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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, January 01, 1892, Image 11

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THE SCHOOLS.
tfacts About Those of the
City and County.
An Admirable System and Its
Features.
A Statement of Finances and of
Bnildings.
' The Receipt* end DUbarsemente—Sal
aries of Teachers—Facts Taken
from the Superintend
ent's Beport.
The facts given below regarding the
•city schools have been carefully com
piled from the annual reports of the
City Superintendent of Schools Friesner
and Clerk Baker of the board of educa
tion. The information given will prove
of interest to all who take an interest in
educational affairs. The financial re
port of the board is first submitted:
RECEIPTS.
Balance July 1, 1890 t 68,627 24
From State 101,273 50
From County 46,125.00
From City 55,325,87
Miscellaneous .4 2,243,80
5273.595.41
EXPENDITURES.
Teachers' salaries 1156,486 50
Janitois' salar es 11,660.00
Apparatus 157 90
Site (San l'edro st) 2,500 00
Buildings 63,940 36
Furniture 13,908 26
Gradiug —
High school grounds .. f 450 00
Street assessments 140 25 590 25
Repairs tlabor aud building mate
rials) 6,844 32
Census 595 00
Fuel 1,798 00
Gas 374 00
Insurance 2,785 00
■Printing 418 75
Supplies— -
Stationery, etc *5,221 85
Miscellaneous (chemi
;C Kcals, trushes, etc)'.. .. 891 46 6.113 31
»268,171 05
Old error written off 127 02
Total 1268,298 67
Balance July 1,1891 5,296 74
Total $273,595 41
As compared with the present year,
some changes have been made in the
salaries of teachers. The following
schedule has been adopted to remain in
force until June 30, 1892:
Principal High school, per month $150
Teachers in High school 100 to 125
Principals, 12-rooiu ouildingg 135
Principals, 8-room buildings 120
Principals, 4-room buidliugs and Nor. pri
mary 100
Teachers in 2d and 3d grades 05 to 75
Teachers in other grades 75 to 85
Kindergarten principal 75
Kindergarten teachers 50 to G5
Kindergarten assistants not to exceed.. . 25
Drawing teacher 130
Writing teacher ... 125
Music teacher 125
Night School teacher 50
Teachers to be paid for the actual time they
work.
The joint report of Superintendent
Friesner and Clerk Baker gives the fol
lowing facts regarding new school build
ings:
"The buildings now in course of con
struction are the Hewitt-Btreet school
house of eight rooms, located just south
of East First street (this takes the place
of a four-room building unlit for use);
the Ann, the Temple and the Breed
street houses, all of which are being
raised and made into eight-room build
ings. ■ ■
The Spring-street house has been en
tirely inadequate for the large number
of pupils residing near the center of the
city so that during a part of the past
year we were obliged to have six schools
in that building (300 children) on half
day time. By gaining four rooms on
Hewitt street and by readjusting the
district lines of the Spring and Hewitt
street districts, it was supposed that;
there would be accommodations suffi
cient to give all children full day time.
But on the re-opening of schools
(October 15, 1891,) we found it still nec
essary to conduct some half-day schools
at the Spring-street school house, not
withithstanding it is the largest house
(twelve rooms) in the city.
Because of this lack of room in this
quarter and because business is fast sur
rounding the building, it is respectfully
suggested that the Spring street site and
building be sold and two sites, one east
and one west of Main street, be pur
chased instead, and an eight-room
building be erected on each site, there
by gaining four rooms in this vicinity.
KINDKKOARTEN.
To the wide-awake primaiy teacher
who is on the gui vive for everything
that will enlarge her usefulness in tho
school-room, we would earnestly recom
mend that she turn herattention during
her spare moments to the study and
practice of kindergarten occupations
and gifts.
The work begun in the kindergarten
department in paper folding, cutting,
etc., should be carried on as a branch
of manual training through the primary
schools', that "imitation may by degrees
grow into invention." and that all the
steps in right education taken there
may be continued to the consummation
of a work well begun.
The following account of the kinder
garten work done in our city schools
during the past year is given by Mrß.
Nora D. Mayhew, the principal of the
kindergartens.
