in joke he put a bullet
through this cap while I was wearing it,
and in joke, too, he missed me when he
fired just now. And now I have a fancy
for a joke.' With these words he raised
his pistol as if to shoot me down before
her eyes.
"Masha threw herself at his feet.
" 'Rise, Masha! For shame!' I cried
in my passion; 'and yon, sir, cease to
amuse yourself at the expense of an un
happy woman. Will you fire or not?'
"'I will not,' replied Silvio. 'I am
satisfied. I have witnessed your agita
tion, your terror. I forced you to fire
at me. That is enough; you will re
member me. I leave you to your con
science.'
"He was now about to go. Bnt he
stopped at the door, looked round at the
picture which my shot had passed
through, fired at it almost without tak
ing aim and disappeared.
"My wife had sunk down fainting.
The servants had not ventured to stop
Silvio, whom they looked upon with
terror. He passed out to the steps,
called his coachman, and before I could
collect myself drove off."
The count was silent. I had now
heard the end of the story of which the
beginning had long before surprised me.
The hero of it I never saw again. I
heard, however, that Silvio, during the
rising of Alexander Ipsilanti, command
ed a detachment of insurgents and was
killed in action.—Translated from the
Busßian of Alexander Pushkin, Boston
Globe.
How to Bat Bananas at the Table.
Bananas ought never to be peeled en
tirely and the skinned fruit taken in the
fingers. This is not nice at all. It is
admissible to peel the frnit gradually,
eating it as it is peeled; it is better, in
this case, to nearly sever the mouthful
with the fruit knife before attempting
the bite, as it is never elegant to leave
the print of the teeth in any article of
food. Very dainty folk, however, object
even to this way of eating the fruit, as
after one or two monthfnls the skin
hangs over the hand in an nndesirable
way. Such prefer to cut the banana
throngh longitudinally, skin and all,
and then with spoon or fork, preferably
the former, take ont small portions at a
time.—Her Point of View in New York
Times.
Bide and Tie.
"Bide and tie" is an old Salem saying.
Two men would start out on a journey
with one horse. One would ride a speci
fied distance, then, dismounting and ty
ing the horse, he would walk on to the
next changing place, where he would
find the horse tied and waiting for him,
having been ridden there by the man
who started out afoot. And so the whole
distance would be traversed, each one
riding and walking in turn. The item
"Bide and tie and go to Boston" is found
in an old account book, at a charge of
"four and sixpence."—Boston Tran
script.
Admitted tbe racta.
Newspaper editors have to be very careful In
opening their columns for statements. But
awa-e that the Dr. MI les Medical Co. are re
sponsible, we make room for the following tes
timonial from B. McDougall, Auburn, Ind.,
who for two years noticed a stoppage or skip
plug ol the pulse, bis left side got so tender he
could n'.t lie on It, his heart fluttered, he was
alarmed, went to different doctors, found no
relief, but one bottle of Dr. Miles' New Heart
Cure cnred him. Tbe elegant book. New and
Startling Facts, free at C. H. Hance's. It tells
all about Heart and Nervous Diseases and many
wonderful cures.
Read about Mullen, Bluett A Co. and the Pas
adena Choral society, in this issue.
tihlloh'» Consumption Care.
This is beyond question the most successful
Cough Medicine we have ever sold, a few doses
invariably ome the worst oases of Cough,
Croup and Bronchitis, while its wonderful
success in the cure of Consumption Is without
a parallel In the history of medicine. Since its
first discovery it has been sold on a guarantee,
a test which no other medicine can stand. If
you have a cough we earnestly ask you to try
it. Price 10c, 500 and 11. If your lungs are
sore, chest or back lame, use Bhlloh's Porous
Plaster. Sold wholesale by Haas, Baruch A
Co., and all retail druggists.
Oar Home Brew.
Mai or A Zoebleln's Lager, fresh from the
brewery, on draught in all the principal sa
loons, delivered promptly In bottles or kegs
Office and Brewery. 44A Aliso st Telephone 91.
Use German Family Soap.
How Lost! How Regained
A Great Medical' Work for Young cm
Middle-Aged Men. Sew Edition.