During the past school year eight
kindergartens have been established as
a part of our public school system, lo
cated respectively at the Thirtieth. San
Pedro, Ninth, Fremont avenue. Corn
well, Castelar, Railroad and Hellman
Btreet echoole, each one accommodating
about thirty-five pupils between the
ages of 5 and 0 years. These kin
dergartens each have been in charge of
a director or chief kindergartner who
has been assisted by a pupil of the
training class volunteeiing her services
while learning Froebel's system, or
method of instruction. The entire kin
dergarten system has been under
the supervision of a principal *vhose
mission it was to systemize
and bring unity into the work, for
"without unity there is no strength."
For this purpose she assembled the
regular teachers every Tuesday after
noon and submitted to them a weekly
programme, which was discussed at
length, thus affording an opportunity
for exchange of th'iught and increase of
interest. On Friday afternoon of each
week the regular teachers and assist
ants, or students of the* training class,
assembled with the principal to gain a
better understanding of tbe songs and
games which form so important a part
of the kindergarten system.
The principal also directs the distri
bution of time and kindergarten mate
rial, watches over the progress of the
occupations, observes tho execution of
programme and proper application of
Froebel's method, and tbna maintaino i*
constant spirit and enthusiasm. Beg-
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD: FRIDAY MORNING, JANUARY 1, 1892.
CITY SCHOOL BUILDINGS.
• Name of Site.
Location.
Principal and
Teachers :.n Charge.
QD
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) 1884
■ 1890
)....,.
) 1«»8
) 1880
» 1890
1890
> 1882
1 I---J
l| 1872
I 1890
i 1886
i 1888
1890
Arroyo street
•wain street
Truman street
Chestnut street. .
Hellman street
Prlchard street
Gates street
Griffin avenne
Castelar street
Sand street
Alpine street
Temple street
Grafton street
Casco street
Alvarado street
Union avenue
Fremont avenue ...
Pearl street
Spring street
Kitrhlh street
Tenth street
Arroyo and Cypress streets
swain street and N. Griffin avenue
Truman and Humboldt streets
Chestnut street near Pasadena avenue .
Hellman street near Downey avenue
Prlchard and Flora streets
Oates street near Hawkins street
Griffin avenue near Darwin street
uastelar*nd College streets
Sand street near Castelar street
tlpine and Centennial streets
Temple street near Edgeware road. .•
Crafton street north of Temple street...
Casco and Temple streets
Alvarado and W. First streets
Union avenue near W. First street
Fremont avenue near W. First street—
Pearl street near W. Fourth street
Spring- street near Sixth street
Eighth street and Grand avenue
Tenth street near Veinon stre-it
Sixteenth street near Hill street
Seventeenth and Georgia Bell Btreets
Thirtieth street nearMaiu street
San Ped'o street near Washington street
Staunton aye. near E. Washington street
E. Seventh and Lemon
E. Nluth Btreet and Stanford avenue
Hewitt street near E First Btreet
Amelia street near Lazard street
Railroad street near Main street
Ann andMagdalena streets..
Macy street and Brooklyn avenue
Cornwall and Sheridan streets...
Breed and New York streets
E. First and Savannah streets .'. ..
Euclid and E. Second streets
Castelar street near Sand street
Miss Mary A. Lang
Miss Mary E. McGraw
Miss Mary A. Henderson .
Miss Janet M. Henderson.
Miss Millie M. Cox..
Miss Ella M Dixon
Miss Helen K. Hunt
Mrs. C. G. Do Bois
Mrs. T. B. Millard
Miss Cora S. Slack
M iss Rose H. Hardenberg..
Mrs Kate Brodbeek
Mrs, Grace P. Clarke
Mr! G. H. Cnilcote
Hiss Esther L. Strauss
Mr. Charles L, Ennis
Miss E L. Gibson
Miss Lizzie Moore
Miss Bentha Gordon
Miss Edith Joy
Mr. M. C. Bettinger
Miss F. A. Andersou
MIbs Mary Murphy
Mls> Mary Foy
Mrs E A. Hanchette. ...
Miss L. A. Williams
Miss V. A. Olmstead
Sirs' M.' 'A.' White"
Miss M. McDonald
Miss K. McCarthy
Mrs. M. T. Henry
Miss M. Murdoch
Miss E.' A.' Packard! . . .
150x1
178*1
76x1
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20
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13
9,
6.
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1890
1890
1882
188*
1977
1888
1890
1888
1888
1888
1890
1884
1890
1891
1886
1884
1890
1888
i 1890
| 1886
1890
i.....
I San
Sixteenth street
Seventeenth street..
Thirtieth street. ..
San Pedro street ...
Staunton avenue...
Seventh street
Nluth street
Hewitt street
Amelia street
Railroad street
Ann street
Macy street
Cornwall Btreet
Breed street
First street
Kuclid street
High school
8an
:W
21
i
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9
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I ....
i 1890
Total ,
;
ular visits were made to each kinder
garten two times each month.
Total number of pupils enrolled during
the year
Average number belonging
Average daily attendance
Per cent of attendance 'O
Under the classification of general
statistics the following facts and figures
are submitted:
GENERAL STATISTICS.
Population of city in 1890 (U. 8 cen
hiis) 50,394
Estimated population October, 1891 55,000
No. children of census age (5 to 17)
June, 1890 ■• 10,867
No children of census age (5 to 17)
June, 1891 11 '2?i
Increase for 1891 .... 217
Total enrollment (age 6to 21) for 1890 8,288
Total enrollment (ago 6to 21) for 1891 8,744
Increase for 1891 456
Kindergarten enrollment (age 5 to 6)
for 1890 135
Kindergarten enrollment (ago 5 to 6)
for 1891 422
Increase for 1891 287
Average daily attendance for 1890 5825
Average daily attendance for 1891.... 6506
Increase for 1891 bBl
Per cent of enrollment on census num
ber, 189 C 7<>-2
Per cent of eniollment on census num
ber, 1891 "8.8
City tax levy for schools 1888 (on
J10O) 10.2000
City tax levy for schools 1889 J340
City tax levy for Behools 1890 107b
City tax levy for schools 1891 0876
The following table shows the statis
tics regarding children in the city during
the past year:
No. of white children between 5 and 17 years
of age
No. of negro, Indian and Chinese children be
tween 5 and 17 years of age
Total number of census children
No. ol children under 5 years of age
No. of chi aren between 5 and 17 years of age
who have attended public schools during
the year
No. of children between 5 and 17 years of age
who have attended private schools only
during the year
No. of children 'between 5 and 17 years of age
who have not attended school during the
year
No. pupils enrolled in the public schools
No. teachers employed
Average number of pupils per teacher
Cost per capita on total enrollment
Cost per capita on average enrollment
Cost per capita on average daily attendance
1,616
2,234
33
68
18 41
29 29
30 91
651
79
4,164
1,184
4,085
1.307
2,975
43
69
$16 06
25 37
26 83
502
2,495
55
4,330
1,446
4,275
$15
22
24
611
2,976
1,405
4,111
06
63
$ 16 66
23 08
24 27
762
3.417
40
5,584
2,576
5,544
1.416
4,680
86
57
$16 53
23 81
15 15
747
3,877
60
6,050
2,731
5,990
1886
1.649
5,445
118
46
$ 15 77
| 24 08
26 14
934
4,874
7,1
7,457
3,492
7,384
1837.
4 573
7.330
125
39
$ 17 43
26 35
28 49
1,050
5,100
332
10.692
3,372
10,3601
1388
2,156
8,128
151
42
$ 1 8 40
21 61
25 95
1,529
7,101
195
10 780
5,061
10,591
1889
2,165
8,28s
160
40
$ 20 60
27 55
29 29
1,436
7,266
262
10,867
. 4,856
10,005
1890
$21
26
28
1,197
8,115
241
11,084
4,907
10.843
1891
A YEAR'S CONSTRUCTION.
Increased Number of Buildings Erected
in the Last Year.
The report of Superintendent of
Buildings Muchmore for the past year
shows a gratifying increase in the devel
opment of the city. During the year
the superintendent received as fees for
building permits $893. The report is as
follows:
Building permits issued from
Dec. 1,1891. to Dec. 1,1891. .. 654
Estimated cost ol same *1,300,130 00
Divided as follow);
247 frame dwelling, costing 621,035 50
Average costabout 2,500 00
64 stables, costing 28,077 00
42 bri"K building*, costing . . 444,679 00
151 alterations and repairs to
frame dwellings 87,085 00
70 permits to move and repair
buildings, costing 22,195 50
?,1 permits to repair and change
brick buildines, costing 34,450 00
49 miscellaneous permits, cost
ing 68,609 00
90 examinations of plumbing .