Or SELF-PRESERVATION. A new and onlj
Uold Medal PRIZE ESSAY on NERVOUS anc
PHYSICAL DEBILITY, ERRORS ol
YOUTH. EXHAUSTED VITALITY, PRE
MATURE I>ECLINE, and all DISEASES
and WEAKNESSES of MAN. SOO pages, cloth
8 lit; 128 Invaluable preßeriptiona. Only $1.0
y mail, double scaled. Descriptive Prospect,
os with endorsements Mpp I CCMr
of the Press and voluntary f" 1 MRW
testimonials of tho cured. I ■•*••■» «UVY,
Consultation in person or by mail. Expert treat
ment. INVIOLAKLE SECRECY and CER
TAIS CURE. Address Dr. W. H. Parker, 01
The Peabody Medical Rggn 11 -eSfi'tt fegflftSJ
Instltnte, No. 4 Bnl- FjfiSfl I jL"TW*
finchSt.Boston.Mass. CbP*^-31
or Post Office u..vi>.nr. PM ll "F°*l T ■
The Peabody Medical Institute has many 03
tatorebatnoeuual— Herald. (Copyrighted.)
wtwrs
BUCKING
USED BY MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN.
A SHINE LASTS A WEEK.
LEATHER PRESERVER.
A Handsome polish.
IS WATER-PROOF.
20C. A BOTTLE.
1 cent a □ foot
■ will pay for changing the ap
pearance of old Furniture bo
completelythatitwill look like new.
JSIK-BON
IS THE \X NAME
OF THE PAINT THAT DOEB IT.
■■Will I 111 l I TIMMMMMTTTTTt
CONSUMPTION CURED.
HALL'S BALSAM
FOR THE LUNGS
Has been a nev4r-failing family remedy for
COUGHS, COLDS, CONSUMPTION, "LA
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PNEUMONIA, CATARRH, INFLUENZA,
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ASTHMA, WHOOPING COUGH, CROUP,
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Leading to CONSUMPTION.
DR. WM. HALL'S BALSAM contains no
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inflamed and poisoned by disease, and prevents
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is pleasant to the taste. Be sure and ask for
DR. WM. HALL'S BALSAM, and take no other.
Trade supplied by F. W. BRAUN A CO.
Los Angeles. Price, 25c, 50c, ,1.00.
DR. WM. nALL & CO, NEW YORK.
FcURE FITS!
When I say cure I do not mean merely to stop them
for a time and then have them return again. 1 mean a
radical care. I have made the disease of FITS, EPI
LEPSY or FALLING SICKNESS a life long study. I
warrant my remedy to oure the worst cases. Because
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H. G. ROOT, M. C, 183 Pearl St., N. Y.
ILLICH'S
RESTAURANT.
Everything New and First-Clast.
146 ana 147 N. Main Street,
ap29-tf JERRY ILLICH Proprietor)
GEO. TURNER. A. ADAMS.
ADAMS St TURNER,
NEW AND SECOND-HAND FURNITDRE
Bought, Sold and Exchanged.
Upholstering and Repairing. Goods delivered
free to all parts of the city.
623 UPPER MAIN ST., LOS ANGELES, CAL.
12-9-lm
Baker Iron Works
950 to 966 BUENA VISTA ST,
LO9 ANQEUEB, CAL.,
Adjoining the Southern Pao'.flo Ground". Tel*
nhone 124. 7-21 »
AKITA,-£—
Manufacturer : of : Bamboo : Goods,
Wholesale and Retail.
SPECIAL DESIGNS MADE TO ORDER.
Also Dealer In
JAPANESE : FANCY : GOODS.
404 B. Spring St., Los Angeles.
11-21 lm
"eagle stables,
122 South Broadway.
Good Teams at Reasonable Rates. Telephone
No. 246.
v . 5 3m W. F. wniTß, Proprietor.
UNITED STATES STABLE,
PETER CLOS, Proprietor.
Horses, Carriages and Saddle Horses To Let
AU Kinds of Horses Bought and Sold.
Horses Boarded by the Day.Week or month
Telephone 255.
N0.953 Flower street, Loa Angeles, Cal
Jyl4-tf
KALSOMINING AND PAPERING,
RTAR SIGN CO.. 8-23 tf 222 Franklin
Naud's Warehouse.