A rigid examination of plumbing has
been enforced since May 1,1891, and
the good effects resulting from it are
very evident. After the new sanitary
regulations, which have been adopted
by the board of health, come into effect,
January 1, 1891, there is reason to hope
that the plumbing done from that date
can be made first class.
Woman artisans are called for by Mrs.
Virginia C. Meredith, chairman of the
executive committee of the board of
lady managers of the world's fair, to
work on the interior decorations of the
woman's building. Carved balustrades,
fret-work for screens, ornamental hard
ware, hinges, keys, door-knobs and
mural decorations are among the many
objects which are to be prepared by the
hands of trained women.
"His friends all advised him to go on
the stage," said the unsuccessful tra
gedian's father,
"Yes, I see bow, it was his friends
egged him on and the audience egged
him off."—[Washington Star.
THE COUNTY SCHOOLS.
Statistics Compiled by County Super
intendent Seamans.
The statistics compiled by Superin
tendent Seaman of the county schools
for the past year show a gradual gain in
all essentials of growth, from an educa
tional standpoint, in this county. The
enrollment in the county schools for
1890 91 has been larger than for any
previous year since the establishment of
the county schools.
The following table shows tho yearly
growth of the school department of Los
Angeles county for the past ten years :
1880 81
188 1- 8 i
1882- 83
1883- 84
1884- 85
1835-86
1886-87
1837 83
I 883 89
1889-90
1899-91
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72
77
78
80
84
95
5
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2
4
11
5
19
13
2
6
55
I'd
ft ft 2.
ft ~"
■ MB"
: S?b
: 0 ?
9 5 10
6 9-10
14 5-10
69-10
9 1-10
16 6-10
40 6-10
, 2
12-10
C
8
4,152
4,356 4 4-10
4,877 11 9 10
6,127 25 6-10
6,565 71-10
7.033 7 210
8,186 16 3-10
10,133 23 8-10
11,853 16 9-10
10,832
10,312
55
00
as-
ft
: s
: a
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'■ VI
a
3
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ft
a
117
119
134
154
175
143
172
181
159
501
o
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o
55
ft ■
oo
: °
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: 3
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SB
ft •
6.175
7,533
9,086
9,624
10,084
L 11,879
16,69 '
19,258
16.'71
16,255
On fB
oo o
6,91
7,80
9,28
10,83
11,36
12,61
14,85
19,57
22,32
19,05
20,97
65 3-10
67 1-10
75 6 10
76 1-10
74 7-10
75 9 10
76 6 10
71 8 10
80 3-10
j81 4-10
ft £5
n 3
3 2;
3 2.
p.
3,662
4,179
5,039
5,881
6,703
7,613
8,541
11,709
14,797
12.715
13.755
II
SB
pa
a
8
i i
114 1-10
21 7-10
15 s-10
13 9-10
13 310
12 1-10
37
26 3-10
_B
id
3
9
Total No.
of teach-
ers em-
ployed
1
ST
<2
iia
• 5*
Average
monthly
salary.
3 10
4- 10
5- 10
6- 10
9 10
8-10
4-10
6- 10
7- 10
3-10
Si
p 3
B 3
a*
21 17 9-10
33 23
34 21 310
36 20 3-10
61 28 9-10
101 U2 7-10
1UI4--5-10
153; 44 3-10
222 516-10
197 50 7-10
212
c
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• 7 CD
ft
ft
ft
B
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$ I
71
,71
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-2.
s
: S
$124,509
128,312
136,545
146,336
155,962
181,58s!
193,774
248,219
369,631
352,115
342,341
S3?
g.3-
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: b
: ga
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20
19
13
15
18
14
17
11 (i-10
12 0-tc
16
15 7-10
B 3 SO
• 00 p
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How Maine Firemen Managed.