GRAIN, WOOL,
—Aim—
General Merchandise Warehouse.
ADVANCES MADE ON WOOL. 7-U-ti
BANKING HOUSES.
German-American Saving's Bank,
114 SOUTH MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAL. PAID IN QOLD, - - $100,000X0.
nterest compounded quarterly to depositors at the rate of 5 per cent on term and 8.6 m per cent
on ordinary deposits.
E. N. MCDONALD, Pres't L. LICHTENBERGER and W. M. SHELDON, Vice-Pres'ts.
VICTOR PONET, Treasurer. M.N. AVERY, Secy. P. F. SCHUMACHER, Asst. Secy.
gtV Open every Saturday evening for deposits.
MAIN-STREET SAVINGS BANK AND TRDST CO,
4','o S. MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAL, - - - - $200,000.
B. LAN KERSHIM, PRKS'T. CHAS. FORMAN, VICB-PBJts'T FRANK W. DX VAN, CAIHIBB
PAYS 5 PER CENT. INTEREST ON DEPOSITS. RECEIVES DE
POSITS EROM $1.00 TO $6000.
S cent deposit stamps for sale a* stores in different parts ot the city and county.
(Incorporated October 28,1889.)
There Are No Taxes on Savings Bank Deposits.
DIRECTORS.
H. W. HELLMAN, ABE HAAS, J. J. SCHALLERT,
J. H. JONES, CHAS. FORMAN, I. N. VAN NUYB,
GEO. H. PIKE, E. GERMAIN, J. B.LANKERBHIM
Security Savings Bank, Capital, $200,000
NO. 148 SOUTH MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
F. N. MYERS PRF.BID
ISA! AS W. HELLMAN, President Nevada Bank, San Francisco; President Farmers and M
chants Bank, Los Angeles.
ANDREW J. BOWNE President Fourth; National Bank, Grand Rapids, Mlo
H. W. HELLMAN Vice-president Farmers aud Merchants Bank, Los Angeles
8. A. FIRMING VICE-PRESIDENT
T. L. DLQUK Cspltalist, Los Angeles
A. C. ROGERS "•• Physician, Los Angeles
MAURICE H. HELLMAN 0( Hellman, Waldcck A Co., Wholesale Stationers, Los Angola
J. A. GRAVES Of Graves, O'Melveuy & Shankland, Attorneys, Los Angeles
JAMES RAWSON . Capitalist, Boston
J. F. SARTORI CASHIER: also Vice-president First National Bank, Monrovia, Cal.
FIVE PER CENT INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS,
THE NOTICE OF THE PUBLIC IS CALLED
To the fact that this bank has the largest paid up capital and surplus combined of any savings
bank in Southern California, and only loans money on approved real estate security; that
among its stockholder are some of the oldesl and most respontlDle eltisens of the community;
tiiat, under the State law, the p>ivate estates of Its stockholders sre prorata liable for the total
Indebtedness of the bank. These facie, with care exercised In making loans, insure a safe
depository for saving accounts. School teachers, clerks, mechanics, employees in factories aud
shops, laborers, etc., will find it convenient to make deposits in small amounts. CHILDREN'S
SAVINGS DEPOSITS received In sums of Scents and upward. Remittances may be sent by
draft or Wells, Fargo A Co.'s express. 3-1 6m
Southern California National Bank,
10l 8 SPHINO £»T., NADKAU BLOCK..
L. N. BREED. President. WM. F. BOSBYSHELL, Vice-President. 0. N. FLINT, Cashier.
Capital Paid In Gold Coin $300,000
Surplus and Undivided Profits 35.000
Authorized Capital 800.000
DIRECTORS—L. N. Bieed, H. T. Newell, H. A. Barclay, Silao Holman, W.
H. Kolliday, E. C. Bosbyshell, M. Hasan, Frank Rader, D. Remick, Thos. Goaa,
William F. Boabyshell. lui-ti
Los Anfifeles Savings Bank,
236 NORTH MAIN STREET,
CAPITAL STOCK BJIOO.OOO
SURPLUS 9 10,000
L. C. GOODWIN, rresident J. X. PLATER, Vlc»-PrceidouL
W. M. CASWELL, Secretary.
STOCKHOLDERS:
I. W. Hellman L. C. Goodwin, J. E. Plater.
R. S. Baker, J. B. Lankorahlm, A. A. Curtis,
G. W. Prescott, 0. E. Paxton, H. H. Paxton.
6-5 if. Five I. r "put. Interest Paid on Tern* Deposits.