The firemen of Caribou, Me., were
called upon to perform a feat rather out
of the usual line of duty. The bridge
across the Aroostook river connecting
the two sections of the village burned,
and although the adjacent buildings in
the main village were saved those on
the opposite side of the river, near the
end of the bridge, took fire and were
threatened with destruction. All of the
fire apparatus was in *he main village,
the bridge was destroyed and there
were no boats at hand. Accordingly
the best swimmers in the fire company
were selected to swim the river with
a line of hose. They accomplished the
feat and got across just in time to pre
vent the destruction of $60,#00 worth of
property.—Philadelphia Ledger.
THE CITY'S HEALTH.
Statistics Showing a Decrease in the
Death Kate During the Year.
There was a slight falling off in the
death rate in Los Angeles last year, as
contrasted with 1890. The total deaths
in the city were 831, as against 844 in
the preceding year. The health officer,
figuring on a basis of population of 65,
--000 souls, places the death rate at 12.78
per 1000 inhabitants. Out of the 174
consumptives set forth in the statistical
table given below, it is interesting to
note that only 20 were natives of the
Pacific coast, the larger proportion be
ing from the eastern states, and evi
dently having only Bought this salubri
oub climate when in the last stages of
this dread disease.
Below will be found a tabulated state
ment of the deaths in the city during
the year just ended:
Typhoid fever 26
Typho malarial fever 2
Diphtheria 28
Measles 1
Scarlet fever 2
Whooping congh 6
Croup -. 6
Pva?mia 3
Hcplii :i in in 6
Diarrheal ) under 5 jears 33
diseases j over 5 years 1
Cancer 25
Phthisis pulmonnlis 174
Tubercular meningitis 9
Meningitis 32
Apoplexy 30
Convulsions 9
Diseases of nervous system 22
Diseases of heart 64
Bronchitis.. 16
Pneumonia 63
Diseases of respiratory system 18
Bright's disease 25
Enteritis, gastritis, peritonitis 35
Diseases ot liver 11
Diseases of urinary organs 15
Puerperal diseases 8
Inanition snd marasmus 41
General debility and asthenia 23
Dentition 6
Suicide 19
Accident and violence 25
Unclassified deaths 52
Total 831
During past year there were, accord
ing to the table prepared by Clerk Mc-
Evry, 999 births in the city ot Los Ange
les, against 831 in the preceding year,
showing a net gain in the population
from this source.
THE STATE TAXES.
A Statement of the Payments by Coun-
In order that the state and counties
should receive their just proportion of
taxes all the county auditors are obliged
to report annually to Controller Colgan
the assessed values of taxable real estate,
improvements, personal property and
money, etc., in their respective counties.
For use as a check when the settle
ments are made between the county
treasurers and the controller, L. C.
Striening, the accountant in the latter's
office, has completed, after much work,
a lengthy statement of millions of fig
ures which, among many other things,
gives the amounts charged the tax col
lectors for the year 1891.
The total value of land and improve
ments in the Btate is given as $1,020,
--727,955; total value of personal property
and money, $190,103,597; total value of
taxable property, exclusive of railroads,
assessed by the state board of equaliza
tion, $1,200,891,552; total amount of tax
charged to tax collectors for state pur
poses, $5,355,700; total amount of tax
charged to tax collectors for county pur
poses, $9,958,698; total amount of tax
charged to tax collectors, $15,314,458.
The following table, included in the
statement, will show the total value of
taxable property, exclusive of railroad
assessments, in each county,for the year
1891, as compiled from the auditor's re
ports :
Alameda i 83,031,722
Alpine 278,037
Amador 4,201,181
Butte 16,870,ti07
Calaveras 4,091,825
Colusa 12,853 281
Contra Costa 15,490,137
Del Norte 2 070,027
El Dorado 3,011,273
Fresno 39,638,490
Glenn 10,093,501
Humboldt 16,965,117
Inyo 1,367.440
Kern 11.323,412
Lake 3,864,819
Lassen 2,561,124
Los Angeles 80,367 521
Marin 11,394,216
Mariposa 1,862,795
Mendocino 11641.431
Merced 13,768,335
Modoc 3,162,090
Mono 853.280
Monterey 16.427,535
Napa 13,769,565
Nevada 5,330,195
Orange 9,895193
placer 7.948,554
Plumas 3,322,090
Sacramento 32,878 435
San Benito , 0,110,150
San Bernardino 23,469,545
San Diego 26,475,093
San Francisco 399,826,677
San Joaquin 37,308,879
San Luis Obispo 13,608,094
San Mateo .... 15,411,569
Santa Barbara 16,412,705
Santa Clara 52,986,423
Santa Cruz 11,078,252
Shasta 5.899,565
Sierra 1,4»0,589
Siskiyou 6,553,713
Solano 18,477,715
Sonoma 28,526,187
Stanislaus 15,483,540
Sutter 9,046,541
Tehafta 10,644,553
Trinity 1,419,364
Tulare 23,116,095
Tuolumne 3,047 895
Ventura , 7,351,317
Yolo 19,907 514
Yuba 6,701,943
Total ... $1,020,727,955
People who lost their vision in ancient
times were literally without sight in the
world. Spectacles were invented in the
year 1320, bnt were not in general use
antil nearly 200 years later.
THE FIRST BRIGADE.
Southern California's Citizen
Soldiery.
• —————
Considerable Progress During
the Year.
A Complete Showing; of Its Present
Status.
Change* In the Official Personnel —A
Naval Battalion - The Signal
Corp*—The Total En
rollment.
The progress made by the National
guard of California, and more especially
the First brigade, stationed in Southern
California, during tbe past year in all
departments has been especially com
mendable. In many essentials the local
national guardsmen lead the division.
The importance of a proper maintenance
and encouragement of the militia by the
citizens cannot be over-estimated. Cer
tain it is that if the merchants and citi
zens in general would give one-half the
support and manifest one-half the in
terest in the state soldiers shown in the
eastern states California would stand in
the front rank in all the standards of
excellence. Today California, with a
coast line covering hundreds of miles,
has only an available force of 4050 offi
cers and men. The same coast line on
the Atlantic seaboard can show a to
tal of 80,000 National guardsmen.
Merchants, manufacturers, indeed all
classes of citizens have a vital in:erest
in the maintenance of the National
guard if they will only stop to consider
the subject. In case of sudden invas
sion, California would virtually be at
the mercy of tbe invaders. It is the
duty of every good citizen to give his
best support and encouragement to the
National guard. Southern Californians
in particular should work for the en
largement of the guard. By reference
to general orders of July it will be found
that out of a total enrollment of 4157
men, 2020 or one-half are comprised in
the second brigade with headquarters
et Sen Francisco, which does not leave
a very formidable force for the north
and south of the state, to say the least.
During the year past there have been
quite a large number of changes in the
official personnel of the first brigade,
composed of the Seventh and Ninth
regiments, the Naval battalion at San
Diego, and the Signal corps, located
here. .
The officers of the first brigade are as
follows: Brigadier-General E. P. John
eon, commanding; Lieutenant-Colonel
L. S. Butler, assistant adjutant-general;
Lieutenant-Colonel W. G. Cochran, sur
geon ; Major E. L. Steam, ordnance
officer; Major Cyrus Willard, engineer
officer; Major G. Wiley Wells, judge ad
vocate; Major A. W. Barrett, quarter
master ; Major George 8. Bonebrake,
paymaster; Major Driffeil, brigade in
spector; Major George S. Dannels, com
missary ; Major Horace M. Russell, in
spector of rifle practice; Major M. T.
Owens, signal officer; Captain H. Z. Os
borne and Captain A. C. Jones, aides
de-camp ; staff orderlies, Harry R. Hath
eway, W. E. Hutchinson.
The field and staff officers of the
Seventh regiment are: Colonel com
manding, William G. Schrieber; Lieu
tenant colonel, James L. Howland;
major, M. L. Stern; adjutant, John B.
Franklin; ordnance officer, Lieut. F. C.
Smythe; quartermaster, Lieut. D. W.
Parmar; commissary, Lieut. C. N. Wil
son; surgeon, Frank K. Ainsworth;
paymaster, Lieut. J. S. Collins; inspec
tor rifle practice, John Last; chaplain,
Chas. A. Kienzel; sergeant, Maj. J. H.
Keller.