State Loan and Trust Co,
OK LOS ANQELES.
Bnliscribed Capital 51,000,000.
Capital Paid Up •660,000.
BANKING BOOM. N. W. CORNER SPRING
AND SECOND STREETS. BRYBON
BONBBRAKE BLOCK.
OtTK'KHS AND DIBBCTOBS.
GEORGE H. BONEBRAKE, President
W. hVmby* ,8B " I Vice-Presidents
A. E. FLETCHER, Cashier.
J. F. TO WELL, Genl. Manager.
W. G. Cochran. P. M. Green.
H. J. Woollacott, Wm. H. Crocker,
O.T.Johnson, San Francisco,
A. A. Hubbard.
We act as trustees for corporations and estates
Loan money on flrst-class real estate and
collaterals Keep choice securities for sale.
Pay interest on savings deposits. Safe de
posit boxes for rent. Applications for loans
received from Borrowers In person or by mall.
THIRST NATIONAL BANK OF LOS ANGELES.
CAPITAL STOCK $200,000
RESERVE $260,000
I, F. SPENCE President
J. D. BioKNI'LL Vlce-Preaident
J. M. ELLIOTT Cashier
G. B. SHAFFER. Assistant Cashier
Directors—B. F. Spence, J. D. Bloknell, 8. H.
Mott, Wm. Lacy, H. Mabury, J. M. Elliott, D. If.
McGarry lul
QITIZENS' BANK OF LOS ANGELES,
Corner Third and Spring streets.
Capital $200,000.00
T. S. C. LOWE President
T. W. BROTHERTON Vice-president
F. D. HALL Assistant Cashier,
Directors: T. S. C. Lowe, L. W. Blinn, Ja
bes Perclval, C. F. Cronin, T. W. Brotherton.
T. D. Stimson, Robert Hale.
General banking business. Bonds for sale
and other flrst-class investments. 12m
E. F. Sfsncb, John N. Hunt,
Pres't Secy and Trees.
Savings Bank of Southern California,
Southeast corner Spring and Court streets,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAL, - - - 81100,000
DIRECTORS.
Geo. H. Bonebrake, H. L Drew, J. M. Elliott,
C. M. Hasson, F. C. Howes, John B. Hunt,
Hiram Mabury, E. F. Spence.
Interest paid on deposits. Money to loan on
flrst-class real estate. 3-/6 12m
LCHBBB V Allllfi.
J. M. Griffith, President.
H. G. Stevenson, Vlce-Pree. and Treat.
T. K. Nichols, Secy. B. L. Chandler, Supt
J. M. GRIFFITH COMPANY,
Lumber Dealers
And Manufacturers of
DOOAB, WINDOWS, BLINDS, BTAIItS,
Mill work of every description.
984 N. Alameda Street, Los Angeles.
lul tt
Kerekhoff-Cuzner
MILL AND LUMBER CO.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Main Office: LOS ANGELES. Wholesale Yard
at SAN PEDRO.
Branch Yards—Pomona, Pasadena, Lamanda,
Aiusa, Burbank. Planing Mills—Los Angeles
and Pomona. Cargoes furnished to order.
CLARK & HUMPHREYS,
Wholesale and Retail
Lumber : Dealers,
REDONDO BEACH
AND' —
LQB ANQELES.
Head office, Lot Angeles-123H W. Second st.
12-27-3 m
PERRY. MOTT 6c OO'EJ
LUMBER YARDS
AND PLANING MILLS,
No. 316 Commercial Street jnl
PIONEER TRUCK 00.
uccessors to McLain A Lehman.)
FBOFBIBTOBS OF TUB
Pioneer Truck & Transfer Co.
Piano and Safe Moving a Specialty.
Telephone 187 8 Market at, Los Angeles'Cal
lel-tf
~-
jpAKMERS AMD MERCHANTS BANE OF
LOS ANBELSB, CAL.