The line officers of the regiment,
among whom there have been many
changes during the past year, are as
follows:
A—Captain, Frank A. Martin ; first
lieutenant, Henry Steere; second lieu
tenant, F. L. Baldwin.
B—Captain, N. S. Bangham; first
lieutenant, W. R. Sutliffe; second lieu
tenant, P. J. Cook.
C—Captain, Tbeo Meyer; first lieu
tenant, H. D. Alfonso; second lieutenant,
A. G. Reese.
D—Captain, S. T. Black; first lieu
tenant, A. \V. Browne; second lieuten
ant, J. W. Hammond.
F—Captain, L. S. Chappalear; first
lieutenant, M. L. Shaw; second lieu
tenant, M. Anderson.
G—Captain, A. L. Lewis; first lieu
tenant, William Kroeger; second lieu
tenant, E. Browning.
The field and staff olficers of the Ninth
regiment are Colonel Commanding E.
B. Spileman ; Lieutenant-Colonel G. L.
Bryant; Major Charles S. McKelvey;
Major John R. Berry, adjutant; Major
Thomas L. McQee, surgeon; Cap
tain John Herron, chaplain; Lieu
tenant James E. Mack, quartermas
ter; Lieutenant Charles T. Rice, com
missary ; Lieutenant S. Harville, pay
master; Lieutenant C. D. Ball, ord
nance officer; Lieutenant G. Lorbier,
inspector of rifle practice.
The company commissioned olficers of
the Ninth regiment are given below:
A—Captain, Edward E. Spileman ;
first lieutenant, A. G. Hartley ; second
lieutenant, A. G. Thelin.
B —Captain, H. M. Schiller: first lieu
tenant, 11. M. Dannels; second lieuten
ant, R. N. Dodge.
C—Captain, James N. Keith; first
lieutenant, ; second lieutenant,
S. R. Langwortby.
D—Captain, W. O. Welsh; first lieu
tenant, •; second lieutenant, F. B.
Thomas.
E —Caotain, E. M. Ducoe; first lieu
tenant, F. Muscott; second lieutenant,
C. L. Allison.
F—Captain, H. T. Matthews; first
lieutenant, N. A.TJIm; second lieuten
ant, P. 8. Roper.
A new addition to the First brigade
during the past year was the formation
of company A, of a naval battalion at
San Diego. The roster shows 94 men
with Thomas A. Nerney as lieutenant,
commanding; Edward H. Miller, junior
lieutenant; Frank M. Simpson, senior
ensign ; Wm. D. Bloodgood, junior en
sign.
The signal corps of the First brigade
consists of twenty-one men, under the
command of First Lieut. William E.
Darricott. The corps can well be proud
of its work for the past year. Many of
the charts prepared by them will com
pare favorably with regular army work.
The following statistics, taken from
the report of the annual muster and in
spection of tbe national gnard show th*
results as regards the First brigade:
FIRST BRIO J OK.
Organization.
! I f I
m
m
10 6 15 66 70
20 121 95.2©
Staff" and non commis'd
stall
First brigade signal corps'..
IKFANTRY.
Organization.
Staff and non-commis'd
staff.
Baud
Company A
B
" C
" D
K
" O
3 ► H
SIM
_J_ L JL
18 { 16 93.8a
1 19 20 .50
45 6 51 88.20
42 8 50 84 OO
40 18 58 08.9©
32 22 54 59.20
42 8 50 84.00
38 17 55 69.0O
255 99 354 72.00
Total I
NINTH KEOIMENT OF INFANTRY.
Organization.
5
(9
at
n
P
fe
if
P
-J
c
W
(ft
H
O
rt>
B
(ft
iff and non - commis'd
laff
nd
mpany Jt
? B
" c
" D
E
r
To'al
_ The total enrollment of the State Na
tional guard, as taken from the annual
muster, is shown in the following statis
tical table:
Organization.
3
a

n
a
e
11
First brigade staff and
non-oommis'c staff .
Seventh infantry
Ninth infantry
Signal corps
Total j
171
Second brieade staff and
non-commiss'd staff' ..
First infantry
Second artillery
Third infantry
Fifth infantry.