Capital (paid up) 1600,000
Surplus aud Profits 076,000
Total 51,178,000
amaw
Ibaias W. Hellman President
Herman W. Hellman Vice-President
Jobn Milker Cashier
H. J. Fleishman Assistant Cashier
FM RECTORH.
W. H. Perry, Kmeline Childs, J. B. Lanker
shim, c. E. Thorn, C. Ducommnn. H. W. Hell
man, L. C. Goodwin, A. Glassell I. W. Hell
man.
Exchange for sale on all the principal cities
of the United States, Europe, China and Japan.
QALIFOBNIA BANK,
Cor. Broadway and Second St.., Los Angeler.
Subscribed Capital 1600,000
Paid up Capital 1800,000
Surplus | 20,000
DIRECTORS:
Hervey Lindley, J. C. Kays, K. W. Jonas,
G. W. Huges, Sam. Lewis.
H. O. Witmer President
I. Frank* nil eld Vice-President
T. J. Weldon, Cashier.
J. M. Witmer, Assistant Cashier.
General Banking and Exchange Busmen
transacted. m4-4m
ANGELES COUNTY BANK,
Los Angeler, CaL
Capital Stock Paid Up. 1100,000
Surplus, UIH.OOO.
JOHN E. PLATER President
ROBT. 8. BAKES Vice-President
GEO. H. STEWART Cashier
DIRECTORS
B. 8. Baker, Lewellyn Blxby,
Jotham Bixby, Geo. H. Stewart,
L. T. Garnsey, Chas. Form an,
John B. Plater.
Bny and Sell Exchange on San Francisco,
New York, London, Paris, Berlin and Frank
fort.
Receive Money on open account and certifi
cate of deposit, and do a general banking and
exchange business. Jul
rpHB NATIONAL BANK OF CALIFORNIA,
Corner of Spring and Second streets,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAL PAID UP 1200.000
board or directors:
Dr. W. L. Grave*, E. F. C. Klokke. O. T. John
son, W. Hadley, Dan McFarland, M. H. Sher
man. Fred Eaton, John Wolfskin, Thes. It.Bard.
J. M. C. Marble, President,
O. H. Churchill, Vice-President,
Ferry Wildman, Cashier.
10-31 A. Uadley, Asst. Cashier.
THB UNIVERSITY BANK OF I,OS ANGELES,
No. 317 New High street.
Capital stock fully paid up 1100.000
Surplus 40.000
r. M. WIDNEY President
D.O. MILTIMORE Vice President
GEO, L. ARNOLD Cashier
DIRECTORS.
B. M. Widney, D. O. Mlltimore, S. W. Little, 0.
M.Wells, John McAithur, C. A. Warner, L.J.P.
Morrill.
General banking business, aud loans on flrst
class real estate solicited. Buy and sail flrst
class stocks, bonds and warrants. Parties wish
ing to Invest in flrst-class securities on either
long or short time can be accommodated.
1-<HE CITY BANK, ,
37 South Sprlug (treat
Capital Btocx ....?. &300.000
A. D. OHILDBESB President
lOHN 8. PARK Cashier
DIRBOTOBS.
W. T. Childress, Polndexter Bonn
J. J. Bchallert, E. E. Crandall.
John 8. Park, B. G. L~nt
A. D. Childress.
General banking. Fire and burglar proof safe
eposit boxes rented at from $3 to $20 pec an
num. m 4 12m
LOB ANGELES NATIONAL BANK,
Oor. First and Spring streets,
U. S. DEPOSITORY.
Capital $500,000 00
Surplus 82,600 00
TOTAI 1682,600 00
GEO. H. BONEBRAKE President
JOHN BRYBON, SB Vioe-Prsetdent
F. C. HOWES. Cashier
B. W. COX Assistant Cashier
No Interest pe'* or deposit*.
DIRECTORS.
Dr. W. 9. Cochran, H. H. Markham,
Perry M. Green, John Bryton, Br.,
Dr. H. Slnsabaugh, F. 0. Howes,
George H. Bonebrake. Warren Gilleleu.
No Interest paid on deposits.
Exchange for sale on all the principal Clues
of the CaTtad States and Europe. m 9

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