Sl.rnal corps
Ban Francisco hussars
1 16 93 70
43 609 92.70
3> 434 92 hO
39 496 92.0O
35 403 91.00
1 40 97.5©
9 62 85 40
159 2,060 92 OO
Total
hird brigade Btaff and
nou commis'd staff
ixth infantry
ignal corps
13 30.00
392 89.00
10 .00
415 87.4©
Total
is u stall
r
1
Total. ..
9 5 14
293 6 299
I 30.! 11 313
50
.00
Total I
EO
Total
Totals
The largest numerical strength: Com
pany C, First infantry. 99. The small
est, Companies B and F, Seventh infan
try, 50 each.
Highest percentage of attendance:
Company G, First infantry; F and G,
Third infantry; Battery G. Second artil
lery ; Companies A and F, Fifth infan
try ; B. Sixth infantry, and C Eighth in
fantry battilion, each 100. Lowest,
Battery E, First artillery, 52.60.
Largest attendance at inspection:
Companies C and G, First infantry, 96
each. Smallest, Battery E, First artil
lery, 30.
The following organizations had 100
per cent at inspections and muster: Sig
nal corps, Third brigade; field staff and
non-commissioned staff, First infantry; .
Second artillery; Sixth infantry; Eighth
infantry. Bands, Sixth infantry and
Eighth infantry.
Highest average merit, 6: Companies
A and B, First infancy ; A and B, Sixth
infantry: D, Eighth infantry; signal
corps, First brigade; signal corps, Sec
ond brigade. Lowest, 2; Company D,
Seventh infantry.
The following companies paraded with
more than 90 per cent, thirty-one in
number, against twenty-two last year:
Company B, Ninth infantry 91 50
Company H, First infantry 90 OO
Company C, First infantry 90.90
Company I), First infantiy 9^.70
Company F, First infantry 98 30
Company G, First infantry 100 OO
Company H, First infantry 94.30
Company A. Second infantry 96.40
Company C, Second infantry 94.00
Company D, Second infantry 96 10
Company X, Second infantry 90 20
Company G, Second infantry 100.00
Company H, Second intantr 98.00
Company A, Third infantry 98 OO
Company C, Third infantry 93.20
Company I), Third infantiy 0/.60
Company F, Third infantry 100.00
Company G, Third infantry 100 00
Company H, Third infantry 94.80
Company A, Fifth infantry 100 00 ,
Company B, Fifth infantry 90.50
Company E, Fifth infantry 94.40
Company F, Fifth infantry 100.00
Company A, Sixth infantry 94.10
Company B, Sixth infantry 100.00
Compan/K, Sixth infantry 90.30
Company A, Eighth infantry 98.20
Cumpany B, Eighth infantry 98.10
Company C, Eighth infantry 100.00
Company D, Eighth infantry 98 OO
Company E, Eighth infantry 96.00
MARITIME TRAFFIC.
Increased Business Transacted Last
Year at Redondo and San Pedro.
Agent W. Parrißh, of the Pacific Coast
Steamship company, has just compiled
the figures showing the passenger and
freight business transacted during the
year at the ports of San Pedro and Re
dondo. There has been a marked in
crease in the freight traffic as compared
with previous years, and the passenger
traffic has held its own. The table is as
follows:
Freight landed at San Pedro.Decem
ber 1, 1890, toDeeemher 1, 1891,
pounds 34,169,310
Freight landed at Redondo 35,074,350
Freight takeu from San Pedro 19,443,468
Freight taken from Redondo 19.117,877
Passengers landed at San Pedro .. 2,542
Passengers landed at Redondo 1,512
Passengers taken from San Pedro.. 3,931
Passengers taken from Redondo 1,094
Passenger steamers at San fedro,
trip- 157
Passengei steamers at Bodondo 95
Freight steamers at San Pedro 50
Freigat steamers at Redondo 77
You get an idea of the rotundity of
the world in the following statement.
In popular histories of the seven
wonders of the world we read that tbe
Pharos, the first lighthouse, could be
seen at a distance of 100 miles. In order
for this to have been possible tbe Pharos
must have been a mile and a quarter in
height.
The most marvelous strories belong to
the past where they cannot be verified.
A giant exhibited in Rouen in 1830.
Professor Williams says, measured
nearly 18 feet in height.
11

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